John Healey Portrait

John Healey

Labour - Wentworth and Dearne

Shadow Secretary of State for Defence

(since April 2020)
1 APPG membership (as of 2 Jun 2021)
Transatlantic Trade
Shadow Secretary of State for Housing
9th Jan 2018 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Secretary of State for Housing
7th Oct 2016 - 9th Jan 2018
Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government) (Housing and Planning)
14th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Secretary of State for Health
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Shadow Minister (Housing)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Minister of State (Department for Communities and Local Government) (Housing)
5th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
2nd Nov 2007 - 12th Oct 2009
Minister of State (Department of Communities and Local Government) (Local Government)
29th Jun 2007 - 5th Jun 2009
Tax Law Rewrite Bills (Joint Committee)
20th Dec 2004 - 12th Jan 2009
Public Accounts Committee
20th Jul 2005 - 19th Nov 2007
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th May 2005 - 28th Jun 2007
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th May 2002 - 10th May 2005
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education and Skills)
11th Jun 2001 - 30th May 2002
Employment Sub-committee
23rd Jul 1997 - 29th Nov 1999
Education & Employment
14th Jul 1997 - 29th Nov 1999


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Investing in Children and Young People
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 193 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 224 Noes - 0
Speeches
Tuesday 8th June 2021
Ajax Programme

That was a statement of astonishing complacency. We have seen £3.5 billion paid out, four years late, and just 14 …

Written Answers
Wednesday 16th June 2021
Ministry of Defence: Contracts
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the contracts awarded by his Department of a …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 18th March 2015
WENTWORTH WOODHOUSE IN ROTHERHAM, SOUTH YORKSHIRE
That this House commends the current plans to secure the future of one of the grandest stately homes in England, …
Bills
Tuesday 2nd July 2013
Letting Agents (Competition, Choice and Standards) Bill 2013-14
A Bill to establish a national mandatory licensing scheme for letting and managing agents, with established standards and redress for …
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
2. (a) Support linked to an MP but received by a local party organisation or indirectly via a central party organisation
Name of donor: Community Union
Address of donor: 465c Caledonian Road, London N7 9AX
Amount of donation or nature and …
EDM signed
Monday 17th July 2017
SOCIAL SECURITY
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Loans for Mortgage Interest Regulations 2017 (S.1., 2017, …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, John Healey has voted in 239 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All John Healey Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Ben Wallace (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Defence
(43 debate interactions)
Robert Jenrick (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government
(14 debate interactions)
Kevan Jones (Labour)
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Defence
(55 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(25 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(2 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all John Healey's debates

Wentworth and Dearne Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Wentworth and Dearne signature proportion
John Healey has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by John Healey

17th July 2017
John Healey signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 17th July 2017

SOCIAL SECURITY

Tabled by: Jeremy Corbyn (Independent - Islington North)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Loans for Mortgage Interest Regulations 2017 (S.1., 2017, No. 725), dated 5 July 2017, a copy of which was laid before this House on 6 July, be annulled.
50 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Mar 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 43
Independent: 4
Scottish National Party: 2
Green Party: 1
6th March 2017
John Healey signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 6th March 2017

SOCIAL SECURITY

Tabled by: Jeremy Corbyn (Independent - Islington North)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Universal Credit (Housing Costs Element for claimants aged 18 to 21) (Amendment) Regulations 2017 (S.I., 2017, No. 252), dated 2 March 2017, a copy of which was laid before this House on 3 March, be annulled.
86 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Apr 2017)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 53
Labour: 25
Independent: 5
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 1
Green Party: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
View All John Healey's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by John Healey, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


2 Urgent Questions tabled by John Healey

Tuesday 10th November 2020

John Healey has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by John Healey


A Bill to establish a national mandatory licensing scheme for letting and managing agents, with established standards and redress for landlords, tenants and leaseholders, and prohibition of letting and management agent fees; to enable local authorities to administer and enforce the scheme; to require that tenants, landlords and leaseholders have written agreements; and to empower local authorities, either alone or in partnership, to trade as letting and managing agents.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 2nd July 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision to introduce leave, pay and allowance arrangements for parents of children born to surrogate mothers equal to those available to parents whose children are born to them; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 17th April 2012

John Healey has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


319 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
13th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 41 of his Department’s Integrated Review 2021, how many critical vulnerabilities in the cyber systems of the public sector has the National Cyber Security Centre addressed as at 13 May 2021.

It is for each public sector organisation to remediate vulnerabilities in their systems and this information is not held centrally. This is achieved through activities such as designing systems to be secure, regularly patching, continuous monitoring, security testing and vulnerability disclosure programmes. The NCSC and Cabinet Office provide expert advice and guidance to help public sector organisations address critical vulnerabilities.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what (a) policy, (b) administrative and (c) advisory support the civil service provides to select committees.

The civil service does not provide policy, administrative or advisory support to select committees.

The Government supports the work of select committees by providing information and evidence to their inquiries.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
12th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of recent trends in the rate of unemployment among veterans.

Veterans offer a vast range of skills and talent to civilian employers and the Government recognises that having a job is one of the key foundations for those leaving the Armed Forces to transition into civilian life. This is why the Government is taking a number of steps to support veterans into employment such as making it easier to join the Civil Service and introducing a national insurance tax break for their employers. The MOD’s Careers Transition Partnership supports Service leavers entering the job market. Of the 2018/19 UK regular service leavers who used a CTP service, and reported their employment outcomes, 86% were employed, 8% economically inactive, and 6% unemployed six months after using the service.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department is taking to help prevent suicide among veterans.

In January 2019, the Government published the first Cross-Government Suicide Prevention Workplan, which sets out an ambitious programme across national and local government and the NHS. This includes actions being taken forward by MoD and NHS England for veterans and armed service personnel. The Government has committed to publishing an updated workplan and progress report against the National Strategy, expected in Spring 2021.

The majority of veterans successfully access mental health programmes available to the general population through the NHS, however for those veterans who need extra support, the NHS in England offers bespoke and specialist mental health services, which benefit from over £10m investment per year. Recent months have seen the rollout of the new NHS England High Intensity Service, which will provide further specialist care for veterans with acute mental health needs or who are in a mental health crisis. The Government has also provided £6 million in funding to support 100 service charities during the Covid-19 pandemic, including charities supporting veterans with their mental health.

12th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 10 March 2020 to Question 25623 on Grenfell Tower Inquiry: Public Appointments, if he will place in the Library a copy of the contract entered into with the search company appointed to recruit a replacement panel member.

As part of the Government transparency agenda, it is a legal requirement for central Government Departments to publish all awarded contracts over £10,000 in value on the Contracts Finder website. Once a contract for this recruitment has been finalised and signed it will be published in the usual way.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 10 March 2020 to Question 25623, if he has set a deadline for a replacement panel member to be appointed.

Further announcements will be made in the usual way.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when a new panel member will be appointed to the Grenfell Tower inquiry; and what discussions he has with people affected by the Grenfell Tower fire on that appointment.

In February, the Prime Minister, as Sponsor Minister for the Grenfell Tower Inquiry, wrote to the Inquiry Chair to confirm his intention to appoint a replacement panel member. He also confirmed that Cabinet Office officials would engage a search company to identify a shortlist of candidates.

As soon as a suitable new panel member has been identified, the Prime Minister will write to the Inquiry Chair to seek his consent to the appointment as required by the Inquiries Act. The successful candidate will be announced once the process has been completed so they start work as soon as possible.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 3 February 2020 to Question 8952 on Public Appointments: Standards, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the due diligence process for appointments to the panels of statutory public inquiries following the resignation of Benita Mehra from her role as a panel member on the Grenfell Tower Inquiry.

Due diligence and consideration of conflicts of interest are important parts of any appointment process. The Inquiries Act 2005 sets out the suitability and impartiality requirements of inquiry panel appointments. Appointments to statutory public inquiries are made in accordance with the Act.



Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the due diligence process for public appointments following the resignation of Benita Mehra from her role as a panel member on the Grenfell Tower Inquiry.

Ms Mehra's appointment was not a public appointment. She was appointed to the panel of a statutory public inquiry in line with the Inquiries Act 2005.

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with the Scandinavian governments on the potential for upper-stage rocket debris from UK launches to land on their sovereign territory.

There is no expectation that upper stage debris from any UK launch will affect the sovereign territory of any Scandinavian country.

The Government has held discussions with all countries to the north of the British Isles which may hold an interest in, or whose territory may be affected by, space launch activities undertaken from the UK.

Where there is a possibility of UK-based launch companies seeking to deposit launch vehicle debris (whether this is from the vehicle's upper stage or otherwise) in another state's territorial waters or Exclusive Economic Zone, the government intends to obtain consent from the affected countries.

Amanda Solloway
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to use OneWeb to enhance the UK’s space capabilities.

With an increasing number of global players developing Low Earth Orbit Satellite constellations, OneWeb enables the UK to be at the forefront of rapidly evolving Space technology and helps the UK project its influence internationally through a global asset.

OneWeb will help grow UK-based capabilities in the satellite technology value chain by creating opportunities for high-value manufacturing, launch capability, and space data applications.

Amanda Solloway
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent progress has been made on the creation of a satellite navigation system.

This Government has made clear its ambitions in space through a new ministerial level National Space Council and by developing a Space Strategy to bring long term strategic and commercial benefits for the UK. The Government recognises the contribution the space sector makes to our economy, national security, global influence and in helping the nation to tackle the COVID crisis.

The GNSS programme is currently in its Engineering Design and Development Phase to research and understand what would best suit the UK's requirements. The programme is taking the appropriate time to investigate the requirements, design specifications and costs as fully as possible. This includes assessing value for money, scope for innovation, new markets and how much a system could meet the UK's assured positioning navigation and timing requirements as part of an ambitious new space strategy.

The programme has recently proceeded with a number of technical contracts from April to September to deliver key engineering work whilst protecting skills and technical GNSS sector jobs.

A project led by the Cabinet Office is developing the UK's positioning navigation and timing (PNT) requirements, bringing together expertise from across Whitehall, industry and the PNT community to consider requirements across military, civil and Critical National Infrastructure sectors.

In addition to other technologies, a UK GNSS capability could form part of the mix of solutions needed.

Amanda Solloway
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to Question 130636 tabled on December 16 2020, if he will extend the adjusted calculation for early education entitlement funding, used during the autumn 2020 term, into spring 2021 in line with the extension to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

We have provided unprecedented support to early years providers throughout the COVID-19 outbreak through block-buying childcare places and schemes, including furlough. Childminders are also eligible to receive support from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, which has been extended until the end of April 2021: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

The government will continue to support families with their childcare costs. My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced on 25 November an extra £44 million for 2021-22, for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers.

On 17 December 2020, the government announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance.

We will fund local authorities in the 2021 spring term based on their January 2021 census. If attendance rises after the census is taken, we will top-up councils to up to 85% of their January 2020 census level, where a local authority can provide evidence for increased attendance during the spring term. This will give local authorities additional financial confidence to pay providers for increasing attendance later in the spring term. The early years local authority survey continues on a weekly basis. The following link has more information on the use of Early Years Dedicated Schools Grant in spring 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2020-to-2021/dsg-technical-note-2020-to-2021.

In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance, local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children (for example, sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency) through withdrawing funding, but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods, taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector, including on this subject. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to Question 130635 tabled on 16 December 2020, what assessment he has made of the financial effect on childminders of reintroducing the method of calculating early years entitlement funding that was in place before the covid-19 outbreak.

We have provided unprecedented support to early years providers throughout the COVID-19 outbreak through block-buying childcare places and schemes, including furlough. Childminders are also eligible to receive support from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, which has been extended until the end of April 2021: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

The government will continue to support families with their childcare costs. My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced on 25 November an extra £44 million for 2021-22, for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers.

On 17 December 2020, the government announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance.

We will fund local authorities in the 2021 spring term based on their January 2021 census. If attendance rises after the census is taken, we will top-up councils to up to 85% of their January 2020 census level, where a local authority can provide evidence for increased attendance during the spring term. This will give local authorities additional financial confidence to pay providers for increasing attendance later in the spring term. The early years local authority survey continues on a weekly basis. The following link has more information on the use of Early Years Dedicated Schools Grant in spring 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2020-to-2021/dsg-technical-note-2020-to-2021.

In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance, local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children (for example, sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency) through withdrawing funding, but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods, taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector, including on this subject. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the financial effect on childminders of re-introducing the method of calculating early years entitlement funding that was in place before the covid-19 outbreak.

We have provided unprecedented support to early years providers throughout the COVID-19 outbreak through block-buying childcare places and schemes including furlough. Childminders are also eligible to receive support from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, which has been extended until the end of April 2021: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

Whilst we recognise childcare attendance has been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak, we saw attendance rise over the autumn term from 482,000 on 10 September to 759,000 on 17 December. On 17 December 2020, the government therefore announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance. In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children, for example sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency through withdrawing funding, but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector, including on this subject. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

The government will continue to support families with their childcare costs. My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced on 25 November an extra £44 million for the 2021-22 financial year, for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will extend the adjusted calculation for the early education entitlement funding, used during the autumn 2020 term, into spring 2021, in line with the extension to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

We recognise childcare attendance has been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak; we saw attendance rise over the autumn term from 482,000 on 10 September to 759,000 on 17 December 2020. On 17 December 2020, the government therefore announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance. In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/use-of-free-early-education-entitlements-funding-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/use-of-free-early-education-entitlements-funding-during-coronavirus-covid-19), local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children, (for example, sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency through withdrawing funding), but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods, taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We will fund local authorities in the 2021 spring term based on their January 2021 census. If attendance rises after the census is taken, we will top-up councils to up to 85% of their January 2020 census level, where a local authority can provide evidence for increased attendance during the spring term. This will give local authorities additional financial confidence to pay providers for increasing attendance later in the spring term.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector and have heard from them already on this subject. We publish regular official statistics on attendance in early years settings (https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak) and the next release is due on Tuesday 2 February. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which local authorities do not pay early education entitlement funding in full to childminders.

Our guidance makes clear how we expect local authorities to fund early years entitlement places during the COVID-19 outbreak. Local authorities should only take a different approach from that set out in guidance if they have good reasons for doing so, their approach is fair and equitable, and they communicate this clearly to their providers. Further information on this guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/use-of-free-early-education-entitlements-funding-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/use-of-free-early-education-entitlements-funding-during-coronavirus-covid-19.

Through our regular contact with local authorities, it is apparent that the vast majority have been compliant with our funding guidance throughout the COVID-19 outbreak.

Childminder funding can be more complex than funding for group-based providers. This is because unlike nurseries, which typically offer a fairly consistent number of childcare places, the number and age of children cared for by a childminder can vary significantly throughout the year and from one year to another. This means that childminders may move in and out of offering the government’s early years entitlements depending on the children they are caring for at any given time.

For this reason, we know that some local authorities fund their childminders on a case-by-case basis in the interests of value for money and propriety. This ensures that they are not paying providers who might not otherwise have been offering entitlement places.

We do not currently hold data on the number of local authorities taking tailored approaches to childminder funding. This is due to the highly variable nature of this provision, and that fact that arrangements may vary within a single local authority based on the individual circumstances of each childminder.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average housing costs were for full-time students in England in each of the last 10 years.

The government measures student housing costs periodically but does not collect data annually. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2014/15 reported average housing costs of £4,151 for full-time undergraduates who incurred those costs. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2011/12 reported average housing costs of £3,628 for full-time undergraduates who incurred them.

The student finance system contributes towards undergraduate students’ living costs at University, with the most support available for students from the lowest income families. The government increased maximum loans for living costs by 2.8% for the current academic year, 2019/20, to £8,944 for students living away from home and studying outside London with a further 2.9% increase to £9,203 for 2020/21. Higher rates of loan are available for students living away from home and studying in London.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the extent to which maintenance loans cover the cost of housing for students in England.

The government measures student housing costs periodically but does not collect data annually. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2014/15 reported average housing costs of £4,151 for full-time undergraduates who incurred those costs. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2011/12 reported average housing costs of £3,628 for full-time undergraduates who incurred them.

The student finance system contributes towards undergraduate students’ living costs at University, with the most support available for students from the lowest income families. The government increased maximum loans for living costs by 2.8% for the current academic year, 2019/20, to £8,944 for students living away from home and studying outside London with a further 2.9% increase to £9,203 for 2020/21. Higher rates of loan are available for students living away from home and studying in London.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the UK’s financial commitment is to the EU’s Copernicus Earth programme in the (a) 2021-22 financial year and (b) each financial year to 2024-25.

The UK Government has welcomed the agreement in principle for the UK to continue to participate in the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme as a third country for 2021-2027.

Formal participation will only begin once the Protocol I to the Trade and Cooperation Agreement is adopted.

Once this has taken place the UK’s financial commitment will be reported in Defra’s accounts.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 30 June 2020 to Question 64852 on the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, on what date the Government commissioned research by Middlesex University into dog attacks is planned to be published.

Middlesex University’s draft report on measures to reduce dog attacks and promote responsible ownership was submitted to Defra in March this year. The report is currently being peer reviewed and will be finalised in light of peer review comments. Our intention is to publish the final report later this year.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what forms of smokeless coal will be permissible under changes proposed in the Air quality: using cleaner fuels for domestic burning consultation response, published 21 February 2020.

As stated in the Government Response published on 21 February, we want to see a move from bituminous coal to less polluting fuels in the domestic setting. We will facilitate this transition by only allowing the sale of smokeless coal (or anthracite) and low sulphur manufactured solid fuels for the purpose of domestic combustion.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many and what proportion of planning outcomes for new housing developments were in accordance with Environment Agency flood risk advice, by region, in each of the last 10 years.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

As a statutory consultee in development planning, the Environment Agency (EA) advises local planning authorities and developers on how to enable climate resilient development and identify opportunities to protect and enhance the environment.

The EA provides advice on all development proposals in areas that are at (i) medium or high risk of flooding from rivers or the sea (other than minor development) (ii) within 20 metres of a Main River, (iii) within an area with critical drainage problems (other than minor development).

The EA does not make the final decision on local planning approvals and local planning authorities are responsible and accountable for approving proposals for new development in their local areas. In the majority of cases the EA’s flood risk advice is taken on board by local planning authorities.

Environment Agency performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19 split by Environment Agency operational hub.

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

North – new homes with recorded planning decisions

3195

10539

13276

12610

8035

7934

6166

4161

65916

North - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

0

649

112

597

3

152

58

11

1582

North - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

100.0%

93.8%

99.2%

95.3%

100.0%

98.1%

99.1%

99.7%

97.6%

South East - new homes with recorded planning decisions

14912

35251

18237

26961

21498

13872

10924

10812

152467

South East - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

11

353

1072

639

26

220

42

89

2452

South East - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.9%

99.0%

94.1%

97.6%

99.9%

98.4%

99.6%

99.2%

98.4%

West and Central - new homes with recorded planning decisions

28360

20194

27105

37364

36599

20289

17598

8051

195560

West and Central - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled and partially over-ruled decisions

113

449

120

102

154

65

58

29

1090

West and Central - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.6%

97.8%

99.6%

99.7%

99.6%

99.7%

99.7%

99.6%

99.4%

Environment Agency national performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

Total new homes with recorded planning decisions

46467

65984

58618

76935

66132

42095

34688

23024

413943

Total new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

124

1451

1304

1338

183

437

158

129

5124

Average % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.7%

97.8%

97.8%

98.3%

99.7%

99.0%

99.5%

99.4%

98.8%

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many and what proportion of applications for the development of new homes had planning outcomes in accordance with Environment Agency advice on flood risk, by region, in each of the last 10 years.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

As a statutory consultee in development planning, the Environment Agency (EA) advises local planning authorities and developers on how to enable climate resilient development and identify opportunities to protect and enhance the environment.

The EA provides advice on all development proposals in areas that are at (i) medium or high risk of flooding from rivers or the sea (other than minor development) (ii) within 20 metres of a Main River, (iii) within an area with critical drainage problems (other than minor development).

The EA does not make the final decision on local planning approvals and local planning authorities are responsible and accountable for approving proposals for new development in their local areas. In the majority of cases the EA’s flood risk advice is taken on board by local planning authorities.

Environment Agency performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19 split by Environment Agency operational hub.

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

North – new homes with recorded planning decisions

3195

10539

13276

12610

8035

7934

6166

4161

65916

North - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

0

649

112

597

3

152

58

11

1582

North - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

100.0%

93.8%

99.2%

95.3%

100.0%

98.1%

99.1%

99.7%

97.6%

South East - new homes with recorded planning decisions

14912

35251

18237

26961

21498

13872

10924

10812

152467

South East - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

11

353

1072

639

26

220

42

89

2452

South East - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.9%

99.0%

94.1%

97.6%

99.9%

98.4%

99.6%

99.2%

98.4%

West and Central - new homes with recorded planning decisions

28360

20194

27105

37364

36599

20289

17598

8051

195560

West and Central - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled and partially over-ruled decisions

113

449

120

102

154

65

58

29

1090

West and Central - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.6%

97.8%

99.6%

99.7%

99.6%

99.7%

99.7%

99.6%

99.4%

Environment Agency national performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

Total new homes with recorded planning decisions

46467

65984

58618

76935

66132

42095

34688

23024

413943

Total new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

124

1451

1304

1338

183

437

158

129

5124

Average % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.7%

97.8%

97.8%

98.3%

99.7%

99.0%

99.5%

99.4%

98.8%

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether legal agreements have been signed by private sector partners to help ensure UK rocket launches are consistent with climate change emissions reduction targets.

All applicants for a launch or spaceport licence under the Space Industry Act 2018 are required to submit an assessment of environmental effects. The spaceflight regulator will take account of these assessments and the Government’s environmental objectives when deciding licence applications and setting licence conditions. The Government will set environmental objectives for the regulator, including minimising emissions contributing to climate change resulting from spaceflight activities.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 10 February 2021 to Question HL12641 on Electric Vehicles: Charging Points, in which local authority areas the 3,800 chargepoints funded by the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme have been installed; and how many of the potential 7,200 charging device installations have been funded from his Department’s doubling of funding to that scheme.

The doubling of funding for the ORCS to £20 million announced in May last year by the Transport Secretary will allow local authorities to install up to 7,200 charging devices, making charging at home and overnight easier for those without an off-street parking space.

The attached document details the local authorities which have received grant awards under the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme, to date. In financial year 2020/21 almost 2,000 chargepoints were approved under the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS). ORCS is a demand-led fund open to all UK local authorities. As the Scheme moves into financial year 2021/22, amendments have been made, taking into account local authority feedback and the experience of previous years, in order to improve access to funding for as many local authorities as possible.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of trends in the number of veterans claiming universal credit in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Currently we do not record as part of our official statistic the number of Universal Credit claimants who are veterans. With Universal Credit, claimants will have an initial interview with their Work Coach as part of the application process. This discussion will cover their career history and skills and qualifications etc, which identifies those claimants who are veterans and ensures appropriate support is offered.

The Department is also continuing to look at what other opportunities might be available to better identify and record data on veterans on the Universal Credit system and has regular conversations with the Ministry of Defence (MOD). This is part of a much wider piece of work involving a number of Departments, including the MOD and the Office for Veterans’ Affairs, to improve the collection and use of data relating to veterans.

DWP is proud to provide vital and significant support to veterans which recognises their particular needs and circumstances, including through Armed Forces Champions in each Jobcentre Plus District. For example, early voluntary entry to the Work and Health Programme, and using Service Medical Board evidence where we can so a severely disabled person does not have to undergo additional examinations for Employment and Support Allowance and Universal Credit purposes. We are also able to signpost veterans to other organisations for further support where appropriate.

The department is a supporter of the Armed Forces Covenant which helps ensure members of the armed forces community have access to government support in a number of areas, including:

  • Starting a new career
  • Access to healthcare
  • Education and family well-being
  • Having a home
  • Financial assistance
  • Discounted services, including travel
Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what criteria are used by the Health and Safety Executive to trigger on-site inspections of businesses accused or suspected of breaking covid-19 workplace safety regulations.

Physical inspections of premises, whilst an important part of the Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE) work, are one part of a much wider approach taken by HSE. Members of the public and employees can submit a concern to HSE in relation to unsatisfactory conditions or risk control measures in the workplace; concerns come into the organisation in a variety of ways, with most arriving either via telephone or the online form on HSE’s website.

Concerns received are triaged and classified either red, amber or green; those classified green are largely dealt with remotely by HSE’s Concerns and Advice Team, whilst amber and red concerns are passed to HSE’s field teams for further investigation

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many on-site inspections of businesses have been carried out by the Health and Safety Executive relating to covid-19 since 1 January 2020 to date, by (a) week and (b) local authority area.

The number of proactive site inspections that have been carried out which have addressed Covid-19 issues is not readily identifiable.

The majority of Covid-19 related site inspections have arisen from the investigation of a concern raised by workers or a member of the public. In April 2020, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) introduced a change to its recording system to identify visits that addressed a concern relating to Covid-19. Hence, it is not possible to identify site visits made before then. In addition to the numbers below, where a concern is not specifically related to Covid-19 but such issues are identified, then action will be taken to address them.

HSE does not record the date of an investigation visit in an easily retrievable format. The table below identifies the numbers of visits based upon the month in which the visit report was created on their operational database.

Date

Number of site visits

April

15

May

48

June

1

Grand Total

64

The following table provides site visits by Local Authority:

Site Local Authority

Site Visits

Mid Devon

5

Canterbury

4

Glasgow UA

3

Medway Towns UA

3

Wellingborough

2

Hull City UA

2

Flintshire UA

2

City of Westminster

2

Brentwood

2

Burnley

2

Midlothian UA

2

Thanet

2

East Ayrshire UA

2

Surrey Heath

1

Brighton & Hove UA

1

Torbay UA

1

Plymouth UA

1

Sevenoaks

1

Manchester

1

Kingston-upon-Thames

1

Greenwich

1

Corby

1

Folkstone and Hythe

1

Portsmouth UA

1

Tower Hamlets

1

Aberdeen City UA

1

Reading

1

Maidstone

1

Not Applicable

1

Bradford

1

Bristol UA

1

Tonbridge & Malling

1

North Ayrshire UA

1

North Lanarkshire UA

1

Cardiff UA

1

Guildford

1

Waltham Forest

1

Kensington & Chelsea

1

South Lanarkshire UA

1

Newcastle-upon-Tyne

1

West Lothian UA

1

Leicester UA

1

York

1

Northampton

1

NB: the above data was extracted from an operational database on 4th June 2020 and is subject to change e.g. due to the delay between a site visit and recording the information into the database.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she has taken to (a) protect public-facing universal credit and jobcentre staff and (b) limit their social interaction since 16 March 2020.

DWP has always followed Public Health England guidelines on social distancing. As of 24th March, Jobcentres are only offering face-to-face appointments – conducted in accordance with PHE guidelines on social distancing - for the small number of claimants who would otherwise not be able to receive support. This helps us to continue to deliver our critical services whilst keeping our customers and staff safe.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to provide (a) phone and (b) online appointments for new universal credit claimants.

We have temporarily suspended the requirement for face-to-face Jobcentre Plus appointments for all claimants in Universal Credit, Job Seekers’ Allowance (JSA), Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and Income Support. Advances for all new UC claimants are now available online / via phone, with no requirement to attend a job centre.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit claimants have been asked to attend in-person appointments with the imposition of sanctions if they failed to attend since 16 March 2020.

As both the Prime Minister and Chancellor have made clear, the Government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID 19 and we have been clear in our intention that everyone should be supported to do the right thing.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what information her Department holds on the average (a) journey time and (b) distance universal credit claimants have made to attend in-person appointments in the latest period for which figures are available.

This information is not collected.

Since the introduction of Universal Credit, claimants have been supported by a more flexible approach to contact, with much greater use of digital and telephone channels. This enables claimants to continue to engage with the Department, receive appropriate support and satisfy the conditions of their personalised Claimant Commitment, without having to always attend an appointment in person.

Claimants can also access free telephony and web support through the Citizen’s Advice Help to Claim service.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he is taking to ensure limited social interaction in relation to appointments for new universal credit claimants since 16 March 2020.

DWP has always followed Public Health England guidelines on social distancing. As of 24th March, Jobcentres are only offering face-to-face appointments – conducted in accordance with PHE guidelines on social distancing - for the small number of claimants who would otherwise not be able to receive support. This helps us to continue to deliver our critical services whilst keeping our customers and staff safe.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will publish the caseload statistics for local housing allowance for each broad rental market area in each of the last three years.

We will place a copy of a document in the library which shows the caseload statistics of Local Housing Allowance claimants in Universal Credit and Housing Benefit for each broad rental market area in each of the last three years.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will maintain targeted affordability funding for local housing allowance from April 2020.

The written ministerial statement laid on Monday announced that the freeze to local housing allowance (LHA) will end and rates will increase by 1.7% from April 2020. Targeted Affordability Funding (TAF) was introduced in recognition that the impact of the freeze may have different effects across the country. As the freeze has ended, there will be no TAF. For individuals who may require more support, Discretionary Housing Payments are available.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Written Statement of 13 January 2020, Welfare Update, what estimate he has made of the proportion of properties in each broad rental market area that will be affordable to local housing allowance claimants from April 2020.

In response to COVID-19, this Department has increased Local Housing Allowance (LHA) rates to the 30th percentile of local market rents from April for Universal Credit and Housing Benefit claimants, giving additional financial support for private renters.

This means that 30% of properties in each broad rental market area (BRMA) in England, Scotland and Wales are within the LHA rate with the exception of 15 rates in central and inner London where the national maximum caps continue to apply. The national caps have also been increased and are now based on the Outer London LHA rate plus 20%.

The proportion of properties in central and inner London that are within the LHA rate are set out below:

BRMA

Room

1 Bed

2 Bed

3 Bed

4 Bed

Central London

30%

less than 5%

less than 5%

less than 5%

less than 5%

Inner East London

30%

15%-20%

25%-30%

15%-20%

30%

Inner North London

30%

15%-20%

20%-25%

15%-20%

20%-25%

Inner South East London

30%

30%

30%

30%

30%

Inner South West London

30%

25%-30%

30%

25%-30%

20%-25%

Inner West London

30%

30%

30%

25%-30%

30%

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will issue clear guidance to care providers on the use of the Infection Control Fund to pay care home workers their normal wage in the event that they need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of care providers using funding from the Infection Control Fund to pay care home workers their normal wage in the event that they need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of care home workers receiving their normal wage in the event that they need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of using the Infection Control Fund to support care home workers who need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his policy is on care home workers being required to use their annual leave entitlement in the event that they need to stay at home and self-isolate.

The Department has written to local authorities and care providers to remind them of the importance of paying staff normal wages when self-isolating. Since May 2020 the Government has made available an Infection Control Fund and one of the stated purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate. We are working with local government, stakeholders and care providers to ensure as many providers as possible are following our guidance.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what steps he has taken to further the development of international (a) norms, (b) rules and (c) principles on responsible behaviours in space in each of the last six months.

In December 2020, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a UK-led resolution on "Reducing Space Threat through norms, rules and principles of responsible behaviour". The resolution called for States to study space threats and contribute their ideas to the United Nations Secretary-General by 3 May 2021. The United Kingdom submitted its views which can be found on the website of the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs, https://www.un.org/disarmament/topics/outerspace-sg-report-outer-space-2021/.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the financial impact on savers with a National Savings and Investments (NS&I) account after the reduction of the premium bond prize fund rate from 1.4 per cent to 1 per cent in December 2020.

In setting interest rates for its products, NS&I must balance the interests of savers, taxpayers and the broader financial services sector.

With unprecedented Government funding requirements in 2020 due to Covid-19 pandemic measures and amid significant uncertainty and volatility in the retail savings market, NS&I experienced unprecedented upside pressures on its Net Financing. In the first six months of 2020-21, NS&I raised a total of £38.3 billion of Net Financing for the Government, so a decision was taken to reduce the Premium Bond rates to mitigate the risk of NS&I exceeding its £35 billion (+/- £5 billion) Net Financing target.

More broadly, it is important that Government takes into account taxpayer value considerations when making financing decisions. With gilt yields at low levels for the majority of the past year, the Government financing raised through NS&I has been more expensive than that raised through gilt issuance.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to provide self-employed workers with 80 per cent of their profits prior to the start of the covid-19 outbreak in the fourth Self-Employed Income Support Scheme grant.

The Government recognises the importance of supporting the self-employed during the COVID-19 outbreak. The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) provides generous support to self-employed people who meet the eligibility criteria.

There will be a fourth SEISS grant covering February to April 2021. Further details on the SEISS, including the fourth grant, will be announced on 3 March.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 13 October 2020 to Question 100891, how many and what proportion of brewers produce (a) less than 2,100 hectolitres per year and (b) between 2,100 and 5,000 hectolitres per year.

Further information about small breweries will be published with the technical consultation on Small Brewers Relief this Autumn.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many breweries produce less than (a) 2,100 hectolitres and (b) 5,000 hectolitres of beer in each local authority area each year.

HMRC publishes annual statistics on Small Brewers Relief, this includes the total number of people claiming the relief and the cost of the relief. Information on the location of Brewers receiving the relief is not readily available. The latest publication of annual tax relief data for Small Brewers Relief can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/main-tax-expenditures-and-structural-reliefs.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the value is of the small breweries relief to breweries producing (a) 3,000 hectolitres, (b) 4,000 hectolitres and (c) 5,000 hectolitres of beer each year.

Small Brewers producing less than 5,000 hectolitres per year are currently entitled to a 50% reduction in the rate of duty charged on their beer. The value of the relief to an individual Brewer will depend on the strength of the beer produced. At an average strength of 4% this would reduce a Brewer’s beer duty bill by £114,480 on 3,000 hectolitres, £152,640 on 4,000 hectolitres, and £190.800 on 5,000 hectolitres per annum.

HMRC publishes annual statistics on Small Brewers Relief, this includes the number of people claiming the relief and the total cost of the relief. Information on the total cost of the relief by production volume is not readily available. The latest publication of annual tax relief data for Small Brewers Relief can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/main-tax-expenditures-and-structural-reliefs.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 82WH, how many provider properties under the Asylum Dispersal Scheme her Department has inspected by region in each year since 2010.

As well as the many tens of thousands of property inspections carried out by our providers, 2,525 property inspections were carried out by Home Office staff in 2019/20. Routine Home Office inspections were paused towards the end of the year due to the emerging Covid-19 crisis but have now recommenced in line with coronavirus guidelines.

Data on the number of properties the Home Office has inspected since 2010 by area is not held in a reportable format and can only be provided at disproportionate cost by examination of individual inspection records.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 81WH on the Asylum Dispersal System, how many inspections her Department conducted of provider properties for the Asylum Dispersal Scheme in 2019-20.

As well as the many tens of thousands of property inspections carried out by our providers, 2,525 property inspections were carried out by Home Office staff in 2019/20. Routine Home Office inspections were paused towards the end of the year due to the emerging Covid-19 crisis but have now recommenced in line with coronavirus guidelines.

Data on the number of properties the Home Office has inspected since 2010 by area is not held in a reportable format and can only be provided at disproportionate cost by examination of individual inspection records.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 81WH on the Asylum Dispersal Scheme, if she will publish the 40 local authorities which have adopted the voluntary dispersal agreements but have providers unable to find suitable properties for the Asylum Dispersal System.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets#asylum-support (opens in a new tab) Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 27 May 2021.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of these statistics which disaggregates the number of asylum seekers accommodated in dispersal accommodation for the first time in each quarter in each of the last two years, by local authority. These figures are not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 81WH on the Asylum Dispersal System, if she will publish a list of the local authorities which have adopted voluntary dispersal agreements.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets#asylum-support (opens in a new tab) Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 27 May 2021.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of these statistics which disaggregates the number of asylum seekers accommodated in dispersal accommodation for the first time in each quarter in each of the last two years, by local authority. These figures are not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Grenfell Tower Inquiry phase 1 report, which Department is responsible for implementing the recommendations in that report; what the implementation status is of each such recommendation; and what the planned timescale is for implementing each of those recommendations.

The Home Office is working collaboratively with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, the Fire and Rescue Sector and all relevant stakeholders to deliver Grenfell Tower Inquiry phase 1 recommendations with quality, pace and ambition.

The Government published an update on delivery on 21 January and continues to make progress. As announced in the Queen’s Speech, we will shortly introduce a Fire Safety Bill, a necessary first step towards implementation of the Inquiry’s recommendations

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the contracts awarded by his Department of a value in excess of £50 million since the publication of the Defence and Security Industrial Strategy.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) has recorded six contracts with a value in excess of £50 million, which have a start date and have been launched after the publication of the Defence and Security Industrial Strategy on 23 March 2021. A list of these contracts is below.

Contract Title*

Challenger 2 Life Extension Programme (Demonstration, Manufacture & Initial In-Service Contract)

Marine Rotating Electrical Machinery

WR21 and MT30 Capability Sustainment Contract (Gas Turbine Engines for Type 45 and Queen Elizabeth Class Ships)

Provision of P-8A Aircraft Support and Training Support

C-17 Synthetic Training Services

*details of one contract has been withheld due to its sensitive nature.

Information about the contracts that we place with industry is available on GOV.uk as part of our MOD Trade, Industry and Contracts statistics: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/defence-trade-and-industry-index.

In addition, MOD contracts worth over £10,000 are published on the Government's Contracts Finder website, which is available on GOV.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of projected total cost of project PEGASUS.

The existing approved cost of Project PEGASUS is £634 million. Following a pause to reassess the requirements for the project, it will now run in two phases. Firstly, the delivery of the store capability, which is due to complete by June 2025. The second stage will be the manufacturing capability, and an assessment phase is underway to determine the best value for money solution with a target for delivery of the first unit in 2030.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he expects project PEGASUS to be completed.

The existing approved cost of Project PEGASUS is £634 million. Following a pause to reassess the requirements for the project, it will now run in two phases. Firstly, the delivery of the store capability, which is due to complete by June 2025. The second stage will be the manufacturing capability, and an assessment phase is underway to determine the best value for money solution with a target for delivery of the first unit in 2030.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the projected total cost for MENSA.

The approved cost of Project MENSA, the new-build warhead assembly and disassembly facility at AWE Burghfield, is £1.8 billion.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has begun a review into the Dreadnought programme.

Similar to all Defence programmes, the Dreadnought submarine programme is continuously assessed. Despite the effects of Covid-19, the Dreadnought programme remains on track for the First of Class, HMS Dreadnought, to enter service in the early 2030s.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of the proposed expansion of the cap on the UK's stockpile of nuclear warheads.

As announced in the Integrated Review the UK will move to an overall nuclear weapon stockpile of no more than 260 warheads. This is a stockpile ceiling, not a target, and we will remain deliberately ambiguous about the exact number of warheads in our stockpile to avoid simplifying the calculations of potential adversaries, similarly the precise costs associated with the size of the stockpile will be withheld for National Security reasons.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, by what date he expects the MENSA project to be fully operational.

The approved delivery date of Project MENSA, the new-build warhead assembly and disassembly facility at AWE Burghfield, is 2023.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the planned timescale is for the in-service date for the replacement to the Trident Holbrook warhead; and if he will make a statement.

The UK's Replacement Warhead is planned to enter service in the 2030's. I am withholding specific information about in-service dates for the purposes of safeguarding national security.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the cost of refuelling HMS Vanguard.

I am withholding information regarding the completion date of the refuelling of HMS Vanguard as disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of our Armed Forces. I am also withholding the estimated cost as its disclosure would prejudice commercial interests.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when the refuelling of HMS Vanguard will be completed.

I am withholding information regarding the completion date of the refuelling of HMS Vanguard as disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of our Armed Forces. I am also withholding the estimated cost as its disclosure would prejudice commercial interests.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when the Ajax programme will reach full operating capability.

Work is ongoing to test the scheduled date for Full Operating Capacity (FOC) of 2025 in order to ensure there is a jointly agreed, risk adjusted schedule between General Dynamics and the Ministry of Defence, which will provide an agreed deliverable date to reach FOC. Any change to the FOC will be published in due course.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what impact the delay in the Ajax programme will have on the British Army’s capabilities over the next decade.

The current forecast initial operating capability, or IOC, is 30 June 2021, with a 50 per cent confidence, and a 90 per cent confidence for September 2021. To be clear, the Department will not take the programme into IOC until we are confident that we have achieved what we need to achieve at this stage of the vehicle’s development.

I refer the right hon. Gentleman to my responses to his Urgent Question of 8 June 2021, in which I noted issues of concern on the vehicle which needed to be addressed. It is too early to provide an estimate of what impact this may have on the achievement of FOC, on which work is ongoing.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will commission an internal review into how the personal data of UK Armed Forces personnel was leaked through WhatsApp in June 2021.

The longstanding position of successive Governments is not to comment on UK Special Forces personnel as to do so would put those personnel and operations at risk.

An investigation into this matter is ongoing and is being conducted by the Royal Military Police. Additionally, internal processes are being reviewed as to how this type of data is handled and communicated within the Department.

The individuals affected by the breach, and their families, have been issued operational and personal security advice. Personnel have also been advised to adhere to further security advice provided by the MOD Counter Threat Advisory Team, which is continually updated and easily accessible to all Service personnel regardless of location and accessibility to MOD systems.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that the identities of UK Armed Forces personnel are protected after the recent reported data breach through WhatsApp.

The longstanding position of successive Governments is not to comment on UK Special Forces personnel as to do so would put those personnel and operations at risk.

An investigation into this matter is ongoing and is being conducted by the Royal Military Police. Additionally, internal processes are being reviewed as to how this type of data is handled and communicated within the Department.

The individuals affected by the breach, and their families, have been issued operational and personal security advice. Personnel have also been advised to adhere to further security advice provided by the MOD Counter Threat Advisory Team, which is continually updated and easily accessible to all Service personnel regardless of location and accessibility to MOD systems.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel in the Special Forces have been affected by the recent reported leak of personal data onto WhatsApp groups.

The longstanding position of successive Governments is not to comment on UK Special Forces personnel as to do so would put those personnel and operations at risk.

An investigation into this matter is ongoing and is being conducted by the Royal Military Police. Additionally, internal processes are being reviewed as to how this type of data is handled and communicated within the Department.

The individuals affected by the breach, and their families, have been issued operational and personal security advice. Personnel have also been advised to adhere to further security advice provided by the MOD Counter Threat Advisory Team, which is continually updated and easily accessible to all Service personnel regardless of location and accessibility to MOD systems.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent assessment has he made of the safety and security of personnel in the UK Special Forces after the reported leak of details of 1,182 British soldiers through WhatsApp; and what steps is he taking in response to that data breach.

The longstanding position of successive Governments is not to comment on UK Special Forces personnel as to do so would put those personnel and operations at risk.

An investigation into this matter is ongoing and is being conducted by the Royal Military Police. Additionally, internal processes are being reviewed as to how this type of data is handled and communicated within the Department.

The individuals affected by the breach, and their families, have been issued operational and personal security advice. Personnel have also been advised to adhere to further security advice provided by the MOD Counter Threat Advisory Team, which is continually updated and easily accessible to all Service personnel regardless of location and accessibility to MOD systems.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment has he made of the potential effect of the reduced 20mph speed limit for the Ajax armoured vehicles to travel safely on the (a) UK’s operational capabilities and (b) protection of UK Forces from drone warfare.

In terms of the vehicle's speed, AJAX is capable of speeds up to 70KPH but an initial limitation of 30KPH was introduced as a control measure for newly qualified Household Cavalry Regiment crews. This is being reviewed and will likely be removed in July.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the location is of the site used to produce the pressure hull steel used in the production of the Trafalgar class and Vangard class submarines.

The pressure hull steel used in the production of the Vanguard Class of submarine was predominantly sourced from the British Steel Corporation's Dalzell plant in Motherwell, Scotland. Owing to the time that has elapsed since the procurement of steel for the Trafalgar Class submarines, reliable information on the source is not readily available. However, it is likely that the pressure hull steel was produced by UK manufacturers.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made about the effect of the decision to retire the C130 Hercules by 2023 on the operational capability of the Special Forces.

It has been the longstanding position of successive Governments not to comment on the capabilities of the UK special forces, as to do so would put personnel and operations at risk.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average cost to his Department is for each day a Type 45 Destroyer is at sea.

For a Type 45 that has been active throughout a full year (at sea and alongside), an indicative average daily operating cost is £0.126 million.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 7.34 of the Defence in a competitive age Command Paper, CP411, how many personnel will be allocated to the new experimentation battalion.

The Ministry of Defence will prioritise more than £6.6 billion of research, development, and experimentation over the next four years so the Armed Forces can adapt to the threat with advanced technologies. As part of this, 2nd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment will rerole to become a new prototype warfighting and experimentation battalion. The Army will use spring and early summer 2021 to refine and test the designs, capabilities and structure of its units before making more detailed announcements later this year.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 56 of the Defence in a competitive age Command Paper, CP411, how many more UK weapons will be integrated onto the Lightning II aircraft; and which regions in the UK will benefit from that decision.

Alongside modifications to the fielded UK Paveway IV precision surface attack weapon, the current Programme of Record will deliver two new UK Weapons onto UK Lightning aircraft. These are the MBDA Meteor Beyond Visual Range Air to Air missile and the SPEAR Capability 3 precision surface attack missile. MBDA state that the Integration of these weapons will benefit their sites in Bolton, Bristol and Stevenage.

Future UK weapons, such as SPEAR Capability 5, will be considered for integration as part of the spiral development of UK Lightning to meet future threats, exploit multi-domain integration and expand utility.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Command Paper 411 entitled Defence in a competitive age, published March 2021, which four battalions the new Ranger Regiment will be drawn from.

As referred to in the Command Paper; Defence in a Competitive Age, the new Ranger Regiment will be aligned with the new Divisions of Infantry and initially seeded from the current Specialised Infantry Battalions: 1 SCOTS, 2 PWRR, 2 LANCS and 4 RIFLES.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence,with reference to the Command Paper 411 entitled Defence in a competitive age, published March 2021, which infantry battalion will be be deleted as part of his Department’s defence plans.

As the Secretary of State said in his statement to the House on 22 March, the new structures planned for the Army will require fewer units. Therefore, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment will be amalgamated with the 1st Battalion to form a new Boxer-mounted battalion.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the (a) national space operations centre and (b) space academy will be located.

Both the National Space Operations Centre and the Space Academy programmes are at an early stage of development. As both programmes mature, analysis will be undertaken against a range of factors to identify the future location for both entities, but no decisions have yet been made.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the annual budget for the Defence Cyber Academy is in each financial year between 2021-22 and 2024-25.

The annual budget for the Defence Cyber Academy for financial year (FY) 2021-2022 is £4.47 million. This budget is forecast to increase in FY 2022-23 and again in FY 2023-24.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the timeframe is for the establishment of the Defence Cyber Academy.

The Defence Cyber Academy builds upon the existing Defence Cyber School, and will reach Initial Operating Capability in 2023 and Full Operating Capability in 2024. At Initial Operating Capability the Defence Cyber Academy will be able to address the current Ministry of Defence requirement for individual cyber training in full. At Full Operating Capability, all positions in the Defence Cyber Academy will be filled, programmes in place for external engagement, international courses available to allies and partners and a cross-Government Defence and Security skills framework established.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the Defence Cyber Academy will be located.

The Defence Cyber Academy will be located in Shrivenham, Wiltshire, as part of the UK Defence Academy.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when his Department plans to decide on the number of Lightning II F-35 aircraft to order in addition to those aircraft already ordered.

Following the outcome of the Integrated Review and confirmation that the UK Lightning Force will grow beyond 48 F-35B aircraft, we are undertaking a period of further analysis to evaluate the scale and optimum delivery profile of our second tranche of F-35Bs as well as associated infrastructure and support equipment. Once complete, this activity will inform procurement timelines.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what discussions he has had with counterparts in the Scottish Government on the military-commercial uses of future spaceports in Scotland.

The Ministry of Defence works with the UK Space Agency (UKSA) to support the delivery of commercial UK launch. Defence Ministers have not had any contact with Scottish Government counterparts on this subject.

Any engagement on UK spaceports with the Scottish Government would currently be conducted through the UKSA-led programme.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which components of Tempest will be built in (a) Sweden and (b) Italy.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the announcement of a £2 billion investment by his Department in the Future Combat Air System, how many jobs that investment will support over the next (a) five years and (b) decade.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the fuselage for Tempest will be built.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the wing for Tempest will be built.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the engine for Tempest will be built.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 56 of the Government's Defence Command Paper, where the £2 billion allocated by his Department to the Future Combat Air System will be spent.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what specific training will be provided to personnel as part of the new Security Force Assistance Brigade.

The design of the new Security Force Assistance Brigade is under development and the plan for how the Army will reorganise to create this, and other new capabilities, will be announced later in 2021. Detailed programming and balanced decisions about the optimum resourcing and sequencing of this institutional change will follow. As with all our personnel, we will ensure members of this new Brigade are trained and equipped to fulfil their role, operating across the globe to develop the capacity of partners and allies.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much funding will be allocated to the new Security Force Assistance Brigade.

The design of the new Security Force Assistance Brigade is under development and the plan for how the Army will reorganise to create this, and other new capabilities, will be announced later in 2021. Detailed programming and balanced decisions about the optimum resourcing and sequencing of this institutional change will follow. As with all our personnel, we will ensure members of this new Brigade are trained and equipped to fulfil their role, operating across the globe to develop the capacity of partners and allies.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel will make up the new Security Force Assistance Brigade.

The design of the new Security Force Assistance Brigade is under development and the plan for how the Army will reorganise to create this, and other new capabilities, will be announced later in 2021. Detailed programming and balanced decisions about the optimum resourcing and sequencing of this institutional change will follow. As with all our personnel, we will ensure members of this new Brigade are trained and equipped to fulfil their role, operating across the globe to develop the capacity of partners and allies.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when his Department plans to deliver the proposed warfighting division.

Warfighting already is, and will remain, the cornerstone of deterrence and the bedrock of the British Army. The plans announced by the Defence Secretary ensure that the Army will continue to have a warfighting division at its heart.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much funding his Department has allocated to achieve the goal of launching a British satellite from Scotland by 2022 as announced in November 2020.

The Ministry of Defence is working closely with the UK Space Agency (UKSA) to support the delivery of commercial UK launch. The UKSA is funding a range of industry-led projects to help grow the UK’s spaceflight capabilities.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the UK’s military spaceports will be used for; and how those spaceports will enhance the UK’s military capabilities.

Defence continues to work with partners across Government, including with the UK Space Agency, to fulfil the Government's ambition to become a meaningful space player. We are supporting the UK Space Agency's Spaceflight Programme which aims to establish commercial vertical and horizontal small satellite launch from UK spaceports from 2022. There is currently no plan for the Government to own any spaceports.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the UK’s military spaceports will be based.

Defence continues to work with partners across Government, including with the UK Space Agency, to fulfil the Government's ambition to become a meaningful space player. We are supporting the UK Space Agency's Spaceflight Programme which aims to establish commercial vertical and horizontal small satellite launch from UK spaceports from 2022. There is currently no plan for the Government to own any spaceports.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the effect of seasonal conditions on the UK's (a) ability to launch space missions and (b) space capabilities.

Defence continues to work with partners across Government, including with the UK Space Agency, to fulfil the Government's ambition to become a meaningful space player. We are supporting the UK Space Agency's Spaceflight Programme which aims to establish commercial vertical and horizontal small satellite launch from UK spaceports from 2022. There is currently no plan for the Government to own any spaceports.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much funding his Department has provided to private space companies in each year since 2010; and what assessment he has made of the effect of the defence spending settlement on the funding available for that expenditure.

Information on annual spend to private space companies is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

We will invest an additional £1.4 billion over 10 years on space to support the Integrated Review commitment to make the UK a meaningful space actor. We will support the growth of the UK commercial space sector, and ensure the UK has the capabilities to protect and defend our interests in a more congested and contested space domain.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel are working in the UK defence space sector as at 20 May 2021.

The UK space sector as a whole directly employed 45,100 people in 2018-19. We do not hold information on how many personnel are working specifically in defence-related functions as part of the UK space sector.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the average amount of training time given to the armed forces reservists each year between 2010 and 2021.

No estimate has been made of the average amount of training time given to Armed Forces reservists. The number of reservists varies throughout each year and, as a result, there is no fixed point in any year at which an average could be calculated.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to publish the Defence Space Strategy.

We aim to publish the Defence Space Strategy after the National Space Strategy later this year.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many days each of the (a) Type-45 Destroyers and (b) Type 23 Frigates spent at sea between 2015 and 2020.

The information requested is provided in the following tables.

Type 23 Frigates:

FRIGATE

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

ARGYLL

25

0

111

141

101

191

IRON DUKE

85

132

94

0

4

0

KENT

124

67

0

57

172

155

LANCASTER

157

0

0

0

6

144

MONMOUTH

68

113

209

131

37

10

MONTROSE

0

0

41

145

198

227

NORTHUMBERLAND

48

0

0

117

146

154

PORTLAND

107

176

41

0

0

0

RICHMOND

180

73

51

0

11

190

SOMERSET

131

113

95

60

0

0

ST ALBANS

122

136

138

120

77

0

SUTHERLAND

127

127

103

166

103

161

WESTMINSTER

0

0

126

152

131

114

Type 45 Destroyers:

DESTROYER

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

DARING

48

148

85

0

0

0

DAUNTLESS

114

2

0

0

0

29

DIAMOND

27

118

116

99

14

71

DRAGON

69

56

56

145

163

110

DEFENDER

106

115

0

84

183

129

DUNCAN

188

86

107

135

153

0

The normal operating cycle of every ship involves them entering different readiness levels depending on their programmes, periods of refit and Departmental planning requirements. In addition, these figures represent days at sea, and it should be noted that, while deployed away from the UK, ships will spend both days at sea and alongside in ports around the world.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 20 of the Government’s Defence Command Paper, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of a reduction in development aid on his Department’s crisis management approach to prevent and manage crises before they escalate.

The MOD's ability to prepare for and manage crises before they escalate will be strengthened by an increase in defence spending of £24 billion over the next four years.

As the Defence Command Paper sets out, this significant investment will enable the UK to build a more proactive, adaptable, and engaged Armed Forces working with partners to shape the global environment and manage crises. As a force for good the UK remains a global leader in international development and is committed to supporting the world's poorest people.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 16 of the Government’s Defence Command Paper, how much does he plan to increase (a) investment in and (b) deployments to Oman by.

The £23.8 million investment in the UK logistics hub at Duqm port will triple the size of the existing UK base. This investment will help facilitate Royal Navy deployments to the Indian Ocean including the ability to support the UK's two aircraft carriers HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales. Work is ongoing to determine the scale and timing of further investments.

The Defence Command Paper committed to increased UK deployments to Oman. We are working through the detail of what this will mean in practice, including with our Omani partners.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel will be allocated to the Space Command announced on 1 April 2021.

At Full Operating Capability, there will be approximately 650 personnel within UK Space Command which will be a a Joint Organisation with personnel from all three single Services and the Civil Service. There will be approximately 250 personnel in the Headquarters and capability development element of UK Space Command. As well as 320 personnel at RAF Fylingdales, 45 personnel in the UK Space Operations Centre and 35 personnel in Space Assurance, Training, Test and Evaluation Unit.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what will the annual budget be for the Space Command announced on 1 April 2021.

The annual budget for UK Space Command for this Financial Year is approximately £51.8 million. This includes the transfer of operating budgets from Air Command of existing RAF Units of RAF Fylingdales and UK Space Operations Centre.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where will the Space Command announced on 1 April 2021 recruit from; and for what roles will it recruit.

Space Command is a Joint organisation and will have personnel from all three single Services and the Civil Service. UK Space Command personnel will undertake a range of roles to enable assured access to the space domain and space operations; as well as space workforce development (training and growth) and capability development of space domain military equipment programmes. When fully operationally capable, UK Space Command will provide command and control of all of Defence's space capabilities to achieve Defence's and the UK's ambition for space.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the details of defence equipment contracts over a value of £5 million awarded since 1 March 2021.

Defence procurement projects cover an extensive range of equipment, infrastructure, information services and broad service contracts.

With over 500 contracts placed by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) since March 2021, including over 40 contracts with a value over £5 million, specific details concerning equipment contracts could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

The MOD publishes statistics on organisations paid more than £5 million and the levels of expenditure against competitive and non-competitive contracts, although due to the need to verify the information before publication, the next update is not expected until later this year. The most recent publication can be found at the following link: www.gov.uk/government/collections/defence-trade-and-industry-index.

MOD contracts worth over £10,000 are published on the Government's Contracts Finder website at: www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total value of defence equipment contracts awarded by his Department was in (a) March and (b) April 2021.

Defence procurement projects cover an extensive range of equipment, infrastructure, information services and broad service contracts.

With over 500 contracts placed by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) since March 2021, including over 40 contracts with a value over £5 million, specific details concerning equipment contracts could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

The MOD publishes statistics on organisations paid more than £5 million and the levels of expenditure against competitive and non-competitive contracts, although due to the need to verify the information before publication, the next update is not expected until later this year. The most recent publication can be found at the following link: www.gov.uk/government/collections/defence-trade-and-industry-index.

MOD contracts worth over £10,000 are published on the Government's Contracts Finder website at: www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 15 of the Government’s Defence Command Paper, what the planned timetable is for increasing the UK’s global network by one third.

We will begin to realise the expansion of the Global Network this year. Thereafter we will grow the network incrementally until the full extent of the expansion, as currently planned, is realised in 2027.

Early gains are to be made in countries where the training burden, particularly the requirement to learn a language, is less or we have suitable candidates with the pre-requisite skills to deploy quickly. The highest priority posts requiring longer training will start to be realised in years two and three, with growth continuing out to 2027.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what investment his Department plans to provide to private space companies to help strengthen the UK’s space industry.

Defence will invest an additional £1.4 billion over 10 years on space in support of the Integrated Review commitment.

We are also working closely with BEIS to develop the UK's first national space strategy that will take an integrated approach and set out how we will support the UK space sector to realise the benefits from this dynamic market.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what his Department’s strategy is for tackling zero day exploits.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) takes cyber security and resilience very seriously and is increasing our already substantial investment in this area as a result of the Integrated Review settlement. The MOD conducts a range of activities to ensure its systems are protected against attack. This includes working closely with industry and partners across Government, especially the National Cyber Security Centre. Although the unknown scope and quality of zero-day exploits means that their prevention can never be guaranteed, the MOD takes a proactive approach to identifying and managing threats and vulnerabilities. For security reasons we do not comment on details, as to do so could be useful to potential adversaries.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to protect (a) critical infrastructure, such as the energy industry and financial services, and (b) physical infrastructure, such as airports and the NHS.

The protection of critical national infrastructure (CNI) in the UK is the responsibility of its owners and operators in collaboration with the Centre for the Protection of Critical National Infrastructure (CPNI), the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and Civil Police Forces. Ministry of Defence Police support the protection of UK CNI through the provision of guarding services for a small number of sites.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps the Government is taking to help ensure that (a) tools and (b) weaponry that may be used by the National Cyber Force against British nationals for offensive cyber operations are (i) legitimate and (ii) proportionate; and if he will make a statement.

The UK has rigorous processes in place to ensure that offensive cyber operations are conducted in accordance with domestic and international law. Oversight of National Cyber Force activity is provided by the Investigatory Powers Commissioner's Office and the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent assessment he has made of the threat to UK security posed by non-state actors' use of (a) digital communications and (b) social media platforms.

As Her Majesty's Government outlined in the Integrated Review and Defence Command Paper, we recognise hostile cyber activity, by whatever vector, as a top-tier threat to UK interests. We are committed to ensuring that our national security is protected. Working together with partners across Government, the Ministry of Defence monitors non-state activities closely, assesses the risks and takes action to counter them using the full spectrum of national capabilities as appropriate. The Online Safety Bill is testament to our commitment to tackle harmful online content and behaviours, including holding social media platforms to account.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 41 of the Integrated Review 2021, what the critical vulnerabilities are in the UK's data and digital infrastructure; and what steps his Department is taking to address those vulnerabilities.

Defence Digital has responsibility for remediating vulnerabilities in Ministry of Defence platforms, systems and core digital infrastructure. This is achieved through an extensive programme of activities which includes designing systems to be secure, regularly patching, continuous monitoring, security testing and vulnerability disclosure programmes. In these efforts, we work closely with industry and partners across Government, particularly the National Cyber Security Centre. For security reasons we do not comment on details, as to do so could be useful to our adversaries.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to publish guidance on social value in defence equipment contracts.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) procurement decision-making processes continue to be based on HM Treasury's Green Book framework. This ensures that all relevant costs and benefits to UK society are considered when undertaking procurement and project appraisal, thereby reflecting the totality of impacts on UK society overall, referred to as social value.

In September 2020, the Cabinet Office published Procurement Policy Note (PPN) 06/20 requiring additional social value benefits to be explicitly evaluated in all central government procurement (where the requirements are relevant and proportionate) rather than just 'considered' as previously required. The Social Value Model set out in the PPN requires a minimum of 10% of the total tender evaluation weighting to be allocated to specific social value criteria.

The application of the Social Value Model has been required from 1 January 2021 for all procurements under the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 this has included a number of tenders conducted by the Ministry of Defence. From the 1st June 2021, the MOD will extend this to include all procurements under the Defence and Security Public Contract Regulations 2011.

The MOD will continue to follow the guidance provided in PPN 06/20, setting out how to take account of social value in the award of contracts by using the Social Value Model. Further information can be accessed on the gov.uk website at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/procurement-policy-note-0620-taking-account-of-social-value-in-the-award-of-central-government-contracts

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 41 of the Integrated Review 2021, what steps have been taken to invest in an integrated education and training system for the UK’s cyber ecosystem to maximise the UK’s cyber capabilities.

As part of the Government's commitment to strengthen the UK's cyber ecosystem, Defence is investing heavily in training and educating our workforce, and making this activity available cross-government where applicable. This includes the development of a Defence Cyber Academy which will significantly increase our current teaching capacity, build stronger links with other bodies including the newly-established UK Cyber Security Council and embed common standards aligned with industry and academia. The development of our people of will be underpinned by the Defence Cyber Competency Framework and supported by a suite of Cyber Virtual Environments on which to train and exercise both internally and externally with our cross-government partners.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Integrated Review 2021, what resources his Department has allocated to strengthen security to meet the potential threat of a terrorist attack using CBRN weapons by 2030.

Through the Modernising Defence Programme and now the Integrated Review, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) has committed to invest over £880 million over the next ten years to develop and maintain its counter-Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) capability. Capability development and delivery is focussed on physical protection, medical countermeasures, hazard management, sensing and knowledge management. This commitment has been enabled by over £130 million from the MOD's own science and technology programme over the past four years. The future MOD science and technology capabilities and portfolio are currently being assessed and will continue to support Defence's ability to counter current and emerging threats. The MOD also plans to spend £12 million over the next four years to reduce the risks of such attacks, through the International Biological Security Programme.

CBRN weapon use remains an enduring and growing threat to the UK, our deployed forces and international stability. To counter this threat, we will have capabilities in place that allow us to maintain our political and military freedom of action despite the presence, threat or use of CBRN materials. The MOD must also be prepared to provide counter-CBRN forces to support a UK homeland resilience response to multiple threats and maintain our contingent capability to operate overseas. The United Kingdom's world leading CBRN science and technology capability will continue to play a vital part in maintaining our counter-CBRN operational advantage and in countering current and emerging CBRN threats.

The MOD's capabilities must be viewed within the context of cross Government activity and the Department readily contributes to the United Kingdom's wider counter-CBRN capabilities and activities. These include those of the Counter Proliferation and Arms Control Centre, inter-agency operations in the homeland and overseas and collaboration with our key allies around the world.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel will be employed by the new National Cyber Force.

We do not comment on exact figures for  national security reasons.  We are investing in our recruitment, including our recruitment pipelines. We are creating dedicated cyber career pathways to build a world-class workforce.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Integrated Review, what the workforce requirement is for the Royal Marines in (a) 2021, (b) 2024 and (c) 2030.

No decisions have been made on the future size of the Royal Marines. As the Royal Marines transition into the Future Commando Force and turn to new upgraded and autonomous capabilities, there is the potential for the workforce structure to change in the future.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department has taken to strengthen links with private businesses to improve their cyber defences and capabilities from attacks by hostile state and non-state actors.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) works with key industry partners in the Defence Cyber Protection Partnership (DCPP) to improve the cyber security and resilience of the defence supply chain. The DCPP Cyber Security Model sets out a proportionate approach to cyber risk in line with the MOD information used by suppliers, and specifies related controls. These controls build on the National Cyber Security Centre's Cyber Essentials scheme, adding higher levels of cyber security depending upon the risk. The process is mandated for all MOD contracts and is followed down the supply chain. In addition, MOD works with other government departments and with industry bodies to highlight the importance of cyber defence and resilience to businesses of all sizes.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what body will oversee the activities of the National Cyber Force to ensure that it is acting in line with the powers enacted to it under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016.

The UK deploys its cyber capabilities in accordance with national and international law. The Investigatory Powers Commissioner keeps under review the key statutory powers for the conduct of cyber operations, including the activities of the National Cyber Force. Parliamentary oversight is provided by the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent discussions has he had with his European counterparts on the Tempest project.

The Integrated Review and Defence Command Paper committed £2billion in funding over the four years to develop a world leading future combat air system, bringing MOD and industry partners together to deliver the technology, skills, and intellectual property needed to stay at the cutting edge.

We are on track to launch the Concept and Assessment phase later this year and continue to target an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030’s.

The UK signed a trilateral MOU with Italy and Sweden in December 2020 to enable joint work on the Future Combat Air System.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what his timetable is for the Tempest project to begin production.

The Integrated Review and Defence Command Paper committed £2billion in funding over the four years to develop a world leading future combat air system, bringing MOD and industry partners together to deliver the technology, skills, and intellectual property needed to stay at the cutting edge.

We are on track to launch the Concept and Assessment phase later this year and continue to target an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030’s.

The UK signed a trilateral MOU with Italy and Sweden in December 2020 to enable joint work on the Future Combat Air System.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces recruits have enlisted from each parliamentary consistency since 2010.

Not all the information requested is available but that which is can be found in the attached tables.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces recruits have been enlisted from each region of the UK since 2010.

Not all the information requested is available but that which is can be found in the attached tables.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many British Army recruits have been enlisted from each region since 2010.

The attached spreadsheet contains information detailing intake to the UK Regulars by Region for the British Army between 2013-14 and 2019-20 inclusive. Information to cover the period prior to that is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many British Army recruits have been enlisted from each parliamentary constituency since 2010.

The attached spreadsheet contains information detailing intake to the UK Regulars by Constituency for the British Army between 2013-14 and 2019-20 inclusive. Information to cover the period prior to that is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he is planning to not announce the headquarters of the national cyber force during local government election purdah.

We have announced that the National Cyber Force HQ will be in the North of England, with the exact location to be confirmed in due course. Further details will not be announced during the pre-election period.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which Minister in his Department approved the recommendation, as set out in the Capita review of fire risks at Faslane and Coulport naval bases, to reduce fire response services crew by 15 per cent, and if he will place a copy of that report in the Library.

Defence Fire and Rescue has responsibility for oversight of the Defence Fire and Rescue Project contract outsourced to Capita. Capita Fire and Rescue's (CFR's) specific proposals to reduce the level of cover at Faslane and Coulport, following their recent review of fire risks, do not require approval at Ministerial level. The workforce change proposals were endorsed by the Naval Base Commander of HMNB Clyde, and the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service have been extensively consulted. The reduction in firefighter resources from a six person 24/7 watch to a five person 24/7 watch will not impact CFR's ability to respond to an incident effectively.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2021 to Question 143689 and the Prime Minister's statement of 19 November 2020, Official report, column 499, how many staff will be employed by the unit that will ensure value for money for his Department's expenditure.

The Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) Approach to Investment Decisions (MAID) introduced changes to our approvals programmes including adopting the Treasury Green Book 3 Stage Approvals process for all Defence Investment Decisions; placing the Senior Responsible Owner-led programme at the heart of our approach and introducing the Strategic Outline case to promote early engagement and decision making.

We intend to strengthen our mechanisms to challenge delivery and drive value for money. We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government’s planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the MOD’s priority outcomes.

Separately, we are also establishing the Secretary of State’s Office for Net Assessment and Challenge to ensure that we keep pace with the rapidly evolving threats we face and ensure that our strategy and force structure delivers sustained strategic advantage for the UK.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2021 to Question 143688 and the Prime Minister's statement of 19 November 2020 , Official Report, column 499, how much funding from the public purse will be allocated to the unit for ensuring value for money from his Department's expenditure.

The Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) Approach to Investment Decisions (MAID) introduced changes to our approvals programmes including adopting the Treasury Green Book 3 Stage Approvals process for all Defence Investment Decisions; placing the Senior Responsible Owner-led programme at the heart of our approach and introducing the Strategic Outline case to promote early engagement and decision making.

We intend to strengthen our mechanisms to challenge delivery and drive value for money. We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government’s planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the MOD’s priority outcomes.

Separately, we are also establishing the Secretary of State’s Office for Net Assessment and Challenge to ensure that we keep pace with the rapidly evolving threats we face and ensure that our strategy and force structure delivers sustained strategic advantage for the UK.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2021 to Question 143687 Ministry of Defence: Cost Effectiveness and the Prime Minister's statement of 19 November 2020 on the Integrated Review, Official report, column 499, what powers the unit will have to ensure value for money of his Department's expenditure.

The Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) Approach to Investment Decisions (MAID) introduced changes to our approvals programmes including adopting the Treasury Green Book 3 Stage Approvals process for all Defence Investment Decisions; placing the Senior Responsible Owner-led programme at the heart of our approach and introducing the Strategic Outline case to promote early engagement and decision making.

We intend to strengthen our mechanisms to challenge delivery and drive value for money. We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government’s planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the MOD’s priority outcomes.

Separately, we are also establishing the Secretary of State’s Office for Net Assessment and Challenge to ensure that we keep pace with the rapidly evolving threats we face and ensure that our strategy and force structure delivers sustained strategic advantage for the UK.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2021 to Question 143686, what further progress has been made on establishing a unit to ensure that his Department secures value for money from the defence spending settlement.

The Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) Approach to Investment Decisions (MAID) introduced changes to our approvals programmes including adopting the Treasury Green Book 3 Stage Approvals process for all Defence Investment Decisions; placing the Senior Responsible Owner-led programme at the heart of our approach and introducing the Strategic Outline case to promote early engagement and decision making.

We intend to strengthen our mechanisms to challenge delivery and drive value for money. We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government’s planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the MOD’s priority outcomes.

Separately, we are also establishing the Secretary of State’s Office for Net Assessment and Challenge to ensure that we keep pace with the rapidly evolving threats we face and ensure that our strategy and force structure delivers sustained strategic advantage for the UK.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the ratio of pay between an officer and a non-officer was in each year since 2010.

The requested information can be found it the table below:


Ratio of median annual salary (average Officer salary relative to average Other Ranks salary) in each year since 2010:

Date

Other Ranks (OR) to Officer (OF) Pay Ratio (OR : OF)

01/04/2010

1:1.77

01/04/2011

1:1.77

01/04/2012

1:1.77

01/04/2013

1:1.77

01/04/2014

1:1.79

01/04/2015

1:1.77

01/04/2016

1:1.77

01/04/2017

1:1.73

01/04/2018

1:1.70

01/04/2019

1:1.66

01/04/2020

1:1.70

Notes:

1. The median average (mid-point of the distribution of personnel within the rank) salaries provided in this response are calculated from the annual salaries for all Regular Officers and Other Ranks as at 1-April each year. This means that the averages are based on salary at that point in the year, not what each Service person will have been paid in total across the year, which may differ, for example due to pay rate changes and promotions. Where there was a promotion within the month of March, the new rank’s rate of pay was used in the calculation.

2. Median salaries are measured as at 1 April within the financial year. Changes in the medians can therefore reflect both changes in pay rates and changes in the relative distribution of personnel within the rank.

3. The year-on-year change in average pay should not be interpreted as the growth in pay that an average service person will have experienced. The data purely reflects the change in the median salary over time and it would be unrealistic to assume that an individual's pay would follow this path. Many Service personnel also benefit from an annual increment in addition to any rise recommended by the independent Armed Forces Pay Review Body and, for senior officers, the Senior Salaries Review Body

4. The pay structure changed significantly with the introduction of Pay 16 which accounts for the large change in ratio in 2017. A simple comparison of medians between years is not possible.

5. This data uses a different method for calculating the average than the Military Salaries Index (MSI) published in the Quarterly Service Personnel Statistics and are the actual average annual salaries as at April each year.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what comparative assessment he has made of the armed forces pay increase and the projected rate of inflation in 2021-22.

In November 2020 my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer set out, as part of the 2020 Spending Review, the rationale behind a public sector pay pause this year. As outlined in the Secretary of State for Defence's recent letter to the Chair of the Armed Forces' Pay Review Body, covering Pay Round 2021/22, and as detailed in HM Treasury's earlier Economic Evidence to the Pay Review Bodies 2020/21, the pay pause recognises that public sector pay has been shielded from the pandemic's economic effects. It also serves to protect public sector jobs at this time of crisis whilst ensuring fairness between the public and private sectors. As such, no consideration has been given to the effect of a pay pause on average median pay; the household income of Service personnel; or a comparison with projected rates of inflation.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the effect of the pay freeze on the household income of armed forces personnel in 2021-22.

In November 2020 my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer set out, as part of the 2020 Spending Review, the rationale behind a public sector pay pause this year. As outlined in the Secretary of State for Defence's recent letter to the Chair of the Armed Forces' Pay Review Body, covering Pay Round 2021/22, and as detailed in HM Treasury's earlier Economic Evidence to the Pay Review Bodies 2020/21, the pay pause recognises that public sector pay has been shielded from the pandemic's economic effects. It also serves to protect public sector jobs at this time of crisis whilst ensuring fairness between the public and private sectors. As such, no consideration has been given to the effect of a pay pause on average median pay; the household income of Service personnel; or a comparison with projected rates of inflation.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average median pay for armed forces personnel will be in 2021-22.

In November 2020 my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer set out, as part of the 2020 Spending Review, the rationale behind a public sector pay pause this year. As outlined in the Secretary of State for Defence's recent letter to the Chair of the Armed Forces' Pay Review Body, covering Pay Round 2021/22, and as detailed in HM Treasury's earlier Economic Evidence to the Pay Review Bodies 2020/21, the pay pause recognises that public sector pay has been shielded from the pandemic's economic effects. It also serves to protect public sector jobs at this time of crisis whilst ensuring fairness between the public and private sectors. As such, no consideration has been given to the effect of a pay pause on average median pay; the household income of Service personnel; or a comparison with projected rates of inflation.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what qualifications are required for a general duty personnel to be selected for vaccinator training.

Prerequisite qualifications for general duty personnel to be selected for vaccinator training is a minimum of two A-levels.

Following selection candidates undergo an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check, complete the NHS online training package, which is the same course as the civilian volunteer workforce undertake, followed by a practical training day, prior to commencing vaccination tasks.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many covid-19 vaccination centres have been built by the armed forces.

The armed forces have assisted with the establishment of 60 COVID-19 vaccination centres in Scotland and England.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how long the training is for general duty personnel to become qualified vaccinators.

The training package for general duties personnel to become qualified vaccinators lasts up to four days.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many general duty personnel are currently (a) trained as vaccinators and (b) training to be qualified vaccinators.

As of 23 February Defence has trained 36 general duties personnel to be vaccinators to support the COVID-19 response, with a further 239 undergoing training.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many covid-19 vaccinations the armed forces have carried out since the start of the covid-19 vaccination roll out.

Data on the administration of COVID-19 vaccinations is collated by the Department of Health and Social Care to which Defence does not have access.

The Ministry of Defence does not collect data on vaccinations given by its personnel.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Combat Medical Technicians are currently on standby to assist with vaccinations in the event that the Department of Health and Social Care submit a Military Aid to Civilian Authority request.

As at 23 February, 220 Combat Medical Technicians (CMTs) are supporting vaccination tasks as part of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Approximately 250 additional CMTs are held at readiness.

Defence has also been working closely with the Department of Health and Social Care on a programme of training for general duties personnel to bolster the number of qualified vaccinators we could provide should further support be requested.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many staff he plans to allocate to the Office of Net Assessment and Challenge.

The new Secretary of State’s Office of Net Assessment and Challenge was announced in December last year. It will undertake strategic analysis, net assessment, doctrinal development, and red teaming, in order to provide a strengthened challenge function within the Ministry of Defence.

The composition, size, and budget of the Office is still under development, incorporating advice from Air Marshal Edward Stringer, Director-General Joint Force Development, and further details will be announced on completion.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what budget he plans to allocate to the Office of Net Assessment and Challenge.

The new Secretary of State’s Office of Net Assessment and Challenge was announced in December last year. It will undertake strategic analysis, net assessment, doctrinal development, and red teaming, in order to provide a strengthened challenge function within the Ministry of Defence.

The composition, size, and budget of the Office is still under development, incorporating advice from Air Marshal Edward Stringer, Director-General Joint Force Development, and further details will be announced on completion.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress his Department has made on establishing the Office of Net Assessment and Challenge.

The new Secretary of State’s Office of Net Assessment and Challenge was announced in December last year. It will undertake strategic analysis, net assessment, doctrinal development, and red teaming, in order to provide a strengthened challenge function within the Ministry of Defence.

The composition, size, and budget of the Office is still under development, incorporating advice from Air Marshal Edward Stringer, Director-General Joint Force Development, and further details will be announced on completion.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel have been promoted to officer ranks in each year since 2010 by ethnicity.

The requested information can be found in the table below for financial year 2012/13 onwards. No data is held for the period prior to financial year 2012/13.

UK Regular Personnel1, by ethncity2, that have been promoted from the other ranks (OR) into the officer ranks (OF), by financial year3:

Financial Year

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

BAME

~

10

10

20

20

20

30

30

White

340

370

460

500

600

630

640

650

Unknown

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

Tri-Service Total

340

380

470

520

620

660

670

680

Notes:

1 UK Regulars comprise Full time Service personnel, including Nursing Services, but excluding Full Time Reserve Service (FTRS) personnel, Gurkhas, mobilised Reservists, Military Provost Guard Service (MPGS), Locally Engaged Personnel (LEP), Non Regular Permanent Staff (NRPS), High Readiness Reserve (HRR) and Expeditionary Forces Institute (EFI) personnel. This table includes those promoted to both trained and untrained officers and, therefore, there is potential for some personnel to return to the other ranks.

2 As recorded on the Joint Personnel Administrative system.

3 Figures in the tables have been rounded to the nearest 10, though numbers ending in a "5" have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 20 to prevent systematic bias caused by rounding numbers upwards. Numbers of 5 or less are represented by "~".

Additional statistical information on diversity in Defence can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/uk-armed-forces-biannual-diversity-statistics-index

Defence is committed to achieving a more diverse workforce and has embarked on a range of activities to increase the number of Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic (BAME) and female recruits into the Armed Forces. Whilst the representation of BAME personnel joining the officer ranks is improving, we recognise that progress in terms of the representative rates of our people – both military and civilian – has been too slow. It is clear there is still much further to go and we are working hard to fulfil the key objective in our 2018-2030 Diversity and Inclusion Strategy to eliminate discrimination and improve diversity throughout Defence:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/defence-diversity-and-inclusion-strategy-2018-to-2030-a-force-for-inclusion

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department has taken to improve armed forces personnel satisfaction rates in Service Family Accommodation and Service Living Accommodation.

Our approach to improving satisfaction is founded on a combination of investment in the condition of our accommodation and improvements the maintenance service it receives.

Over £200 million will be spent in this Financial Year on significantly improving and modernising around 5,000 homes, as well as enhancing their energy efficiency.

In addition, the Department continues to invest in new family homes with over 1,000 new-build properties provided in the last two years.

Currently more than £200 million is spent annually on improving Single Living Accommodation (SLA).

We have also defined terms of for the new maintenance contracts that will roll out later this year in order to provide for an enhanced level of service.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress has been made in establishing a unit to ensure his Department secures value for money from the defence spending settlement.

Since my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s statement announcing this historic settlement, we have worked to ensure we have robust mechanisms in place to drive and assure value for money. The Defence Secretary has been clear that the Department’s spending must return to a sustainable footing and our whole approach is predicated on meeting the threats we face affordably and at the pace required to keep us safe.

We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government's planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the Ministry of Defence's priority outcomes. Through these regular updates and other means, Ministers will be able to track performance and take early action where delivery may be under pressure.

We are driving improvements in programme delivery, procurement, and acquisition to manage complexity, risk, and the pace of technological change affordably and rigorously.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Prime Minister's Statement of November 19 2020 on the Integrated Review, Official Report, Column 499, how many staff will be employed by the unit that will ensure value for money for his Department's expenditure.

Since my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s statement announcing this historic settlement, we have worked to ensure we have robust mechanisms in place to drive and assure value for money. The Defence Secretary has been clear that the Department’s spending must return to a sustainable footing and our whole approach is predicated on meeting the threats we face affordably and at the pace required to keep us safe.

We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government's planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the Ministry of Defence's priority outcomes. Through these regular updates and other means, Ministers will be able to track performance and take early action where delivery may be under pressure.

We are driving improvements in programme delivery, procurement, and acquisition to manage complexity, risk, and the pace of technological change affordably and rigorously.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Prime Minister's Statement of November 19 2020 on the Integrated Review, Official Report, Column 499, what assessment the unit established to ensure value for money of his Department's expenditure has made of previous policies to improve value for money from his Department's expenditure.

Since my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s statement announcing this historic settlement, we have worked to ensure we have robust mechanisms in place to drive and assure value for money. The Defence Secretary has been clear that the Department’s spending must return to a sustainable footing and our whole approach is predicated on meeting the threats we face affordably and at the pace required to keep us safe.

We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government's planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the Ministry of Defence's priority outcomes. Through these regular updates and other means, Ministers will be able to track performance and take early action where delivery may be under pressure.

We are driving improvements in programme delivery, procurement, and acquisition to manage complexity, risk, and the pace of technological change affordably and rigorously.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Prime Minister's Statement of November 19 2020 on the Integrated Review, Official Report, Column 499, what powers the unit that will ensure value for money of his Department's expenditure will have.

Since my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s statement announcing this historic settlement, we have worked to ensure we have robust mechanisms in place to drive and assure value for money. The Defence Secretary has been clear that the Department’s spending must return to a sustainable footing and our whole approach is predicated on meeting the threats we face affordably and at the pace required to keep us safe.

We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government's planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the Ministry of Defence's priority outcomes. Through these regular updates and other means, Ministers will be able to track performance and take early action where delivery may be under pressure.

We are driving improvements in programme delivery, procurement, and acquisition to manage complexity, risk, and the pace of technological change affordably and rigorously.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Prime Minister's Statement of November 19 2020 on the Integrated Review, Official Report, Column 499, how much funding from the public purse will be allocated to the unit for ensuring value for money from his Department's expenditure.

Since my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s statement announcing this historic settlement, we have worked to ensure we have robust mechanisms in place to drive and assure value for money. The Defence Secretary has been clear that the Department’s spending must return to a sustainable footing and our whole approach is predicated on meeting the threats we face affordably and at the pace required to keep us safe.

We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government's planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the Ministry of Defence's priority outcomes. Through these regular updates and other means, Ministers will be able to track performance and take early action where delivery may be under pressure.

We are driving improvements in programme delivery, procurement, and acquisition to manage complexity, risk, and the pace of technological change affordably and rigorously.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the rate of conviction of sexual assault cases in the Service Justice System.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is clear that sexual offending is not tolerated in the Armed Forces and, if it does occur, we have processes in place to ensure that support is offered and provided to victims. Allegations made to the Service Police are considered fully and, subject to the outcome of any investigation, referred to the Director of Service Prosecutions (DSP) for a decision on charging. The conduct of investigations and decisions to charge are subject to independent decisions by the Provost Marshals and the DSP.

The Service Police and Prosecutors who deal with allegations of sexual assault undergo the same training as those in the civilian criminal justice system and work to the same standards. I am confident that the service justice system provides an effective and fair system of justice for the men and women in the UK’s Armed Forces; anyone failing to meet the clear and high standards of behaviour required to serve will be dealt with robustly, including dismissal.

The MOD is in the process of implementing a number of recommendations following the Service Justice System Review, which will ensure the service justice system is more effective, efficient and provides a better service to those who use it, in particular victims and witnesses. The recommendations which require legislation form part of the Armed Forces Bill.

Detailed statistics about sexual offending in the Service Justice System are published annually as part of our commitment to openness and transparency:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/sexual-offences-in-the-service-justice-system

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the rate of conviction is for sexual assault cases in the Service Justice System.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is clear that sexual offending is not tolerated in the Armed Forces and, if it does occur, we have processes in place to ensure that support is offered and provided to victims. Allegations made to the Service Police are considered fully and, subject to the outcome of any investigation, referred to the Director of Service Prosecutions (DSP) for a decision on charging. The conduct of investigations and decisions to charge are subject to independent decisions by the Provost Marshals and the DSP.

The Service Police and Prosecutors who deal with allegations of sexual assault undergo the same training as those in the civilian criminal justice system and work to the same standards. I am confident that the service justice system provides an effective and fair system of justice for the men and women in the UK’s Armed Forces; anyone failing to meet the clear and high standards of behaviour required to serve will be dealt with robustly, including dismissal.

The MOD is in the process of implementing a number of recommendations following the Service Justice System Review, which will ensure the service justice system is more effective, efficient and provides a better service to those who use it, in particular victims and witnesses. The recommendations which require legislation form part of the Armed Forces Bill.

Detailed statistics about sexual offending in the Service Justice System are published annually as part of our commitment to openness and transparency:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/sexual-offences-in-the-service-justice-system

18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when the judge-led review into how allegations of wrongdoing are raised and investigated, announced on 13 October 2020, is planned to be (a) concluded and (b) published.

The Judge-led Review was commissioned by the Government to ensure that we have the most up-to date and future-proof skills and processes in place to investigate and, where appropriate prosecute, cases where serious allegations of criminal wrong-doing are made against UK forces on operations overseas. Where necessary, improvements will be made. The Review is due to report by the summer and we aim to publish it once we have considered the recommendations.

13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Forces Help to Buy payments have been completed in each region since the scheme began.

The requested information is published in the Forces Help to Buy Scheme quarterly statistics which can be found at the following address: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/forces-help-to-buy-scheme-quarterly-statistics-index. Table 5 of the most recent statistics shows the regional breakdowns for the total number of payments made since the scheme began in April 2014 to September 2020.

13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel and their families have been rejected by the Forces Help to Buy scheme’s application process since the establishment of that scheme by rank.

Since the Forces Help to Buy Scheme (FHTB) began, 51,186 First Stage FHTB applications have been received. 26,317 of these applications have proceeded to the Second Stage.

Payment has been made to around 22,200 applicants, totaling around £336 million, an average of approximately £15,100 per claim. At least 95% of payments, as at 30 September 2020, have already resulted in a purchased property or extension.

Detailed statistics on FHTB are published quarterly and can be found at the following address:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/forces-help-to-buy-scheme-quarterly-statistics-index.

However, it will take time to collate information on the numbers of applications, by rank, which did not pass initial and detailed eligibility checks and I will write in due course.

13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his oral contribution of 12 January 2021, Official Report, column 194 on reservist training, if he will publish details of other steps his Department has taken to meet financial pressures in the last 12 months; and what savings were made by each of those measures.

It is a routine aspect of managing the defence budget that many measures are taken during the course of the financial year to ensure that spending remains within levels authorised by Parliament and to allow resources to be reallocated to new and emerging priorities. It would not be appropriate to publish a full list of all such measures taken over the past 12 months as that would reveal information of value to our potential adversaries. The Armed Forces remain fully funded to deliver their core defence tasks and the extra £16.5 billion of investment in Defence announced in the spending review will ensure that they can continue to do so.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of currency depreciation in defence procurement on the defence budget.

We address the impact of foreign exchange using forward purchase contracts agreed with the Bank of England. Foreign Currency Exchange hedging is layered over a number of years which means that by the start of the year, a significant proportion of the forecast foreign currency requirement has already been purchased. The layering approach mitigates the risk of over or under hedging and provides budget stability in the forward programme. It is not intended to generate gains or savings from the foreign exchange market.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel from BAME backgrounds have been promoted into the officer ranks since 2012.

The information needed to answer the right hon. Member’s question is taking time to collate, and I will write to him shortly.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 6 February 2020 to Written Question 11516 on Sri Lanka: Military Aid, whether an Overseas Justice and Security Assistance assessment was completed before HMS Montrose visited Colombo in April 2019 as part of her deployment in the Indian Ocean.

An Overseas Justice and Security Assistance (OSJA) assessment was completed before HMS Montrose visited Colombo and engaged with the Sri Lankan Navy in April 2019. We regularly review and update our OSJA's to ensure that human rights and International Humanitarian Law risks are considered prior to providing justice or security sector assistance.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 6 February 2020 to Question 11516 on Sri Lanka: Military Aid, whether an Overseas Security and Justice Assistance assessment was completed before the HMS Montrose provided assistance to the Sri Lankan Navy in April 2019.

An Overseas Justice and Security Assistance (OSJA) assessment was completed before HMS Montrose visited Colombo and engaged with the Sri Lankan Navy in April 2019. We regularly review and update our OSJA's to ensure that human rights and International Humanitarian Law risks are considered prior to providing justice or security sector assistance.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many combat medics are deployed across the UK as part of the rollout of the covid-19 vaccine.

There are currently 14 Combat Medical Technicians deployed across Wales in support of the Vaccine Programme. A further 63 Combat Medical Technicians are being held at readiness, as part of the Vaccine Quick Reaction Force for NHS England.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, in what locations combat medics have been deployed in the UK as part of the rollout of the vaccine against covid-19.

There are currently Combat Medical Technicians deployed across Wales in support of the Vaccine Programme, with further Combat Medical Technicians being held at readiness as part of the Vaccine Quick Reaction Force for NHS England. We stand ready to support the vaccine roll out in Scotland and Northern Ireland should help be requested.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his comment of 31 December 2020 on Times Radio that 250 teams of medically trained personnel are on standby to assist in the rollout of the covid-19 vaccine, how many personnel make up each of those teams; and what level of medical training do those teams possess.

The initial quick response teams comprise one Doctor, two Registered Health Professionals and three Combat Medical Technicians. Subsequent teams are likely to be of similar skills and numbers but will be tailored to meet the needs of the setting within which vaccinations will be delivered.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many combat medics are serving in each branch of the armed forces.

There are circa 2,750 Combat Medical Technicians in the whole of the Armed Forces. Of these circa 570 are in the Royal Navy, circa 1,800 are in the Army, and circa 380 are in the Royal Air Force.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to deposit in the Library the next update on Military Aid to Civilian Authority (MACA) requests.

The latest update will be sent to Deposited Papers today, Monday 11 January, and they are updated every Monday. Although not visible straight away online, the deposits are available to MPs on request straight away.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 6 February 2020 to Written Question 11516 on Sri Lanka: Military Aid, what support his Department has provided to Sri Lanka to combat (a) terrorism and (b) drug trafficking since April 2019.

Since April 2019, we have delivered some counter-terrorism assistance to the Sri Lankan Armed Forces. This limited assistance has focused on Counter Improvised Explosive Device (C-IED) training, improving Sri Lanka's capacity to tackle the current and potential future threat from violent extremism. We have not provided any further support to the Sri Lankan Armed Forces in combating drug trafficking.

We carefully consider all our engagement with the Sri Lankan Armed Forces which aims to support the development of a modern, professional and human rights compliant military. Our supporting Overseas Security and Justice Assistance (OSJA) Assessment is regularly updated to ensure our assistance and engagement is in line with our values and is consistent with our domestic and international human rights obligations. Successive OSJAs have considered the moratorium on executions for drug offenders. Following an injunction by the Sri Lankan Supreme Court in July 2019 the moratorium has not been lifted and remains official Sri Lankan government policy.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 6 February 2020 to Written Question 11516 on Sri Lanka: Military Aid, whether the fact that Sri Lanka had recently lifted the moratorium on executions for drug offenders in March 2019, was specifically considered in any OSJA assessments completed in respect of the assistance.

Since April 2019, we have delivered some counter-terrorism assistance to the Sri Lankan Armed Forces. This limited assistance has focused on Counter Improvised Explosive Device (C-IED) training, improving Sri Lanka's capacity to tackle the current and potential future threat from violent extremism. We have not provided any further support to the Sri Lankan Armed Forces in combating drug trafficking.

We carefully consider all our engagement with the Sri Lankan Armed Forces which aims to support the development of a modern, professional and human rights compliant military. Our supporting Overseas Security and Justice Assistance (OSJA) Assessment is regularly updated to ensure our assistance and engagement is in line with our values and is consistent with our domestic and international human rights obligations. Successive OSJAs have considered the moratorium on executions for drug offenders. Following an injunction by the Sri Lankan Supreme Court in July 2019 the moratorium has not been lifted and remains official Sri Lankan government policy.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 6 February 2020 to Written Question 11516 on Sri Lanka: Military Aid, what mitigating steps were (a) included in any OSJA assessments; and( b) taken to ensure this UK assistance did not enable death sentences to be handed down for drug offences in Sri Lanka.

Since April 2019, we have delivered some counter-terrorism assistance to the Sri Lankan Armed Forces. This limited assistance has focused on Counter Improvised Explosive Device (C-IED) training, improving Sri Lanka's capacity to tackle the current and potential future threat from violent extremism. We have not provided any further support to the Sri Lankan Armed Forces in combating drug trafficking.

We carefully consider all our engagement with the Sri Lankan Armed Forces which aims to support the development of a modern, professional and human rights compliant military. Our supporting Overseas Security and Justice Assistance (OSJA) Assessment is regularly updated to ensure our assistance and engagement is in line with our values and is consistent with our domestic and international human rights obligations. Successive OSJAs have considered the moratorium on executions for drug offenders. Following an injunction by the Sri Lankan Supreme Court in July 2019 the moratorium has not been lifted and remains official Sri Lankan government policy.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the armed forces units involved in the development of the Virusend disinfectant spray.

A range of personnel across Defence were involved in the trials and development of Virusend, along with Industry, other Government Departments, Academia and Public Bodies. It is not possible at this time to calculate the net cost, and the public price charged per bottle is determined by retailers.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much it cost to develop the Virusend disinfectant spray; and what the per bottle cost is of that spray.

A range of personnel across Defence were involved in the trials and development of Virusend, along with Industry, other Government Departments, Academia and Public Bodies. It is not possible at this time to calculate the net cost, and the public price charged per bottle is determined by retailers.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel are currently deployed to assist in the roll-out of covid-19 vaccines.

The Ministry of Defence currently has circa 144 Armed Forces personnel providing direct assistance to the COVID-19 vaccine roll out, with a further 133 personnel remaining at readiness to support if required.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which armed forces regiments are being deployed to conduct mass covid-19 testing in schools.

Up to 1,500 Defence personnel from all three Services are being used to form local response teams ready to support and advise schools in England. This support will be drawn from the package of 14,000 personnel held at readiness to support COVID-19 related tasks.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many schools will receive assistance from the armed forces in conducting mass covid-19 testing.

Defence local response teams are ready to support and advise all secondary schools and colleges in England, to provide advice both virtually and in person. It will cover the establishment of testing sites, understanding of the testing process and assisting in the set-up of their testing facilities.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel are currently assisting local hospitals in their response to the covid-19 outbreak.

There are currently 50 Armed Forces personnel deployed to three hospitals to provide direct support to their COVID-19 response. In addition to this there are a further circa 1,622 personnel from the Joint Hospital Group who are routinely embedded within NHS Trusts who may be delivering against COVID-19 related activities.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many hospitals are currently being assisted by the armed forces in their response to the covid-19 outbreak.

50 Armed Forces Personnel are currently providing specific assistance related to the COVID-19 pandemic to three NHS Hospitals. A further circa 1,622 personnel from the Joint Hospital Group who are routinely embedded within 56 NHS Trusts may be delivering against COVID-19 related activities.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 26 November 2020 to Question 118587: Navy, whether the ships announced as part of the spending settlement are included in the current planning model for future capability.

The Integrated Review will set out the priorities that the MOD will deliver within the new funding settlement early next year. As the Prime Minister made clear in his Integrated Review speech of 19 November, the Government are going to use the extra defence spending to restore Britain's position as the foremost naval power in Europe.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 26 November 2020 to Question 118587 on Navy, whether the new platforms and programmes specified in the funding settlement are included in the current future capability planning models.

The Integrated Review will set out the priorities that the MOD will deliver within the new funding settlement early next year. As the Prime Minister made clear in his Integrated Review speech of 19 November, the Government are going to use the extra defence spending to restore Britain's position as the foremost naval power in Europe.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 26 November 2020 to Question 118587 on Navy, what the current limits of capability to which he refers in his answer are, and whether those limits are the same as the workforce requirements set in SDSR 2015.

The Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) 15 settlement authorised the size of the Royal Navy (RN) to be 30,600 at 2025. Such plans are not static and subsequent changes to capability have been authorised which will increase the planned size of the RN to just over 31,000 by 2027. However, the date by which we expect these new vessels to be operational is unlikely to be as soon as this.

The Prime Minister’s announcement on 19 November marked the first outcome of the Integrated Review. Further details of the new platforms, capabilities, programmes and personnel opportunities that stem from it will be set out alongside its full publication.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when his Department plans to publish updates on Military Aid to the Civil Authorities requests; and how frequently he plans to provide copies of those updates to the Library.

Updates on Military Aid to Civil Authorities (MACA) activity have been made available to Members weekly since 10 November 2020. The latest version, as at 7 December, can be accessed at: https://depositedpapers.parliament.uk/depositedpaper/2282763/details

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many meetings Ministers in his Department have held with stakeholders on potential Type 31e exports in the last 12 months; and on what dates those meetings were held.

Ministry of Defence (MOD) Ministers have regular engagement with stakeholders across Government and with our industry partners concerning potential Arrowhead 140 (AH140) export opportunities. MOD and UKDSE continue to actively support UK industry in pursuit of AH140 export orders.

All Ministerial meetings with industry partners are published on GOV.UK in quarterly transparency returns as part of the Government's commitment to publishing transparency information.

This can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings-with-external-organisations-in-the-ministry-of-defence

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent engagements he has had with his Turkish counterpart.

I regularly meet with my international counterparts.

My most recent engagement with my Turkish counterpart was in early October when we met and discussed a wide range of Defence and security issues, including Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) capabilities.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his speech at the Air and Space Power conference on 15 July 2020, what recent discussions he has had with his Turkish counterpart on drones.

I regularly meet with my international counterparts.

My most recent engagement with my Turkish counterpart was in early October when we met and discussed a wide range of Defence and security issues, including Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) capabilities.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent discussions he has had with the (a) Military Aviation Authority and (b) Civil Aviation Authority on the certification for safe use of drones.

The Secretary of State for Defence has requested advice from the Military Aviation Authority with regard to the procurement and governance of small Remotely Piloted Air Systems.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many export orders have been made for Type 31e.

The Type 31 frigate is the UK variant of the Arrowhead 140 (AH140) design. No export orders have currently been placed for AH140, but UK industry in partnership with the UK Defence and Security Exports (UKDSE) and MOD are actively pursuing a number of campaigns.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many export orders were envisaged for Type 31e by his Department at the end of the concept phase.

Work to evaluate the potential scope of the general purpose frigate market was conducted prior to the T31 procurement being launched. This research helped to inform the development of the T31 evaluation criteria. As part of the Design & Build contract, Babcock is required to generate a strategy which outlines their approach to exporting the T31. There has been healthy international interest so far in the Type 31. The MOD has been supporting UK Defence and Security Exports and Babcock in actively pursuing a number of these opportunities.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the cost has been of the public tender process for the Fleet Solid Support Ships to date.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend Minister for the Armed Forces (James Heappey) on 30 January 2020 to Question 8160 to the right hon. Member for North Durham (Kevan Jones).

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress has been made on the training exercise Agile Stance; and if he will make a statement.

The AGILE STANCE Campaign Plan is a multi-year programme designed to test and develop a responsive and agile UK Strategic Base. It will be managed and operated as a capability and demonstrate elements of UK Whole Force mobilisation.

The initial exercise in the campaign, AGILE LAUNCH, will be conducted in autumn 2021. This had been previously planned for Autumn 2020 but was delayed owing to the impact of COVID 19.

Future major exercises are planned for 2022 (AGILE POSTURE) and 2024 (AGILE DEFENDER) which will increase in scale and complexity.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel will be deployed to support covid-19 testing in areas under tier three local covid alert level restrictions.

Currently there are over 150 military personnel deployed to assist with community testing in tier three areas Defence and the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) are currently working together to assess how resource can be used most effectively in line with the guidance for local delivery on 30 November 2020.

As agreed by the Secretary of State for Defence and the Chief Secretary to the Treasury (CST), marginal costs would be the default charging regime where military support is requested for COVID-19 related tasks. Marginal costs takes into account travel, food and accommodation, but not the cost of the support itself. The total cost varies depending on factors such as the number of military personnel required as well as the duration of the task.

Military support to the community testing will be deployed at the request of the local authority in consultation with DHSC and authorised by a Defence Minister using the Military Aid to Civil Authority (MACA) process.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the cost will be of armed forces personnel supporting covid-19 testing in areas under tier three local covid alert level restrictions.

Currently there are over 150 military personnel deployed to assist with community testing in tier three areas Defence and the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) are currently working together to assess how resource can be used most effectively in line with the guidance for local delivery on 30 November 2020.

As agreed by the Secretary of State for Defence and the Chief Secretary to the Treasury (CST), marginal costs would be the default charging regime where military support is requested for COVID-19 related tasks. Marginal costs takes into account travel, food and accommodation, but not the cost of the support itself. The total cost varies depending on factors such as the number of military personnel required as well as the duration of the task.

Military support to the community testing will be deployed at the request of the local authority in consultation with DHSC and authorised by a Defence Minister using the Military Aid to Civil Authority (MACA) process.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how the armed forces will be deployed to support community testing for covid-19 in areas under tier three local covid alert level restrictions.

Currently there are over 150 military personnel deployed to assist with community testing in tier three areas Defence and the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) are currently working together to assess how resource can be used most effectively in line with the guidance for local delivery on 30 November 2020.

As agreed by the Secretary of State for Defence and the Chief Secretary to the Treasury (CST), marginal costs would be the default charging regime where military support is requested for COVID-19 related tasks. Marginal costs takes into account travel, food and accommodation, but not the cost of the support itself. The total cost varies depending on factors such as the number of military personnel required as well as the duration of the task.

Military support to the community testing will be deployed at the request of the local authority in consultation with DHSC and authorised by a Defence Minister using the Military Aid to Civil Authority (MACA) process.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many days each of the Type-45 Destroyers have spent at sea in each of the last five years.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend the Minister for Defence Procurement (Jeremy Quin) on 2 June 2020 to Question 49606 to the right hon. Member for North Durham (Kevan Jones).

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will set out the timescale for the Type 32 programme.

The programme and procurement strategy for the Type 32 frigate will be decided following the concept phase, which has not yet been launched. It is too early to determine costs.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the Type 32 will be built.

The programme and procurement strategy for the Type 32 frigate will be decided following the concept phase, which has not yet been launched. It is too early to determine costs.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the planned budget is for the Type 32 programme.

The programme and procurement strategy for the Type 32 frigate will be decided following the concept phase, which has not yet been launched. It is too early to determine costs.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what tasks the Type 32 will undertake.

The roles and capabilities for the Type 32 frigate will be decided following the concept phase, which has not yet been launched.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department has spent on each Armed Forces redundancy scheme in each year since 2010.

The following table provides the requested information for the Army. The same information for the Royal Navy and Royal Air Force is not available.

Army Top Level Budget Spend (£ million) on the Armed Forces Redundancy Scheme

Financial Year (FY)

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

Total

Total

26.598

74.541

151.760

24.027

5.975

282.901

Note: spend was zero in each FY from 2016-17.

25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel have been made involuntarily redundant in each year since 2010.

Detailed statistics on the numbers of Service personnel either applying or selected for redundancy in the UK Armed Forces redundancy programme 2011-2015 (Tranches 1 to 4) have been published at the following address: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/uk-armed-forces-redundancy-program-statistics-index

The redundancies in all four tranches were compulsory. However, eligible personnel (by rank, branch or trade) were able to apply for selection for compulsory redundancy. Applicants formed 62% of those made redundant in Tranche 1, 72% in Tranche 2, 84% in Tranche 3 and 72% in Tranche 4.

The vast majority of Service personnel who were made redundant through this programme had left Service by March 2016. Another eight personnel left their Service on redundancy terms between April 2016 and December 2017. Since then, no additional Service personnel have been made redundant.

25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much of the funding settlement for his Department announced on 19 November 2020 is (a) capital and (b) revenue.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) settlement is for £188 billion over the four years from 2020-21, of which £126 billion is for resource spending (excluding non-cash items such as depreciation) and £62 billion is for capital spending. A further £1.3 billion has been allocated as a contingency for Dreadnought. The SR20 funding announcement does not specify revenue assumptions in MOD’s funding settlement.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what work is being undertaken on the Fleet Solid Support Ships.

As announced by the Secretary of State for Defence on 21 October 2020, the competition for the new Fleet Solid Support ships will commence in Spring 2021. Work is currently underway to meet that target.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to publish the Defence and Security Industrial Strategy.

Work continues on the Defence and Security Industrial Strategy which is Defence-led but brings in the views of other departments across Government. The review is ongoing and its findings are being used to inform the Government’s broader Integrated Review, the conclusions of which will be announced in the new year.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the cost to the public purse was of capabilities manufactured by foreign contractors in each year since 2009-10.

The Ministry of Defence publishes information on gov.uk for all expenditure with UK commerce and industry since 2013/14. From this it is possible to extract an estimate of expenditure overseas, which is shown in the table below.

All figures below exclude payments on assets bought via contracts with other Governments.

Orders placed in the UK may include those placed with the UK arms of multinational companies.

Financial Year

Overall Expenditure £bn

UK Expenditure £bn

Estimated Overseas Expenditure £bn

2013/14

22,212

18,838

3,374

2014/15

22,316

19,124

3,192

2015/16

21,214

18,712

2,502

2016/17

20,961

18,547

2,414

2017/18

21,976

18,853

3,123

2018/19

21,562

19,234

2,328

*Figures for overall and UK expenditure can be found within Table 1 of the latest bulletin which can be accessed at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/mod-regional-expenditure-with-uk-industry-and-supported-employment-201819

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the oral Answer of the Secretary of State for Defence of 21 September 2020, Official Report, column 618, on his undertaking to place the terms of reference for the Tom Kelly independent review in the Library, when he plans to so place those terms of reference in the Library.

A copy of the terms of reference has been placed in the Library of the House.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel have been deployed in response to Military Aid to Civilian Authority (MACA) requests since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

As of 19 November 2020 Defence has deployed over 7,800 Armed Forces personnel since March 2020, to support the national response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

This is a cumulative figure, not the number of troops currently deployed. This number also does not account for multiple deployments of the same person.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many covid-19 related Military Aid to Civilian Authority (MACA) requests have been closed since March 2020; and if he will list those closed requests.

As of 17 November 2020 the Ministry of Defence has tracked 190 Covid-19 related Military Aid to Civilian Authority (MACA) requests as having been closed since March 2020.

For detail of the MACA requests that have been closed, I am attaching a document containing the requested information.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the cost has been of each covid-19 related Military Aid to Civilian Authority (MACA) request.

The Military Assistance to the Civil Authorities (MACA) mechanism has been used by Defence to meet the support requirements of other Departments during COVID-19.

At present, 342 MACAs have been requested in support of Government's domestic COVID-19 response at an estimated total cost of £29.7million. Costs vary according to each task, although marginal costs are the default charging regime when military support is requested.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total cost of Military Aid to Civilian Authority (MACA) requests has been to his Department since March 2020.

At present, the total recoverable costs related to MACA activity since March are estimated to be £29.7million.

Defence has taken a forward leaning approach towards supporting the Government's response to COVID-19, in order to ensure that costs are not a barrier to Other Government Departments requesting and receiving the military support they need.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 13 July 2020 to Question 70307 on Ministry of Defence: Iraq Detainees, how much his Department has agreed to pay to date in relation to those outstanding 414 civil claims.

Details of 330 of the 1,000 civil claims where an agreement with the claimant in terms of damages to be paid to the claimant, notwithstanding the legal costs that may not yet have been agreed and paid, are already in the public domain following responses provided to FOI requests received and the High Court judgment of December 2017 relating to the trials of the four lead claims in the Iraqi Civilian Litigation (ICL). Discussions between the claimants' solicitors and departmental officials with regard to the resolution of the outstanding remaining claims in the ICL have continued since early 2018, but the terms of these discussions and any outcomes remain the subject of a confidentiality agreement and we are therefore unable to provide a detailed and complete response to this question at this time. However, although the confidentiality agreement remains extant, it is hoped that we will be in a position to provide further information in relation to the remaining outstanding claims in the ICL in the near future.

13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civil claims were brought against his Department under the Human Rights Act 1998 in (a) 2000 and (b) 2009.

The information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. To locate, retrieve and extract the information requested would involve wide-ranging searches of a number of databases and liaison with the Government Legal Department.

13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civil claims were brought against his Department under the Human Rights Act 1998 from 2010 to 2020.

The information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. To locate, retrieve and extract the information requested would involve wide-ranging searches of a number of databases and liaison with the Government Legal Department.

13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many cases of compensation for post-traumatic stress disorder have been awarded by his Department to armed forces personnel under the War Pensions Scheme in each year from 2000 to 5 April 2005.

The information requested is being collated. I will write to the hon. Member as soon as it is available.

13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many cases of compensation for post-traumatic stress disorder have been awarded by his Department to armed forces personnel under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme to date.

It is not possible to reliably determine awards made specifically for PTSD, as individuals who claimed for PTSD may have been awarded compensation for a range of mental illnesses. However, from the electronic records available it has been determined that as at 31 March 2020 some 3,739 awards had been made for PTSD under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme (AFCS) between 06 April 2005 and 31 March 2020.

Defence Statistics publish annual National Statistics on the AFCS. The most recent update was published in June 2020 (as at 31 March 2020) on the Gov.UK website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/armed-forces-compensation-scheme-statistics-index

13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many cases of compensation for post-traumatic stress disorder have been awarded by his Department to armed forces personnel through civil claims to date.

Since 1 April 2009, compensation has been paid out to 75 current or former service personnel in respect of PTSD claims. The cases consist of PTSD claims with a clinical negligence nature, ie the failure to diagnose and treat PTSD, as well as Service personal injury claims where PTSD is considered the incident injury.

25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many leases with Annington Homes are due to be ended in the next 12 months; and if he will publish the locations of those properties.

To date, the Department has issued notices to Annington Homes to terminate the leases on 217 properties at seven locations in the next 12 months as shown in the following table:

Marham

41

Ripon

42

Ternhill

56

Warminster

24

Illchester

44

Biggin Hill

8

Wrexham

2

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many leases with Annington Homes his Department has ended in the last 12 months; and in what locations those leases were in place.

In the period covering October 2019 to September 2020, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) has terminated the leases on 364 properties owned by Annington Homes in nine locations as shown in the table below.

Canterbury

9

Brampton, Cumbria

19

RAF Wittering

20

Ripon

8

RAF Marham

80

RAF Henlow

84

North Luffenham

40

Lydd

8

Bordon

96

Of the 364 Annington Homes property leases terminated in the last 12 months, 288 properties were empty. Of the remaining properties, 44 were let to Service families and 32 to civilians, who were all rehoused in other MOD properties in the local area. No records are held on whether any of the tenants were veterans.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, of the leases with Annington Homes that his Department ended in the last 12 months, how many were for homes of (a) military families (b) veterans.

In the period covering October 2019 to September 2020, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) has terminated the leases on 364 properties owned by Annington Homes in nine locations as shown in the table below.

Canterbury

9

Brampton, Cumbria

19

RAF Wittering

20

Ripon

8

RAF Marham

80

RAF Henlow

84

North Luffenham

40

Lydd

8

Bordon

96

Of the 364 Annington Homes property leases terminated in the last 12 months, 288 properties were empty. Of the remaining properties, 44 were let to Service families and 32 to civilians, who were all rehoused in other MOD properties in the local area. No records are held on whether any of the tenants were veterans.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the criteria are for extending the notice period for tenants where leases with Annington Homes are terminated by his Department.

The terms of the Common Law Tenancy (CLT) agreement governing the leases stipulates 'two months' notice after the first four months occupancy'.

In respect of the 367 civilian sub-let tenants recently issued with termination notices, 17 have found alternative accommodation, and for all the remaining 350 tenants the Department has decided to extend the notice period to 12 months, expiring at the end of September 2021.

This extension of the notice period reflects the unique current circumstances faced by tenants.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which of his Department's bases in each branch of the armed forces in (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland and (d) Northern Ireland are used by over (i) 5,000 personnel (ii) 10,000 personnel (iii) 25,000 personnel each year.

The information could be provided only at disproportionate cost as the number of personnel who use a particular base varies on a day to day basis and the information on these numbers is not held centrally.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, in which constituency each company with a prime contract with his Department is based; and how many employees each of those companies has.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) regularly publishes information on regional expenditure with UK industry and supported employment on gov.uk.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/mod-regional-expenditure-with-uk-industry-and-supported-employment-201819

The MOD does not collate information at a constituency level, or details concerning subcontractors.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, in which constituency each company with subcontract with his Department is based; and how many employees each of those companies has.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) regularly publishes information on regional expenditure with UK industry and supported employment on gov.uk.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/mod-regional-expenditure-with-uk-industry-and-supported-employment-201819

The MOD does not collate information at a constituency level, or details concerning subcontractors.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he is taking to ensure his Department's spending is benefits the economy of each (a) region and (b) nation of the UK.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) spent £19.2 billion with UK industry and commerce in 2018-19, directly supporting 119,000 jobs across every region and nation of the UK and indirectly supporting many thousands more.

The MOD is committed to supporting the UK defence industry. Since 2015, we have published a National Shipbuilding Strategy, launched the Combat Air Strategy and refreshed our Defence Industrial Policy. Our Defence Prosperity Programme, set out to Parliament in March 2019, aims to grow Defence's contribution to UK prosperity, including by working to sustain and develop an internationally competitive and productive UK Defence sector.

The MOD is also leading a review of the UK's defence and security industrial sectors, which will enhance our strategic approach to best support a competitive, innovative and world-class industrial base that drives investment and prosperity across the Union, which can then underpin national security now and in the future.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many staff are employed in the defence and aerospace industry by his Department's contractors and sub-contractors in the constituency of (a) Durham North West, (b) Stockton North, (c) Blackpool North, and Cleveleys, (d) Burnley, (e) Hyndburn, (f) Pendle, (g) Ashfield, (h) Derby South, (i) Lincoln, (j) Loughborough, (k) Sherwood, and (l) Coventry North West.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not collate information on the defence and aerospace industry at a constituency level, or details concerning subcontractors.

The MOD estimates the number of direct jobs supported by MOD expenditure with industry and commerce at a UK national and regional level. Our latest data from the 2018-19 Financial Year is demonstrated below:

Nation and/or Region

Constituencies included

MOD Expenditure with industry and commerce in that nation and/or region (£ million)

Number of Jobs supported in that nation and/or region

East Midlands

Ashfield; Derby South; Lincoln; Loughborough and Sherwood

893

6,500

East of England

South East Cambridgeshire; Stevenage

1,140

6,100

North East

Durham North West; Stockton North

96

600

North West

Blackpool North, and Cleveleys; Burnley; Hyndburn; Pendle

1,965

12,500

Scotland

Paisley and Renfrewshire North

1,758

10,200

South East

Portsmouth North; Portsmouth South

4,581

27,500

South West

Filton and Bradley Stoke

5,184

32,500

Wales

Alyn and Deeside; Islwyn; Torfaen; Vale of Glamorgan; Wrexham

1,086

7,700

West Midlands

Coventry North West; Wolverhampton North East

583

4,300

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many staff are employed in the defence and aerospace industry by his Department's contractors and sub-contractors in the constituency of (a) Wolverhampton North East, (b) South East Cambridgeshire, (c) Stevenage, (d) Portsmouth North, (e) Portsmouth South, (f) Filton and Bradley Stoke, (g) Alyn and Deeside, (h) Wrexham, (i) Torfaen, (j) Islwyn, (k) Vale of Glamorgan, and (l) Paisley and Renfrewshire North.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not collate information on the defence and aerospace industry at a constituency level, or details concerning subcontractors.

The MOD estimates the number of direct jobs supported by MOD expenditure with industry and commerce at a UK national and regional level. Our latest data from the 2018-19 Financial Year is demonstrated below:

Nation and/or Region

Constituencies included

MOD Expenditure with industry and commerce in that nation and/or region (£ million)

Number of Jobs supported in that nation and/or region

East Midlands

Ashfield; Derby South; Lincoln; Loughborough and Sherwood

893

6,500

East of England

South East Cambridgeshire; Stevenage

1,140

6,100

North East

Durham North West; Stockton North

96

600

North West

Blackpool North, and Cleveleys; Burnley; Hyndburn; Pendle

1,965

12,500

Scotland

Paisley and Renfrewshire North

1,758

10,200

South East

Portsmouth North; Portsmouth South

4,581

27,500

South West

Filton and Bradley Stoke

5,184

32,500

Wales

Alyn and Deeside; Islwyn; Torfaen; Vale of Glamorgan; Wrexham

1,086

7,700

West Midlands

Coventry North West; Wolverhampton North East

583

4,300

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2020 to Question 70308 on Ministry of Defence: Employers' Liability, what the total amount of compensation paid out by his Department was for the (a) 125 claims brought between three and six years of the date of incident and (b) 70 claims brought more than six years after the date of incident.

Of the 125 claims brought between three and six years of the date of the incident, 23 of these claims are still open. Of the 102 cases that have been closed, 54 have been settled in favour of the claimant. I can confirm that a total of £8.57 million has been paid in compensation by the Ministry of Defence in relation to these 54 claims.

Of the 70 claims brought more than six years after the date of the incident, 27 of these claims are still open. Of the 43 cases that have been closed, 14 have been settled in favour of the claimant. I can confirm that a total of £2.47million has been paid in compensation by the Ministry of Defence in relation to these 14 claims.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme, how many claims for noise-related hearing loss were settled between 2015 to 2019; and what the total amount of compensation paid out through that scheme was for those claims.

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) is considered under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme (AFCS).

Between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2019, under the AFCS, 797 claims were awarded for NIHL. As at 31 May 2020, £5,868,720.00 had been awarded in lump sums and £1,023,931.00 in Guaranteed Income Payments.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many claims through the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme for post-traumatic stress disorder were settled between 2015 to 2019; and how much compensation has been paid out through that scheme for those claims.

Between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2019, under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme, 2,087 claims were awarded for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. As at 31 May 2020, £25,294,008.00 had been awarded in lump sums and £9,031,098 in Guaranteed Income Payments.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the highest possible level of compensation is through the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme for (a) noise-induced hearing loss and (b) Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in a single claim.

Under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme, the highest possible levels of compensation for the injuries which you describe are:

(a) Noise-induced loss – Level 6 (the highest level for this category) entitles a claimant to a lump sum of £144,200 (Bilateral permanent hearing loss of more than 75dB averaged over 1, 2 and 3 kHz).

(b) Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder – Level 4 (the highest level for this category) entitles a claimant to a lump sum of £298,700 for the most severe cases of mental health disorder (Permanent mental disorder causing very severe functional limitation or restriction).

If both these descriptors were awarded in a single claim, the lump sum payable would be £442,900.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2020 to Question 70307 on Ministry of Defence: Iraq Detainees, given that the Alseran judgement was handed down on 14 December 2017, when does the Ministry of Defence anticipate concluding the remaining 414 outstanding claims.

We are unable to comment with any degree of certainty as to when the remaining 414 outstanding claims will be concluded because such conclusion is dependent on the settlement of both the damages and costs elements of the claims. Whilst discussions are ongoing with a view to agreeing a negotiated settlement of the outstanding claims, if no agreement can be reached in respect of those outstanding issues that preclude a final settlement, those outstanding issues will become the subject of further Court proceedings that could foreseeably continue until December 2021.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2020 to Question 70307 on Ministry of Defence: Iraq Detainees, how many of the 1000 civil claims have reached an agreement with the claimant in terms of damages to be paid to the claimant, notwithstanding the legal costs that may not yet have been agreed and paid.

Details of 330 of the 1,000 civil claims where an agreement with the claimant in terms of damages to be paid to the claimant, notwithstanding the legal costs that may not yet have been agreed and paid, are already in the public domain following responses provided to FOI requests received and the High Court judgment of December 2017 relating to the trials of the four lead claims in the Iraqi Civilian Litigation (ICL). Discussions between the claimants' solicitors and departmental officials with regard to the resolution of the outstanding remaining claims in the ICL have continued since early 2018, but the terms of these discussions and any outcomes remain the subject of a confidentiality agreement and we are therefore unable to provide a detailed and complete response to this question at this time. However, although the confidentiality agreement remains extant, it is hoped that we will be in a position to provide further information in relation to the remaining outstanding claims in the ICL in the near future.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2020 to Question 70307 on Ministry of Defence: Iraq Detainees, how many of the judicial claims resolved in the claimant’s favour, either by (a) settlement or (b) at a final hearing.

As explained in the answer to Question 70307, only a few of the approximately 1,400 judicial reviews brought on behalf of Iraqi nationals were resolved by the time Public Interest Lawyers went into administration in 2016. None were settled by the Ministry of Defence.

The Courts have only handed down judgments, following hearings, in nine cases (although some of these proceedings covered multiple complainants). Of these, six were decided in the complainants' favour; one was decided wholly in favour of the Ministry of Defence; and in the remaining two cases, the complainants won certain issues and the Ministry of Defence others.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2020 to Question 70307 on Ministry of Defence: Iraq Detainees, of the remaining cases of the 1500 judicial review claims, how many of those claimants were notified that the investigations have been completed (a) before, and (b) after 13 April 2020.

The firm Public Interest Lawyers submitted approximately 1,400 judicial reviews by Iraqi nationals seeking an ECHR-compliant investigation into alleged violations of Article 2 (right to life) or Article 3 (prohibition of torture and ill-treatment).

Judicial reviews are separate from initial criminal investigations. All cases in which there were allegations of criminality were referred to the Service police. The Service police have been notifying complainants appropriately of the outcome of these investigative steps: those whose allegations are screened out at the pre-investigation stage, are notified online; those whose cases proceed to an investigation are notified by letter once that stage is complete.

The Ministry of Defence is required to consider whether those investigative steps have been sufficient to discharge any investigative obligations that may arise under ECHR, and to notify the complainant of this decision.

By 13 April 2020, the Ministry of Defence had notified around 630 complainants (those whose criminal allegations had resulted in the Service police producing a final report summarising the investigative steps taken) of its decision not to establish a further non-criminal investigation. The Ministry of Defence is working as quickly as possible to ensure that all remaining complainants in this category are notified by the end of this year.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his answer of 6 July to the oral question from the Hon. Member for Kingston Upon Hull West and Hessle, Official Report, Column 659, when the impact assessment for the Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill 2019-21 will be published.

The correct position is that the Impact Assessment for the Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill has not yet been published. I will seek to publish an Impact Assessment in advance of the Bill’s Second Reading.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he will publish the Government’s response to the consultation on Legal protections for armed forces personnel and Veterans serving in operations outside the United Kingdom, which closed on 13 October 2019.

We plan to publish the Government's response to the public consultation on Legal Protections for Armed Forces Personnel and Veterans serving in operations outside the United Kingdom around the time of Second Reading of the Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill.

7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many of the civil claims filed against his Department, under employers' liability, by serving armed forces personnel, veterans and their families were issued after (a) three and (b) six years when calculated from either the date of the alleged incident, or the date of knowledge of the incident, which ever is later, since 2003.

Data has been provided for Employer's Liability claims brought by current and former service personnel and their families since 1 May 2007 where a date of incident has been recorded and the country of incident has been recorded as either Iraq or Afghanistan. Date of knowledge is not recorded on the claims management systems. 522 civil claims have been identified and of these I can confirm that a) 357 were brought within three years of the date of incident b) 125 were brought between three and six years of the date of incident and c) 70 were brought more than six years after the date of incident. The data is held in a number of case management systems each recording data in a different way and it is not possible to answer the question put which asks about Employer's liability in general without exceeding the costs limit.

7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 29 June 2020 to Question 67536 on Ministry of Defence: Iraq Detainees, of the 1,000 civil claims in connection with operations in Iraq, how many cases were brought after (a) three and (b) six years, when calculated from the date the claim was issued, rather than the date the claim was serviced.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 6 July 2020 to Question 67536.

We are unable to provide a complete response to this question, as we have not yet finished calculating the time elapsed between the date of the alleged incident and the date on which the claim was either issued or served in all cases. However, we can say that at least 500 were brought more than six years after the alleged incident and would have been caught by the longstop introduced in the Overseas Operations (Service Personnel & Veterans) Bill; at least 250 were brought within three to six years and would have been subject to the Courts discretion; and at least 40 were brought within three years of the alleged incident.

7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 29 June 2020 to Question 67536 on Ministry of Defence: Iraq Detainees, how many of the approximately 1,000 civil claims and 1,500 judicial reviews in connection with operations in Iraq, were settled.

A claim is considered "settled" when the Ministry of Defence (MOD) has agreed the damages to be awarded to the claimant, and these and the associated legal costs have been paid. I can confirm that, of the approximately 1,000 compensation claims brought in connection with operations in Iraq, approximately 330 have been settled to date and 217 have been either withdrawn or struck out. Discussions regarding the resolution of the remaining 414 claims remain ongoing.

With regard to the approximately 1,400 judicial review claims, only a few were resolved by the time Public Interest Lawyers went into administration in 2016. Under a 2017 Court Order, unless the claimant revives their claim within three months of the MOD notifying them that any investigations into their allegations are complete, any remaining claims are to be automatically struck out. This process is ongoing.

7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department's civilian staff will be subject to the same provisions within the Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill as military personnel when posted overseas to support military operations.

The provisions in Part 1 of the Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill will only apply to alleged offences committed more than five years ago by current or former members of the UK Armed Forces, including Reserves, and members of British Overseas Territory Forces when operating as part of UK Armed Forces, on operations outside the British Islands.

Although Ministry of Defence (MOD) Civil Servants do deploy in support of our Armed Forces during overseas operations, they are not generally deployed on the front line of military operations and are not ordinarily exposed to the same risks and dangers as Service personnel. As a result, the justification for the additional protection provided by the statutory presumption against prosecution to Armed Forces personnel would not be present in relation to Civil Servants.

The provisions on civil litigation in Part 2 of the Bill relate to claims brought against the MOD, the Secretary of State for Defence, or any member of Her Majesty's forces in connection with overseas operations. These provisions will apply to all claimants in the same way.

1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 29 June 2020 to Question 63455 on Ministry of Defence: Iraq Detainees, of the 1000 civil claims filed in connection with operations in Iraq, how many of those claims were filed within (a) three and (b) six years of the alleged offence.

We are unable to provide a complete response to this question, as we have not yet finished calculating the time elapsed between the date of the alleged incident and the date on which the claim was served in all cases. However, We can say that at least 500 were brought more than six years after the alleged incident, and would have been caught by the longstop introduced in the Overseas Operations (Service Personnel & Veterans) Bill; at least 250 were brought within thre to six years, and would have been subject to the Courts discretion; and at least 40 were brought within three years of the alleged incident.

25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much Official Development Assistance has been spent by his Department in each year from 2015 to 2020.

Ministry of Defence Official Development Assistance spend figures for this period are as follows:

Year

ODA Expenditure (£million)

2015

11.48

2016

5.11

2017

6.11

2018

4.99

2019

6.07

2020

5.58 (Forecast)

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, by how much his Department has been requested to reduce its share of the Official Development Assistance budget; and how that reduction will effect the 2 per cent spending target.

No decisions have been taken on reducing the Ministry of Defence's share of the Official Development Assistance (ODA) budget. ODA represents just 0.01% of the UK’s defence budget. The UK remains committed to meeting the NATO 2% spending target.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, in which countries his Department has used its share of Official Development Assistance in each year 2015 to 2020.

The Ministry of Defence Official Development Assistance budget has been spent in the following countries.

Year

ODA Expenditure (£million)

Countries of ODA Expenditure

2015

11.48

South Africa, Cyprus, Nepal, Mediterranean1, Non-Specific.2

2016

5.11

Cyprus, Kenya, Afghanistan, Mediterranean1, Non-specific.

2017

6.11

Kenya, Afghanistan, Non-specific.2

2018

4.99

Kenya, Afghanistan, Non-specific.2

2019

6.07

Kenya, Afghanistan, Non-specific.2

2020

5.58 (Forecasted)

Kenya, Afghanistan, Non-specific.2

1.Assistance to refugees in the Mediterranean.

2.Non-country specific (defence education) programmes delivered to participants from a range of countries.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he has taken to assess whether reductions to Official Development Assistance (ODA) by his Department would threaten the security of (a) British assets overseas, and (b) individuals, groups and communities who are beneficiaries of the ODA spend by his Department.

No decisions have been taken on reducing the Ministry of Defence's share of the Official Development Assistance (ODA) budget. ODA represents a very small proportion of the Defence budget, and adjustments to the ODA budget would not pose a threat to UK or international security.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, on what date was Operation Northmoor concluded by his Department.

On 15 July 2019, following consultation with the Director of Service Prosecutions and with the concurrence of the independent persons providing external assurance, the then Provost Marshal (Army) exercised his right as an independent authority to conclude the investigation phase of Operation Northmoor.

In line with normal Service Police practice, anyone interviewed under caution and any affected units were notified, once appropriate, that they would not be referred to prosecutors.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, on what date he announced that Operation Northmoor had been concluded; and how that official announcement made.

On 15 July 2019, following consultation with the Director of Service Prosecutions and with the concurrence of the independent persons providing external assurance, the then Provost Marshal (Army) exercised his right as an independent authority to conclude the investigation phase of Operation Northmoor.

In line with normal Service Police practice, anyone interviewed under caution and any affected units were notified, once appropriate, that they would not be referred to prosecutors.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the conclusions of Operation Northmoor.

On 15 July 2019, following consultation with the Director of Service Prosecutions and with the concurrence of the independent persons providing external assurance, the then Provost Marshal (Army) exercised his right as an independent authority to conclude the investigation phase of Operation Northmoor.

In line with normal Service Police practice, anyone interviewed under caution and any affected units were notified, once appropriate, that they would not be referred to prosecutors.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what communication Ministers in his Department have had with personnel under investigation as part of Operation Northmoor in relation to the conclusion of that investigation.

On 15 July 2019, following consultation with the Director of Service Prosecutions and with the concurrence of the independent persons providing external assurance, the then Provost Marshal (Army) exercised his right as an independent authority to conclude the investigation phase of Operation Northmoor.

In line with normal Service Police practice, anyone interviewed under caution and any affected units were notified, once appropriate, that they would not be referred to prosecutors.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the names of the schools that receive funding allocated by his Department for Combined Cadet Forces.

Every school hosting a Combined Cadet Force (CCF) unit receives funding from the Ministry of Defence. The majority of this support is provided indirectly through the supply of equipment, uniforms and stores, and the delivery of summer camps and training activities.

In addition, a small monetary grant, with the amount dependant on the number of cadets within the school's unit, is given directly to the school to assist with administration. The list of CCF schools is provided in the attached table.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the Community Cadet Forces centres in each local authority.

There are approximately 3,000 community cadet units across the UK comprising Sea Cadets, the Volunteer Cadet Corps, the Army Cadet Force and the Air Training Corps. These units are administered and supported in various ways by the single Service cadet HQs. However, locations of cadet units are not recorded by local authority and to determine this data would incur disproportionate cost.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, in which constituency each (a) base, (b) garrison and (c) barracks of each of the armed forces in (i) England, (ii) Wales, (iii) Scotland and (iv) Northern Ireland is located; and which of those bases are designated for use by (A) NATO and (B) US visiting forces.

A table showing which constituency each Ministry of Defence base, garrison and barracks is located within England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland is attached.

The database purely identifies areas of land owned or leased by the Ministry of Defence. Due to recent changes, the function of a site may differ from that shown in the database.

Bases designated for use by NATO in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland are as follows:

  • Allied Maritime Command (MARCOM) – Northwood Headquarters – South West Hertfordshire
  • NATO Joint Electronic Warfare Core Staff (JEWCS) – Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton – Yeovil
  • NATO Intelligence Fusion Centre (NIFC) – Royal Air Force Molesworth - North West Cambridgeshire
  • Deployed Communication Module Delta (DCMD), part of 1 NATO Signals Battalion – Blandford Camp – North Dorset
  • Head Quarter Allied Rapid Reaction Corps and Head Quarter 1st Signal Brigade – Imjin Barracks – Tewkesbury

Bases designated for use by the United States Visiting Forces (USVF) in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland are as follows:

  • Royal Air Force Alconbury - Huntingdon
  • Royal Air Force Barford St. John - Banbury
  • Royal Air Force Croughton – South Northamptonshire
  • Royal Air Force Fairford - The Cotswolds
  • Royal Air Force Feltwell - South West Norfolk
  • Royal Air Force Lakenheath - West Suffolk
  • Royal Air Force Menwith Hill – Skipton and Ripon
  • Royal Air Force Mildenhall - West Suffolk
  • Royal Air Force Molesworth - North West Cambridgeshire
  • Royal Air Force Welford - Newbury
  • Blenheim Crescent – Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Community Cadet Forces centres have closed from 2015 to date.

From 2015 to date, 125 community cadet units within the United Kingdom have closed across all Ministry of Defence sponsored cadet forces. Units close for a variety of reasons including insufficient numbers of adult volunteers and health and safety issues relating to buildings used. In some cases, two separate units may close and merge to form a single, larger unit which can allow cadets to participate in a greater range of activities.

During the same period, 64 new cadet units have opened in the community; there are approximately 3,000 such units in total.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have enlisted in the (a) Army, (b) Royal Air Force, (c) Royal Navy and (d) Royal Marines in each of the last five years, by constituency.

It is taking time to collate the information needed to respond to the hon. Member’s question. I will write to him as soon as it is available.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what plans he has to ensure that military personnel that are critical for national security are tested for covid-19.

The Ministry of Defence is using a range of measures, including testing, to mitigate the risk of COVID-19 to its personnel and staff.

Defence personnel are included within the national testing programme established by the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) and the National Health Service. Testing has also been incorporated into Defence's wider strategy of risk-reduction measures, collectively minimising the potential risk to personnel operating at home and overseas.

Defence has continued to maintain its critical operational outputs throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, in addition to supporting wider Government, the NHS and Devolved Administrations in their response to COVID-19 and will continue doing so wherever it is required.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the level of capacity for covid-19 testing of military personnel that are required to maintain full military capabilities.

Defence personnel are included within the national testing programme established and led by the Department for Health and Social Care and the National Health Service.

There is sufficient capacity and testing has been incorporated into Defence's wider strategy of risk-reduction measures to minimise the potential risk to personnel operating at home and overseas.

Defence has continued to maintain its operational output throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, in addition to supporting wider Government, the NHS and Devolved Administrations in their response to COVID-19 and will continue doing so wherever it is required.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the testing of the crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth for covid-19, if he will provide details of the other groups of military personnel that have been tested for that disease.

Testing has been incorporated into Defence's wider strategy of risk-reduction measures to minimise the potential risk to personnel deploying overseas.

Defence has continued to maintain its critical operational outputs throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, and carefully monitors the risk to all Defence personnel.

Figures for Armed Forces personnel who have been tested positive for COVID-19, or have been hospitalised, are included within the overall Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) figures. The Ministry of Defence does not routinely publish the number of tests administered to Defence personnel, nor the number of positive or negative cases of COVID-19.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many military personnel have been tested for covid-19; and of those how many have tested (a) positive and (b) negative.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is using a range of measures, including testing, to mitigate the risk of COVID-19 to its personnel and staff.

Defence personnel are included within the national testing programme established by Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) and the National Health Service, and testing has been incorporated into Defence's wider strategy of risk-reduction measures to minimise the potential risk to personnel deploying overseas.

Figures of Armed Forces personnel who have been tested positive for COVID-19 or have been hospitalised are included within the overall DHSC figures. The MOD does not routinely publish the number of tests administered to Defence personnel nor the number of positive and negative cases of COVID-19 within its workforce.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the former Secretary of State for Defence's keynote speech at the Sea Power Conference on 15 May 2019, what progress he has made on (a) commissioning and (b) setting a timescale for completion for work examining the lessons from the Mars tanker procurement; and if he will place a report of the findings of that work in the House of Commons Library.

For details of the schedule for the MARS (Tide Class) Tanker Learning from Experience report, I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the then Minister for Defence Procurement (Anne-Marie Trevelyan) on 4 September 2019 to Question 286672 to the right Hon. Member for North Durham (Kevan Jones).

I also refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Warley (John Spellar) on 18 May 2020 in response to Question 45955.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the defence implications of a satellite navigation system for the UK.

UK Armed Forces rely upon accurate Positioning, Navigation and Timing information for a variety of critical applications. We have privileged access to US GPS, the world's foremost GNSS system. The Ministry of Defence is committed to a systems-of-systems approach to managing PNT vulnerabilities; we are working across Government, including the UK Space Agency, to develop options for UK Assured PNT to maximise return on investment and meet Critical National Infrastructure requirements.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress he has made on the procurement of the Fleet Solid Support ships.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my noble Friend, the Minister of State at the Ministry of Defence (Baroness Goldie of Bishopton), on 10 March 2020 to Question HL2182 in the House of Lords.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will place in the House of Commons Library a copy of any advice his Department has (a) undertaken and (b) commissioned on the use of citriodiol as a treatment for covid-19.

I will write to the hon. Member about this, and place a copy of my letter in the Library of the House.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many military personnel have received citriodiol as protection against covid-19; and how much his Department has spent on that product.

Defence arranged for an initial supply of 36 bottles of Citriodiol to be provided to each of the 10 Joint Military Commands, at a total cost of £1,725.84. They now have the freedom to order supplies directly. It is not possible to confirm the number of personnel who have used the product.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, by what date the crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth will have been tested for covid-19.

All members of the ship's company of HMS Queen Elizabeth were tested for COVID-19 on Monday 27 April. The ship sailed for a planned period of Operational Sea Training on 29 April.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many military personnel have been tested for covid-19.

Defence personnel are included within the national testing programme established by Department for Health and Social Care and the National Health Service.

The central collation of data on COVID-19 testing of military personnel started from 18 April. Between 18 April and 29 April, a minimum of 1,222 military personnel were tested for COVID-19.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 18 May 2021 to Question 61, which were the three towns in Yorkshire and the Humber that Ministers decided not to invite to bid for funding under the Towns Fund.

Officials made a number of recommendations for ministers’ consideration. The selection process was robust, comprehensive and fair and it is right that where judgments were required, these were made by ministers.

The £4.8 billion Levelling Up Fund will support even more places across the UK to transform and future-proof their town centres and highstreets, by investing in infrastructure to improve everyday life.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to page 29 of the report published by the National Audit Office on 21 July 2020, entitled Review of the Town Deals selection process, for what reason 16 towns in Yorkshire and the Humber were selected to bid for funding under the Towns Fund when officials in his Department recommended that 19 towns in that region should be invited to bid.

The process for selecting Town Deals was designed by civil servants in the Department and agreed by previous Ministers. Regional spread was an important priority and Ministers therefore considered the priority towns by region. All towns in the highest priority group for each region were selected. Ministers then used their judgment and local knowledge to select those in the medium and lower priority groups. In making that judgment, Ministers looked at both opportunities arising from investment in the wider area, and potential job losses in the future. Ministers were responsible for qualitative judgments and took the final decisions.

The Department has published a summary of its Accounting Officer Assessment which sets out the details to this selection process here.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, for what reason four low priority areas in Yorkshire and the Humber were invited to bid for funding under the Towns Fund.

The selection criteria for Town Deals was set by officials and took into account a range of factors including deprivation, skills levels and exposure to economic shocks. From this list of eligible towns, Ministers selected the 101 towns invited to develop town deal proposals in line with advice from officials. It was appropriate that Ministers made the selection rather than officials, due to the need for qualitative judgement and accountability for decision-making.

The Department has published a summary of its Accounting Officer Assessment which sets out the details of this selection process here.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, for what reason Thurnscoe, Barnsley, Mexborough, Bolton-upon-Dearne, Rawmarsh and Wath-upon-Dearne were not invited to bid for Towns Fund funding when officials in his Department scored them higher for income deprivation than Goole, Whitby, Wakefield, Todmorden and Brighouse, which were invited to bid.

The selection criteria for Town Deals was set by officials and took into account a range of factors including deprivation, skills levels and exposure to economic shocks. From this list of eligible towns, Ministers selected the 101 towns invited to develop town deal proposals in line with advice from officials. It was appropriate that Ministers made the selection rather than officials, due to the need for qualitative judgement and accountability for decision-making.

The Department has published a summary of its Accounting Officer Assessment which sets out the details of this selection process here.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, for what reason Thurnscoe, Barnsley, Mexborough, Bolton-upon-Dearne, Rawmarsh and Wath-upon-Dearne were not invited to bid for Towns Fund funding when their total score, following an assessment by his officials of their need and growth potential, was higher than the scores for Whitby, Shipley, Wakefield, Todmorden, Stocksbridge, Brighouse and Morley, which were invited to bid.

The selection criteria for Town Deals was set by officials and took into account a range of factors including deprivation, skills levels and exposure to economic shocks. From this list of eligible towns, Ministers selected the 101 towns invited to develop town deal proposals in line with advice from officials. It was appropriate that Ministers made the selection rather than officials, due to the need for qualitative judgement and accountability for decision-making.

The Department has published a summary of its Accounting Officer Assessment which sets out the details of this selection process here.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the covid-19 pandemic, what steps he is taking to ensure (a) support and (b) protection for people sleeping rough.

MHCLG continues to work with local partners, including local authorities and local resilience forums, to assist preparedness to manage the potential impacts of the Covid-19 outbreak. We absolutely recognise the difficulties involved in self-isolation for people who are homeless. That is why Public Health England have now published further guidance for hostels and day centres. We are considering whether further action is required and are working with the sector to develop an appropriate response as a matter of urgency.

£1.6 billion of additional funding will go to local authorities to enable them to respond to other COVID-19 pressures across all the services they deliver, including stepping up support for homeless people.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what data will be regularly published by Homes England and to what schedule.

Homes England are committed to the government’s transparency agenda and regularly publishes information which includes:

Report

Publication Frequency

Content

Housing Statistics

Bi-annual

The report covers housing delivery, outlining the housing starts and completions within the period.

Help to Buy Housing Statistics

Annual

The report covers performance and financial delivery data.

Annual Report and Financial Statements

Annual

The report covers performance and financial delivery data.

Expenditure Transparency Report

Monthly

This report covers all transactions above £250.

Homes England Register of Interests

Annually and as additions are made.

Register of interests for the members of the Homes England board, committees and management team.

Help to Buy Equity Loan Statistics

Quarterly

This report covers quarterly data on the Help to Buy equity loan scheme, setting out the number of homes purchased and value of equity loans issued under the scheme in England.

Help to Buy Loan Repayment Statistics

Annual

The report covers data on the repayment of Help to Buy Loans.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he has issued guidance for housing sector professionals who regularly interact with other people following the declaration of the covid-19 pandemic.

MHCLG continues to work closely with local authorities to ensure they are prepared to deliver their statutory obligations under the Civil Contingencies Act 2004.

The Secretary of State has instructed officials to work with councils to support and maintain their public services, including housing provision via the COVID-19 Response fund, which has initially been set at £5 billion and provides funding so public services are prepared and protected.

Guidance has been issued to assist staff and employers in addressing COVID-19, in a hostel or day centre environment.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of whether the decision in Budget 2020 to increase funding for cladding remediation is compliant with the public accounting rules as set out in Managing Public Money.

On 11 March 2020 the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £1bn Building Safety Fund to support residential building safety remediation in the private and social sector. The fund will support building owners and landlords who are unable to meet the costs of unsafe non-ACM cladding remediation in buildings over 18 metres.

The scheme has only just been announced and we are currently assessing it in detail, prior to launch, to determine its compliance with the public accounting rules as set out in Managing Public Money.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, who was the Accounting Officer for his Department when the decision to include an additional £1 billion for removal of unsafe cladding for residential buildings above 18 metres in the Budget 2020, as set out in paragraph 1.185 of the Budget 2020 Redbook, was approved by his Department.

Jeremy Pocklington CB was appointed Acting Permanent Secretary on 27 February.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether homes funded under the new affordable homes programme from 2021-22 will be required to include a right to shared ownership.

Right to Shared Ownership will give many social housing tenants the opportunity to purchase a stake in their home and take their first step into home ownership.

At Budget we announced £12.2 billion of investment to build affordable homes, which is the biggest cash investment in affordable housing for a decade.

As a condition of this funding, homes built with it must have the Right to Shared Ownership attached.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 2 March 2020 to Question 20383 on Affordable Housing, whether the statistics on funding allocations include (a) affordable home ownership, (b) affordable rent and (c) social rented homes funded through the Shared Ownership and Affordable Housing Programme.

The Government is committed to increasing the supply of social housing and has made £9 billion available through the Affordable Homes Programme to March 2022 to deliver approximately 250,000 new affordable homes in a wide range of tenures, including Social Rent.

We do not break down funding by tenure for the programme however, new affordable home ownership, affordable rent and social rented homes have been funded through the Shared Ownership and Affordable Housing Programme 2016/21.

The Affordable Homes Programme supports councils and housing associations to build more genuinely affordable homes, in areas of acute affordability pressure, with at least 12,500 social rent homes to be delivered in high cost areas to support families struggling to pay their rent.

Further information on affordable housing supply may be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/affordable-housing-supply

Building on this, we announced at budget 2020 that we are investing £12 billion to build affordable homes between 2021/22 - 2025/26. This will be the biggest cash investment in affordable housing for a decade.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 4 February 2020 to Question 22361 on Affordable Housing, if he will publish data for the annual amount of grant funding allocated to affordable housing in (a) 2008-09 and (b) 2009-10.

MHCLG and its predecessor DCLG publicly publish accounts and financial statements going back to 2010/11 which can be accessed here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/247455/0971.pdf.

The overall investment in the 2008-11 National Affordable Housing Programme (NAHP) was £8 billion at the start of the programme, with a further £2.28 billion allocated to the programme for residual delivery in the 2011-15 Affordable Homes Programme (AHP) for a total of just over £10 billion.

Details of these amounts may be found at:

To provide data regarding the annual amount of grant funding allocated to affordable housing by the department in 2008/9 and 2009/10 internally would be at a disproportionate cost to the department. However, this data may also be found in the public domain at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-oscar-publishing-from-the-database.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much (a) development and (b) infrastructure finance has been allocated from the Home Building Fund, by each local authority.

The Home Building Fund supports developers to either directly build new homes or to deliver the infrastructure required to enable construction of housing to start on a site. It is a market-facing fund that is available for projects that are viable investments according to our published criteria, and it does not operate on a fixed bidding timetable. Homes England market the fund through continuous market engagement including with trade bodies such as the Home Builders Federation, and any developer is free to apply to the fund through the Homes England portal. There is no predetermined geographic allocation of funding and the consideration of individual transactions is based on investment criteria around viability.

Table 1 shows the investment committed directly to individual sites in each local authority area.

In addition to investment being made in individual sites or projects, a number of large-scale investment funds and national lending alliances have also been supported through the Home Building Fund. This investment is not allocated at local authority level, so a further £354 million development finance and £90 million infrastructure investment has been invested through these national vehicles.

This data is based on projects that have been supported by investment made through the Home Building Fund since its launch in October 2016.

Table 1. Home Building Fund Investment by Local Authority

Local Authority

Development Investment

Infrastructure Investment

Allerdale

4,225,324

Amber Valley

4,919,747

4,401,420

Ashfield

349,118

Ashford

2,350,000

49,585,923

Barnsley

2,054,248

Barrow-in-Furness

1,900,000

Basildon

-

Bassetlaw

1,489,000

3,943,113

Bedford

9,265,137

Birmingham

7,451,053

Blackburn with Darwen

9,279,790

Bolsover

5,874,325

Boston

3,229,275

Bracknell Forest

865,000

19,999,531

Bradford

9,914,991

Braintree

400,000

Bristol

24,314,371

Bromsgrove

-

Broxbourne

3,556,299

Broxtowe

3,268,136

Burnley

-

Cannock Chase

1,031,747

Cheltenham

-

Cheshire East

20,657,652

Cheshire West and Chester

13,609,937

Chesterfield

4,693,612

Chorley

610,097

Colchester

1,285,855

Copeland

-

Corby

-

36,758,320

Cornwall

10,743,668

County Durham

12,368,152

Coventry

8,838,081

Craven

5,860,393

Darlington

452,919

Daventry

851,291

Derby

-

Doncaster

4,683,711

-

Dudley

454,726

East Dorset

-

East Hampshire

5,701,257

26,882,064

East Lindsey

2,262,725

East Riding of Yorkshire

8,652,106

8,331,000

Exeter

148,905

Fylde

3,724,662

Gravesham

778,887

Guildford

2,117,553

Halton

748,483

Hambleton

11,899,834

Harborough

1,126,150

Harrogate

9,188,979

Hartlepool

5,377,417

Herefordshire

311,970

High Peak

1,486,137

Hounslow

5,830,189

Huntingdonshire

16,057,996

20,629,062

Hyndburn

381,435

Ipswich

16,433,396

Isle of Wight

4,457,039

Kings Lynn and West Norfolk

-

Kingston Upon Hull

889,976

Kirklees

9,197,126

Knowsley

-

Lambeth

4,827,758

Lancaster

6,745,455

Leeds

8,137,747

8,151,897

Leicester

3,152,066

Liverpool

-

London wide

30,000,076

Malvern Hills

1,420,000

Manchester

-

Mansfield

503,774

11,990,195

Medway Towns

7,638,070

Merton

21,210,179

Mid Devon

719,700

Mid Suffolk

-

Newark and Sherwood

542,149

Newcastle upon Tyne

7,039,878

Newcastle-under-Lyme

877,300

Newham

42,569,252

-

North Devon

7,340,225

-

North Dorset

3,113,766

North East Derbyshire

5,049,798

North East Lincolnshire

2,201,975

North Lincolnshire

930,298

17,084,996

North Norfolk

879,798

North Tyneside

805,347

North Warwickshire

1,471,000

North West Leicestershire

1,928,928

Northampton

775,136

Northumberland

10,747,043

Norwich

4,496,657

Nottingham

908,579

Oxford

-

Pendle

1,506,314

Peterborough

-

Plymouth

10,034,619

Preston

6,925,519

Redbridge

12,578,201

Redcar and Cleveland

1,327,636

Ribble Valley

3,651,603

Richmondshire

2,433,369

Rossendale

3,027,150

Rotherham

3,865,491

Rushcliffe

-

-

Rutland

2,000,000

Ryedale

48,214

Salford

58,501,305

3,207,462

Sandwell

7,843,328

Scarborough

3,886,435

3,000,396

Sedgemoor

1,180,142

Sefton

509,665

Sheffield

8,354,481

Shropshire

9,017,797

South Derbyshire

1,861,294

-

South Gloucestershire

-

South Hams

6,429,278

South Holland

2,751,122

South Kesteven

650,551

South Norfolk

426,719

South Oxfordshire

609,765

South Somerset

977,032

Southampton

5,163,290

6,703,161

St. Helens

5,711,227

Staffordshire Moorlands

2,559,640

Stockton-on-Tees

9,105,148

Stoke-on-Trent

3,943,242

Stratford-on-Avon

2,938,961

Stroud

1,098,678

Sunderland

15,856,615

Sutton

-

Swale

-

Tameside

-

Teignbridge

-

Telford and Wrekin

2,270,615

Torbay

-

Torridge

876,334

Vale of White Horse

10,154,011

Wakefield

2,968,661

Warrington

1,682,307

Watford

-

Wellingborough

1,443,000

68,435,581

West Berkshire

1,623,811

West Devon

1,400,756

West Dorset

-

West Lancashire

917,949

Weymouth and Portland

-

Wigan

6,542,029

Wiltshire

1,848,686

Winchester

2,579,916

Wirral

1,403,375

Wolverhampton

2,797,203

Wyre

1,433,525

York

500,207

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much funding in affordable housing grant has been paid to providers under Strategic Housing Partnerships in each quarter for which figures are available.

The Government does not publish how much grant funding for affordable housing is paid out through Strategic Partnerships on a quarterly basis.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much Housing Infrastructure Fund forward funding has been approved by each local authority.

The Housing Infrastructure Fund is a competitive £5.5 billion fund awarded to areas with the greatest housing need to support infrastructure projects that will unlock up to 650,000 homes. To date, circa £3 billion has been allocated across every English region to local authorities whose bids meet the funding criteria.

Information on Housing Infrastructure Fund spend is routinely published and can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/housing-infrastructure-fund.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much was spent on affordable housing grant by Homes England in 2018-19.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of additional homes delivered as a result of the Home Building Fund, by local authority.

The Home Building Fund provides lending through a number of vehicles including:

Directly to individual sites

Through a number of large investment funds (national)

Lending alliances (national)

Table 1, below, shows the number of homes completed in each local authority area and the proportion that are classed as additional.

Approximately 40 per cent of homes delivered through the Home Building Fund can be classed as additional supply.

The data that is provided for homes built through lending alliances and large investment funds is not provided at local authority level. Therefore, additional to the figures in the table below, a further 14,130 new homes have been built through these national vehicles. 5,652 of these homes would be classed as additional.

The data is based on projects that have been supported by the investment made through the Home Building Fund since its launch in October 2016.

Table 1. Home Building Fund Delivery by Local Authroity

Local Authority Area

Total completed homes

Proportion classed as additional

Allerdale

106

42

Amber Valley

82

33

Ashfield

12

5

Barnsley

36

14

Barrow-in-Furness

636

254

Bassetlaw

78

31

Bedford

200

80

Birmingham

80

32

Blackburn with Darwen

176

70

Bolsover

86

34

Boston

130

52

Bracknell Forest

28

11

Bradford

392

157

Braintree

40

16

Bristol

52

21

Broxbourne

6

2

Broxtowe

104

42

Cannock Chase

30

12

Cheshire East

1,016

406

Cheshire West and Chester

828

331

Chesterfield

224

90

Chorley

20

8

Cornwall

578

231

County Durham

710

284

Coventry

126

50

Craven

348

139

Doncaster

350

140

East Hampshire

32

13

East Lindsey

14

6

East Riding of Yorkshire

340

136

Exeter

12

5

Fylde

82

33

Gravesham

10

4

Guildford

18

7

Halton

10

4

Hambleton

356

142

Harborough

14

6

Harrogate

26

10

Hartlepool

168

67

Herefordshire

20

8

High Peak

68

27

Hounslow

314

126

Huntingdonshire

244

98

Ipswich

300

120

Isle of Wight

78

31

Kingston Upon Hull

36

14

Kirklees

226

90

Lambeth

240

96

Lancaster

272

109

Leeds

258

103

Leicester

304

122

Mansfield

12

5

Mid Devon

20

8

Newcastle-under-Lyme

28

11

Newcastle upon Tyne

378

151

Northampton

28

11

North Devon

140

56

North Dorset

10

4

North East Derbyshire

106

42

North East Lincolnshire

140

56

North Lincolnshire

6

2

North Tyneside

36

14

Northumberland

274

110

North Warwickshire

14

6

North West Leicestershire

262

105

Norwich

52

21

Nottingham

42

17

Pendle

48

19

Plymouth

322

129

Preston

54

22

Redbridge

630

252

Redcar and Cleveland

28

11

Ribble Valley

24

10

Richmondshire

40

16

Rossendale

74

30

Rotherham

48

19

Rutland

276

110

Salford

1,840

736

Sandwell

344

138

Scarborough

422

169

Sefton

14

6

Sheffield

826

330

Shropshire

376

150

Southampton

256

102

South Derbyshire

132

53

South Hams

14

6

South Holland

228

91

South Kesteven

64

26

South Norfolk

15

6

South Oxfordshire

12

5

South Somerset

14

6

Staffordshire Moorlands

62

25

St. Helens

86

34

Stockton-on-Tees

520

208

Stoke-on-Trent

552

221

Sunderland

772

309

Telford and Wrekin

60

24

Torridge

12

5

Vale of White Horse

256

102

Wakefield

216

86

Warrington

40

16

Wellingborough

60

24

West Lancashire

20

8

Wigan

146

58

Winchester

200

80

Wirral

6

2

Wolverhampton

228

91

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his oral contribution of 27 February 2020, Official report, column 509, if he will provide details of the annual amount of grant funding allocated to affordable housing in each of the last 10 financial years.

The Government is committed to increasing the supply of social housing and has made £9 billion available through the Affordable Homes Programme to March 2022 to deliver approximately 250,000 new affordable homes in a wide range of tenures.

The table below provides details on affordable homes programme funding since 2010. This data may also be found in the public domain at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-oscar-publishing-from-the-database

Financial Year

Affordable Homes Programme Expenditure

2010/11

£2,660,493,213

2011/12

£1,431,994,000

2012/13

£1,136,633,000

2013/14

£1,219,494,000

2014/15

£1,342,398,000

2015/16

£1,256,863,000

2016/17

£747,333,.000

2017/18

£1,308,730,000

2018/19

£1,670,312,000

The way in which our delivery partners Homes England and the Greater London Authority allocate this funding across the country is publicly available. To view the further allocations across England regions and local authorities please see the following:

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many homes have been built in national floodzone three in each of the last 10 years, by region.

The Department does not hold figures for the number of homes built in National Flood Zone 3.

Estimates of the numbers of new homes built in National Flood Zone 3 within each region can be obtained by comparing the percentage of new residential addresses created that were in National Flood Zone 3, with the number of new build completions by region as published in Table 118 at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/850826/Live_Table_118.xls.

A table has been provided giving percentages for each region for all homes built within National Flood Zone 3, from the beginning of the new data series in 2013-14 to the latest year available.

All local planning authorities are expected to follow the strict tests set out in national planning policy and guidance, which includes steering development away from high risk flood areas. Where development in flood risk areas is considered, national planning policy is clear that it should be safe, resilient and not increase flood risk anywhere. We have been clear that new housing is not appropriate and should not be allowed in a functional floodplain, where water has to flow or be stored in times of flood.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much of the Community Housing fund has been allocated.

The Community Housing Fund was launched in 2016. Over the four years that the Fund has been in existence, a total of £118,385,132 has been allocated to date by Homes England, or directly by MHCLG and its predecessor, the Department for Communities and Local Government. Allocations made by Homes England may differ from actual expenditure.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much funding has been allocated under the Shared Ownership and Affordable Homes Programme 2016 to 2021 to date in each (a) region and (b) local authority area.

The Government is committed to increasing the supply of social housing and has made £9 billion available through the Affordable Homes Programme to March 2022 to deliver approximately 250,000 new affordable homes in a wide range of tenures, including Social Rent.

The programme is delivered by our partners Homes England and the Greater London Authority (GLA), with £4.7 billion allocated to Homes England and £4.8 billion to the GLA.

The way in which Homes England and the GLA allocate this funding across the country is publicly available. To view the further allocations across England regions and local authorities please see the following:

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much funding has been allocated through the Community Housing Fund in each year for which figures are available, by local authority area.

In the attached, Table 1 shows the sums directly allocated from the Community Housing Fund by the Department (and its predecessor, the Department for Communities and Local Government) and Homes England over each of the four years that Fund has been in existence.

In 2016/17, grants were awarded by the Department directly to local authorities.

Over 2017/18, no grant was awarded from the Community Housing Fund.

The figures given in respect of grants allocated to the Greater London Authority in 2018/19 and 2019/20 represent allocations made directly by the Department in order to deliver the Community Housing Fund in London.

All remaining allocations in 2018/19 and 2019/20 were made by Homes England. The figures given in respect of allocations made by Homes England are the sums of the total grant allocated to the respective local authorities and the total grant allocated to community-based organisations within those respective local authority areas. These figures may differ from actual expenditure.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much of the housing infrastructure fund has been spent in each (a) region and (b) local authority.

The Housing Infrastructure Fund is a competitive £5.5 billion fun awarded to areas with the greatest housing need, to support infrastructure projects that will unlock up to 650,000 homes. To date, circa £3 billion has been allocated across every English region to local authorities whose bids meet the funding criteria.

Information on Housing Infrastructure fund spend is routinely published and can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/housing-infrastructure-fund.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to protect freeholders against service charges and other fees and charges.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and ensuring that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. The Government is aware that homeowners could be subject to a possession order or the granting of a lease of their home by the rentcharge owner over rentcharge arrears. As part of our leasehold reform work, we are moving forward with legislation to repeal Section 121 of the Law of Property Act 1925 to ensure homeowners are not subjected to unfair possession orders.

Furthermore, where people pay estate rentcharges, it is not right that these homeowners have limited rights to challenge these costs. That is why the Government intends to legislate to give freeholders on private and mixed-tenure estates equivalent rights to leaseholders to challenge the reasonableness of estate rent charges.

The Government also asked the Regulation of Property Agents working group, chaired by Lord Best, to look at how service charges for leaseholders - and estate rent charges for resident freehold homeowners - could be made more transparent. The group also considered in what circumstances other fees and charges, such as administration charges or permission fees which affect both leaseholders and freeholders, are justified or whether they should be capped or banned. The working group published its final report to in July 2019 (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/regulation-of-property-agents-working-group-report). We are considering?the report’s?recommendations and will announce next?steps in due course.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many and what proportion of local authorities have an up-to-date local plan.

It is essential for Local Planning Authorities to have up to date plan policies in place to plan for our housing needs and to provide clarity to communities and developers about where new homes should be built. It also helps ensure that development is planned for and is sustainable rather than the result of speculative applications.

There are 9 Local Planning Authorities (3 per cent) without an Local Plan adopted under the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 Act that have not yet submitted their first plan for Examination. Once plans have been adopted, it is down to Local Planning Authorities to determine if these are up to date. This is to ensure that policies remain relevant and effectively address the needs of the local community.

The Planning Inspectorate publishes Local Plan progress information at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/local-plans#monitoring-local-plan-progress.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what deadline he has set for all local authorities to have an up-to-date local plan.

It is essential for Local Planning Authorities to have up to date plan policies in place to plan for our housing needs and to provide clarity to communities and developers about where new homes should be built. It also helps ensure that development is planned for and is sustainable rather than the result of speculative applications.

There are 9 Local Planning Authorities (3 per cent) without an Local Plan adopted under the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 Act that have not yet submitted their first plan for Examination. Once plans have been adopted, it is down to Local Planning Authorities to determine if these are up to date. This is to ensure that policies remain relevant and effectively address the needs of the local community.

The Planning Inspectorate publishes Local Plan progress information at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/local-plans#monitoring-local-plan-progress.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will publish a copy of the standard agreement used by his Department for the allocation of private sector ACM remediation funding.

The funding agreements reached with applicants are bespoke to the circumstances of each building through negotiations between the applicant and delivery partner, and are commercially sensitive.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many and what proportion of Help to Buy, Equity Loan customers are in arrears, in each region of the UK.

At end November 2019 1,983 Help to Buy customers or 5.8 per cent of the total due to be paying interest fees, were in arrears. The large majority of customers in arrears are only one or two payments behind and this debt very largely reflects short-term administrative issues with direct debit set-up at the start of the interest fee paying period. Total interest fee arrears of £189,000 at end of November 2019 represent 2.7 per cent of total amounts charged to customer accounts.

The number of customer in arrears by region are: East Midlands – 221; East of England – 210; London – 103; North East – 174; North West – 352; South East – 270; South West – 182; West Midlands – 230; Yorkshire and the Humber – 241.



3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the reasons why some people have redeemed their Help to Buy equity loans; and what estimate he has made of future redemption rates.

Of the 221,362 Help to Buy equity loans issued by 31 March 2019, 30,645 or 13.8 per cent had been redeemed by that date. Of the 30,645 full redemptions to 31 March 2019, 49.5 per cent (15,184) occurred via the sale of the home and 50.5 per cent (15,461) via customers remaining in their home and paying off their loan by re-mortgaging or with other funds.

3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 3 February 2020 to Question 9589 on Homelessness: Finance, how much funding has been allocated to (a) Housing First pilots (b) the London Collaboration Project and (c) each of the smaller pilots and funding streams in 2020-21.

Funding allocations for 2020-21 for Housing First pilots, the London Collaboration Project and the Offender Accommodation Pilots are currently being finalised.

Regarding the Housing First pilots in 2019-20,?the Government has committed £7.9 million?to the project.

Regarding the London Collaboration Project, the Government committed £37.8 million to the project in 2018 over 4 years.

Regarding each of the smaller pilots and funding streams:

  • As part of the Rough Sleeping Strategy the Government committed £6.4 million to launch the Offender Accommodation Pilots to 2022.
  • The £11.2 million Rough Sleeping Impact Bond (SIB) is a payment-by-results programme so payment is made on delivery of outcomes agreed with MHCLG. The programme was established as part of the £50 million Homelessness Prevention Programme. Delivery began in October 2017 and will run until March 2021.
Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the title is of the programme of £437 million in funding that will be allocated to tackling homelessness; and how much will be allocated to each part of that programme.

In 2020/2021 we are providing £437 million to tackle homelessness and rough sleeping. This marks a £69 million increase in funding from the previous year.

Funding for 2020/21 is comprised of three main funding streams:

  • The Homelessness Reduction Grant: The £63 million fund provides funding to local authorities to support them implement the Homelessness Reduction Act and will enable local authorities to do more to prevent and relieve homelessness in their areas.
  • The Rough Sleeping Initiative: The £112 million fund is designed to support the establishment or enhancement of coordinated local services for rough sleepers, or those at risk of sleeping rough which would help prevent homelessness.
  • The Flexible Homelessness Support Grant: The £200 million fund will help local authorities plan and respond to their local homelessness pressures.

We are also funding:

  • Housing First pilots to provide rough sleepers with the most complex needs stable and affordable accommodation with intensive wrap-around support to help them recover from complex issues and sustain their tenancies.
  • London Collaboration Project which aims to become the main source of private rented sector accommodation to prevent and relieve homelessness in London.
  • A number of smaller pilots/funding streams such as the Offender Accommodation Pilot and Rough Sleeping Social Impact Bond.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many regulatory judgements were issued by the Regulator of Social Housing in relation to fire safety concerns since June 2017.

The Regulator of Social Housing sets standards that registered providers are required to meet - including that a landlord meets all applicable statutory requirements that provide for the health and safety of the occupants of their homes. Failure to comply with a standard may result in the regulator publishing a Regulatory Judgement or a Regulatory Notice depending on the nature of the failing.

In relation to fire safety, there was one Regulatory Notice against a housing association in 2017/18. There were five Regulatory Notices in 2018/19 (four housing associations and a local authority)


From 1 April 2019 to 31 March 2020 there were 13 Regulatory Notices issued in total (six housing associations and seven local authorities). In addition, there were 2 Regulatory judgements issued due to health and safety concerns, including fire safety.

From 1 April 2020 to date, no Regulatory Notices have been issued relating to fire safety.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Regulator of Social Housing in ensuring the fire safety of homes (a) owned and (b) managed by registered providers of social housing.

The Regulator of Social Housing sets standards that registered providers are required to meet - including that a landlord meets all applicable statutory requirements that provide for the health and safety of the occupants of their homes. Failure to comply with a standard may result in the regulator publishing a Regulatory Judgement or a Regulatory Notice depending on the nature of the failing.

In relation to fire safety, there was one Regulatory Notice against a housing association in 2017/18. There were five Regulatory Notices in 2018/19 (four housing associations and a local authority). In 2019/20 there has been 12 Regulatory Notices to date (five housing associations and seven local authorities).

The Regulator is operationally independent, but provides regular assurance to the department that its fundamental objectives are being delivered efficiently and effectively.

28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many complaints have been (a) made and (b) upheld to the Housing Ombudsman in relation to fire safety since June 2017.

Since June 2017 the Housing Ombudsman received 28 complaints in relation to “Fire Safety” which were within the Ombudsman’s formal remit for investigation.

A further one complaint received prior to 2017 was determined during this period. Of those, 6 were upheld – where the Ombudsman found maladministration, partial maladministration or mediated a settlement agreed by both parties.

20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his oral statement of 20 January 2020, how many additional buildings will be affected by the statement that ACM cladding with an unmodified polyethylene core should not be used on buildings at any height.

This information in relation to residential buildings is not currently held by the Department.

20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate has made of the (a) number of new buildings each year that will be required to fit sprinklers in the event that the height threshold for sprinklers is reduced to 11 metres and (b) cost to developers of that work.

We estimate that reducing the sprinkler height threshold from 30 metres to 18 metres as a requirement in new build blocks of flats will mean 1,970 new builds fitting sprinkler systems over 10 years, with an annual cost of between £27 million to £38 million. Reducing the height threshold further to, for example, 11 metres would mean 15,940 new buildings fitting systems over 10 years, with an annual cost of between £136 million and £193 million. A full impact assessment will be published alongside any future announcements.

20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when he plans to publish the Building Safety Bill.

The Government is committed to bringing forward a Building Safety Bill that delivers meaningful and lasting change as soon as practicable. Resident safety is paramount and we owe it to them to get this right.

The Government will also introduce a Fire Safety Bill in the coming weeks to put beyond doubt that building owners and managers of multi-occupied residential premises of any height are required to fully consider and mitigate the risks of any external wall systems and front doors to individual flats.

20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much additional funding his Department plans to allocate to the Health and Safety Executive for the establishment of the new Building Safety Regulator.

The Building Safety Regulator will receive the funding it needs to deliver its functions and my Department is working with the Health and Safety Executive to determine set-up and running costs. We intend to give the regulator the ability to recover some costs from those it regulates, as recommended by Dame Judith Hackitt’s independent review.

20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of buildings that are operating (a) waking watch and (b) other interim fire safety measures; and what the average cost is of the operation of those measures.

The Government has worked closely with local authorities and Fire and Rescue Services to ensure that interim safety measures are in place, where necessary, in all high-rise residential buildings with unsafe ACM cladding, until the cladding is replaced. Details of these buildings can be found in the Building Safety Programme monthly data release here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/building-safety-programme-monthly-data-release-december-2019

The Department does not hold information on costs or other types of buildings with interim safety measures.

20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his oral statement of 20 January 2020 in relation to the commissioning of a matrix of risk that will (a) replace the existing system and (b) underpin future regulatory regimes, who he plans to commission to undertake that work; if he will publish the terms of reference for that work; and what the timeframe is for the (i) completion and (ii) publication of that work.

We are working closely with the Protection board and the Independent Expert Advisory Panel on this work. The Department has recently published a call for evidence asking for information on how to prioritise risk in existing buildings. Following from the call for evidence we will commission a comprehensive research program in March. The specification for this work will be published in accordance with standard procurement procedures.

15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his oral contribution of 5 September 2019, Official Report, col 373, how many owners of buildings with dangerous ACM cladding have been named and shamed.

As of 31 December 2019, out of the 92 buildings in scope for the private sector remediation fund, 82 have submitted applications. The Department will continue to closely monitor the remediation of buildings. From next month the Department will name those responsible for buildings where remediation is not started.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, by what date the Government will publish a draft bill on leasehold reform.

The Government is committed to publishing a draft bill on leasehold reform and will inform Parliament of publication timings in due course.

13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when he plans to publish proposals on energy efficiency standards for work carried out in existing dwellings.

The Government has committed to introduce a Future Homes Standard by 2025. This means new homes will be future proofed, with low carbon heating and lower energy use through high levels of energy efficiency. We propose that new homes built to the Future Homes Standard from 2025 should have carbon dioxide emissions up to 80 per cent lower than those built to current building regulations standards.

We are currently consulting on a meaningful and achievable increase to the energy efficiency standards for new homes to be introduced through the Building Regulations in 2020, as a stepping stone to this commitment. The preferred option is to set a standard that should result in a 31 per cent reduction in CO2 emissions.

A further consultation will follow, in the coming months, proposing changes to the energy efficiency standards for non-domestic buildings and for building work to existing homes and non-domestic buildings; and on preventing overheating in new buildings.

22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many criminal cases brought against a member of the armed forces received funding from the public purse on legal representation for the complainant from 2010 to 2020.

This information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many civil cases relating to allegations of wrongdoing by a member of the armed forces received funding from the public purse for legal representation for the complainant from 2010 to 2020.

This information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much has been spent from the public purse on legal representation for complainants on (a) criminal and (b) civil cases in relation to allegations of wrongdoing by members of the armed forces since 2010.

This information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)