John Healey Portrait

John Healey

Labour - Wentworth and Dearne

First elected: 1st May 1997

Shadow Secretary of State for Defence

(since April 2020)

1 APPG membership (as of 24 Jan 2024)
Transatlantic Trade
Shadow Secretary of State for Housing
9th Jan 2018 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Secretary of State for Housing
7th Oct 2016 - 9th Jan 2018
Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government) (Housing and Planning)
14th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Secretary of State for Health
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Shadow Minister (Housing)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Minister of State (Department for Communities and Local Government) (Housing)
5th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
2nd Nov 2007 - 12th Oct 2009
Minister of State (Department of Communities and Local Government) (Local Government)
29th Jun 2007 - 5th Jun 2009
Tax Law Rewrite Bills (Joint Committee)
20th Dec 2004 - 12th Jan 2009
Public Accounts Committee
20th Jul 2005 - 19th Nov 2007
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th May 2005 - 28th Jun 2007
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th May 2002 - 10th May 2005
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education and Skills)
11th Jun 2001 - 30th May 2002
Employment Sub-committee
23rd Jul 1997 - 29th Nov 1999
Education & Employment
14th Jul 1997 - 29th Nov 1999


Department Event
Wednesday 6th March 2024
09:25
Ministry of Defence
Sixth Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
6 Mar 2024, 9:25 a.m.
The draft Single Source Contract (Amendment) Regulations 2024
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Wednesday 6th March 2024
09:25
Ministry of Defence
Sixth Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - Select & Joint Committees
6 Mar 2024, 9:25 a.m.
The draft Single Source Contract (Amendment) Regulations 2024
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Monday 25th March 2024
14:30
Ministry of Defence
Oral questions - Main Chamber
25 Mar 2024, 2:30 p.m.
Defence (including Topical Questions)
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Division Votes
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 150 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 179 Noes - 294
Speeches
Monday 26th February 2024
Situation in the Red Sea
I thank the Defence Secretary for advance sight of his statement. We accept that the weekend’s airstrikes were legal, limited, …
Written Answers
Thursday 29th February 2024
Armed Forces: Recruitment
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of changes …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 18th March 2015
WENTWORTH WOODHOUSE IN ROTHERHAM, SOUTH YORKSHIRE
That this House commends the current plans to secure the future of one of the grandest stately homes in England, …
Bills
Tuesday 2nd July 2013
Letting Agents (Competition, Choice and Standards) Bill 2013-14
A Bill to establish a national mandatory licensing scheme for letting and managing agents, with established standards and redress for …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th October 2023
8. Miscellaneous
From 12 July 2023, Executive Committee Member of the British American Parliamentary Group. This is an unpaid role.
EDM signed
Monday 17th July 2017
SOCIAL SECURITY
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Loans for Mortgage Interest Regulations 2017 (S.1., 2017, …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 25th January 2017
Town and Country Planning (Electricity Generating Consent) Bill 2016-17
A Bill to make provision about the disclosure, consideration and approval of proposals for onshore electricity power stations of 50MW …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, John Healey has voted in 617 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All John Healey Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Ben Wallace (Conservative)
(92 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(35 debate interactions)
James Heappey (Conservative)
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
(26 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Defence
(196 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(26 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all John Healey's debates

Wentworth and Dearne Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Wentworth and Dearne signature proportion
John Healey has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by John Healey

17th July 2017
John Healey signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 17th July 2017

SOCIAL SECURITY

Tabled by: Jeremy Corbyn (Independent - Islington North)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Loans for Mortgage Interest Regulations 2017 (S.1., 2017, No. 725), dated 5 July 2017, a copy of which was laid before this House on 6 July, be annulled.
50 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Mar 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 43
Independent: 4
Scottish National Party: 2
Green Party: 1
6th March 2017
John Healey signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 6th March 2017

SOCIAL SECURITY

Tabled by: Jeremy Corbyn (Independent - Islington North)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Universal Credit (Housing Costs Element for claimants aged 18 to 21) (Amendment) Regulations 2017 (S.I., 2017, No. 252), dated 2 March 2017, a copy of which was laid before this House on 3 March, be annulled.
86 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Apr 2017)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 53
Labour: 26
Independent: 5
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 1
Green Party: 1
View All John Healey's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by John Healey, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


9 Urgent Questions tabled by John Healey

Tuesday 19th December 2023
Tuesday 5th December 2023
Tuesday 28th November 2023
Tuesday 24th October 2023
Thursday 27th April 2023
Wednesday 11th May 2022
Tuesday 21st September 2021
Tuesday 10th November 2020

John Healey has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by John Healey


A Bill to establish a national mandatory licensing scheme for letting and managing agents, with established standards and redress for landlords, tenants and leaseholders, and prohibition of letting and management agent fees; to enable local authorities to administer and enforce the scheme; to require that tenants, landlords and leaseholders have written agreements; and to empower local authorities, either alone or in partnership, to trade as letting and managing agents.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 2nd July 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision to introduce leave, pay and allowance arrangements for parents of children born to surrogate mothers equal to those available to parents whose children are born to them; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 17th April 2012

3903 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the Answer of 27 June 2022 to Question 26698 and with reference to the Answer given by the Secretary of State for Defence on 27 June 2022 to Question 23221, if she will set out how many meetings of the National Security Council she has attended since April 2022.

The National Security Council is a committee of the Cabinet. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly

28th Jun 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many meetings of the National Security Council she has attended since April 2022.

The National Security Council is a committee of the Cabinet. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the cost of photography services to his Department provided by external contractors was in each year since 2010.

Non-campaign photography tasks are undertaken by internal staff as part of their routine work and everyday roles and do not get billed separately. This service comes at no extra cost to the taxpayer.

The Cabinet Office does pay external organisations to provide photography and videography for our various cross-government communication campaigns. However isolated spend data on these specific services is not split out from wider campaign costs.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what his planned timeline for when all eligible personnel under the (a) Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and (b) Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme will be relocated from Pakistan to the UK.

The UK has made an ambitious and generous commitment to help at-risk people in Afghanistan and, so far, we have brought around 24,600 people to safety, including over 21,600, people eligible for the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) and the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) schemes, as of September 2023. The Government is committed to relocating all eligible persons who remain in Pakistan and third countries as soon as possible.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
29th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much his Department spent on photography at Ministerial (a) events, (b) visits, and (c) meetings in each month since October 2022.

These tasks are undertaken by internal staff as part of their routine work and everyday roles. They do not get billed separately. This service comes at no extra cost to the taxpayer.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
28th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 27 November 2023 to Question 3092 on Veterans: Finance, whether the £10m funding for the Veterans’ Places, Pathways, and People Programme is drawn from his Department’s pre-existing budget.

The £10 million of funding for the Veterans’ Places, Pathways, and People Programme is additional money and is not from the Department’s pre-existing budget. This funding will be used to increase support to a significant community of vulnerable veterans throughout the UK, and will be spent over three financial years.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to paragraph 5.6 of the Autumn Statement 2023, CP977, whether the £10 million commitment to support veterans is new funding.

The £10 million commitment to support veterans is new funding for the Veterans’ Places, Pathways and People Programme, which will increase support to a significant community of vulnerable veterans throughout the UK. The funding will be spent over three financial years 2024-2025, 2025-2026 and 2026-2027.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much his Department has spent on veterans homelessness support in each month of 2023.

To date, the Government has committed nearly £30m towards ending veteran homelessness, including:

  • £20m capital housing fund over three years to provide extra housing for veterans through the development of new builds and the refurbishment of social and charitable housing.

  • £500k to fund Op FORTITUDE, a dedicated referral scheme to provide a single central point for local authorities, charities and housing providers to support homeless and rough sleeping veterans, in addition to over £7.2m to fund specialist help for veterans in more than 900 veteran supported housing units.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress his Department has made towards ending veteran homelessness.

To date, the Government has committed nearly £30m towards ending veteran homelessness, including:

  • £20m capital housing fund over three years to provide extra housing for veterans through the development of new builds and the refurbishment of social and charitable housing.

  • £500k to fund Op FORTITUDE, a dedicated referral scheme to provide a single central point for local authorities, charities and housing providers to support homeless and rough sleeping veterans, in addition to over £7.2m to fund specialist help for veterans in more than 900 veteran supported housing units.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
21st Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of homeless veterans have secured accommodation through the Reducing Veteran Homelessness Programme in each region.

To date, the Government has committed nearly £30m towards ending veteran homelessness, including:

  • £20m capital housing fund over three years to provide extra housing for veterans through the development of new builds and the refurbishment of social and charitable housing.

  • £500k to fund Op FORTITUDE, a dedicated referral scheme to provide a single central point for local authorities, charities and housing providers to support homeless and rough sleeping veterans, in addition to over £7.2m to fund specialist help for veterans in more than 900 veteran supported housing units.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
11th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 2 May to question 182778 on Refugees: Afghanistan, on what dates the Minister for Veterans' Affairs met other ministers on Afghan resettlement since 2 February 2023.

It has been the standard practice of successive Administrations not to publish granular information relating to ministerial meetings. I remain committed to engaging with colleagues across government to support Afghans who have been resettled in the UK to access independent accommodation.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
11th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 9 May 2023 to Question 183317 on Capita: Cybercrime, what his Department's (a) policies on and (b) processes for informing (i) public sector employees and (ii) other individuals affected by a breach of Government data are.

The Cabinet Office takes personal data breaches very seriously. As part of standard procedure, the Cabinet Office advises that all Cabinet Office employees must immediately report breaches to the Security Team and Data Protection Officer. Any breach that meets the legal tests set out in UK GDPR will be reported to the Information Commissioner or data subjects within the statutory deadlines.

It is our policy that data subjects will usually be notified of any incident pertaining to their personal data. Agreements with delivery partner(s) and 3rd party suppliers must stipulate the arrangements and obligations for ensuring that there is an established, effective and timely process to identify and report any actual or suspected losses of data/information by the ‘provider’.

10th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 9 May 2023 to Question 183317 on Capita: Cybercrime, whether any (a) civilian and (b) military personnel data was affected by the cyber attack.

The Cabinet Office, the Financial Conduct Authority and the National Cyber Security Center (NCSC) are working with Capita to understand any risks to government data following the incident in March. Investigations, including client consultation, are ongoing and it would not be appropriate to comment on the detail for security reasons.

3rd May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many meetings the Minister for Veterans' Affairs has had with Ministers responsible for Afghan schemes since 2 February 2023.

I refer my Rt Hon. Friend to the answer given to his question on 2nd May 2023 (182778).

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
2nd May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the cyber attack against Capita on 31 March 2023, whether his Department believe Russian hackers were responsible for the incident.

The Cabinet Office, the Financial Conduct Authority and the National Cyber Security Center (NCSC) are working with Capita to understand any risks to government data following the incident in March. Investigations, including client consultation are ongoing and it would not be appropriate to comment on the detail for security reasons.

2nd May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the cyber attack against Capita discovered on 31 March 2023, what personal data was accessed following this attack.

The Cabinet Office, the Financial Conduct Authority and the National Cyber Security Center (NCSC) are working with Capita to understand any risks to government data following the incident in March. Investigations, including client consultation are ongoing and it would not be appropriate to comment on the detail for security reasons.

2nd May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the cyber attack against Capita on discovered on 31 March 2023, whether his Department has identified any personal information of defence personnel for sale online following that incident.

The Cabinet Office, the Financial Conduct Authority and the National Cyber Security Center (NCSC) are working with Capita to understand any risks to government data following the incident in March. Investigations, including client consultation are ongoing and it would not be appropriate to comment on the detail for security reasons.

2nd May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, on what date the cyber attack against Capita on 31 March 2023 was reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office.

The Cabinet Office, the Financial Conduct Authority and the National Cyber Security Center (NCSC) are working with Capita to understand any risks to government data following the incident in March. Investigations, including client consultation are ongoing and it would not be appropriate to comment on the detail for security reasons.

2nd May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 24 April to Question 181691, on Capita: Cybercrime, when he expects his Department's investigation into the Capita cyber attack to conclude.

The Cabinet Office, the Financial Conduct Authority and the National Cyber Security Center (NCSC) are working with Capita to understand any risks to government data following the incident in March. Investigations, including client consultation are ongoing and it would not be appropriate to comment on the detail for security reasons.

2nd May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether any personal information of (a) civilian and (b) military personnel working at (i) fire and rescue services, (ii) the submarine training facility and (iii) other Capita defence sites were affected by the cyber attack against Capita on 31 March 2023.

The Cabinet Office, the Financial Conduct Authority and the National Cyber Security Center (NCSC) are working with Capita to understand any risks to government data following the incident in March. Investigations, including client consultation are ongoing and it would not be appropriate to comment on the detail for security reasons.

26th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 25 April 2023 to Question 180997 on Refugees: Afghanistan, how many meetings the Minister for Veterans Affairs has held with relevant Ministers responsible for Afghan schemes since 2 February 2023.

The Minister for Veterans’ Affairs has held various meetings with ministers, advisors and officials regarding Afghan resettlement since February 2023, and continues to engage with colleagues across government as we intensify our support to Afghans who have been resettled in the UK to access independent accommodation.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
17th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the oral contribution of 28 March 2023 by the Minister for Veterans Affairs on Afghan Resettlement Update, Official Report, column 847, on what date the Prime Minister asked the Minister to put together plans to end the practice of Afghan families living in bridging hotels.

On 28 March, I set out the Government’s intention to increase our support to Afghans who have been resettled in the UK to access independent accommodation and thereby end the use of temporary bridging hotels for this cohort.

Recognising that this will require a sustained cross-Government effort, on 2 February 2023, the Prime Minister asked me to lead on convening departments that are responsible for the delivery of this work from within the Cabinet Office. Secretaries of State and Ministers remain accountable for their respective policy briefs.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
17th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the Minister for Veterans Affairs’ responsibilities are for the (a) Afghan Relations and Assistance Policy and (b) Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme personnel and their families.

On 28 March, I set out the Government’s intention to increase our support to Afghans who have been resettled in the UK to access independent accommodation and thereby end the use of temporary bridging hotels for this cohort.

Recognising that this will require a sustained cross-Government effort, on 2 February 2023, the Prime Minister asked me to lead on convening departments that are responsible for the delivery of this work from within the Cabinet Office. Secretaries of State and Ministers remain accountable for their respective policy briefs.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
21st Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 7 February to Question 138263 on Defence, when he plans to publish the update to the Integrated Review.

As the Chancellor set out in the Autumn Statement, the Government is updating the Integrated Review. The date of publication for this will be confirmed in due course.

12th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Prime Minister has appointed a Defence Industrial Adviser.

The Defence Industrial Adviser was a temporary role appointed in September 2022 which came to an end in December last year, and which was created under the previous administration. As planned, the responsibilities have reverted back to the previous office holders.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
29th Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the National Resilience Strategy will be published.

We intend to publish early in 2023.

27th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether it is the government’s policy to continue with the Integrated Review announced by the previous government.

The Government has decided to continue with the Integrated Review refresh. The date of publication will be confirmed in due course.

19th Oct 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, whether she has any plans to appoint a dedicated Space Minister.

My hon. Friend, the Member for Wealden (Nusrat Ghani), is the Minister of State (Minister for Science and Investment Security) at the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and has responsibility for these matters. A summary of her responsibilities can be found on gov.uk here: Minister of State (Minister for Science and Investment Security) - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 27 June 2022 to Question 23221 on Military Aid: Ukraine, how many meetings of the National Security Council he has personally attended since April 2022.

The National Security Council is a committee of the Cabinet. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

28th Jun 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 27 June 2022 to Question 23221, on Ukraine: Military Aid, how many meetings of the National Security Council have taken place since April 2022; and how many he has attended since that date.

The National Security Council is a committee of the Cabinet. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

7th Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he will publish the national resilience strategy.

The Integrated Review, published in March 2021, set a goal to strengthen the UK’s national resilience. The Integrated Review also committed to the development of a new Resilience Strategy to set out a new vision and approach to support improvements to our national resilience. Following a successful Call for Evidence in the summer of last year, the government plans to publish the Strategy in spring 2022.

19th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the terms of reference for the independent review into the historic treatment of LGBT armed forces service personnel.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Secretary of State for Defence have commissioned an independent Review into the impact of the pre 2000 ban on homosexuality in the Armed Forces. The Review will look at the experiences of former LGBT service personnel, and make evidence-based recommendations, including on how the Government can better tailor support to the LGBT veteran community. An independent Chair will be announced shortly, after which the full terms of reference will be published and the Review can commence. As the Review is independent, we cannot comment on potential findings and recommendations that it may make.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the independent review into the historic treatment of LGBT armed forces service personnel will consider appropriate compensation for those affected.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Secretary of State for Defence have commissioned an independent Review into the impact of the pre 2000 ban on homosexuality in the Armed Forces. The Review will look at the experiences of former LGBT service personnel, and make evidence-based recommendations, including on how the Government can better tailor support to the LGBT veteran community. An independent Chair will be announced shortly, after which the full terms of reference will be published and the Review can commence. As the Review is independent, we cannot comment on potential findings and recommendations that it may make.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the chair of the independent review into the historic treatment of LGBT of armed forces service personnel will be announced.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Secretary of State for Defence have commissioned an independent Review into the impact of the pre 2000 ban on homosexuality in the Armed Forces. The Review will look at the experiences of former LGBT service personnel, and make evidence-based recommendations, including on how the Government can better tailor support to the LGBT veteran community. An independent Chair will be announced shortly, after which the full terms of reference will be published and the Review can commence. As the Review is independent, we cannot comment on potential findings and recommendations that it may make.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the independent review into the historic treatment of LGBT armed forces personnel will (a) open and (b) publish its findings.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Secretary of State for Defence have commissioned an independent Review into the impact of the pre 2000 ban on homosexuality in the Armed Forces. The Review will look at the experiences of former LGBT service personnel, and make evidence-based recommendations, including on how the Government can better tailor support to the LGBT veteran community. An independent Chair will be announced shortly, after which the full terms of reference will be published and the Review can commence. As the Review is independent, we cannot comment on potential findings and recommendations that it may make.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will list the budget for the Office for Veterans Affairs for each year from 2019-20 to 2024-25.

The Office for Veterans’ Affairs (OVA) was set up in October 2019 and annual spending has been as follows:

2019/20: £50k (actual spend)

Represents initial set-up costs following the OVA’s establishment in October 2019, part-way through the financial year.

2020/21: £1.6m (actual spend)

Reflects expenditure on building OVA capability and capacity during this period, and the impact of the COVID pandemic on delivery.

2021/22: £4.4m (forecast spend)

In addition to full year expenditure, the OVA is working with the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust to distribute a further £5 million through the Afghanistan Veterans Fund, as announced by the Prime Minister in September 2021.

The budgets for 2022-23 and future years are not yet confirmed and will be set in accordance with the department's annual process of business planning. The OVA will also deliver the £5m Veterans Health Innovation Fund in 2022/23, as announced at the Budget in October 2021.

The budget allocated to the OVA represents only part of the Government's wider support for veterans. The Veterans’ Strategy Action Plan, launched on 19 January 2022, outlines over 60 commitments funded by over £70 million from departments across Government, including initiatives on health and wellbeing, employment opportunities, digitalisation of services, and enhanced research and data. These commitments build on recent progress and support including the National Insurance contribution holiday for employers of Service leavers, and the introduction of the Veterans Railcard.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the £5 million boost for armed forces charities announced by the Government on 6 September 2021, how much and what proportion of that funding has been distributed to armed forces charities; how many of those charities have received additional funding from that £5 million; and how much each of those charities has received.

The £5 million additional funding for Armed Forces charities is being delivered via the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust through an open competition. Applications opened on 13 December 2021 and will close on 17 January 2022. Applications will be assessed after this date and the successful charities will be notified in due course. Charities who wish to submit applications can do so via https://covenantfund.org.uk/.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the number of former service personnel sleeping rough each year since 2010.

Current evidence does not show that veterans are more likely to become homeless or sleep rough than the general population.

Less than 1% (0.9%) of households sleeping rough and seeking government support in England in 2020/21 have at least one household member who has served in the Armed Forces.

The government has put support in place to help veterans to access housing. The government has produced new guidance for Local Authorities to ensure veterans are not disadvantaged by their service when applying for social housing, as well as removing the local connection test to assist the transition into civilian accommodation.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many Government contracts there have been where Departments have sought and (a) received and (b) not received assurances regarding contractor’s tax affairs, by Department, since 2014-15.

This information is not held centrally.

2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the figures published by his Department in January 2019 on Population projections: UK armed forces veterans residing in Great Britain 2016 to 2018, whether he plans to publish more recent figures.

For the first time, a question was added to the England and Wales census asking respondents if they have previously served in the UK Armed Forces. A range of new statistics on the veteran population will be published by the Office for National Statistics once the data collected from the census is analysed, including the total number of veterans residing in England and Wales. In Scotland, the census will be carried out in 2022, and will also include a question asking respondents whether they have previously served. In Northern Ireland, the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) will collect data on the total number of veterans in Northern Ireland and the 11 Local Government Districts.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 41 of his Department’s Integrated Review 2021, how many critical vulnerabilities in the cyber systems of the public sector has the National Cyber Security Centre addressed as at 13 May 2021.

It is for each public sector organisation to remediate vulnerabilities in their systems and this information is not held centrally. This is achieved through activities such as designing systems to be secure, regularly patching, continuous monitoring, security testing and vulnerability disclosure programmes. The NCSC and Cabinet Office provide expert advice and guidance to help public sector organisations address critical vulnerabilities.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what (a) policy, (b) administrative and (c) advisory support the civil service provides to select committees.

The civil service does not provide policy, administrative or advisory support to select committees.

The Government supports the work of select committees by providing information and evidence to their inquiries.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of recent trends in the rate of unemployment among veterans.

Veterans offer a vast range of skills and talent to civilian employers and the Government recognises that having a job is one of the key foundations for those leaving the Armed Forces to transition into civilian life. This is why the Government is taking a number of steps to support veterans into employment such as making it easier to join the Civil Service and introducing a national insurance tax break for their employers. The MOD’s Careers Transition Partnership supports Service leavers entering the job market. Of the 2018/19 UK regular service leavers who used a CTP service, and reported their employment outcomes, 86% were employed, 8% economically inactive, and 6% unemployed six months after using the service.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
12th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department is taking to help prevent suicide among veterans.

In January 2019, the Government published the first Cross-Government Suicide Prevention Workplan, which sets out an ambitious programme across national and local government and the NHS. This includes actions being taken forward by MoD and NHS England for veterans and armed service personnel. The Government has committed to publishing an updated workplan and progress report against the National Strategy, expected in Spring 2021.

The majority of veterans successfully access mental health programmes available to the general population through the NHS, however for those veterans who need extra support, the NHS in England offers bespoke and specialist mental health services, which benefit from over £10m investment per year. Recent months have seen the rollout of the new NHS England High Intensity Service, which will provide further specialist care for veterans with acute mental health needs or who are in a mental health crisis. The Government has also provided £6 million in funding to support 100 service charities during the Covid-19 pandemic, including charities supporting veterans with their mental health.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 10 March 2020 to Question 25623 on Grenfell Tower Inquiry: Public Appointments, if he will place in the Library a copy of the contract entered into with the search company appointed to recruit a replacement panel member.

As part of the Government transparency agenda, it is a legal requirement for central Government Departments to publish all awarded contracts over £10,000 in value on the Contracts Finder website. Once a contract for this recruitment has been finalised and signed it will be published in the usual way.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 10 March 2020 to Question 25623 on Grenfell Tower Inquiry: Public Appointments, which search company has been engaged to identify a shortlist of candidates; and by what date that company has been asked to return a shortlist.

Further announcements will be made in the usual way.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 10 March 2020 to Question 25623, if he has set a deadline for a replacement panel member to be appointed.

Further announcements will be made in the usual way.

5th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when a new panel member will be appointed to the Grenfell Tower inquiry; and what discussions he has with people affected by the Grenfell Tower fire on that appointment.

In February, the Prime Minister, as Sponsor Minister for the Grenfell Tower Inquiry, wrote to the Inquiry Chair to confirm his intention to appoint a replacement panel member. He also confirmed that Cabinet Office officials would engage a search company to identify a shortlist of candidates.

As soon as a suitable new panel member has been identified, the Prime Minister will write to the Inquiry Chair to seek his consent to the appointment as required by the Inquiries Act. The successful candidate will be announced once the process has been completed so they start work as soon as possible.

3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 3 February 2020 to Question 8952 on Public Appointments: Standards, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the due diligence process for appointments to the panels of statutory public inquiries following the resignation of Benita Mehra from her role as a panel member on the Grenfell Tower Inquiry.

Due diligence and consideration of conflicts of interest are important parts of any appointment process. The Inquiries Act 2005 sets out the suitability and impartiality requirements of inquiry panel appointments. Appointments to statutory public inquiries are made in accordance with the Act.



Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the due diligence process for public appointments following the resignation of Benita Mehra from her role as a panel member on the Grenfell Tower Inquiry.

Ms Mehra's appointment was not a public appointment. She was appointed to the panel of a statutory public inquiry in line with the Inquiries Act 2005.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
14th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of its re-export controls on the sales of surplus military equipment.

The UK system is based on having a thorough risk-assessment process for the original export licence before the goods leave the UK. Export licence applicants are required to inform us of any intention to re-export the goods at the time of submitting their export licence application. It is an offence for an export licence applicant to knowingly make a statement which is false, and any licence granted on the basis of this would become void. This encourages exporters to be clear on their export licence applications about known re-exports to third countries.

We can and do refuse applications where there is a planned re-export that is inconsistent with the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria, or where we assess that the goods may be diverted to an undesirable destination.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department is taking steps to monitor the re-export of defence equipment sold as surplus to requirements.

The UK system is based on having a thorough risk-assessment process for the original export licence before the goods leave the UK. Export licence applicants are required to inform us of any intention to re-export the goods at the time of submitting their export licence application. It is an offence for an export licence applicant to knowingly make a statement which is false, and any licence granted on the basis of this would become void. This encourages exporters to be clear on their export licence applications about known re-exports to third countries.

We can and do refuse applications where there is a planned re-export that is inconsistent with the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria, or where we assess that the goods may be diverted to an undesirable destination.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what controls her Department places on the re-export of military equipment sold as surplus to requirements.

The UK system is based on having a thorough risk-assessment process for the original export licence before the goods leave the UK. Export licence applicants are required to inform us of any intention to re-export the goods at the time of submitting their export licence application. It is an offence for an export licence applicant to knowingly make a statement which is false, and any licence granted on the basis of this would become void. This encourages exporters to be clear on their export licence applications about known re-exports to third countries.

We can and do refuse applications where there is a planned re-export that is inconsistent with the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria, or where we assess that the goods may be diverted to an undesirable destination.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps her Department is taking to monitor the re-export of defence equipment.

The UK system is based on having a thorough risk-assessment process for the original export licence before the goods leave the UK. Export licence applicants are required to inform us of any intention to re-export the goods at the time of submitting their export licence application. It is an offence for an export licence applicant to knowingly make a statement which is false, and any licence granted on the basis of this would become void. This encourages exporters to be clear on their export licence applications about known re-exports to third countries.

We can and do refuse applications where there is a planned re-export that is inconsistent with the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria, or where we assess that the goods may be diverted to an undesirable destination.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what controls her Department places on the re-export of defence equipment.

The UK system is based on having a thorough risk-assessment process for the original export licence before the goods leave the UK. Export licence applicants are required to inform us of any intention to re-export the goods at the time of submitting their export licence application. It is an offence for an export licence applicant to knowingly make a statement which is false, and any licence granted on the basis of this would become void. This encourages exporters to be clear on their export licence applications about known re-exports to third countries.

We can and do refuse applications where there is a planned re-export that is inconsistent with the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria, or where we assess that the goods may be diverted to an undesirable destination.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
5th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many discussions has he had with the Ukrainian Government on the security of civilian nuclear power plants in Ukraine since Russia’s invasion in February 2022.

My predecessors and I have maintained regular engagement with our Ukrainian colleagues following the Russian Federation’s unlawful invasion of Ukraine, and its reckless actions against nuclear facilities, including at the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power plant and Chornobyl Exclusion Zone.

In these conversations we have paid tribute to the immense bravery of Ukrainian staff who continue to safely operate nuclear facilities across Ukraine under the most extreme pressure. We have committed funding to support nuclear security in Ukraine, including up to £2.3m of UK funding to the International Atomic Energy Agency which has been made available to support nuclear security activities in Ukraine.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, with reference to the Integrated Review, published in March 2021, whether it remains the Government's policy to spend 2.4 per cent of GDP on R&D by 2027.

In the 2017 Industrial Strategy, the Government committed to increasing UK economy-wide investment in Research and Development (R&D) to 2.4% of GDP by 2027. Last year, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) updated its R&D data methodology to better represent R&D performed in small businesses and higher education institutions throughout the UK. The updated figures suggest that the UK’s total investment in R&D reached 2.6-2.7% of GDP in 2019 and 2.9-3% in 2020, exceeding our “2.4% by 2027” target.

The Government is now taking time to consider a range of options.

12th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 12 October 2022 to Question 54467 on Nuclear Installations: Ukraine, when (a) he and (b) his predecessors held discussions with Ukrainian government officials on the security of Ukraine’s nuclear facilities in the period since February 2022.

My predecessors, the Ministerial Team and I maintain regular engagement with our Ukrainian colleagues following the Russian Federation’s illegal invasion of Ukraine, and its reckless actions against nuclear facilities. Discussions were held in February, March, June, August and September.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer to Question 45194 on Ukraine: Nuclear Installations, what discussions he has had Ukrainian government ministers on the security of Ukraine's nuclear facilities since February 2022.

My predecessors and I have maintained regular engagement with our Ukrainian colleagues following the Russian Federation’s illegal invasion of Ukraine, and its reckless actions against nuclear facilities, including at the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power plant and Chornobyl Exclusion Zone.

In these conversations, the Government has paid tribute to the immense bravery of Ukrainian staff who continue to operate nuclear facilities safely across Ukraine under the most extreme pressure.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with the Scandinavian governments on the potential for upper-stage rocket debris from UK launches to land on their sovereign territory.

There is no expectation that upper stage debris from any UK launch will affect the sovereign territory of any Scandinavian country.

The Government has held discussions with all countries to the north of the British Isles which may hold an interest in, or whose territory may be affected by, space launch activities undertaken from the UK.

Where there is a possibility of UK-based launch companies seeking to deposit launch vehicle debris (whether this is from the vehicle's upper stage or otherwise) in another state's territorial waters or Exclusive Economic Zone, the government intends to obtain consent from the affected countries.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to use OneWeb to enhance the UK’s space capabilities.

With an increasing number of global players developing Low Earth Orbit Satellite constellations, OneWeb enables the UK to be at the forefront of rapidly evolving Space technology and helps the UK project its influence internationally through a global asset.

OneWeb will help grow UK-based capabilities in the satellite technology value chain by creating opportunities for high-value manufacturing, launch capability, and space data applications.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent progress has been made on the creation of a satellite navigation system.

This Government has made clear its ambitions in space through a new ministerial level National Space Council and by developing a Space Strategy to bring long term strategic and commercial benefits for the UK. The Government recognises the contribution the space sector makes to our economy, national security, global influence and in helping the nation to tackle the COVID crisis.

The GNSS programme is currently in its Engineering Design and Development Phase to research and understand what would best suit the UK's requirements. The programme is taking the appropriate time to investigate the requirements, design specifications and costs as fully as possible. This includes assessing value for money, scope for innovation, new markets and how much a system could meet the UK's assured positioning navigation and timing requirements as part of an ambitious new space strategy.

The programme has recently proceeded with a number of technical contracts from April to September to deliver key engineering work whilst protecting skills and technical GNSS sector jobs.

A project led by the Cabinet Office is developing the UK's positioning navigation and timing (PNT) requirements, bringing together expertise from across Whitehall, industry and the PNT community to consider requirements across military, civil and Critical National Infrastructure sectors.

In addition to other technologies, a UK GNSS capability could form part of the mix of solutions needed.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the impact of graphics processing unit scalping on UK (a) competition policy and (b) businesses.

Under UK competition law, responsibility for investigating anticompetitive practices falls to the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), the UK’s competition authority. The government has ensured that the CMA has significant powers and expertise to investigate anti-competitive practices, and as an independent authority, the CMA has discretion to investigate competition cases which, according to its prioritisation principles, it considers most appropriate. The CMA may also carry out detailed examinations of why particular markets may not be working well and take remedial action to address features of markets which restrict competition.

GPUs are used for a number of applications and supply has been impacted by an ongoing global shortage. The current shortage is due to a confluence of unexpected events, including unprecedented pandemic-driven shifts in demand within a global market. HMG recognises the severity of the current chip shortage, the widespread international ramifications and the difficulties it has created for a number of UK firms and individuals. HMG are engaging affected UK sectors and key international partners to identify any available domestic or international mitigations.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average Ofsted status was of schools with Combined Cadet Force contingents in 2023.

The Government committed £50 million of London Interbank Offered Rate funding to the Cadet Expansion Programme to increase the number of Cadet Units in schools across the UK to 500 by April 2020. Having achieved this target, the Department for Education and Ministry of Defence are continuing to work on the Government's ambition to increase the number of cadets in schools to 60,000 by April 2024.

Cadets have access to a broad range of youth activities, which are undertaken in a safe and controlled environment. These experiences can help develop qualities such as loyalty and respect, self confidence, teamwork, and resilience which helps cadets achieve excellence and shape their own future. Schools that have set up Cadet Units have also reported a range of benefits, including improvement in attendance, attainment, commitment and relationships between staff and students.

Ofsted grades for the 275 state funded schools with cadet units are below. There are three schools that do not have Ofsted grades as at 31 December 2022.

Ofsted Grade

Number of state funded schools with an Ofsted grade with cadets

% of the overall grade

Outstanding

60

22%

Good

163

59%

Requires improvement

39

14%

Inadequate

13

5%

Ofsted Statistics as at 31 December 2022

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to Question 130635 tabled on 16 December 2020, what assessment he has made of the financial effect on childminders of reintroducing the method of calculating early years entitlement funding that was in place before the covid-19 outbreak.

We have provided unprecedented support to early years providers throughout the COVID-19 outbreak through block-buying childcare places and schemes, including furlough. Childminders are also eligible to receive support from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, which has been extended until the end of April 2021: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

The government will continue to support families with their childcare costs. My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced on 25 November an extra £44 million for 2021-22, for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers.

On 17 December 2020, the government announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance.

We will fund local authorities in the 2021 spring term based on their January 2021 census. If attendance rises after the census is taken, we will top-up councils to up to 85% of their January 2020 census level, where a local authority can provide evidence for increased attendance during the spring term. This will give local authorities additional financial confidence to pay providers for increasing attendance later in the spring term. The early years local authority survey continues on a weekly basis. The following link has more information on the use of Early Years Dedicated Schools Grant in spring 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2020-to-2021/dsg-technical-note-2020-to-2021.

In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance, local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children (for example, sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency) through withdrawing funding, but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods, taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector, including on this subject. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to Question 130636 tabled on December 16 2020, if he will extend the adjusted calculation for early education entitlement funding, used during the autumn 2020 term, into spring 2021 in line with the extension to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

We have provided unprecedented support to early years providers throughout the COVID-19 outbreak through block-buying childcare places and schemes, including furlough. Childminders are also eligible to receive support from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, which has been extended until the end of April 2021: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

The government will continue to support families with their childcare costs. My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced on 25 November an extra £44 million for 2021-22, for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers.

On 17 December 2020, the government announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance.

We will fund local authorities in the 2021 spring term based on their January 2021 census. If attendance rises after the census is taken, we will top-up councils to up to 85% of their January 2020 census level, where a local authority can provide evidence for increased attendance during the spring term. This will give local authorities additional financial confidence to pay providers for increasing attendance later in the spring term. The early years local authority survey continues on a weekly basis. The following link has more information on the use of Early Years Dedicated Schools Grant in spring 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2020-to-2021/dsg-technical-note-2020-to-2021.

In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance, local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children (for example, sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency) through withdrawing funding, but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods, taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector, including on this subject. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the financial effect on childminders of re-introducing the method of calculating early years entitlement funding that was in place before the covid-19 outbreak.

We have provided unprecedented support to early years providers throughout the COVID-19 outbreak through block-buying childcare places and schemes including furlough. Childminders are also eligible to receive support from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, which has been extended until the end of April 2021: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

Whilst we recognise childcare attendance has been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak, we saw attendance rise over the autumn term from 482,000 on 10 September to 759,000 on 17 December. On 17 December 2020, the government therefore announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance. In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children, for example sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency through withdrawing funding, but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector, including on this subject. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

The government will continue to support families with their childcare costs. My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced on 25 November an extra £44 million for the 2021-22 financial year, for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will extend the adjusted calculation for the early education entitlement funding, used during the autumn 2020 term, into spring 2021, in line with the extension to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

We recognise childcare attendance has been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak; we saw attendance rise over the autumn term from 482,000 on 10 September to 759,000 on 17 December 2020. On 17 December 2020, the government therefore announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance. In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/use-of-free-early-education-entitlements-funding-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/use-of-free-early-education-entitlements-funding-during-coronavirus-covid-19), local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children, (for example, sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency through withdrawing funding), but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods, taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We will fund local authorities in the 2021 spring term based on their January 2021 census. If attendance rises after the census is taken, we will top-up councils to up to 85% of their January 2020 census level, where a local authority can provide evidence for increased attendance during the spring term. This will give local authorities additional financial confidence to pay providers for increasing attendance later in the spring term.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector and have heard from them already on this subject. We publish regular official statistics on attendance in early years settings (https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak) and the next release is due on Tuesday 2 February. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of maintenance loans for full-time students in England for the purpose of housing costs.

The government measures student housing costs periodically but does not collect data annually. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2014/15 reported average housing costs of £4,151 for full-time undergraduates who incurred those costs. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2011/12 reported average housing costs of £3,628 for full-time undergraduates who incurred them.

The student finance system contributes towards undergraduate students’ living costs at University, with the most support available for students from the lowest income families. The government increased maximum loans for living costs by 2.8% for the current academic year, 2019/20, to £8,944 for students living away from home and studying outside London with a further 2.9% increase to £9,203 for 2020/21. Higher rates of loan are available for students living away from home and studying in London.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average housing costs were for full-time students in England in each of the last 10 years.

The government measures student housing costs periodically but does not collect data annually. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2014/15 reported average housing costs of £4,151 for full-time undergraduates who incurred those costs. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2011/12 reported average housing costs of £3,628 for full-time undergraduates who incurred them.

The student finance system contributes towards undergraduate students’ living costs at University, with the most support available for students from the lowest income families. The government increased maximum loans for living costs by 2.8% for the current academic year, 2019/20, to £8,944 for students living away from home and studying outside London with a further 2.9% increase to £9,203 for 2020/21. Higher rates of loan are available for students living away from home and studying in London.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the extent to which maintenance loans cover the cost of housing for students in England.

The government measures student housing costs periodically but does not collect data annually. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2014/15 reported average housing costs of £4,151 for full-time undergraduates who incurred those costs. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2011/12 reported average housing costs of £3,628 for full-time undergraduates who incurred them.

The student finance system contributes towards undergraduate students’ living costs at University, with the most support available for students from the lowest income families. The government increased maximum loans for living costs by 2.8% for the current academic year, 2019/20, to £8,944 for students living away from home and studying outside London with a further 2.9% increase to £9,203 for 2020/21. Higher rates of loan are available for students living away from home and studying in London.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the UK’s financial commitment is to the EU’s Copernicus Earth programme in the (a) 2021-22 financial year and (b) each financial year to 2024-25.

The UK Government has welcomed the agreement in principle for the UK to continue to participate in the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme as a third country for 2021-2027.

Formal participation will only begin once the Protocol I to the Trade and Cooperation Agreement is adopted.

Once this has taken place the UK’s financial commitment will be reported in Defra’s accounts.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 30 June 2020 to Question 64852 on the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, on what date the Government commissioned research by Middlesex University into dog attacks is planned to be published.

Middlesex University’s draft report on measures to reduce dog attacks and promote responsible ownership was submitted to Defra in March this year. The report is currently being peer reviewed and will be finalised in light of peer review comments. Our intention is to publish the final report later this year.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what forms of smokeless coal will be permissible under changes proposed in the Air quality: using cleaner fuels for domestic burning consultation response, published 21 February 2020.

As stated in the Government Response published on 21 February, we want to see a move from bituminous coal to less polluting fuels in the domestic setting. We will facilitate this transition by only allowing the sale of smokeless coal (or anthracite) and low sulphur manufactured solid fuels for the purpose of domestic combustion.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many and what proportion of planning outcomes for new housing developments were in accordance with Environment Agency flood risk advice, by region, in each of the last 10 years.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

As a statutory consultee in development planning, the Environment Agency (EA) advises local planning authorities and developers on how to enable climate resilient development and identify opportunities to protect and enhance the environment.

The EA provides advice on all development proposals in areas that are at (i) medium or high risk of flooding from rivers or the sea (other than minor development) (ii) within 20 metres of a Main River, (iii) within an area with critical drainage problems (other than minor development).

The EA does not make the final decision on local planning approvals and local planning authorities are responsible and accountable for approving proposals for new development in their local areas. In the majority of cases the EA’s flood risk advice is taken on board by local planning authorities.

Environment Agency performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19 split by Environment Agency operational hub.

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

North – new homes with recorded planning decisions

3195

10539

13276

12610

8035

7934

6166

4161

65916

North - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

0

649

112

597

3

152

58

11

1582

North - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

100.0%

93.8%

99.2%

95.3%

100.0%

98.1%

99.1%

99.7%

97.6%

South East - new homes with recorded planning decisions

14912

35251

18237

26961

21498

13872

10924

10812

152467

South East - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

11

353

1072

639

26

220

42

89

2452

South East - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.9%

99.0%

94.1%

97.6%

99.9%

98.4%

99.6%

99.2%

98.4%

West and Central - new homes with recorded planning decisions

28360

20194

27105

37364

36599

20289

17598

8051

195560

West and Central - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled and partially over-ruled decisions

113

449

120

102

154

65

58

29

1090

West and Central - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.6%

97.8%

99.6%

99.7%

99.6%

99.7%

99.7%

99.6%

99.4%

Environment Agency national performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

Total new homes with recorded planning decisions

46467

65984

58618

76935

66132

42095

34688

23024

413943

Total new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

124

1451

1304

1338

183

437

158

129

5124

Average % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.7%

97.8%

97.8%

98.3%

99.7%

99.0%

99.5%

99.4%

98.8%

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many and what proportion of applications for the development of new homes had planning outcomes in accordance with Environment Agency advice on flood risk, by region, in each of the last 10 years.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

As a statutory consultee in development planning, the Environment Agency (EA) advises local planning authorities and developers on how to enable climate resilient development and identify opportunities to protect and enhance the environment.

The EA provides advice on all development proposals in areas that are at (i) medium or high risk of flooding from rivers or the sea (other than minor development) (ii) within 20 metres of a Main River, (iii) within an area with critical drainage problems (other than minor development).

The EA does not make the final decision on local planning approvals and local planning authorities are responsible and accountable for approving proposals for new development in their local areas. In the majority of cases the EA’s flood risk advice is taken on board by local planning authorities.

Environment Agency performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19 split by Environment Agency operational hub.

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

North – new homes with recorded planning decisions

3195

10539

13276

12610

8035

7934

6166

4161

65916

North - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

0

649

112

597

3

152

58

11

1582

North - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

100.0%

93.8%

99.2%

95.3%

100.0%

98.1%

99.1%

99.7%

97.6%

South East - new homes with recorded planning decisions

14912

35251

18237

26961

21498

13872

10924

10812

152467

South East - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

11

353

1072

639

26

220

42

89

2452

South East - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.9%

99.0%

94.1%

97.6%

99.9%

98.4%

99.6%

99.2%

98.4%

West and Central - new homes with recorded planning decisions

28360

20194

27105

37364

36599

20289

17598

8051

195560

West and Central - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled and partially over-ruled decisions

113

449

120

102

154

65

58

29

1090

West and Central - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.6%

97.8%

99.6%

99.7%

99.6%

99.7%

99.7%

99.6%

99.4%

Environment Agency national performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

Total new homes with recorded planning decisions

46467

65984

58618

76935

66132

42095

34688

23024

413943

Total new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

124

1451

1304

1338

183

437

158

129

5124

Average % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.7%

97.8%

97.8%

98.3%

99.7%

99.0%

99.5%

99.4%

98.8%

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate she has made of when the inquiry into whether UK components have been used in Russian weapons systems in Ukraine will conclude; and if she will make a statement.

I would like to clarify that there is no formal inquiry underway, contrary to press reports.

The Government has reviewed the reports about UK components being recovered from Russian military equipment. It is likely that some Russian military equipment contains sub-components, some of which are dual-use and are not controlled, obtained from a range of countries, including the UK.

The UK, in coordination with allies, has introduced several packages of hard-hitting sanctions that prohibit the supply of a wide range of goods and services, including components that could be utilised in Russian military equipment. This information is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/russia-sanctions-guidance/russia-sanctions-guidance.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to Answer of 13 October 2022 to Question 59432 on Armed Forces and Veterans: Railways, what appropriate verification of veteran status to gain free train travel for military personnel and veterans on remembrance includes.

Appropriate verification for Veterans seeking to use free rail travel to Remembrance events includes: the Ministry of Defence-issued Veterans ID, Veterans Railcard, Veterans Oyster photocard or other forms of identification, such as proof of pension. Station staff will be able to help Veterans who are unable to provide the listed forms of verification.

Further information can be found on the National Rail website at the following link:

https://www.nationalrail.co.uk/times_fares/remembrance-sunday.aspx

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the annual cost of providing free train travel for serving and former Armed Forces personnel to attend remembrance services.

The Department for Transport does not hold data on the number of Veterans or Military Personnel using free rail travel to Remembrance events in previous years. Those travelling in their uniform or who held appropriate verification will have been able to travel for free without requiring a ticket to be issued.

We will continue to offer free rail travel to Military Personnel and Veterans travelling to Remembrance events this year.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many (a) former and (b) current Armed Forces personnel have claimed free allowances for free train travel for Remembrance in each year since his Department has offered it.

The Department for Transport does not hold data on the number of Veterans or Military Personnel using free rail travel to Remembrance events in previous years. Those travelling in their uniform or who held appropriate verification will have been able to travel for free without requiring a ticket to be issued.

We will continue to offer free rail travel to Military Personnel and Veterans travelling to Remembrance events this year.

19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 15 November 2021 to Question 74893, how much HS2 Ltd spent to acquire the 609 residential properties through Statutory and Discretionary Schemes.

To date, HS2 Ltd has spent £199,179,925 on all acquisitions for Phase 2b. This figure is based on purchase price only of land and property acquisitions between 2014 and the end of October 2021 acquired through statutory and discretionary schemes. HS2 Ltd does not record how many residential properties have been acquired, as a property can have mixed usage.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 15 November 2021 to Question 74893, how many residential properties were acquired through Statutory Discretion Schemes by constituency.

To date, HS2 Ltd has spent £199,179,925 on all acquisitions for Phase 2b. This figure is based on purchase price only of land and property acquisitions between 2014 and the end of October 2021 acquired through statutory and discretionary schemes. HS2 Ltd does not record how many residential properties have been acquired, as a property can have mixed usage.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether legal agreements have been signed by private sector partners to help ensure UK rocket launches are consistent with climate change emissions reduction targets.

All applicants for a launch or spaceport licence under the Space Industry Act 2018 are required to submit an assessment of environmental effects. The spaceflight regulator will take account of these assessments and the Government’s environmental objectives when deciding licence applications and setting licence conditions. The Government will set environmental objectives for the regulator, including minimising emissions contributing to climate change resulting from spaceflight activities.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 10 February 2021 to Question HL12641 on Electric Vehicles: Charging Points, in which local authority areas the 3,800 chargepoints funded by the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme have been installed; and how many of the potential 7,200 charging device installations have been funded from his Department’s doubling of funding to that scheme.

The doubling of funding for the ORCS to £20 million announced in May last year by the Transport Secretary will allow local authorities to install up to 7,200 charging devices, making charging at home and overnight easier for those without an off-street parking space.

The attached document details the local authorities which have received grant awards under the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme, to date. In financial year 2020/21 almost 2,000 chargepoints were approved under the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS). ORCS is a demand-led fund open to all UK local authorities. As the Scheme moves into financial year 2021/22, amendments have been made, taking into account local authority feedback and the experience of previous years, in order to improve access to funding for as many local authorities as possible.

22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Answer of 12 July 2023 to Question 193037 on Universal Credit: Armed Forces, how many Universal Credit claimants have been identified as (a) serving and (b) having served in the armed forces for the assessment period ending on 1 July 2023.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) started collecting data on the Armed Forces status of Universal Credit (UC) claimants in Great Britain (GB) in April 2021. At first only new claimants were asked about their Armed Forces status. From June 2021 onwards, other UC claimants reporting changes in their work and earnings have also been able to report their status. From July 2021 onwards, UC agents have also been able to record claimants’ Armed Forces status if they are told about this via other means such as journal messages, face-to-face meetings or by telephone.

Data coverage continues to improve over time and by July 2023 data was held on the armed forces status of approximately 66% of the GB UC caseload (see table below). It should be noted that Armed forces status is self-reported by claimants and is not verified by the Ministry of Defence or Office for Veterans’ Affairs. A claimant’s status can be recorded as “currently serving”, “served in the past”, “not served” or “prefer not to say”. Data is not collected on the specific branch of the Armed Forces that claimants are serving in or have served in in the past.

Data is not held on the total number of UC claimants who are currently serving in the Armed Forces or who have served in the past, but data is held on those who have identified themselves so far.

The way the data is collected means the claimants for whom an Armed Forces status is recorded are not representative of the UC caseload as a whole. This means it is not yet possible to produce reliable estimates of the overall number or proportion of UC claimants who are currently serving in the Armed Forces or who have served in the past.

Increases in the numbers of claimants with a recorded status of “currently serving” or “served in the past” do not necessarily mean the overall numbers of claimants who are currently serving or have served in the past have increased and may reflect increases in the number of claimants for whom data is held as data coverage improves over time.

The table below shows the proportion of the GB UC caseload with a recorded Armed Forces status in July 2023.

UC caseload month

Proportion of caseload with a recorded status

Currently serving

Served in the past

Not served

Prefer not to say

No recorded status

July 2023

66%

4,000

52,000

3,900,000

30,000

2,100,000

Notes:

1. Data is not collected on the Armed Forces status of UC claimants in Northern Ireland. The figures provided only relate to Great Britain.

2. Figures in the table have been rounded according to the Department’s Official Statistics rounding policy.

3. Due to methodological improvements, these figures are based on the Official Statistics UC caseload definition. Some previous figures have used an alternative caseload definition based on assessment period end dates.

4. Further information on the caseload definition used for the UC official statistics can be found on Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Universal Credit claimants were (a) serving armed forces personnel and (b) veterans in each year since 2018.

The information requested is not available. We do not know the total number of currently serving armed forces personnel who are claiming UC.

We have been collecting information, on those that have identified themselves as serving or have served, since April 2021, but we do not yet have enough responses to accurately estimate the total number.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many households with at least one member serving in the armed forces are claiming Universal Credit.

The information requested is not available. We do not know the total number of currently serving armed forces personnel who are claiming UC.

We have been collecting information, on those that have identified themselves as serving or have served, since April 2021, but we do not yet have enough responses to accurately estimate the total number.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average annual amount of Universal Credit paid to (a) serving members of the Armed Forces and (b) veterans was in each year since 2018.

The information requested is not available. We do not know the total number of currently serving armed forces personnel who are claiming UC.

We have been collecting information, on those that have identified themselves as serving or have served, since April 2021, but we do not yet have enough responses to accurately estimate the total number.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in receipt of a War Widows pension are claiming Universal Credit.

The requested information is not held. War Widows Pension is administered by the Ministry of Defence and the department does not have access to this data.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many full-time equivalent Armed Forces Champions have been posted in job centres in each year since 2015.

The first operational year there was a specific activity category for Armed Force Champions was 20/21. The table therefore shows Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of Armed Forces Champions posted in Job Centres in each year since 2020.

In 21/22, the department was establishing the AFC network and in May 2021 there were 31 AFCs/AFCLs in post and this number increased throughout the year as colleagues were recruited into these roles.

Since 22/23, the department has committed to deploying 50 AFCs and 11 AFCLs across the 37 Jobcentre Districts. In May 2022, there were 61 AFC/AFCLs in post and in May 2023, there were 57 AFC/AFCLs in post due to recent attrition. Districts are currently in the process of recruiting to fill the vacant posts to ensure we are fulfilling our commitment of 61 dedicated AFCs and AFCL’s across the Jobcentre Network.

Source: DWP’s internal Activity Based Model (ABM)

Armed Forces Champion, including Armed Forces Champion Leads FTE (Colleagues in post)

Armed Forces Champion, including Armed Forces Champion Leads ABM FTE (Resource allocated)

2020

1

0

2021

31

19

2022

61

52

2023

57

48

Notes:

  • Data is correct as of 31st May 2023.
  • Data for Armed Forces Champion staff has been derived from the Department’s Activity Based Model (ABM). It includes both Armed Forces Champions and Armed Forces Champions Leads.
  • The first operational year there was a specific ABM category for Armed Force Champions was 20/21.
  • Data is taken from the end of May of each year.
  • Less than 10 FTE shown as “-“.
  • The number of Armed Forces Champions within Job Centres is unpublished management information, collected and intended for internal department use and has not been quality assured to National Statistics or Official Statistics standard. As the Department holds the information, we have released it.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 14 December 2022 to Question 104134 on Universal Credit: Armed Forces, how many Universal Credit claimants have been identified as (a) serving and (b) having served in the armed forces for the assessment periods ending on 1 March 2023.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) started collecting data on the Armed Forces status of Universal Credit (UC) claimants in Great Britain (GB) in April 2021. At first only new claimants were asked about their Armed Forces status. From June 2021 onwards, other UC claimants reporting changes in their work and earnings have also been able to report their status. From July 2021 onwards, UC agents have also been able to record claimants’ Armed Forces status if they are told about this via other means such as journal messages, face-to-face meetings or by telephone.

Data coverage continues to improve over time and by February 2023 data was held on the armed forces status of approximately 61% of the GB UC caseload (see table below). It should be noted that Armed forces status is self-reported by claimants and is not verified by the Ministry of Defence or Office for Veterans’ Affairs. A claimant’s status can be recorded as “currently serving”, “served in the past”, “not served” or “prefer not to say”. Data is not collected on the specific branch of the Armed Forces that claimants are serving in or have served in in the past.

Data is not held on the total number of UC claimants who are currently serving in the Armed Forces or who have served in the past, but data is held on those who have identified themselves so far.

The way the data is collected means the claimants for whom an Armed Forces status is recorded are not representative of the UC caseload as a whole. This means it is not yet possible to produce reliable estimates of the overall number or proportion of UC claimants who are currently serving in the Armed Forces or who have served in the past.

Increases in the numbers of claimants with a recorded status of “currently serving” or “served in the past” do not necessarily mean the overall numbers of claimants who are currently serving or have served in the past have increased and may reflect increases in the number of claimants for whom data is held as data coverage improves over time.

The table below shows how the proportion of the GB UC caseload with a recorded Armed Forces status has changed over time. It also shows how many claimants on the caseload had a recorded status of each type.

GB UC caseload by recorded Armed Forces status

UC caseload month

Proportion of caseload with a recorded status

Currently serving

Served in the past

Not served

Prefer not to say

No recorded status

July 2022

51%

3,000

38,600

2,804,200

21,000

2,753,300

August 2022

53%

3,200

40,100

2,912,500

21,800

2,683,400

September 2022

54%

3,200

41,400

3,002,500

22,400

2,614,700

October 2022

56%

3,300

42,800

3,131,700

23,400

2,530,000

November 2022

57%

3,300

44,000

3,218,300

24,000

2,467,100

December 2022

58%

3,400

45,100

3,299,400

24,600

2,407,600

January 2023

59%

3,500

46,200

3,375,000

25,400

2,349,700

February 2023 (provisional)

61%

3,600

48,300

3,508,300

26,500

2,306,900

Notes:

1. Data is not collected on the Armed Forces status of UC claimants in Northern Ireland. The figures provided only relate to Great Britain.

2. Percentages are rounded to the nearest percent and numbers are rounded to the nearest hundred.

3. Figures may be subject to retrospective changes as more up-to-date data becomes available or if methodological improvements are made. Figures relating to February 2023 are provisional and may be subject to revision.

4. Due to methodological improvements, these figures are based on the Official Statistics UC caseload definition. Some previous figures have used an alternative caseload definition based on assessment period end dates.

5. Further information on the caseload definition used for the UC official statistics can be found on Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when he will respond to Question 104134 tabled on 6 December 2022 by the right hon. Member for Wentworth and Deane.

I refer the Right Honourable Gentleman to the answer given to his specific question given on the 14th December 2022.

For the avoidance of doubt please see the answer as follows:

Answered on 14 December 2022

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) started collecting data on the Armed Forces status of Universal Credit (UC) claimants in Great Britain (GB) in April 2021. At first only new claimants were asked about their Armed Forces status. From June 2021 onwards, other UC claimants reporting changes in their work and earnings have also been able to report their status. From July 2021 onwards, UC agents have also been able to record claimants’ Armed Forces status if they are told about this via other means such as journal messages, face-to-face meetings or by telephone.

Data coverage continues to improve over time and by September 2022 data was held on the armed forces status of approximately 54% of the GB UC caseload (see table below). It should be noted that Armed forces status is self-reported by claimants and is not verified by the Ministry of Defence or Office for Veterans’ Affairs. A claimant’s status can be recorded as “currently serving”, “served in the past”, “not served” or “prefer not to say”. Data is not collected on the specific branch of the Armed Forces that claimants are serving in or have served in in the past.

Data is not held on the total number of UC claimants who are currently serving in the Armed Forces or who have served in the past, but data is held on those who have identified themselves so far.

The way the data is collected means the claimants for whom an Armed Forces status is recorded are not representative of the UC caseload as a whole. This means it is not yet possible to produce reliable estimates of the overall number or proportion of UC claimants who are currently serving in the Armed Forces or who have served in the past.

Increases in the numbers of claimants with a recorded status of “currently serving” or “served in the past” do not necessarily mean the overall numbers of claimants who are currently serving or have served in the past have increased and may reflect increases in the number of claimants for whom data is held as data coverage improves over time.

The table below shows the proportion of the GB UC caseload with a recorded Armed Forces status. It also shows how many claimants on the caseload had a recorded status of each type.

GB UC caseload by recorded Armed Forces status

UC caseload month

Proportion of caseload with a recorded status

Currently serving

Served in the past

Not served

Prefer not to say

September 2022

54%

3,200

41,400

3,002,500

22,400

Notes:

1. Data is not collected on the Armed Forces status of UC claimants in Northern Ireland. The figures provided only relate to Great Britain.

2. Percentages are rounded to the nearest percent and numbers are rounded to the nearest hundred.

3. Figures may be subject to retrospective changes as more up-to-date data becomes available or if methodological improvements are made.

4. Due to methodological improvements, these figures are based on the Official Statistics UC caseload definition. Some previous figures have used an alternative caseload definition based on assessment period end dates.

5. Further information on the caseload definition used for the UC official statistics can be found on Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 2 November 2022 to Question 72201 on Universal Credit: Veterans, how many Universal Credit claimants have been identified as (a) serving and (b) having served in the Armed Forces for the assessment periods ending in September 2022.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) started collecting data on the Armed Forces status of Universal Credit (UC) claimants in Great Britain (GB) in April 2021. At first only new claimants were asked about their Armed Forces status. From June 2021 onwards, other UC claimants reporting changes in their work and earnings have also been able to report their status. From July 2021 onwards, UC agents have also been able to record claimants’ Armed Forces status if they are told about this via other means such as journal messages, face-to-face meetings or by telephone.

Data coverage continues to improve over time and by September 2022 data was held on the armed forces status of approximately 54% of the GB UC caseload (see table below). It should be noted that Armed forces status is self-reported by claimants and is not verified by the Ministry of Defence or Office for Veterans’ Affairs. A claimant’s status can be recorded as “currently serving”, “served in the past”, “not served” or “prefer not to say”. Data is not collected on the specific branch of the Armed Forces that claimants are serving in or have served in in the past.

Data is not held on the total number of UC claimants who are currently serving in the Armed Forces or who have served in the past, but data is held on those who have identified themselves so far.

The way the data is collected means the claimants for whom an Armed Forces status is recorded are not representative of the UC caseload as a whole. This means it is not yet possible to produce reliable estimates of the overall number or proportion of UC claimants who are currently serving in the Armed Forces or who have served in the past.

Increases in the numbers of claimants with a recorded status of “currently serving” or “served in the past” do not necessarily mean the overall numbers of claimants who are currently serving or have served in the past have increased and may reflect increases in the number of claimants for whom data is held as data coverage improves over time.

The table below shows the proportion of the GB UC caseload with a recorded Armed Forces status. It also shows how many claimants on the caseload had a recorded status of each type.

GB UC caseload by recorded Armed Forces status

UC caseload month

Proportion of caseload with a recorded status

Currently serving

Served in the past

Not served

Prefer not to say

September 2022

54%

3,200

41,400

3,002,500

22,400

Notes:

1. Data is not collected on the Armed Forces status of UC claimants in Northern Ireland. The figures provided only relate to Great Britain.

2. Percentages are rounded to the nearest percent and numbers are rounded to the nearest hundred.

3. Figures may be subject to retrospective changes as more up-to-date data becomes available or if methodological improvements are made.

4. Due to methodological improvements, these figures are based on the Official Statistics UC caseload definition. Some previous figures have used an alternative caseload definition based on assessment period end dates.

5. Further information on the caseload definition used for the UC official statistics can be found on Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 2 November 2022 to Question 72201 on Universal Credit: Veterans, how many Universal Credit claimants have been identified as (a) serving and (b) having previously served in the Armed Forces for the assessment periods ending in October 2022.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) started collecting data on the Armed Forces status of Universal Credit (UC) claimants in Great Britain (GB) in April 2021. Initially only new claimants were asked about their Armed Forces status. From June 2021 onwards, other UC claimants reporting changes in their work and earnings have also been able to report their status. From July 2021 onwards, UC agents have also been able to record claimants’ Armed Forces status if they are told about this via other means such as journal messages, face-to-face meetings or by telephone.

Data coverage continues to improve over time and by October 2022 data was held on the armed forces status of approximately 56% of the GB UC caseload (see table below).

It should be noted that Armed forces status is self-reported by claimants and is not verified by the Ministry of Defence or Office for Veterans’ Affairs. A claimant’s status can be recorded as “currently serving”, “served in the past”, “not served” or “prefer not to say”. Data is not collected on the specific branch of the Armed Forces that claimants are serving in or have served in in the past.

Data is not held on the total number of UC claimants who are currently serving in the Armed Forces or who have served in the past, but data is held on those who have identified themselves so far.

The way the data is collected means the claimants for whom an Armed Forces status is recorded are not representative of the UC caseload as a whole. This means it is not yet possible to produce reliable estimates of the overall number or proportion of UC claimants who are currently serving in the Armed Forces or who have served in the past.

Increases in the numbers of claimants, on UC, with a recorded status of “currently serving” or “served in the past” do not necessarily mean the overall numbers of claimants who are currently serving or have served in the past have increased and may reflect increases in the number of claimants for whom data is held as data coverage improves over time.

The table below shows the proportion of the GB UC caseload with a recorded Armed Forces status. It also shows how many claimants on the caseload had a recorded status of each type.

GB UC caseload by recorded Armed Forces status

UC caseload Month

Proportion of caseload with a recorded status

Currently serving

Served in the past

Not served

Prefer not to say”

October 2022

56%

3,400

43,500

3,173,000

23,800

Notes:

1. Data is not collected on the Armed Forces status of UC claimants in Northern Ireland. The figures provided only relate to Great Britain.

2. Percentages are rounded to the nearest percent and numbers are rounded to the nearest hundred.

3. Figures may be subject to retrospective changes as more up-to-date data becomes available or if methodological improvements are made.

4. Due to methodological improvements, these figures are based on the Official Statistics UC caseload definition. Some previous figures have used an alternative caseload definition based on assessment period end dates.

5. Further information on the caseload definition used for the UC official statistics can be found on Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what is the average amount deducted from income-related benefits for ex-Armed Forces personnel due to their armed forces pension.

This information is not readily available.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many veterans applying for income-based welfare support have had their claims reduced due to their military pension in each year since 2019.

This information is not readily available.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many former armed forces personnel are claiming legacy benefits.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether an Armed Forces pension is considered income when an individual applies for Universal Credit.

War Pensions and Armed Forces Compensation Payments are not taken into account in Universal Credit. Guaranteed Income Payments, Service Attributable Pensions and service-attributable, non-taxable Service Invalidity Pensions are also not taken into account.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Answer of 14 September 2020 to Question HL7707, whether any elements of the (a) War Pension Scheme and (b) Armed Forces Compensation Scheme are taken into account as income when an ex-service member applies for a legacy benefit.

The Government acknowledges the contribution ex-service personnel have made.

In Pension Credit and the legacy income-related benefits, the first £10 of War Disablement Pension or a Guaranteed Income Payment from the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme is disregarded when calculating a person’s weekly income.

Furthermore, four additions to the War Disablement Pension are completely disregarded in the benefit assessment; these are Constant Attendance Allowance, Mobility Supplement, Severe Disablement Occupational Allowance and dependency increases for anyone other than the applicant or their partner.

For Pension Credit, War Pensions are also considered as qualifying income for the Savings Credit.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the annual cost is of employing an armed forces champion in a job centre plus district.

The annual cost of employing an Armed Forced Champion in financial year 2021-22 was £40,719 based on Armed Forces Champions located nationally, including locally attributable non staff costs, but not support staff and infrastructure costs.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many armed forces champions work in Jobcentres.

Please see below table for data relating to Armed Forces Champions working in Jobcentres.

As the role is not a stand-alone role (i.e. it is in addition to the role of a Work Coach or leader) we have provided the number of Champions which is Staff In Post and also the Full time Equivalents (FTE) that this equates to.

Armed Forces Champions

Job title

Staff in post

FTE

(UCJC) Armed Forces Champion Lead.

8

6.12

(UCJC) Armed Forces Champion.

49

38.69

TOTAL

57

44.81

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 27 September 2022 to Question 47343 on Universal Credit: Veterans, how many Universal Credit claimants have been identified as (a) serving and (b) having previously served in the Armed Forces for the assessment periods ending in August 2022.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) started collecting data on the Armed Forces status of Universal Credit (UC) claimants in Great Britain (GB) in April 2021. Further information on the caseload definition used for the UC official statistics can be found on Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

GB UC caseload by recorded Armed Forces status

UC caseload Month

Proportion of caseload with a recorded status

Currently serving

Served in the past

Not served

Prefer not to say

August 2022

53%

3,200

40,100

2,912,500

21,800

Notes:

1. Data is not collected on the Armed Forces status of UC claimants in Northern Ireland. The figures provided only relate to Great Britain.

2. Percentages are rounded to the nearest percent and numbers are rounded to the nearest hundred.

3. Figures may be subject to retrospective changes as more up-to-date data becomes available or if methodological improvements are made.

4. The figures above differ from those previously provided because methodological improvements mean it is no longer necessary to restrict analysis to claimants with UC assessment periods ending in a given month. Instead, the figures have been provided on a basis that is consistent with the caseload definition that is used for the UC official statistics.

5. Further information on the caseload definition used for the UC official statistics can be found on Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 27 September 2022 to Question 47343 on Universal Credit: Veterans, if she will provide these figures by parliamentary constituency.

The information requested is not available. We do not believe the current data is of suitable quality to present at sub-national levels. We will review this when coverage has improved.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 27 September 2022 to Question 47342 on Universal Credit: Veterans, if she will provide these figures by parliamentary constituency.

The information requested is not available. We do not believe the current data is of suitable quality to present at sub-national levels. We will review this when coverage has improved.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she has made a recent assessment of the potential impact of the cost of living crisis on trends in the number of serving armed forces personnel who are claiming Universal Credit.

The data we hold reflects the fact that month, on month DWP is asking more Universal Credit (UC) claimants about their Armed Forces status. They do not necessarily indicate more demand for UC from serving personnel or veterans due to rises in the cost of living or any other factor.

Both veterans and serving personnel may be able to benefit from cost-of-living measures already put in place by the Government, this includes the new “Energy Price Guarantee” which will ensure that a typical household in Great Britain pays an average £2,500 a year on their energy bill from 1 October 2022. The consumer saving will be based on usage, but a typical household will save at least £1,000 a year (based on current prices from October).

Also included is the over £37bn of cost-of-living support announced earlier this year which includes the £400 non-repayable discount to eligible households provided through the Energy Bills Support Scheme as well as additional targeted support for those on lower incomes.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many households with serving Armed Forces personnel are currently claiming Universal Credit.

The information requested is not available.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
5th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 21 July 2022 to Question 36699 on Universal Credit: Veterans, how many Universal Credit claimants have been identified as serving in the Armed Forces for the assessment periods ending in (a) April, 2022, (b) May 2022, (c) June 2022, (d) July 2022 and (e) August 2022.

The requested information is not available for August. The latest available information is provided in the table below

UC Claimants with an assessment period ending in month, by armed forces status

Month

Proportion of claimants for whom a response is held

Number of claimants recorded as currently serving in the Armed Forces

April 2022

46%

2,500

May 2022

48%

2,600

June 2022

50%

2,800

July 2022

51%

2,900

Notes:

1. Percentage rounded to the nearest percent

2. Number rounded to the nearest 100

3. Figures can differ from previous numbers due to methodological changes and retrospective updates of armed forces status information and UC claims.

4. Figures for GB only

5. Held a response is defined as the claimant having answered one of the following options “previously served”, “currently serving”, “never served”, or “prefer not to say”

6. Armed forces status is self-reported by the UC claimant

7. Armed forces status is as at the end of the UC assessment period

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
5th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 21 July 2022 to Question 36699 on Universal Credit: Veterans, how many Universal Credit claimants have been identified as previously serving in the Armed Forces for the assessment periods ending in (a) June, (b) July 2022 and (c) August 2022.

The requested information is not available for August. The latest available information is provided in the table below

UC Claimants with an assessment period ending in month, by armed forces status

Month

Proportion of claimants for whom a response is held

Number of claimants recorded as having previously served in the Armed Forces

April 2022

46%

33,800

May 2022

48%

35,100

June 2022

50%

36,600

July 2022

51%

38,000

Notes:

1. Percentage rounded to the nearest percent

2. Number rounded to the nearest 100

3. Figures can differ from previous numbers due to methodological changes and retrospective updates of armed forces status information and UC claims.

4. Figures for GB only

5. Held a response is defined as the claimant having answered one of the following options “previously served”, “currently serving”, “never served”, or “prefer not to say”

6. Armed forces status is self-reported by the UC claimant

7. Armed forces status is as at the end of the UC assessment period

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
14th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Universal Credit claimants have been identified as previously serving in the Armed Forces for the assessment periods ending in May 2022.

For assessment period ending in May 2022, we held a response of “previously served”, “currently serving”, “never served”, or “prefer not to say” for approximately 46% of the GB UC caseload. From this data we have identified around 35,100 UC claimants who have previously served in the Armed Forces.

Notes:

1. Percentage rounded to the nearest percent

2. Number rounded to the nearest 100

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will make an estimate on the number of Universal Credit claimants who previously served in the armed forces as of May 2022.

We are not able to make an estimate of the total number of Universal Credit claimants who previously served in the armed forces.

The previous answers to PQs 11554 and 16851 explained that for assessment periods ending in April 2022, DWP held a response for approximately 45% of UC claimants. Possible responses are “previously served”, “currently serving”, “never served”, or “prefer not to say”. From this data we have identified 33,800 UC claimants who have previously served in the Armed Forces. We will not make an estimate of the total number because the claimants for whom we have data may not be representative of all claimants. Nor can we provide further breakdowns by geography or any characteristics relating to the UC claim because of potential bias in the data.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to Answer of 21 June 2022 to Question 16854 on Armed Forces: Universal Credit, how many service personnel and veterans have (a) been identified as eligible for and (b) received an additional benefits payment to help with the cost of living since April 2022, as of 4 July 2022.

I refer the Honourable Member to the answer I provided to Question 11554 on 14 June 2022.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 14 June 2022 to Question 11554 on Social Security Benefits: Armed Forces, how many of the 33,800 Universal Credit claimants who have previously served in the armed forces are former (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) RAF personnel.

The information requested is not available. The department does not hold information about the service of personnel in the armed forces.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 14 June 2022 to Question 11554 on Social Security Benefits: Armed Forces, how many of the 33,800 Universal Credit claimants who previously served in the armed forces are former (a) Commonwealth and (b) Gurkha personnel.

The information requested is not available as the department does not hold any information about the service in the armed forces.

The Department continues to look at what other opportunities might be available to better identify and record data on veterans on the Universal Credit system and has regular conversations with the Ministry of Defence (MOD). This is part of a much wider piece of work involving a number of Departments, including the MOD and the Office for Veterans’ Affairs, to improve the collection and use of data relating to veterans.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 8 June 2022 to Question 11553 on Universal Credit: Veterans, if she will provide a breakdown by (a) region and (b) local authority of the total number of veterans in receipt of Universal Credit for assessment periods ending in April 2022.

The data requested is not available by geography. We do not have data on the total number of veterans on UC, only those who have identified themselves.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of serving members of the armed forces are in receipt of Universal Credit.

The information requested is not currently available. The Department has been collecting this information since April 2021, however there are not enough responses at present to accurately estimate the total number of serving members of the armed forces who are in receipt of Universal Credit.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many veterans have been identified to be in receipt of universal credit in each month since September 2021.

The department began collecting the armed forces status on new Universal Credit (UC) claims from April 2021 and UC claimants declaring their work and earnings from June 2021. From July 2021, Jobcentre work coaches could add information if the claimant were known to be serving or a veteran and had not already provided their status.

The Department continues to look at what other opportunities might be available to better identify and record data on veterans on the Universal Credit system and has regular conversations with the Ministry of Defence (MOD). This is part of a much wider piece of work involving a number of Departments, including the MOD and the Office for Veterans’ Affairs, to improve the collection and use of data relating to veterans.

DWP’s network of 50 Armed Forces Champions (AFCs) and 11 Group Leads provide vital support to veterans and other members of the armed forces community. The AFCs have specific responsibilities for supporting members of the Armed Forces community and their role involves front line responsibilities including building staff capability within their districts, personally handling some claims, supporting veterans into work and helping resolve complex cases where necessary.

Every Work Coach can also support members of the Armed Forces community and their families, working in partnership with their Armed Forces Champions. In those areas where there are particularly high levels of demand, for example garrison towns, this will form a significant part of the work done in individual Jobcentres.

Data is currently only available for the latest month and at a national level. For assessment periods ending in April 2022, we held a response for approximately 45% of the UC caseload. From this data we have identified 33,800 UC claimants who have previously served in the Armed Forces.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many service personnel and veterans have (a) been identified as eligible and (b) received an additional benefits payment to help with the cost of living as of 1 June 2022.

Six million individuals who qualify through their entitlement to disability benefits including War Pension Constant Attendance Allowance, War Pension Mobility Supplement or Armed Forces Independence Payment on May 25th will receive a one-off Disability Cost of Living payment of £150 in the Autumn.

Latest published statistics on those in receipt of the Armed Forces Independence Payment can be found at:

20210624 - Armed Forces Compensation Scheme Annual Statistic 2021 - Statistic - O (publishing.service.gov.uk)

Latest published statistics on those in receipt of the War Pension Constant Attendance Allowance and the War Pension Mobility Supplement can be found at:
War Pensions Scheme statistics: 2021 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Some service personnel and veterans may also be entitled to other payments announced in this package, these include:

  • The £650 Cost of Living Payment, that will be paid to more than 8 million low-income households on a means-tested benefits over two instalments - the first from July, the second in the autumn.
  • A separate, one-off payment of £300 to pensioner households (through and as an addition to the Winter Fuel Payment).
  • The £400 of support for energy bills that the Government is providing through the expansion of the Energy Bills Support Scheme, doubling the £200 of support announced earlier this year and making the whole £400 a non-repayable grant.
  • An additional £500 million to support households, bringing the total funding for this support to £1.5 billion. In England this will take the form of an extension to the Household Support Fund backed by £421m. Devolved administrations will receive £79 million through the Barnett formula.
  • Previously announced measures to help people tackle the cost of living, including frozen alcohol duty and fuel duty, raising the NICs threshold, council tax rebates and the further rise in the National Living Wage to £9.50 an hour from April 2022.

The department began collecting the armed forces status on new Universal Credit (UC) claims from April 2021 and UC claimants declaring their work and earnings from June 2021. From July 2021, Jobcentre work coaches could add information if the claimant were known to be serving or a veteran and had not already provided their status. For assessment periods ending in April 2022, we held a response for approximately 45% of the UC caseload. From this data we have identified 33,800 UC claimants who have previously served in the Armed Forces.

No assessment has been made of the total number of service personnel and veterans who are eligible for and will receive Cost of Living payments across all eligible benefits.

Further information on these payments will be discussed in Parliament as part of the legislative process to ensure their delivery.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of people who have been affected by the underpayment of benefits after transitioning from incapacity benefit to employment and support allowance in (a) Wentworth and Dearne constituency, (b) Rother Valley constituency, (c) Rotherham local authority area and (d) Barnsley local authority area.

I refer the Rt hon. Member to the answer I gave on 19th January to question number 104377.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many kickstart positions were (a) advertised and (b) filled in the defence sector during 2021.

We do not centrally collate information regarding jobs filled or advertised in the defence sector.

To encourage young people to apply for them, Kickstart jobs are categorised by the nature of the role rather than the sector of the employer. This means for example, that a defence-sector administrative job would be categorised as ‘administrative’ not ‘defence’. The most recently published statistics are published here: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2021-12-06/87676

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system which has been developed quickly. The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics, but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many armed forces champions are in post in each job centre district; and how many of those districts are without an armed forces champion.

DWP has 50 Armed Forces Champions, with at least one in each of our 37 Jobcentre Plus Districts. In addition, there are 11 Armed Forces Leads at group level.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she plans to fund more than 100 Armed Forces Champions posts in job centres to support former service personnel to find work.

DWP is determined to provide veterans and other members of the armed forces community with the help and support they need and deserve. Our support to help veterans into jobs is unwavering with 84% gaining employment within 6 months of discharge – higher than the employment rate of the wider population.

To help deliver a better service, and to respond to feedback we had had from armed forces charities and other organisations, we introduced a new Armed Forces Champions model in April 2021. It provides for 50 Armed Forces Champions alongside 11 Group Leads at managerial level.

At least one Armed Forces Champion will be allocated to each Jobcentre Plus District. Their appointments mean for the first time jobcentres are providing help directly to veterans and others where additional support to access and progress in work is needed. Resources in the new network are targeted where there are particularly high levels of demand, for example in garrison towns, and where work linked to the armed forces will form a significant part of that done in individual jobcentres.

Officials in the Department have discussed the new model with a number of armed forces stakeholders and overall feedback has been positive. We continue to monitor and evaluate our new approach but have no plans to increase the number of champions.

In addition to the Armed Forces Champions roles, all DWP Work Coaches are trained to provide veterans and others with the help and support they need.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the oral contribution by Baroness Stedman-Scott on 15 June 2021, House of Lords, Official Report, column 1765, if she will provide the (a) locations and (b) DWP districts of the job centres that have an Armed Forces Champion supporting veterans seeking employment.

For the first time there will be a dedicated armed forces role at middle management level in each of the 11 Jobcentre Plus Groups. The 11 group leads are forming a virtual network and will be responsible for building capability and sharing best practice across the network. They will also be pro-active in liaising with the Army, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force on both recruitment and resettlement.

These Armed Forces Champions Leads will oversee 50 Armed Forces Champions across the Jobcentre Plus network (including at least one in each of the 37 Jobcentre Plus Districts), who will have specific responsibilities for supporting members of the Armed Forces Community as part of their job. Again, for the first time, this involves a front line role personally handling some claims, supporting veterans into work and helping resolve complex cases where necessary. Their specific jobcentre location is not a factor in their ability to deliver this service as their responsibilities are district wide.

Recruitment to these roles is largely complete and the Department expects all of the roles to be filled by the end of July. All of the 11 Leads are in post and all Armed Forces Champions will be in each district by the end of July. Currently 48 have been appointed across 35 Districts, with the final two to be in post by the end of the month.

There are also many staff across the DWP network based in individual Jobcentre offices who will be the local ‘expert’ on Armed Forces issues, and the Department is continually working to build capability across the Jobcentre Plus network.

14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of trends in the number of veterans claiming universal credit in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Currently we do not record as part of our official statistic the number of Universal Credit claimants who are veterans. With Universal Credit, claimants will have an initial interview with their Work Coach as part of the application process. This discussion will cover their career history and skills and qualifications etc, which identifies those claimants who are veterans and ensures appropriate support is offered.

The Department is also continuing to look at what other opportunities might be available to better identify and record data on veterans on the Universal Credit system and has regular conversations with the Ministry of Defence (MOD). This is part of a much wider piece of work involving a number of Departments, including the MOD and the Office for Veterans’ Affairs, to improve the collection and use of data relating to veterans.

DWP is proud to provide vital and significant support to veterans which recognises their particular needs and circumstances, including through Armed Forces Champions in each Jobcentre Plus District. For example, early voluntary entry to the Work and Health Programme, and using Service Medical Board evidence where we can so a severely disabled person does not have to undergo additional examinations for Employment and Support Allowance and Universal Credit purposes. We are also able to signpost veterans to other organisations for further support where appropriate.

The department is a supporter of the Armed Forces Covenant which helps ensure members of the armed forces community have access to government support in a number of areas, including:

  • Starting a new career
  • Access to healthcare
  • Education and family well-being
  • Having a home
  • Financial assistance
  • Discounted services, including travel
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what criteria are used by the Health and Safety Executive to trigger on-site inspections of businesses accused or suspected of breaking covid-19 workplace safety regulations.

Physical inspections of premises, whilst an important part of the Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE) work, are one part of a much wider approach taken by HSE. Members of the public and employees can submit a concern to HSE in relation to unsatisfactory conditions or risk control measures in the workplace; concerns come into the organisation in a variety of ways, with most arriving either via telephone or the online form on HSE’s website.

Concerns received are triaged and classified either red, amber or green; those classified green are largely dealt with remotely by HSE’s Concerns and Advice Team, whilst amber and red concerns are passed to HSE’s field teams for further investigation

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many on-site inspections of businesses have been carried out by the Health and Safety Executive relating to covid-19 since 1 January 2020 to date, by (a) week and (b) local authority area.

The number of proactive site inspections that have been carried out which have addressed Covid-19 issues is not readily identifiable.

The majority of Covid-19 related site inspections have arisen from the investigation of a concern raised by workers or a member of the public. In April 2020, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) introduced a change to its recording system to identify visits that addressed a concern relating to Covid-19. Hence, it is not possible to identify site visits made before then. In addition to the numbers below, where a concern is not specifically related to Covid-19 but such issues are identified, then action will be taken to address them.

HSE does not record the date of an investigation visit in an easily retrievable format. The table below identifies the numbers of visits based upon the month in which the visit report was created on their operational database.

Date

Number of site visits

April

15

May

48

June

1

Grand Total

64

The following table provides site visits by Local Authority:

Site Local Authority

Site Visits

Mid Devon

5

Canterbury

4

Glasgow UA

3

Medway Towns UA

3

Wellingborough

2

Hull City UA

2

Flintshire UA

2

City of Westminster

2

Brentwood

2

Burnley

2

Midlothian UA

2

Thanet

2

East Ayrshire UA

2

Surrey Heath

1

Brighton & Hove UA

1

Torbay UA

1

Plymouth UA

1

Sevenoaks

1

Manchester

1

Kingston-upon-Thames

1

Greenwich

1

Corby

1

Folkstone and Hythe

1

Portsmouth UA

1

Tower Hamlets

1

Aberdeen City UA

1

Reading

1

Maidstone

1

Not Applicable

1

Bradford

1

Bristol UA

1

Tonbridge & Malling

1

North Ayrshire UA

1

North Lanarkshire UA

1

Cardiff UA

1

Guildford

1

Waltham Forest

1

Kensington & Chelsea

1

South Lanarkshire UA

1

Newcastle-upon-Tyne

1

West Lothian UA

1

Leicester UA

1

York

1

Northampton

1

NB: the above data was extracted from an operational database on 4th June 2020 and is subject to change e.g. due to the delay between a site visit and recording the information into the database.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she has taken to (a) protect public-facing universal credit and jobcentre staff and (b) limit their social interaction since 16 March 2020.

DWP has always followed Public Health England guidelines on social distancing. As of 24th March, Jobcentres are only offering face-to-face appointments – conducted in accordance with PHE guidelines on social distancing - for the small number of claimants who would otherwise not be able to receive support. This helps us to continue to deliver our critical services whilst keeping our customers and staff safe.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to provide (a) phone and (b) online appointments for new universal credit claimants.

We have temporarily suspended the requirement for face-to-face Jobcentre Plus appointments for all claimants in Universal Credit, Job Seekers’ Allowance (JSA), Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and Income Support. Advances for all new UC claimants are now available online / via phone, with no requirement to attend a job centre.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether new universal credit claimants have been required to attend in-person appointments after a phone assessment since 16 March 2020.

We have temporarily suspended the requirement for face-to-face Jobcentre Plus appointments for all claimants in Universal Credit, Job Seekers’ Allowance (JSA), Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and Income Support. Advances for all new UC claimants are now available online / via phone, with no requirement to attend a job centre.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit claimants have been asked to attend in-person appointments with the imposition of sanctions if they failed to attend since 16 March 2020.

As both the Prime Minister and Chancellor have made clear, the Government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID 19 and we have been clear in our intention that everyone should be supported to do the right thing.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what information her Department holds on the average (a) journey time and (b) distance universal credit claimants have made to attend in-person appointments in the latest period for which figures are available.

This information is not collected.

Since the introduction of Universal Credit, claimants have been supported by a more flexible approach to contact, with much greater use of digital and telephone channels. This enables claimants to continue to engage with the Department, receive appropriate support and satisfy the conditions of their personalised Claimant Commitment, without having to always attend an appointment in person.

Claimants can also access free telephony and web support through the Citizen’s Advice Help to Claim service.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he is taking to ensure limited social interaction in relation to appointments for new universal credit claimants since 16 March 2020.

DWP has always followed Public Health England guidelines on social distancing. As of 24th March, Jobcentres are only offering face-to-face appointments – conducted in accordance with PHE guidelines on social distancing - for the small number of claimants who would otherwise not be able to receive support. This helps us to continue to deliver our critical services whilst keeping our customers and staff safe.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will publish the caseload statistics for local housing allowance for each broad rental market area in each of the last three years.

We will place a copy of a document in the library which shows the caseload statistics of Local Housing Allowance claimants in Universal Credit and Housing Benefit for each broad rental market area in each of the last three years.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Written Statement of 13 January 2020, Welfare Update, what estimate he has made of the proportion of properties in each broad rental market area that will be affordable to local housing allowance claimants from April 2020.

In response to COVID-19, this Department has increased Local Housing Allowance (LHA) rates to the 30th percentile of local market rents from April for Universal Credit and Housing Benefit claimants, giving additional financial support for private renters.

This means that 30% of properties in each broad rental market area (BRMA) in England, Scotland and Wales are within the LHA rate with the exception of 15 rates in central and inner London where the national maximum caps continue to apply. The national caps have also been increased and are now based on the Outer London LHA rate plus 20%.

The proportion of properties in central and inner London that are within the LHA rate are set out below:

BRMA

Room

1 Bed

2 Bed

3 Bed

4 Bed

Central London

30%

less than 5%

less than 5%

less than 5%

less than 5%

Inner East London

30%

15%-20%

25%-30%

15%-20%

30%

Inner North London

30%

15%-20%

20%-25%

15%-20%

20%-25%

Inner South East London

30%

30%

30%

30%

30%

Inner South West London

30%

25%-30%

30%

25%-30%

20%-25%

Inner West London

30%

30%

30%

25%-30%

30%

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will maintain targeted affordability funding for local housing allowance from April 2020.

The written ministerial statement laid on Monday announced that the freeze to local housing allowance (LHA) will end and rates will increase by 1.7% from April 2020. Targeted Affordability Funding (TAF) was introduced in recognition that the impact of the freeze may have different effects across the country. As the freeze has ended, there will be no TAF. For individuals who may require more support, Discretionary Housing Payments are available.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many paramedics worked in the NHS in each region in each year since 2010.

A table showing the number of full-time equivalent paramedics employed by National Health Service hospital trusts and commissioning bodies in each NHS region in England in August of each year from 2010 to 2022 is attached.

21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking with the devolved administrations to facilitate cross-border referrals for veterans where there is a clinical need or waiting lists are extremely long.

It is for the devolved administrations to determine health policies for those living in those jurisdictions. In England, all individuals are treated according to clinical need with those requiring urgent treatment prioritised accordingly, irrespective of veteran status. The Department and NHS England meet regularly with National Health Service trusts to discuss waiting lists for planned treatment. This includes assessing current progress on addressing waiting times and sharing advice to deliver on the targets in the ‘Delivery plan for tackling the COVID-19 backlog of elective care’.

In addition to mainstream NHS services, there are several bespoke veteran services in England exclusively available to veterans which have shorter waiting times, including Op COURAGE.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will record (a) how many veterans are seen by NHS commissioned services for mental health support, (b) the time to enter treatment and (c) the length of treatment offered on delivery.

This information is not held in the format requested. However, as of 31 August 2022, over 24,000 referrals have been made to Op COURAGE since April 2019, the bespoke mental health service commissioned by NHS England for veterans. The following table shows the number of referrals to Op COURAGE in each year since 2019.

Year

Number of referrals

2019

4,870

2020

5,261

2021

5,802

2022 to 31 August

4,120

Individuals can have multiple referrals, calls or appointments. In addition, some veterans may also seek support through National Health Service mental health services. The following table shows the average waiting time for treatment to the services provided by Op COURAGE in 2021/2022.

Service

Average waiting time in calendar days

Transition, Intervention and Liaison Service

23 days

Complex Treatment Service

16 days

High Intensity Service

4 days

The length of treatment is dependent on the clinical needs and circumstances of the veteran concerned. While NHS England collect data on the length of treatment offered to individuals within Op COURAGE, there is no standard treatment period as individual treatment times will vary.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when Afghan refugees in the UK and housed in bridging hotels will be offered the covid-19 vaccine; and what proportion of Afghan refugees have received (a) a single dose and (b) two doses of the vaccine.

We have provided £3 million to the National Health Service to support an enhanced healthcare offer for people and their families arriving through Afghan resettlement schemes. The NHS was asked to ensure individuals were offered COVID-19 vaccination in line with national guidelines. Vaccinations are being offered to individuals in all 72 bridging hotel sites.

Information on the proportion of refugees who have received a single and two doses of the vaccine is not available, as general practice data does not record whether individuals have been resettled through the Afghan resettlement scheme.

17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will issue clear guidance to care providers on the use of the Infection Control Fund to pay care home workers their normal wage in the event that they need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of care home workers receiving their normal wage in the event that they need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of using the Infection Control Fund to support care home workers who need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his policy is on care home workers being required to use their annual leave entitlement in the event that they need to stay at home and self-isolate.

The Department has written to local authorities and care providers to remind them of the importance of paying staff normal wages when self-isolating. Since May 2020 the Government has made available an Infection Control Fund and one of the stated purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate. We are working with local government, stakeholders and care providers to ensure as many providers as possible are following our guidance.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, on what date he plans to host the 4th European Political Community Summit.

We value the European Political Community (EPC) as an important platform for coordination and discussion on pan-European issues. We are consulting partners about the UK EPC Summit and will make an announcement in due course.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, how many (a) Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and (b) Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme eligible Afghan nationals classed as (i) principals and (ii) dependents are in Pakistan as of 11 December 2023.

As of 12 December, the number of eligible persons in Pakistan who qualified via Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy was 232 principals and 1,147 dependents and the number of eligible persons who qualified via Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme Pathway 3 was 178 principals and 724 dependents.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department has made an estimate of the number of civilian casualties in Ukraine since February 2022.

We condemn Russia's inhumane assault against Ukraine's civilian population and infrastructure. From February 2022 to 8 October 2023, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights recorded 27,768 civilian casualties in Ukraine: 9,806 killed and 17,962 injured. The actual figures are believed to be considerably higher given the challenges of receiving accurate information from locations under Russian control. The UK is committed to ensuring those responsible for atrocities in Ukraine are held accountable. We are supporting the International Criminal Court's independent investigations and Ukrainian domestic judicial processes, including through the Atrocity Crimes Advisory Group, which provides practical assistance to the Office of the Prosecutor General of Ukraine.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme principals his Department has wrongly assessed as eligible.

Under the first stage of ACRS Pathway 3, the FCDO have made assessments against the eligibility criteria as set out on gov.uk. In a small number of cases where an individual has been assessed as eligible in principle for resettlement, eligibility has subsequently been withdrawn. This is where we have received additional information, either from the individual or in the case of British Council or Gardaworld contractors from their relevant employer and the FCDO has assessed that the individual no longer meets the eligibility criteria or did not meet them in the first instance.

We will provide more detail on ACRS Pathway 3 numbers once we have completed processing all expressions of interest and have assured data.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much the Government has spent on housing Afghans in hotel accommodation in Pakistan since August 2021.

Between August 2021 and September 2023, the UK spent approximately £26.7 million accommodating Afghan nationals eligible for resettlement in the UK under the ARAP and ACRS schemes in hotels in Pakistan.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 12 July 2023 to Question 192253 on Afghanistan: Refugees, how many Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) eligible principals his Department has placed on commercial flights from Pakistan to the UK for relocation under the ARAP scheme.

Since 1 December 2022, the number of Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) - eligible persons placed on commercial flights from Pakistan to the UK is 35 (this includes 4 principals and 31 dependents).

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the (a) priorities and (b) objectives are of MI6 for its chairship of NATO’s intelligence committee.

It is the longstanding policy of successive British Governments that we do not comment on intelligence matters.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, which Minister is responsible for arrangements for the Ukraine Recovery Conference in London in June 2023.

The United Kingdom is proud to co-host the Ukraine Recovery Conference (URC23) with Ukraine. As a co-hosted event, arrangements for URC23 are in collaboration with the Government of Ukraine. The HMG Minister responsible is the Foreign Secretary.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the aims and objectives are for the Ukraine Recovery Conference 2023.

The Ukraine Recovery Conference (URC23) will focus on the role of the private sector in supporting recovery and reconstruction. It will provide a platform for the Government of Ukraine to set out its priority reforms, particularly in the business environment and for international partners to signal their support and their offer to Ukraine. The Conference will look at how to unblock obstacles to investment and how governments, the private sector and civil society can work together to support recovery and reconstruction efforts in the longer-term.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 18 April to Question 175506 on Afghanistan: Refugees, how many of the 200 individuals informed by his Department to be eligible in principle for resettlement to the UK under Pathway 3 were (a) British Council workers, (b) GardaWorld contractors, (c) Chevening alumni and (d) other.

The FCDO has informed over 250 British Council contractors, GardaWorld contractors and Chevening alumni that they are eligible in principle for resettlement under ACRS Pathway 3, subject to passing security checks. Including their family members, this accounts for over 1,200 of the 1,500 available places in the first year under Pathway 3. The FCDO has been in contact with all individuals who submitted expressions of interest (EOIs) under ACRS Pathway 3 and has communicated an outcome on over 11,200 (98 per cent) of the over 11,400 EOIs received. We are continuing to work at pace to allocate the remaining places. We will not be commenting on individual cohort numbers while EOIs are still being processed and security checks are outstanding. We will update Parliament once we have completed the allocation process, notified all those who submitted EOIs of the outcome and have assured data to share.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 18 April to Question 175506 on Afghanistan: Refugees, how many of the 11,200 people who submitted an expression of interest and were not deemed eligible in principle for relocation to the UK under Pathway 3, have been informed of their ineligibility.

The FCDO has informed over 250 British Council contractors, GardaWorld contractors and Chevening alumni that they are eligible in principle for resettlement under ACRS Pathway 3, subject to passing security checks. Including their family members, this accounts for over 1,200 of the 1,500 available places in the first year under Pathway 3. The FCDO has been in contact with all individuals who submitted expressions of interest (EOIs) under ACRS Pathway 3 and has communicated an outcome on over 11,200 (98 per cent) of the over 11,400 EOIs received. We are continuing to work at pace to allocate the remaining places. We will not be commenting on individual cohort numbers while EOIs are still being processed and security checks are outstanding. We will update Parliament once we have completed the allocation process, notified all those who submitted EOIs of the outcome and have assured data to share.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many (a) principles and (b) dependents with confirmed eligibility for relocation to the UK from the (i) Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and (ii) Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme are currently housed in hotel accommodation in (A) Pakistan and (B) other third countries.

As of 17 April there were approximately 218 principals and 968 dependents in UK-funded accommodation in Pakistan and other third countries assessed eligible under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy Scheme, and 74 principals and 230 dependents assessed eligible under the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme. The Home Office and UK Visas and Immigration process cases to confirm eligibility to relocate to the UK.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many people (a) expressed interest in Pathway 3 and (b) were approved for relocation to the UK via that pathway under the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme.

The UK Government received over 11,400 expressions of interest (EOI) under ACRS Pathway 3. To date, the FCDO has informed over 200 individuals that they are eligible in principle for resettlement to the UK under Pathway 3, subject to passing security checks. Including their dependents, this accounts for over 1000 of the 1500 available places in the first year of Pathway 3.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much the Government spends per day on accommodation for Afghans in the (a) Margalla Hotel, (b) Islamabad Hotel, (c) Envoy Continental, (d) Legend Palace, (e) IFQ Hotel and Resort, (f) Legend Hotel Islamabad and (g) Crown Plaza in Pakistan.

The total cost of accommodation and meals for ARAP (Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy) and ACRS (Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme) cases in Pakistan between 1 April 2022 and 28 February 2023 is approximately £15 million. For security reasons, we do not specify which hotels are used.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many full time staff from (a) his Department and (b) other Government departments are working on the Ukraine Cyber Programme.

The Conflict Stability and Security Fund Ukraine Cyber Programme is a cross government fund led by FCDO and supported by the Ministry of Defence, National Crime Agency and National Cyber Security Centre. We do not release more detailed information on the Ukraine Cyber Programme for operational security reasons.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the budget is for the Ukraine Cyber Programme in the 2022-23 financial year.

We have led the way alongside international partners to identify and expose malign Russian activity and to hold Russian hostile activity to account. Since Putin's invasion in February, we have committed a total of £7.3 million through the Conflict Stability and Security Fund Ukraine Cyber Programme to date; this is to protect Ukraine's critical national infrastructure and vital public services from cyber-attacks.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment has he made of the humanitarian impact of the UK withdrawal from the UN peacekeeping mission MINUSMA in Mali.

The UK remains troubled about rising instability in Mali and the wider Sahel and the impact of this on the humanitarian situation. A third of the population in Mali need humanitarian assistance, including 1.8 million people in food crisis or emergency. The UN peacekeeping mission (MINUSMA) has a key role to play in creating a secure environment for the safe, civilian-led delivery of humanitarian assistance and, as a Permanent Member of the UN Security Council, the UK will continue to support the mission in fulfilling its objectives. The UK remains committed to supporting those most in need, last year we spent around £300 million in the Sahel, including in Mali. The UK recently announced new support for 2022 which provides vital food, water and sanitation assistance for people in the Sahel and Lake Chad Basin, focused on areas where conflict, climate change and extreme hunger are causing the most suffering.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps is his department taking to support Ukrainian authorities in the clearance of unexploded ordinance and landmines from recently liberated Ukrainian territories.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) has a £2m agreement with the Halo Trust to clear unexploded ordinance and landmines from recently liberated Ukrainian territories. FCDO support has already funded HALO to clear 22,985 square metres of land. The UK-led multi-donor Partnership Fund for a Resilient Ukraine (PFRU) has provided £2m to build the capability of the Ukrainian Special Emergency Services to undertake mine clearance and disposal. The FCDO is also funding the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and working closely with UNDP, the Ukrainian authorities, and other donors to strengthen national and sub-national demining capacity and coordination in Ukraine.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment has he made of the security implications of the security situation in Somalia during drought and food shortages in that country.

Drought and food insecurity, combined with an already difficult security situation, are having a serious impact on Somalia. Displacement rates are increasing, including due to ongoing conflict. The UK is a major security partner to Somalia and in the region, working with others to counter Al-Shabaab and build Somali security forces' capacity. The UK is also providing urgently needed humanitarian assistance to those most affected in Somalia and across the region. On 21 September at the UN General Assembly, the Minister for Development, Vicky Ford MP, announced £22.8 million package assistance for Somalia to alleviate the impact of drought and address the risk of famine. This brings the UK's total support to Somalia since 1 April 2022 to £52.8 million covering humanitarian, protection, health, and nutrition support. We are also stepping up our diplomatic and political engagement to increase life-saving support from the international community.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
21st Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the impact on regional security of escalating military tensions between Armenia and Azerbaijan since the start of September 2022 and following the conclusion of the Nagorno Karabakh War.

The UK Government condemns the recent violence along the international border between Armenia and Azerbaijan. In calls with Armenian Foreign Minister Mirzoyan and Azerbaijani Foreign Minister Bayramov on 15 and 17 September respectively, I reinforced the need for a cessation of hostilities and a return to substantive negotiations to settle all outstanding matters between the parties. The United Kingdom will continue to work with both parties in the coming months to support efforts to secure regional stability and security.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps is he taking to support Ukrainian authorities with the exhumation and identification of victims of alleged mass killings by Russian forces in (a) Bucha and (b) Izyum.

The Attorney General led a scoping mission to the region in May, to assess how the UK could help the Ukrainian Prosecutor General to identify and collect evidence of atrocities. Since then, the UK has been supporting the Office of the Prosecutor General in its work to investigate potential war crimes committed in Ukraine. Our support has included the creation of the Atrocity Crimes Advisory Group, which the UK helped to establish alongside the United States and the European Union, and a £2.5 million support package.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she has plans to appoint a UK Ambassador to the Arctic region.

The UK takes a whole-of-government approach to the Arctic, overseen by a Minister with responsibility for the Polar Regions in FCDO. The UK attends all major Arctic meetings and conferences, either from the UK or from our embassies in the region.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she plans to attend the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Treaty Review Conference in August 2022.

The UK looks forward to working with all states to strengthen the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) at the Tenth Review Conference in August. The FCDO is still finalising Ministerial attendance. The senior official who will represent the UK delegation will be the UK's Permanent Representative to the Conference on Disarmament.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 27 June 2022 to Question 23221, how many meetings of the National Security Council she has attended since April 2022.

The National Security Council is a committee of the Cabinet. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
28th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many meetings of the National Security Council she has attended since April 2022.

The National Security Council is a committee of the Cabinet. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
12th May 2022
To ask the Secretary for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she plans to lay the security and defence agreements signed between the UK, Sweden and Finland before Parliament under the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010; and if she will make a statement.

The Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010 makes provision for treaties subject to ratification first to be laid before Parliament. The Act's definition of a treaty does not capture arrangements which are not legally binding under international law.

The joint statements made between the UK and Finland and the UK and Sweden on 11 May both note that they are political declarations and are not legally binding obligations under international law. The statements in their entirety were published on gov.uk immediately after their signature. These are available at: https://www.gov.uk/international/foreign-affairs#policy_and_engagement

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many UK personnel have worked at the National Cyber Security Centre in each year since 2015.

We do not provide exact figures on the number of personnel working at NCSC for reasons of national security.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment the Government has made of the potential effect on the ceasefire in eastern Ukraine of the OSCE’s special monitoring mission's budget not being renewed beyond March 2022.

The UK is resolute in our support to the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission (SMM). With partners, we will call on all OSCE participating States to ensure a timely adoption of the budget for 2022/23 and continue to support efforts to ensure the SMM is able to fully implement its mandate.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many British employees are funded by the UK’s funding to the OSCE’s special monitoring mission in Ukraine.

The UK provides the third largest number of secondees to the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission. The specific figure, which currently stands at around 50, changes regularly subject to Mission needs and the availability of UK candidates.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much annual funding does the Government provide to the OSCE’s special monitoring mission in Ukraine.

Information on the UK's financial contribution to OSCE Field Missions can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/conflict-stability-and-security-fund-annual-report-2020-to-2021/conflict-stability-and-security-fund-annual-report-2020-to-2021#annex-b-cssf-non-discretionary-spend-breakdown

Information on the budget of the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission can be found here: https://www.osce.org/files/f/documents/0/0/484139.pdf

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 14 December 2021 to Question 90329 on Nuclear Weapons: Proliferation, which recommendations in the Stockholm Initiative for Nuclear Disarmament her Department does not support.

The UK supports the Stockholm Initiative for Nuclear Disarmament and agrees with the principles behind its recommendations. The UK has made significant progress in fulfilling certain recommendations including in reducing our nuclear arsenal to the minimum credible level and reducing the role of nuclear weapons in our security policies. However, the Integrated Review set out the current deteriorating strategic security environment which limits further unilateral action from the UK at this time. In this context, the UK cannot further reduce our arsenal or the role our nuclear weapons play in our policies and doctrine, nor can we tighten our negative security assurances. Our NPT national report highlights the UK's continued commitment to the long-term goal of a world without nuclear weapons and our work to facilitate progress towards nuclear disarmament.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many UK officials will be attending the 2022 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference.

The UK's delegation at the 2022 Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons will be led by the UK's Permanent Representative to the Conference on Disarmament. Delegations this year will be limited in number because of restrictions related to the Covid pandemic.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure that Afghans who are (a) not eligible under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and (b) at risk of harm from the Taliban in Afghanistan are given assistance before the Afghan Citizens' Resettlement Scheme opens.

We have committed to provide £286 million in humanitarian and development support and continue to explore the best ways to provide support to the Afghan people. The Prime Minister's Special Representative for the Afghan Transition, Sir Simon Gass, and Chargé d'Affaires of the UK Mission to Afghanistan in Doha, Dr Martin Longden, travelled to Afghanistan on 5 October to hold talks with the Taliban. Sir Simon and Dr Longden stressed the need to ensure continued safe passage for those who wish to leave the country and respect human rights, including the rights of minorities and women and girls.

During Op PITTING we were able to get approval for evacuation of a number of Afghan nationals, to whom the Home Secretary agreed to grant Leave Outside the Rules to enter the UK, in addition to the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy contingent and British nationals. These people were identified as being particularly at risk and not all were able to leave before the end of the Operation. Providing assistance to those individuals eligible for HMG support remains our priority.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications of the takeover of Kabul by the Taliban for the security of the UK and its allies.

One of our key objectives is to stop Afghanistan from again becoming a base for terrorist attacks around the world, to reduce the threat to the UK and the international community. We will work with our allies and use all the levers at our disposal to achieve this.

20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what steps he has taken to further the development of international (a) norms, (b) rules and (c) principles on responsible behaviours in space in each of the last six months.

In December 2020, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a UK-led resolution on "Reducing Space Threat through norms, rules and principles of responsible behaviour". The resolution called for States to study space threats and contribute their ideas to the United Nations Secretary-General by 3 May 2021. The United Kingdom submitted its views which can be found on the website of the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs, https://www.un.org/disarmament/topics/outerspace-sg-report-outer-space-2021/.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 16 November 2023 to Question 694 on Russia: Defence Equipment, how many (a) allegations have been received, (b) investigations have taken place and (c) penalties have been issued in relation to UK sanctions against Russia since February 2022.

HMRC has been enforcing sanctions against Russia since 2014. Since increased sanctions were announced on 24 February 2022, HMRC has implemented a number of measures which aim to prevent the exportation and importation of restricted goods and respond to breaches of those sanctions.

This includes increased border checks in collaboration with Border Force, trader awareness products and where appropriate the criminal investigation of any breaches, with a view to achieving an enforcement outcome such as a fine or prosecution.

HMRC is conducting multiple ongoing investigations into credible reports of sanctions and export control offences, including controls on the supply of defence equipment to Russia and other countries. These investigations can take a year or more to conclude. The department does not comment on individual investigations.

Since February 2022, HMRC has fined five UK companies through the Compound Settlement scheme for breaches of the UK’s trade sanctions on Russia. Three of these fines have been published in the Notice To Exporters and the other two will be published soon: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/notices-to-exporters#notices-to-exporters-2023.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many UK-based companies his Department has identified as having exported (a) military and (b) dual use capabilities to Russia in violation of UK sanctions since February 2022.

The UK has prohibited the export to Russia of thousands of products, including military and dual use items. Our trade with Russia is down over 96% on pre-invasion levels.

HMRC enforces customs controls on Strategic Exports and sanctioned goods, including arms exports. The department takes breaches of sanctions very seriously and investigates all credible allegations of sanctions offences within its customs remit.

NTE 2023/17: a compound settlement - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Due to the confidentiality element of Compound Settlements, HMRC is unable to disclose details of the types of goods or companies involved.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Nov 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 5 September to Question 40737 on Ukraine: Military Aid, how much funding is being provided by each Department; and how much of this funding comes from Departmental under spend in the 2022-23 financial year.

Earlier this year, the UK provided £1bn in additional support to enhance and sustain Ukraine’s resistance to the Russian invasion. This new funding came from contributions from UK government departments and the devolved administrations’ existing budgets.

All ministerial departments contributed capital from their 2022-23 budgets towards military aid for Ukraine. I refer the rt honourable member to the answer given by my predecessor (Simon Clarke MP) on 5th September 2022 to PQ UIN 14298 for the full list.

Most departments committed around 1.5% of their 2022-23 capital budgets.

These contributions will be formally confirmed at Supplementary Estimates, where revised departmental budgets will be published by HM Treasury in the usual way.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
3rd Nov 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 5 September to Question 40737 on Ukraine: Military Aid, how much each Department contributed; and how much of each contribution came from a departmental under spend for this financial year.

Earlier this year, the UK provided £1bn in additional support to enhance and sustain Ukraine’s resistance to the Russian invasion. This new funding came from contributions from UK government departments and the devolved administrations’ existing budgets.

All ministerial departments contributed capital from their 2022-23 budgets towards military aid for Ukraine. I refer the rt honourable member to the answer given by my predecessor (Simon Clarke MP) on 5th September 2022 to PQ UIN 14298 for the full list.

Most departments committed around 1.5% of their 2022-23 capital budgets.

These contributions will be formally confirmed at Supplementary Estimates, where revised departmental budgets will be published by HM Treasury in the usual way.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
22nd Sep 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what debt relief the UK will provide to Ukraine to help ensure economic stability during winter 2022.

On 20 July, the UK, as part of the Group of Creditors to Ukraine, announced a debt service suspension for Ukraine from 1 August 2022 to December 2023. This agreement means that Ukraine will face no repayments to these bilateral creditors over this period, which eases liquidity pressures and allows the government to focus its scarce resources on more urgent budgetary needs, thus helping to mitigate the economic impact of Russia’s illegal war in Ukraine.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
20th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 19 July 2022 to Question 36000 on Ukraine: Military Aid, from which Departments has the additional £1 billion of support to Ukraine been drawn from.

All ministerial departments contributed from their 2022-23 capital budgets towards military aid for Ukraine. See full list below:

Attorney General’s Office; Cabinet Office; Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy; Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport; Department for Education; Department for Environment Food, & Rural Affairs; Department for International Trade; Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities; Department for Transport; Department for Work and Pensions; Department of Health and Social Care; Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office; HM Treasury; Home Office; and Ministry of Justice;

We also received contributions from the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Territorial Offices (the Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland, the Office of the Secretary of State for Wales, and the Northern Ireland Office).

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 27 June 2022 to Question 23221 on Military Aid: Ukraine, how many meetings of the National Security Council he has personally attended since April 2022.

The National Security Council is a committee of the Cabinet. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

28th Jun 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many meetings of the National Security Council he has attended since April 2022.

The National Security Council is a committee of the Cabinet. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

7th Jun 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department plans to take account of inflation when calculating the funds to be provided to the Ministry of Defence for replacing the stockpiles of weapons supplied to Ukraine.

HM Treasury provides departments with settlements on a cash basis, and they are expected to manage the impacts of inflation within these settlements.

Last month, the Government announced an additional £1.3bn funding for military support to Ukraine. This funding was provided for the 2022/23 financial year and reflective of latest cost forecasts.

29th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the total estimated cost is of the reduction to day-to-day spending at his Department between 1 April 2022 and 2025 based on the predicted levels of inflation for that period.

As part of SR21, departments were asked to meet strict planning assumptions which were based on the expectation that departments would deliver savings over the Spending Review period. At SR21 the government also committed to reducing non-frontline civil service headcount to 2019-20 levels by 2024-25, bar justifiable exemptions.

As a result of this HMT’s day-to-day nominal spending is planned to reduce by £25m between April 2022 and April 2025.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of (a) 10 November 2021 to Question 68120 on Ministry of Defence: Fines and (b) 19 November 2021 to Question 75808 on Government Departments: Fines, what information his Department holds on remedial actions imposed by his Department on (i) the Ministry of Defence and (ii) other Government Departments, in the latest period for which data is available.

The Treasury answered UIN 68120 on 10 November 2021 confirming that the department does not hold a central record of the remedial actions that have historically been taken, and such actions can take many forms.

The Minister for Defense Procurement’s answers of 9th and 10th November (to questions UIN 68119 and 68120) explained the actions taken in respect of the cases reported in the department’s annual reports and accounts, and explained the reasons why these were reportable. Other Government departments will report fines in their annual reports and accounts in a similar manner.

Fines imposed by the Treasury on other government departments are considered fruitless payment, a form of loss. Managing Public Money directs departments to report fruitless payments in the Loss Statement of the Parliamentary Accountability section of their annual report and accounts.

Departments are in the process of laying and publishing annual reports and accounts for the 2020-21 period. Annual reports and accounts for central government departments for 2018-19, 2019-20 and 2020-21 are linked in the Central Government Department’s annual reports and accounts central landing page.

16th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many fines have been issued by his Department to other Government departments in each year since 2010 for accountancy misconduct; and what the value of each fine was.

Government entities are required to produce annual reports and accounts in accordance with the Financial Reporting Manual, which adapts and interprets UK adopted International Financial Reporting Standards for the UK public sector context and sets out how to account for the use of resources. The annual reports and accounts are independently audited by the Comptroller and Auditor General (C&AG), supported by the National Audit Office (NAO), to offer assurance that the underlying transactions have appropriate parliamentary authority and that the accounts have been properly prepared and are free of material misstatements.

The C&AG may qualify his opinion should the findings of the audit suggest that there has not been appropriate parliamentary authority, that the accounts have not been properly prepared or that they are materially misstated. Such matters are drawn to the attention of the Public Accounts Committee which may call the Accounting Officer to account for the findings of the audit. HM Treasury does not issue fines or penalties over the quality of financial reporting as audited by the C&AG.

However, as set out in the Consolidated Budgeting Guidance, the budgeting framework allows for The Chief Secretary to consider further remedial action to incentivise good financial management and penalise actions that break certain rules or actions that fall below expectations. This may include asking the NAO to investigate the value for money that the department achieves, conducting a financial management review, reducing delegated authorities, removing access to Budget Exchange and/or making deductions to administration budgets. In all cases, the Treasury retains the right to apply whatever penalties are appropriate to incentivise good financial management and value for money. The Treasury does not hold a central record of the remedial actions that have historically been taken.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the financial impact on savers with a National Savings and Investments (NS&I) account after the reduction of the premium bond prize fund rate from 1.4 per cent to 1 per cent in December 2020.

In setting interest rates for its products, NS&I must balance the interests of savers, taxpayers and the broader financial services sector.

With unprecedented Government funding requirements in 2020 due to Covid-19 pandemic measures and amid significant uncertainty and volatility in the retail savings market, NS&I experienced unprecedented upside pressures on its Net Financing. In the first six months of 2020-21, NS&I raised a total of £38.3 billion of Net Financing for the Government, so a decision was taken to reduce the Premium Bond rates to mitigate the risk of NS&I exceeding its £35 billion (+/- £5 billion) Net Financing target.

More broadly, it is important that Government takes into account taxpayer value considerations when making financing decisions. With gilt yields at low levels for the majority of the past year, the Government financing raised through NS&I has been more expensive than that raised through gilt issuance.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
29th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to provide self-employed workers with 80 per cent of their profits prior to the start of the covid-19 outbreak in the fourth Self-Employed Income Support Scheme grant.

The Government recognises the importance of supporting the self-employed during the COVID-19 outbreak. The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) provides generous support to self-employed people who meet the eligibility criteria.

There will be a fourth SEISS grant covering February to April 2021. Further details on the SEISS, including the fourth grant, will be announced on 3 March.

15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 13 October 2020 to Question 100891, how many and what proportion of brewers produce (a) less than 2,100 hectolitres per year and (b) between 2,100 and 5,000 hectolitres per year.

Further information about small breweries will be published with the technical consultation on Small Brewers Relief this Autumn.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many breweries produce less than (a) 2,100 hectolitres and (b) 5,000 hectolitres of beer in each local authority area each year.

HMRC publishes annual statistics on Small Brewers Relief, this includes the total number of people claiming the relief and the cost of the relief. Information on the location of Brewers receiving the relief is not readily available. The latest publication of annual tax relief data for Small Brewers Relief can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/main-tax-expenditures-and-structural-reliefs.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the value is of the small breweries relief to breweries producing (a) 3,000 hectolitres, (b) 4,000 hectolitres and (c) 5,000 hectolitres of beer each year.

Small Brewers producing less than 5,000 hectolitres per year are currently entitled to a 50% reduction in the rate of duty charged on their beer. The value of the relief to an individual Brewer will depend on the strength of the beer produced. At an average strength of 4% this would reduce a Brewer’s beer duty bill by £114,480 on 3,000 hectolitres, £152,640 on 4,000 hectolitres, and £190.800 on 5,000 hectolitres per annum.

HMRC publishes annual statistics on Small Brewers Relief, this includes the number of people claiming the relief and the total cost of the relief. Information on the total cost of the relief by production volume is not readily available. The latest publication of annual tax relief data for Small Brewers Relief can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/main-tax-expenditures-and-structural-reliefs.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the economic effect of small breweries relief on small brewers.

We are conducting a review of Small Brewers Relief, and further announcements about this will be made in due course.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether (a) changes to minimum income thresholds and (b) other changes to legal migration rules for (i) family and (ii) work visas apply to members of the armed forces.

We will set out full details of changes to the Immigration Rules for members of the Armed Forces when we intend to lay the Immigration Rules on 14 March.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the total sum paid by the dependents of non-UK citizens was who served in the armed forces for (a) four and (b) five years and were granted indefinite leave to remain in (i) 2021, (ii) 2022 and (iii) 2023.

We do not publish this data in the format required.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many non-UK citizens who served in the Armed Forces for (a) four and (b) five years applied for indefinite leave to remain and had to pay visa fees in (i) 2021, (ii) 2022 and (iii) 2023.

We do not publish this data in the format required.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many ARAP applicants awaiting a decision are residing in UK hotels as of 30 January 2024.

Relocation to the UK is only facilitated once ARAP eligibility status has been decided and entry clearance has been issued, therefore there are no ARAP applicants awaiting an immigration decision residing in UK hotels.

The UK has made an ambitious and generous commitment to resettle.

Afghans fleeing persecution and those who served the UK. The latest published Immigration system statistics - (www.gov.uk) show that (up to the end of September 2023) we have brought around 24,600 people to safety from Afghanistan and the region.

These statistics also show that:

  • We have relocated 11,684 under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP); and
  • 1,674 people were living in interim accommodation (i.e. hotels and serviced accommodation) during this period (though this number changes frequently, and most of those within interim have now moved into settled accommodation) as of September 2023.

ARAP arrivals correct as of around December 2023, and accommodation data, will be reflected in the next release of the Immigration Statistics, which is due around 22 February 2024.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people that have relocated to the UK under the Afghan citizens resettlement scheme are residing in hotels.

The UK has made an ambitious and generous commitment to resettle.

Afghans fleeing persecution and those who served the UK. The latest published Immigration system statistics - (www.gov.uk) show that (up to the end of September 2023) we have brought around 24,600 people to safety from Afghanistan and the region.

These statistics also show that:

  • we have resettled 9,839 people under all three of the Afghan Citizens Resettlement scheme (ACRS) pathways;
  • we have relocated 11,684 under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP); and
  • 1,674 people were living in interim accommodation (i.e. hotels/serviced accommodation) during this period (though this number changes frequently, and most of those within interim have now moved into settled accommodation) as of September 2023.

ACRS and ARAP arrivals correct as of around December 2023, and accommodation data will be reflected in the next release of the Immigration Statistics, which is due around 22 February 2024.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people approved for relocation under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy are residing in hotels in the UK as of 30 January 2024.

The UK has made an ambitious and generous commitment to resettle.

Afghans fleeing persecution and those who served the UK. The latest published Immigration system statistics - (www.gov.uk) show that (up to the end of September 2023) we have brought around 24,600 people to safety from Afghanistan and the region.

These statistics also show that:

  • we have resettled 9,839 people under all three of the Afghan Citizens Resettlement scheme (ACRS) pathways;
  • we have relocated 11,684 under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP); and
  • 1,674 people were living in interim accommodation (i.e. hotels/serviced accommodation) during this period (though this number changes frequently, and most of those within interim have now moved into settled accommodation) as of September 2023.

ACRS and ARAP arrivals correct as of around December 2023, and accommodation data will be reflected in the next release of the Immigration Statistics, which is due around 22 February 2024.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to Oral Statement from the Minister for Veteran Affairs of 13 December 2023 on Afghan Resettlement Update, Official Report, column 911, what estimate he has made of the potential cost of extending contracts for temporary hotel accommodation beyond 31 December 2023.

The Government remains committed to ending the systemic use of hotels, and we do not plan to open new hotels to meet this increased demand.

The information requested on hotel contracts is not publicly available, however, a small number of hotels with existing contracts will be extended for a limited time period to help accommodate ACRS arrivals who have yet to be matched to settled housing solutions in the United Kingdom.

The latest published statistics on Afghan resettlement, up until the end of September, may be viewed at: Immigration system statistics quarterly release - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The next publication of Afghan resettlement data sets is due to be published around 22 February 2024.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Oral Statement from the Minister for Veteran Affairs of 13 December 2023 on Afghan Resettlement Update, Official Report, column 911, how many and what proportion of hotels will the Government extend contracts with to house Afghans beyond 31 December 2023.

The Government remains committed to ending the systemic use of hotels, and we do not plan to open new hotels to meet this increased demand.

The information requested on hotel contracts is not publicly available, however, a small number of hotels with existing contracts will be extended for a limited time period to help accommodate ACRS arrivals who have yet to be matched to settled housing solutions in the United Kingdom.

The latest published statistics on Afghan resettlement, up until the end of September, may be viewed at: Immigration system statistics quarterly release - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The next publication of Afghan resettlement data sets is due to be published around 22 February 2024.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of (a) principals and (b) dependents have been relocated under Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme pathway (i) one and (ii) two each month since July 2022.

The UK has made an ambitious and generous commitment to help at-risk people in Afghanistan and, so far, we have brought around 24,600 people to safety, including thousands of people eligible for our Afghan schemes. We continue to honour our commitments to bring eligible Afghans to the UK.

The data published within the immigration system statistics release (month ending September 2023, published 23 November 2023) provides a breakdown of arrivals by quarter. The number of individuals resettled under the schemes is as follows: 9,699 individuals under ACRS Pathway 1, 70 individuals under ACRS Pathway 2 and 70 individuals under ACRS Pathway 3.

Afghan operational data is viewable at: Afghan Resettlement Programme: operational data - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)(opens in a new tab).

Afghan operational data is released quarterly with the next publication due around the 22 February 2024.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will publish a list of the military sites being used to house (a) Afghan and (b) other refugees and asylum seekers; and what the cost to the public purse is of using these sites for that purpose.

Home Office does not hold the information requested as the costs are held by the Ministry of Defence.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Answer of 19 October 2023 to Question 202637, whether her Department has collected data on the number of Afghans housed in hotel accommodation in March 2023 who were given at least one offer of permanent accommodation before 31 August 2023.

The one offer accommodation matching process was introduced on 02 May 2023.

The one offer accommodation matching process has seen 74 households refuse offers of accommodation. This is in addition to the 317 accommodation offers refused under the previous process.

This is the best available operational data as of 31 August 2023. A further Operational data release is due on 23 November 2023.

19th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 16 October 2023 to Question 199700 Refugees: Afghanistan, if she will publish the data on arrival dates collected for internal and operational use; and what guidance her Department issues on the status of such data under the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

Exact arrival dates are not contained within the quarterly Immigration system statistics, however arrivals by quarter can be found within the immigration statistics for year ending June 2023 - GOV.UK

The data that is published for arrivals under Afghan Resettlement Schemes is viewable at: Immigration system statistics quarterly release - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Freedom of Information requests for Afghan resettlement data are dealt with in accordance with the relevant FOIA guidance.

18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral statement of 19 September 2023 by the Minister for Veterans Affairs, Official Report columns 1253 to 1255, how many Afghan families housed in bridging hotels before March 2023 moved into private accommodation without assistance from the Government.

There is no published breakdown of the number of individuals who moved into private accommodation during the requested period.

Transparency data has recently been released (published on 19 September 2023), following the end of bridging accommodation use. This provides a helpful overview of the best available operational data as of 31 August 2023, and can be viewed at: Afghan bridging hotel exit operational data - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the contribution of the Minister for Veterans Affairs in the debate on Resettlement of Afghans on 19 September 2023, Official Report, column 1253, how many and what proportion of the Afghans housed in hotel accommodation in March 2023 were given at least one offer of permanent accommodation before 31 August 2023.

There is no published breakdown of the number of individuals who received a property offer during the stated period.

We gave Afghans living in hotels and serviced apartments three months’ notice in which they would need to leave their bridging accommodation - and stepped up our support to help them find settled accommodation. This was backed by £285m of new funding for councils which included a flexible housing fund worth £7,100 per person which many LAs used as rent top ups to enable this cohort to access private rented sector properties. The UK Government has granted all Afghans relocated through safe and legal routes with Indefinite Leave to Remain, including the immediate right to work, alongside access to the benefits system and vital health, education, and employment support.

Transparency data has recently been released (published on 19 September 2023), following the end of bridging accommodation use. This provides a helpful overview of the best available operational data as of 31 August 2023, and can be viewed at: Afghan bridging hotel exit operational data - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). This publication confirms that there were over 8,000 Afghans living in bridging accommodation on 28 March, when the plan to end Bridging accommodation was announced. It also shows that overall, 10,404 people have been housed by a local authorities since June 2021.

15th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 14 September 2023 to Question 198599, if her Department will collect the data not held within the quarterly Immigration system statistics, year ending June 2023.

The data requested on arrival dates is not anticipated to be publicly released in future iterations of the quarterly Immigration system statistics. It is collected for internal and operational use only.

12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 7 September 2023 to Question 195655 on Afghanistan: Refugees, if she will publish the data her Department holds on how many (a) principals and (b) dependents have been relocated to the UK under the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme (i) Pathway 2 and (ii) Pathway 3 as of 1 September 2023.

Afghan operational data is released quarterly with the next release due for publication in November 2023. This will include data on the number of people resettled under Pathway 2 and Pathway 3 of Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme.

Official statistics published by the Home Office are kept under review in line with the code of practice for statistics, taking into account a number of factors including user needs, as well as quality and availability of data.

12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 7 September 2023 to Question 195655 on Afghanistan: Refugees, for what reason data on separating principals and dependants is not publicly available.

Afghan operational data is released quarterly with the next release due for publication in November 2023. This will include data on the number of people resettled under Pathway 2 and Pathway 3 of Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme.

Official statistics published by the Home Office are kept under review in line with the code of practice for statistics, taking into account a number of factors including user needs, as well as quality and availability of data.

11th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 7 September to Question 195657 on Afghanistan: Refugees, on what exact date the first cohort of Afghan people arrive in the UK under (a) Pathway 2 and (b) Pathway 3 under the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme.

Exact arrival dates are not contained within the quarterly Immigration system statistics, year ending June 2023 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date did the first cohort of Afghan people arrive in the UK under (a) Pathway 2 and (b) Pathway 3 under the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme.

The UK has made one of the largest commitments of any country to support those impacted by events in Afghanistan.

Whilst public data on separating principals and dependants is not available, the latest Immigration system statistics, year ending June 2023 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) (published on 24 August 2023), show that since their first arrivals in 2021, the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) and the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) - have resettled a total of 21,526 people.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) principals and (b) dependents have been relocated to the UK under the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme (i) Pathway 2 and (ii) Pathway 3 as of 1 September 2023.

The UK has made one of the largest commitments of any country to support those impacted by events in Afghanistan.

Whilst public data on separating principals and dependants is not available, the latest Immigration system statistics, year ending June 2023 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) (published on 24 August 2023), show that since their first arrivals in 2021, the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) and the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) - have resettled a total of 21,526 people.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan people who were previously housed in hotel accommodation in the UK prior to 31 August 2023 have presented themselves as homeless to local authorities as of 1 September 2023.

The UK made an ambitious and generous commitment to help resettle Afghans fleeing persecution and those who served the UK. Since June 2021, we have brought 24,500 people to safety to the UK.

We will provide an update on the hotel departures, including latest figures this week.

6th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on whether any asylum seekers who have crossed the English Channel in a small boat were Afghans who had previously applied to be relocated to the UK via the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and had not received a response to their application.

The information requested is not held in a reportable format and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost as it would require a manual trawl of case records to retrieve.

22nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 18 May 2023 to Question 184276 on Refugees: Afghanistan, what information her Department holds on the cost to the public purse of her Department's legal costs on Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy principals who were refused relocation to the UK by her Department after having been deemed eligible by the Ministry of Defence.

The Home Office does not hold this information in a reportable format.

22nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 18 May 2023 to Question 184276 on Refugees: Afghanistan, what categories of data her Department holds on its role in the Afghan Relations and Assistance Policy.

The UK has made an ambitious and generous commitment to help relocate some of the most at-risk people in Afghanistan and, so far, we have brought around 24,500 vulnerable people to safety, including thousands of people eligible for the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) and Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP).

Work is underway to assure information relating to all the individuals relocated under the ARAP and ACRS on case working systems. Once this work concludes, statistics on both schemes, including the number of people resettled under each, will be included in the published Immigration Statistics.

Statistics on individuals resettled or relocated under the Afghan schemes are available in the Immigration System Statistics, year ending December 2022 release.

For a summary of the data, see the resettlement section of the ‘How many people do we grant protection to?’ chapter; for detailed data, see table Asy_D02 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets.

The resettlement data here includes those who have been resettled under ‘Pathway 1’ and ‘Pathway 2’ of the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme or relocated under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy.

10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much her Department has spent on legal costs for Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy principals refused relocation to the UK by her Department on national security grounds who later had that refusal decision overturned.

The Home Office does not hold centralised data specifically in relation to the categories as tabled in this question.

10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many principal applicants who received Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy eligibility letters from her Department and were refused entry to the UK by her Department on national security grounds have subsequently had that refusal withdrawn or overturned and have been allowed entry to the UK.

The Home Office do not hold centralised data on this.

The latest Immigration System Statistics, year ending December 2022, show that since their first arrivals in 2021, the Afghan schemes (ACRS and ARAP) have resettled a total of 21,387 people.

5th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to Question 181359 tabled on 18 April 2023 on Refugees: Afghanistan.

A response will be provided in due course.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to issue Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme personnel and their families housed in bridging hotels with notice of their eviction from their hotel accommodation.

Bridging hotels are not, and were never designed to be, permanent accommodation. That is why dedicated teams across central and local government have supported over 9,000 Afghans into settled homes.

However, around 8,000 remain in hotel accommodation. Long-term residency in hotels has prevented some Afghans from properly putting down roots, committing to employment and fully integrating into communities. From the end of April 2023, individuals staying in hotels and serviced accommodation began to receive legal notice to leave their temporary accommodation by a certain date.

Dedicated cross-government casework teams, made up of Home Office Liaison Officers and DWP staff, are based in hotels and are working alongside local authority officials to provide advice to Afghans, including information on how to rent in the private sector, find employment and English language training.

The government is providing £285 million of new funding to local authorities supporting the Afghan resettlement schemes. This includes £35 million which will go towards increasing the level of support available as well as a £250 million expansion of the Local Authority Housing Fund to help councils to source homes for Afghans currently in bridging accommodation.

This new, generous package of support comes in addition to the existing support available for people on the ACRS and ARAP schemes, including access to welfare system, the right to work and full access to public services.

The move from hotels into settled accommodation is in the best interests of families and individuals and will enable them to benefit from the freedoms of independent living that only suitable non-hotel accommodation can provide.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Oral Statement of 29 March 2023 by the Minister for Immigration on Illegal Migration Update, Official Report, column 1018, what estimate she has made of the number of asylum seekers that will be housed at each military site in (a) Essex, (b) Lincolnshire, (c) East Sussex and (d) Catterick.

Details on the number of asylum seekers we estimate to be accommodated on each site are available on Asylum accommodation factsheets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Oral Statement on Illegal Migration Update by the Minister for Immigration on 29 March 2023, Official Report, column 1018, which military sites will be used to house asylum claimants in (a) Essex, (b) Lincolnshire and (c) East Sussex.

We do not comment on individual sites. The Home Office are assessing all suitable options for accommodation.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which Minister holds the responsibilities previously held by the Minister for Afghan Resettlement.

I refer the Rt Hon member to my response to Question 175503 on 18 April 2023: Written questions and answers - Written questions, answers and statements - UK Parliament.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Oral Statement of 29 March 2023 by the Minister for Immigration, on Illegal Migration Update, Official Report, column 1018, what steps she is taking to ensure that (a) current and (b) former service accommodation with (i) mould and (ii) damp issues is not used to house asylum claimants.

As will all asylum accommodation, the Home Office will ensure that all accommodation is safe, habitable, fit for purpose and meets all regulatory requirements.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Oral Statement of 29 March 2023 by the Minister for Immigration, on Illegal Migration Update, Official Report, column 1018, when she plans that asylum seekers will move into each military base in (a) Essex, (b) Lincolnshire, (c) East Sussex and (d) Catterick.

We continue to work with our providers and partners to develop timescales for all sites as soon as possible. This will include engaging timescales through multi-agency forums, bringing together key stakeholders such as Local Authorities, police, health and other partners.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Oral Statement of 29 March 2023 by the Minister for Immigration on Illegal Migration Update, Official Report, column 1018, how long she plans to use military sites to house asylum claimants.

The Home Office are assessing how long asylum seekers will be accommodated at the proposed sites.

29th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Oral Statement to the House on 29 March 2023 by the Minister for Immigration, whether asylum seekers being housed at military bases in the UK will be placed in current or former service accommodation rated (a) grade 1, (b) grade 2, (c) grade 3, (d) grade 4 and (e) below grade 4.

I provided an update to Parliament on 29 March about the ongoing work across Government to secure alternative, more appropriate, cost-effective accommodation options around the country.

The two discussed military sites in Lincolnshire and Essex will provide basic and functional accommodation for migrants who illegally enter the UK by crossing the Channel, instead of using expensive hotels.

The sites will house asylum seekers in former barracks and modular accommodation in an orderly manner with healthcare provision, catering facilities and 24/7 security all on site.

28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) principals and (b) dependants have been relocated from Afghanistan to the UK via the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme under (i) Pathway 2 and (ii) Pathway 3 since June 2022.

The latest Immigration System Statistics, year ending December 2022, show that since their first arrivals in 2021, the Afghan schemes – the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) and the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) - have resettled a total of 21,387 people.

The ACRS will see up to 20,000 people from Afghanistan and the region resettled to the UK over the coming years.

Under the second pathway, which opened in 2022, we have now begun to receive the first referrals from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) of vulnerable refugees who have fled Afghanistan for resettlement to the UK. We are pleased to have welcomed the first 22 people to the UK under Pathway 2.

Under Pathway 3 we have welcomed the first arrivals to the UK and look forward welcoming all remaining individuals under this Pathway as soon as is practically possible. There are currently no published statistics on Pathway 3 as arrivals under this pathway began after the start of the new reporting period. The next publication of statistics is due on 25 May 2023.

28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been referred by the UNHCR to Pathway 2 of the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme.

The latest Immigration System Statistics, year ending December 2022, show that since their first arrivals in 2021, the Afghan schemes – the ACRS and the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) - have resettled a total of 21,387 people.

There are currently no published statistics on UNHCR referrals. We do not hold public data on the volume of referrals from UNHCR. The next publication of statistics is due on 25 May 2023 and may include this data. However, we anticipate receiving referrals from UNHCR for up to 2,000 refugees during the first year of pathway 2, although this number will be kept under review.

Those referred under Pathway 2 of the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be assessed for resettlement by UNHCR using their established process, and in line with their resettlement submission categories, which are based on people’s needs and vulnerabilities.

Referrals are then assessed by the Home Office through a case working process and commissioning of relevant screening and security checks. Other aspects of the case, including medical, housing, and safeguarding needs, will be considered at this stage.

We are pleased to have now welcomed the first 22 arrivals to the UK under ACRS Pathway 2, and we will continue to welcome many more people as we receive further UNHCR referrals.

28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which Minister holds the responsibilities previously held by the Minister for Afghan Resettlement.

As Minister for Immigration, I lead on Resettlement: this includes Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme and Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy.

The Rt Hon member for Wells holds responsibility for Defence Afghanistan Relocation as Minister for Armed Forces. We work closely with Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon as Minister for Middle East, North Africa, South Asia and United Nations.

15th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 14 March 2023 to Question 162117 on Afghanistan: Refugees, how many Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (a) principals and (b) dependents were housed in bridging hotels on 15 March 2023 following their relocation to the UK under that scheme.

All those resettling under the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) or Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP), have recourse to public funds and the right to work and study.

We are working intensively across government, and in partnership with local authorities across the country to both bring down the number of people in bridging hotels and help families move into more sustainable accommodation as quickly as possible so they can put down permanent roots. Local authorities currently receive integration tariff funding of £20,520 per person, over three years, for each Afghan family they resettle and provide full integration support to for this duration.

Statistics on individuals resettled or relocated under the Afghan schemes is available in the Immigration System Statistics, year ending December 2022(opens in a new tab) release.

9th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) (a) principals and (b) dependents are currently being housed in bridging hotels following their relocation to the UK under that scheme.

The Government continues to work at pace, in collaboration with over 350 local authorities across the UK, to meet the demand for housing. Alongside this, we are reaching out to landlords, developers, and the wider private rented sector to encourage further offers of properties.

All those resettling under the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) or Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP), have recourse to public funds and the right to work and study.

We are working intensely across government, and in partnership with c.350 local authorities across the country to both bring down the number of people in bridging hotels and move families into more sustainable accommodation as quickly as possible so they can put down permanent roots. Local authorities currently receive integration tariff funding of £20,520 per person, over three years, for each Afghan family they resettle and provide full integration support to for this duration.

The UK is currently experiencing a shortage of local housing accommodation for all, and we acknowledge that sourcing appropriate accommodation for Afghan families can be a complex process due to the diverse needs of those we are supporting. However, this government will remain committed to ensuring each and every Afghan family resettling in the UK has a permanent home. Whilst hotels do not provide a long-term solution, they do offer safe, secure and clean accommodation.

Statistics on individuals resettled or relocated under the Afghan schemes is available in the Immigration System Statistics, year ending December 2022 release.

22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will list the surplus military sites that have been identified as alternatives to hotels for asylum accommodation.

We do not routinely comment on individual sites or proposals that may or may not be used for bridging or asylum accommodation.

16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the annual research and development budget was of the intelligence agencies in each year since 2010.

The budget for the Security and Intelligence Agencies is paid through the Single Intelligence Account (SIA). This is published on an annual basis. The total budgets since 2010 are:

2021/22 - £4.12 billion

2020/21 - £3.72 billion

2019/20 - £3.49 billion

2018/19 – £3.22 billion

2017/18 – £3.02 billion

2016/17 - £2.92 billion

2015/16 – £2.93 billion

2014/15 - £2.63 billion

2013/14 - £2.52 billion

2012/13 - £2.54 billion

2011/12 - £2.38 billion

2010/11 - £2.01 billion

We do not publish break downs on research and development expenditure for national security reasons. Security and Intelligence Agency budgets are audited by the National Audit Office and expenditure is scrutinised by the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of those eligible for the Afghan Relations and Assistance Policy scheme and safely evacuated to the UK have been granted Indefinite Leave to Remain.

Since April 2021, we have relocated over 11,200 Afghans to the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP).

The recent update to the published 'Afghan Resettlement: Operational Data', shows that, at 4th November 2022:

  • The UK has welcomed 22,833 individuals from Afghanistan since June 2021.
  • We have granted Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) to 12,296 individuals across ARAP and ACRS - of which the total number granted ILR under ARAP stands at 5,982.

The figures shown here should be considered provisional, whilst work is underway to assure information relating to all the individuals relocated under the ARAP and resettled under the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) on case working systems. Once this work concludes, statistics on both schemes - including the number of people resettled under each - will be included in the published Immigration Statistics.

4th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason an RAF helicopter was used to transport her to the Manston asylum processing site on 3 November 2022.

The overflight of the operational area was a critical part of an itinerary put together and approved by Clandestine Channel Threat Commander Dan O’Mahoney to enable the Home Secretary to get an overview of operations in the Channel.

4th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she personally requested to be transported to the Manston asylum processing site from Dover via Chinook helicopter on 3 November 2022.

The overflight of the operational area was a critical part of an itinerary put together and approved by Clandestine Channel Threat Commander Dan O’Mahoney to enable the Home Secretary to get an overview of operations in the Channel.

4th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her Department's policy is on the use of helicopters for domestic journeys.

The Departmental Travel Manual does not contain instructions on the use of helicopters.

3rd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are in (a) initial and (b) temporary hotel accommodation.

The number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority, although not broken down into hotels or other accommodation, can be found at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

The latest publication (March 2022) can be found here Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk), under the document Asylum seekers in receipt of support (second edition).

The data published at the end of June have been recently removed and are being investigated. An update will be provided in the next Immigration Statistics release.

2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date was the change of use planning permission for the Manston site approved as a processing centre for asylum claimants.

The current operation of the Manston site is commensurate with the existing planning use.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers there were in (a) initial accommodation and (b) temporary hotel accommodation in each of the last five years.

Occupancy levels are recorded at a specific point in time and vary daily. The number of people flowing through (a) initial accommodation and (b) contingency hotel accommodation in any one year is not recorded.

Statistics relating to supported asylum seekers temporarily residing in contingency accommodation are published as Immigration Statistics under the S98 population tables. The latest publication (March 2022) can be found here Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk), under the document Asylum seekers in receipt of support (second edition). The data published at the end of June have been recently removed and are being investigated. An update will be provided in the next Immigration Statistics release.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of these statistics which disaggregates the number of asylum seekers accommodated in specific accommodation. These figures are not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are in (a) initial accommodation and (b) temporary hotel accommodation in each region as of 18 October 2022.

Occupancy levels are recorded at a specific point in time and vary daily. The number of people flowing through (a) initial accommodation and (b) contingency hotel accommodation in any one year is not recorded.

Statistics relating to supported asylum seekers temporarily residing in contingency accommodation are published as Immigration Statistics under the S98 population tables. The latest publication (March 2022) can be found here Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk), under the document Asylum seekers in receipt of support (second edition). The data published at the end of June have been recently removed and are being investigated. An update will be provided in the next Immigration Statistics release.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of these statistics which disaggregates the number of asylum seekers accommodated in specific accommodation. These figures are not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are in (a) initial accommodation and (b) temporary hotel accommodation.

Occupancy levels are recorded at a specific point in time and vary daily. The number of people flowing through (a) initial accommodation and (b) contingency hotel accommodation in any one year is not recorded.

Statistics relating to supported asylum seekers temporarily residing in contingency accommodation are published as Immigration Statistics under the S98 population tables. The latest publication (March 2022) can be found here Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk), under the document Asylum seekers in receipt of support (second edition). The data published at the end of June have been recently removed and are being investigated. An update will be provided in the next Immigration Statistics release.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of these statistics which disaggregates the number of asylum seekers accommodated in specific accommodation. These figures are not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people arrived in the UK by small boats across the Channel in each month since January 2019; and how many and what proportion of those people subsequently applied for asylum.

The Home Office publishes data on small boat arrivals and subsequent asylum claims in the Irregular Migration to the UK quarterly report. Data on small boat arrivals by month are published in table Irr_02a of the Irregular migration to the UK data tables. Data on asylum claims from arrivals are published in section 4 of the most recent Irregular migration to the UK release. The latest data go up to the end of June 2022.

Statistics on small boats include individuals who were detected on arrival to the UK, detected in the Channel and subsequently brought to the UK, and those encountered in the UK who were suspected of having arrived on a small boat. They do not include any persons who arrived on larger vessels (such as on a ferry), those prevented from departing France or intercepted by French authorities and returned to France, or those who arrived in the UK undetected.

8th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of Afghan citizens who relocated to the UK under the (a) Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and (b) Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme are in bridging accommodation as of 8 September 2022.

Through Operation Warm Welcome, Afghans resettling in the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens’ Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be supported in accessing accommodation alongside the vital health, education, and support into employment they need, to fully integrate into our society.

As stated in the recently published, 'Afghan Resettlement: Operational Data' factsheet, at 12 August 2022, the UK:

  • Has welcomed 21,450 people to the UK from Afghanistan - or a neighbouring country - since June 2021.
  • Is providing temporary accommodation for 9,667 people in hotels.

Officials are working at pace to assure information relating to the individuals resettling in the UK under our bespoke schemes for Afghans on case working systems. Once this work concludes, the Home Office will include Afghan resettlement statistics in its quarterly Immigration Statistics publications.

Until then the factsheet will be updated every quarter – with the next iteration scheduled for publication on 24 November 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
7th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UK Standard Visitor Visas have been granted to Russian citizens in every month during 2022.

The Home Office publishes data on visas in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of granted applications of Visitor visas to Russian nationals are published in table Vis_D02 of the entry clearance visas applications and outcomes dataset. ‘Standard Visitor’ is one of the four types of ‘Visitor’ visas which are aggregated within this dataset, which also include visiting for a Permitted Paid Engagement, the Marriage Visitor visa and visiting the UK in a Chinese Tour Group.

Please note that the published data relate to Russian nationals, regardless of their residency. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending June 2022.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
6th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people who have crossed the English Channel in small boats have absconded once they landed on British shores since the start of 2022.

The Home Office is unable to provide the information that you have requested because the data is not available in a reportable format.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
13th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghans have arrived in the UK under Pathway (a) 1, (b) 2 and (c) 3 of the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme in each month since April 2022.

Over 15,000 people were supported to come to the UK directly following the evacuation of Afghanistan, and a further 4,000 have since arrived. Around 6,500 people brought to safety in the UK during and after the evacuation are eligible for the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) under pathway 1.

Under the newly opened second pathway, we have now begun to receive the first referrals from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) of vulnerable refugees who have fled Afghanistan for resettlement to the UK. Further detail can be found on the UNHCR website: UNHCR UK Information and Links on Afghanistan Situation - UNHCR United Kingdom

The FCDO have also launched a third referral pathway, which will see eligible British Council and GardaWorld contractors and Chevening alumni considered for resettlement to the UK. Eligible individuals are able to express interest in UK resettlement via an online system until Monday 15 August 2022, when the online system will close. The FCDO have set out further information on how this works: Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme Pathway 3: eligibility for British Council and GardaWorld contractors and Chevening Alumni - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Following the evacuation from Afghanistan – and subsequent arrivals - work is underway to assure information relating to all the individuals relocated under both schemes are on case working systems. Once this work concludes, statistics on ACRS and ARAP will be included in future editions of the Immigration Statistics.

6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme applications her Department has processed in the last two months.

Over 15,000 people were supported to come to the UK directly following the evacuation of Afghanistan, and a further 4,000 have since arrived.

Statistics on ACRS and ARAP will be included in future editions of the Immigration Statistics.

6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of people who are eligible for the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will provide up to 20,000 women, children, and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle in the UK over the coming years.

The capacity of the UK to resettle people is not unlimited and difficult decisions have to be made on who will be prioritised. However, we will exceed our initial aim to resettle 5,000 people through the ACRS in the first year.

Those eligible for the ACRS will be prioritised and referred through one of three pathways as set out in a Statement to Parliament on 6 January 2022:

https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/oral-statement-on-the-afghan-citizens-resettlement-scheme

There are around 6,500 people in the UK who have been brought to safety through and after the evacuation and who are eligible for the ACRS. They include women’s rights activists, journalists, and prosecutors, as well as Afghan families of British Nationals.

Under pathway two, we anticipate receiving referrals from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) for up to 2,000 refugees during the first year of this pathway, although this number will be kept under review. We will continue to receive UNHCR referrals to the scheme in coming years.

Under pathway three, in the first year we will offer resettlement places to up to 1,500 people from the three identified cohorts (British Council and GardaWorld contractors and Chevening alumni).

Beyond the first year of pathway three, the government will work with international partners and NGOs to welcome wider groups of Afghans at risk.

Resettlement figures for the ACRS will be published in line with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 5 July 2022 to Question 26695 and with reference to the Answer given by the Secretary of State for Defence on 27 June 2022 to Question 23221, if she will set out how many meetings of the National Security Council she has attended since April 2022.

The National Security Council is a committee of the Cabinet. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

28th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many meetings of the National Security Council she has attended since April 2022.

The National Security Council is a committee of the Cabinet. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
16th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan nationals have been relocated to the UK from Afghanistan via the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme in each month since January 2022.

Over 15,000 people were supported to come to the UK directly during Operation Pitting, and more than 4000 have since arrived.

Work is underway to ensure information relating to all the individuals relocated under all schemes are recorded on case working systems. Once this work concludes, statistics on ACRS and ARAP will be included in future editions of the Immigration Statistics.

31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date her Department submitted a military aid to civilian authorities request to the Ministry of Defence to request military assistance to tackle Channel crossings.

The Government is determined to prevent further loss of life in the Channel and break the business model of dangerous criminal people smugglers.

The UK armed forces already work closely with Border Force in these operations, given their expertise and experience in maritime operations.

This is a complex global issue requiring a response across the whole of government, and it is right that we pursue all options to prevent illegal crossings and protect life at sea.

The Government’s New Plan for Immigration will help deter illegal migration and break the business model of the criminal gangs.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 27 January 2022 to Question 107455 on Undocumented Migrants: English Channel, what the maximum capacity is for housing migrants at the barracks at (a) Napier, (b) Penally and (c) Manston.

Napier capacity is kept under review; currently the capacity is set at 308.

Penally is closed but could accommodate a Covid safe capacity of 234 when operational.

Manston consists of a variety of different accommodation facilities. These will be managed dynamically depending on numbers of arrivals, the makeup of those arrivals and the availability of onward accommodation.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 24 January 2022 to Question 107452 on Undocumented Migrants: English Channel, what type of request her Department submitted to the Ministry of Defence to request the military's help to assist with Channel crossings.

The Government is determined to prevent further loss of life in the Channel and break the business model of dangerous criminal people smugglers.

The UK armed forces already work closely with Border Force in these operations, given their expertise and experience in maritime operations.

This is a complex global issue requiring a response across the whole of government, and it is right that we pursue all options to prevent illegal crossings and protect life at sea.

The Government’s New Plan for Immigration will help deter illegal migration and break the business model of the criminal gangs.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the letter from the Minister for Resettlement of 29 October 2021, how many Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy eligible Afghans are being housed temporarily at each bridging hotel.

There are currently over 12,000 Afghan evacuees in bridging hotel accommodation at the present time.

Our current estate includes approximately 84 hotels and over 12,000 individuals – some of whom are British Nationals and some of whom are Afghans who may be eligible for ARAP or the ACRS.

The numbers in hotels is contingent on offers of support from local authorities, so we urge all Honourable members to speak to their local authorities about what more they can offer.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghans who (a) are and (b) are not eligible for the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy are being housed in bridging hotels as of 4 January 2022, by local authority.

There are currently over 12,000 Afghan evacuees in bridging hotel accommodation at the present time.

Our current estate includes approximately 84 hotels and over 12,000 individuals – some of whom are British Nationals and some of whom are Afghans who may be eligible for ARAP or the ACRS.

The numbers in hotels is contingent on offers of support from local authorities, so we urge all Honourable members to speak to their local authorities about what more they can offer.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Statement of Changes to the Immigration Rules, HC 913, published on 14 December 2021, whether changes made to the eligibility under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy scheme will apply retrospectively to Afghans who have been relocated to the UK already under the ARAP scheme.

The clarifications to the eligibility criteria for Category 4 of the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) will not apply retrospectively to Afghans who have already been relocated in the UK under the ARAP scheme. They will apply to any ARAP eligibility decisions made on or after 1600 hours on 14 December 2021.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme will open.

We are working across Government and with partners such as UNHCR to design the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS), amidst a complex and changing picture. We are committed to working in step with the international community to get this right, and we will set out more details soon.

Eligible people will be prioritised and referred for resettlement to the UK as set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement as explained in my letter to colleagues on 23rd December 2021.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
3rd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date her Department received the request from the Kenyan Government for mutual legal assistance in relation to the killing of Agnes Wanjiru; and when she plans to respond to that request.

As a matter of longstanding policy, the Home Office neither confirms nor denies the existence of mutual legal assistance requests.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
30th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy applicants have indefinite leave to remain.

As part of Operation Warm Welcome, ARAP applicants in the UK are entitled to Indefinite Leave to Remain.

The Home Office is contacting those here in the UK in order to assist them to register their Indefinite Leave to Remain status.

No one will be required to leave the United Kingdom, or be disadvantaged in any way, while we work through their cases.

More information can be found in the Afghanistan Resettlement and Immigration Policy Statement

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement-accessible-version#afghan-relocations-and-assistance-policy

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
30th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding per Afghan resettled in the UK will be provided to local authorities for resettlement under the (a) Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and (b) Afghan Citizens' Resettlement Scheme.

Councils who support people through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) or Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) scheme will receive £20,520 per person, over 3 years, for resettlement and integration costs. Local councils and health partners who resettle families will also receive up to £4,500 per child for education, £850 to cover English language provision for adults requiring this support and £2,600 to cover healthcare.

A further £20 million of flexible funding will be made available to support local authorities with higher cost bases with any additional costs in the provision of services. In addition, the previously announced Afghan Housing Costs Fund will increase from £5 million to £17 million and run for 2 extra years to help local authorities provide housing and give certainty that funding will be available in the future.

The ACRS scheme is not currently open.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the policy guidance on covid-19 vaccination and isolation in relation to the housing of Afghan refugees in bridging hotels.

Covid-19 vaccination and isolation policy guidance is the responsibility of the Department for Health and Social Care.

The Home Office ensures that the accommodation of those evacuated from Afghanistan in bridging hotels is compliant with these policies.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghans her Department estimates to process through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme before March 2022.

Through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS), the UK will relocate up to 20,000 people at risk, including women and girls and minority groups, so they can rebuild their lives in safety.

The scheme is not yet open and remains under development. However, the first to be resettled through this scheme will be some of those who arrived in the UK under the evacuation programme, which included individuals who were considered to be at particular risk – including women’s rights activists, prosecutors and journalists.

Further information on the eligibility, prioritisation and referral of people for the ACRS is set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to the letters from the hon. Member for Wentworth and Dearne of 15 September 2021 and 18 October 2021 on support for Afghan personnel in the UK as part of Operation War Welcome.

The Minister of State for Justice and Minister for Afghan Resettlement will respond shortly.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of people resettled under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy have been provided with permanent housing.

We are working at pace with local authorities to source appropriate accommodation for Afghan families who were evacuated to the UK.

Over 300 local authorities have made offers of accommodation. The process of matching homes to families requires careful attention to detail but we are working to move people as quickly as possible when properties become available.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2021 to Question 44194, on Afghanistan: Refugees, whether applicants to the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy scheme that are already in the UK will be settled before the Afghan citizens' resettlement scheme opens.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) is separate from, and in addition to, the Afghanistan Relocation and Assistance Policy (ARAP). Whilst the ACRS is not yet open, some of those who arrived in the UK under the evacuation programme, which prioritised individuals who were considered to be at particular risk will be the first to be resettled under the ACRS. Officials are working urgently to stand up the remaining elements of the scheme, amid the complex and changing picture.

Further information on both the ARAP and the ACRS is set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement-accessible-version#afghan-relocations-and-assistance-policy

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to (a) open the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme and (b) publish the eligibility criteria for that scheme.

Through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) the UK will relocate up to 20,000 people at risk, including women and girls and minority groups, so they can rebuild their lives in safety.

The first to be resettled through this scheme will be those who arrived in the UK under the evacuation programme, which included individuals who were considered to be at particular risk – including women’s rights activists, prosecutors and journalists.

We are working urgently to stand up the remaining elements of the scheme, amid the complex and changing picture. We are working closely across government and with NGOs, charities, local authorities and civil society groups to ensure support is provided to people who are resettled through this route.

Further information on the eligibility, prioritisation and referral of people for the ACRS is set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Home Department, how many successful Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy applicants and their families that are in the UK have (a) been allocated housing and (b) are still waiting to be allocated housing.

The Afghan citizens’ resettlement scheme (ACRS) will provide protection for people at risk identified as in need.

The government has committed to welcome around 5,000 people in the first year and up to 20,000 over the coming years. We will work with the United Nations and aid agencies to identify those we should help.

The scheme is not yet open yet, further details will be announced in due course.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support for housing the Government is providing to those relocated to the UK under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy.

The Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) launched on 1 April 2021. Under the policy, any current or former locally employed staff who are assessed to be under serious threat to life are offered priority relocation to the UK regardless of their employment status, rank or role, or length of time served. Since 1 April, the Home Office has relocated former Afghan staff and their families in the UK, including those relocated as part of HMG’s evacuation from Afghanistan. The overwhelming majority of those approved by the ARAP scheme have now been evacuated and the scheme remains open for anyone who is eligible.

We are working closely with local authorities to ensure that those relocated to the UK under ARAP are fully supported.

The ARAP programme provides a funding package to resource local authorities who come forward with offers of housing to resettle Afghan staff and their families, enabling delivery of integration support for families and further support on employment, welfare benefits, and access to health, education, and other local services. This is to the value of £10,500 for every Afghan welcomed for up to a year, and also includes their family members who make the journey with them.    MHCLG have recently announced a new Afghan LES Housing Costs Fund of £5 million, to support.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what financial support is available to people relocated to the UK under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy.

The Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) launched on 1 April 2021. Under the policy, any current or former locally employed staff who are assessed to be under serious threat to life are offered priority relocation to the UK regardless of their employment status, rank or role, or length of time served. Since 1 April, the Home Office has relocated former Afghan staff and their families in the UK, including those relocated as part of HMG’s evacuation from Afghanistan. The overwhelming majority of those approved by the ARAP scheme have now been evacuated and the scheme remains open for anyone who is eligible.

We are working closely with local authorities to ensure that those relocated to the UK under ARAP are fully supported.

The ARAP programme provides a funding package to resource local authorities who come forward with offers of housing to resettle Afghan staff and their families, enabling delivery of integration support for families and further support on employment, welfare benefits, and access to health, education, and other local services. This is to the value of £10,500 for every Afghan welcomed for up to a year, and also includes their family members who make the journey with them.    MHCLG have recently announced a new Afghan LES Housing Costs Fund of £5 million, to support.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 81WH on the Asylum Dispersal Scheme, if she will publish the 40 local authorities which have adopted the voluntary dispersal agreements but have providers unable to find suitable properties for the Asylum Dispersal System.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets#asylum-support (opens in a new tab) Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 27 May 2021.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of these statistics which disaggregates the number of asylum seekers accommodated in dispersal accommodation for the first time in each quarter in each of the last two years, by local authority. These figures are not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 81WH on the Asylum Dispersal System, if she will publish a list of the local authorities which have adopted voluntary dispersal agreements.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets#asylum-support (opens in a new tab) Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 27 May 2021.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of these statistics which disaggregates the number of asylum seekers accommodated in dispersal accommodation for the first time in each quarter in each of the last two years, by local authority. These figures are not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 82WH, how many provider properties under the Asylum Dispersal Scheme her Department has inspected by region in each year since 2010.

As well as the many tens of thousands of property inspections carried out by our providers, 2,525 property inspections were carried out by Home Office staff in 2019/20. Routine Home Office inspections were paused towards the end of the year due to the emerging Covid-19 crisis but have now recommenced in line with coronavirus guidelines.

Data on the number of properties the Home Office has inspected since 2010 by area is not held in a reportable format and can only be provided at disproportionate cost by examination of individual inspection records.

26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 81WH on the Asylum Dispersal System, how many inspections her Department conducted of provider properties for the Asylum Dispersal Scheme in 2019-20.

As well as the many tens of thousands of property inspections carried out by our providers, 2,525 property inspections were carried out by Home Office staff in 2019/20. Routine Home Office inspections were paused towards the end of the year due to the emerging Covid-19 crisis but have now recommenced in line with coronavirus guidelines.

Data on the number of properties the Home Office has inspected since 2010 by area is not held in a reportable format and can only be provided at disproportionate cost by examination of individual inspection records.

5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Grenfell Tower Inquiry phase 1 report, which Department is responsible for implementing the recommendations in that report; what the implementation status is of each such recommendation; and what the planned timescale is for implementing each of those recommendations.

The Home Office is working collaboratively with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, the Fire and Rescue Sector and all relevant stakeholders to deliver Grenfell Tower Inquiry phase 1 recommendations with quality, pace and ambition.

The Government published an update on delivery on 21 January and continues to make progress. As announced in the Queen’s Speech, we will shortly introduce a Fire Safety Bill, a necessary first step towards implementation of the Inquiry’s recommendations

26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel are (a) stationed in and (b) deployed to the Middle East.

There are approximately 300 Service personnel stationed; and approximately 2,100 Service personnel deployed on operations in the Middle East.

On any given date these figures can vary due to routine force rebalancing, rest and recuperation periods and relief in place.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his Department’s press release entitled UK to boost Ukraine's artillery reserves with £245 million munitions package, published on 24 February 2024, whether this funding will be drawn from the International Fund for Ukraine.

The funding for the recently announced £245 million munitions package for Ukraine will be drawn from the £2.5 billion of Special Reserve funding allocated for financial year 2024-25, not the International Fund for Ukraine.

A competition for the manufacture and supply of artillery ammunition is also underway on behalf of the International Fund for Ukraine. The potential costs of this competition are commercially sensitive and cannot be made public.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2024 to Question 10908 on Armed Forces: Housing, how many individual families received these payments.

Compensation data is recorded by the Service Family Accommodation address to which it relates, not by who was living there at the time.

The information is not held in the format requested and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many applications to join the Armed Forces were received from Commonwealth citizens in 2023.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member's Question. I will write to him when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of changes to the Minimum Income Requirement changes on the Armed Forces' ability to recruit personnel from (a) the Commonwealth and (b) Nepal.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 26 February 2024, to Questions 13874, 13876, 13877, 13878 and 13879.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, for what reason the first pre-production Challenger 3 main battle tank was sent to Germany for trials.

The UK has the necessary facilities to undertake Challenger 3 trials and most of the trial activity will take place in the UK. The first pre-production vehicle was sent to Germany for a small number of trials that use Rheinmetall proprietary ammunition which would not be cost effective to clear on UK ranges for important but limited trial use. The remainder of the Challenger 3 prototypes will undergo full trialling in the UK, including firing trials.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent assessment he has made of whether the UK has the necessary facilities to undertake the full spectrum of trials that will be needed to qualify the Challenger 3 main battle tank.

The UK has the necessary facilities to undertake Challenger 3 trials and most of the trial activity will take place in the UK. The first pre-production vehicle was sent to Germany for a small number of trials that use Rheinmetall proprietary ammunition which would not be cost effective to clear on UK ranges for important but limited trial use. The remainder of the Challenger 3 prototypes will undergo full trialling in the UK, including firing trials.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what is the maximum occupancy per housing unit is for people temporarily housed in Service Family Accommodation in the UK under the ARAP Scheme.

The Ministry of Defence uses the Housing Act 1985 (space standard) when allocating ARAP eligible persons to Temporary Service Family Accommodation (SFA). The maximum occupancy per house therefore varies accordance to number of bedrooms available, and the ages of the eligible persons in each family.

On average, there are currently six people (including children) housed in temporary SFAs (excluding Temporary Reception, Staging and Onward Moving sites) across the United Kingdom.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
20th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many members of the armed forces have been referred to the Prevent Scheme for what reasons since 2019.

A breakdown of referrals by category is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the Army Race Action Plan.

I will write to the right hon. Member when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of (a) Commonwealth and (b) other foreign nationals serving in the armed forces earn more than £38,700 a year.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member's Questions. I will write to him when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of (a) Commonwealth and (b) other foreign nationals serving in the armed forces earn more than £29,000 a year.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member's Questions. I will write to him when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential impact of (a) changes to minimum income thresholds and (b) other changes to legal migration rules for (i) family and (ii) work visas on (A) Commonwealth and (B) foreign nationals serving in the armed forces.

All Armed Forces personnel, regardless of their nationality, are subject to the Minimum Income Requirement (MIR) if they wish to sponsor a visa for a non-UK family member to enter and later settle in the UK. The Secretary of State has met with the Home Secretary, and the two departments are working together to mitigate potential impacts on the recruitment and retention of our Armed Forces that the increased MIR may have.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) Commonwealth and (b) foreign nationals serving in the armed forces will be affected by (i) changes to minimum income thresholds and (ii) other changes to legal migration rules for (A) family and (B) work visas in 2024.

All Armed Forces personnel, regardless of their nationality, are subject to the Minimum Income Requirement (MIR) if they wish to sponsor a visa for a non-UK family member to enter and later settle in the UK. The Secretary of State has met with the Home Secretary, and the two departments are working together to mitigate potential impacts on the recruitment and retention of our Armed Forces that the increased MIR may have.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will make an assessment with the Secretary of State for the Home Department of the potential impact of changes to (a) minimum income thresholds and (b) other legal migration rules for family and work visas on armed forces personnel with foreign spouses.

All Armed Forces personnel, regardless of their nationality, are subject to the Minimum Income Requirement (MIR) if they wish to sponsor a visa for a non-UK family member to enter and later settle in the UK. The Secretary of State has met with the Home Secretary, and the two departments are working together to mitigate potential impacts on the recruitment and retention of our Armed Forces that the increased MIR may have.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will make an assessment with the Secretary of State for the Home Department of the potential impact of changes to (a) minimum income thresholds and (b) other legal migration rules for family and work visas on armed forces (i) recruitment and (ii) retention.

All Armed Forces personnel, regardless of their nationality, are subject to the Minimum Income Requirement (MIR) if they wish to sponsor a visa for a non-UK family member to enter and later settle in the UK. The Secretary of State has met with the Home Secretary, and the two departments are working together to mitigate potential impacts on the recruitment and retention of our Armed Forces that the increased MIR may have.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he has had recent discussions with the Secretary of State for the Home Department on the potential merits of exempting armed forces personnel from changes to legal migration rules for family and work visas in 2024.

All Armed Forces personnel, regardless of their nationality, are subject to the Minimum Income Requirement (MIR) if they wish to sponsor a visa for a non-UK family member to enter and later settle in the UK. The Secretary of State has met with the Home Secretary, and the two departments are working together to mitigate potential impacts on the recruitment and retention of our Armed Forces that the increased MIR may have.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many combined cadet forces ceased operating in (a) state and (b) independent schools in each region since 2010.

The requested information is only available from 2012. The number of Combined Cadet Force units that ceased operating in (a) State and (b) Independent Schools between 2012 and early 2024 are as follows:

Region

Independent

State

East Anglia

1

2

East Midlands

1

3

Greater London

0

2

North East

1

6

North West

1

5

South East

2

4

South West

0

12

West Midlands

0

2

Yorkshire and Humberside

0

5

Scotland

0

0

Wales

0

0

Northern Ireland

0

0

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many community cadet forces (a) began and (b) ceased operating in (i) state and (ii) independent schools in each year since 2010.

The information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many community cadet forces ceased operating in (a) state and (b) independent schools in each region since 2010.

The information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the annual budget was for the cadet expansion programme in each year since 2010.

Phase One of the Cadet Expansion Programme (CEP) was launched in June 2012 with a budget of £10.85M allocated jointly by the Department for Education (DfE) and the Ministry of Defence (MOD), each providing £8.35million and £2.5million respectively. Phase Two (CEP 500) commenced in July 2015, with the Government committing an extra £50million from LIBOR fines.

Phase Three began in 2020. The Secretary of State for Defence set an ambition to grow to 60,000 cadets in schools by 2024. This equated to an increase of approximately 4,000 more cadets over and above the levels of growth in numbers that had been forecast in CEP 500 applications from schools. DfE has contributed up to £1.1 million annually to CEP in England only. Ministry of Defence annual funding contributions are shown in the below table, and cover CEP across the UK.

Financial Year (FY) 2021/22

FY 2022/23

FY 2023/24

FY 2024/25

£1.4million

£2.1million

£2.8million

£3.6million

Data is only available from the start of the CEP in 2012.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many combined cadet forces (a) began and (b) ceased operating in (i) state and (ii) independent schools in each year since 2010.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member’s Question. I will write to him when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) combined and (b) community cadet forces worked with (i) state and (ii) independent schools in each year since 2010.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member's Question. I will write to him when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel from his Department worked on the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy on a (a) full-time and (b) part-time basis in each month since April 2021.

For statistics from April 2021 to June 2023, I refer the right hon. Member to my letter answering Questions 187098 and 187105, placed in the Library of the House under reference number DEP2023-0588.

From July 2023 until February 2024, the number of staff who worked on the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy on a full-time or part-time basis is summarised below. These figures include civilian augmentees, military personnel, and overseas staff.

Month

Full-time

Part-time

Total Headcount

Jul-23

193

19

212

Aug-23

220

23

243

Sept-23

208

23

231

Oct-23

193

20

213

Nov-23

199

20

219

Dec-23

200

19

219

Jan-24

197

17

214

Feb-24

206

11

217

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 13 February 2024 to Question 12510 on Ukraine: Military Aid, if he will publish a breakdown of the allocation.

As in previous years, we expect the £2.5 billion to cover a broad range of support to Ukraine including rapid procurement and gifting of equipment, development of international capability coalitions and training support through Op INTERFLEX. As previously announced, £200 million of the £2.5 billion will be spent on thousands of military drones for Ukraine. Precise allocations will be decided before the beginning of the next financial year in April.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) target and (b) actual number of people recruited for the Submarine Service was in each year since 2010.

The Royal Navy does not routinely disclose the trained strength of individual branches or specialisms as to do so could, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability of the Armed Forces.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to British Army press release entitled Army’s top Brass Turns Out in Force to Address the World’s Leading Armoured Vehicle Conference, published on 22 January 2024, which 13 vehicle variants are being removed to streamline the Army’s fleet and improve readiness.

The vehicle variants currently identified to be removed from service by 2030 are:

  • AS90
  • Stormer
  • Warrior
  • 105mm light gun
  • BV206
  • Mastiff
  • Ridgback
  • Wolfhound
  • Beach Recovery Vehicle
  • Heavy Equipment Transporter
  • Foxhound Protected Patrol Vehicle
  • Jackal
  • Coyote
  • Pinzgauer
  • Landrover (including WMIK/RWMIK variants)
  • Quad bike
  • Wheeled Tanker
  • Challenger 2
  • Puma

Similarly, on current plans it should be recognised that a number of new platforms and families of vehicles are being introduced such as the New Medium Helicopter, the Boxer family, the Ajax family and the Light Protected Mobility Platform family.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department has spent on legal fees relating to the Morpheus programme as of 8 February 2024.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the right hon. Member's Question. I will write to him when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether HMS Queen Elizabeth will need to be dry-docked following the discovery of issues with the propeller shaft.

Following an issue with HMS Queen Elizabeth's (QNLZ) starboard propeller shaft coupling, QNLZ will sail for Rosyth in Scotland for dry-docking in order that any necessary repairs can be carried out.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many missiles HMS Diamond fired whilst participating in Operation Prosperity Guardian.

During her deployment at the Red Sea, HMS Diamond engaged and shot down nine aerial threats in self-defence whilst firing Sea Viper missiles. For operational security reasons, I cannot comment on the specifics of this activity.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what plans his Department has made for the future provision of roll-on-roll-off shipping capabilities when the existing contract ends.

The Ministry of Defence are currently in negotiations to extend the current contract, this work is ongoing and commercially sensitive. It would therefore be inappropriate to comment further at this time.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many CT40 rounds have been fired by Ajax on the move as of 8 February 2024.

2,118 CT40 rounds have been fired by Ajax on the move as of 8 February 2024.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the Tripartite talks between his Department, Gurkha veterans and the government of Nepal are expected to be concluded this month.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) highly values the Service of all members of the Armed Forces, including the Gurkhas who have a long and distinguished history of service to the UK, both at home and overseas.

The issues raised by members of the Gurkha veteran community are historical and complex. The MOD takes its responsibilities to our Gurkha veterans very seriously. We continue to welcome the highly constructive engagement we have had through the Bilateral Gurkha Veteran Committee and remain committed to supporting them and their families during and after their Service with the British Army. There is currently no end date to conclude these discussions.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his Department's News story entitled 500 trucks rapidly procured for British Army operations, published on 3 February 2024, where the new trucks are being built.

The HX2 8x8 trucks were procured at pace, to support military activity. There was no UK-made option that could have been delivered as quickly. As such, these vehicles, made by Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles (RMMV) in Austria, have only a nominal amount of UK content, related to operational configuration work in Doncaster. Support will be provided in the UK by RMVV UK.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his Department's News story entitled 500 trucks rapidly procured for British Army operations, published on 3 February 2024, what the proportion is of UK content in the new trucks.

The HX2 8x8 trucks were procured at pace, to support military activity. There was no UK-made option that could have been delivered as quickly. As such, these vehicles, made by Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles (RMMV) in Austria, have only a nominal amount of UK content, related to operational configuration work in Doncaster. Support will be provided in the UK by RMVV UK.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his Department's News story entitled 500 trucks rapidly procured for British Army operations, published on 3 February 2024, what variants of HX truck are being procured under the contract.

The HX2 8x8 trucks were procured at pace, to support military activity. There was no UK-made option that could have been delivered as quickly. As such, these vehicles, made by Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles (RMMV) in Austria, have only a nominal amount of UK content, related to operational configuration work in Doncaster. Support will be provided in the UK by RMVV UK.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of (a) pending, (b) rejected and (c) approved applicants to the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy are residing in Afghanistan as of 5 February 2024.

As of 6 February 2024, our records indicate that approximately 600 principal applicants deemed eligible for the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy scheme (ARAP) are recorded as residing in Afghanistan. This figure does not include family members. These figures fluctuate as we continue to identify eligible individuals.

In terms of applications pending, we do not confirm the location of an applicant before an eligibility decision is made. At this stage we focus exclusively on determining the applicant's ARAP eligibility. Once eligibility is determined we confirm the location of the applicant as we prepare to support their onward movement along the relocation journey.

We do not track the location of rejected applicants, having received over 95,000 unique applications to the scheme, and are therefore unable to provide this number.

Furthermore, this number does not yet include any applicants who may be found to be eligible as a consequence of the review into Category 4 decisions I announced to the House on 1 February.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many contracts his Department has with Serco.

The Department currently has 11 open contracts with Serco.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the value is of the contracts his Department has with Serco.

The total value of contracts the Department currently has with Serco is £1.08 billion.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he expects there to be further tripartite talks between (a) his Department, (b) Gurkha veterans and (c) the government of Nepal.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave to Question 12925 on 8 February 2024.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many meetings Ministers in his Department have had with the Gurkha Welfare Trust in each year since 2019.

The Gurkha Welfare Trust (GWT) is an independent charity that works closely with the Ministry of Defence (MOD). Its focus is on the Gurkha welfare pensioners who need the most assistance. Minsters from the MOD have met with the GWT twice since 2019.

The Minister for Defence People and Families met with the GWT Chairman and others in Nepal in January 2023 where he saw for himself the excellent work carried out by the GWT to support our Gurkha veterans and in September 2023, he met the GWT Executive Team and Directors in 2023 to better understand the medical provision in Nepal.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when his Department has held tripartite discussions with Gurkha veterans and the Government of Nepal since 2022.

The Bilateral Gurkha Veteran Welfare Committee, which is jointly chaired by the Minister for Defence People and Families and His Excellency, The Ambassador of Nepal, met on the following dates: 3 November 2022, 19 April 2023, and the 22 November 2023. The next Bilateral Gurkha Veteran Welfare Committee is due to take place 27 March 2024.

In order to facilitate in depth technical discussion about welfare and pension concerns, a working group was set up. The membership of the working group includes Government of Nepal representatives, Gurkha veterans and widows as well as MOD and officials from other relevant Government departments. The working group met on: 30 November 2022, 15 December 2022, 15 June 2023, and the 11 September 2023. The next working group is due to meet on the 21 February 2024.

The Government’s view is that the Gurkha Pension Scheme is fair. Gurkha pensions are different, but these differences are objectively and reasonably justified and well suited to the circumstances of the time. The legal basis for Gurkha pensions has been upheld by three Judicial Reviews since 2003, including a case that went to the European Court of Human Rights.

The Tripartite Agreement 1947 (TPA 1947) is an agreement between the UK, Nepal and India that provides the formal basis for the employment of the Brigade of Gurkhas within the British Army. There are no Tripartite discussions currently.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent discussions his Department has had with the Government of Nepal on pensions for Gurkha veterans in the UK.

The Bilateral Gurkha Veteran Welfare Committee, which is jointly chaired by the Minister for Defence People and Families and His Excellency, The Ambassador of Nepal, met on the following dates: 3 November 2022, 19 April 2023, and the 22 November 2023. The next Bilateral Gurkha Veteran Welfare Committee is due to take place 27 March 2024.

In order to facilitate in depth technical discussion about welfare and pension concerns, a working group was set up. The membership of the working group includes Government of Nepal representatives, Gurkha veterans and widows as well as MOD and officials from other relevant Government departments. The working group met on: 30 November 2022, 15 December 2022, 15 June 2023, and the 11 September 2023. The next working group is due to meet on the 21 February 2024.

The Government’s view is that the Gurkha Pension Scheme is fair. Gurkha pensions are different, but these differences are objectively and reasonably justified and well suited to the circumstances of the time. The legal basis for Gurkha pensions has been upheld by three Judicial Reviews since 2003, including a case that went to the European Court of Human Rights.

The Tripartite Agreement 1947 (TPA 1947) is an agreement between the UK, Nepal and India that provides the formal basis for the employment of the Brigade of Gurkhas within the British Army. There are no Tripartite discussions currently.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, on what dates has the Minister for Defence People and Families had discussions with representatives from Nepal on pensions for Gurkha veterans in the UK in each year since 2019.

The Bilateral Gurkha Veteran Welfare Committee, which is jointly chaired by the Minister for Defence People and Families and His Excellency, The Ambassador of Nepal, met on the following dates: 3 November 2022, 19 April 2023, and the 22 November 2023. The next Bilateral Gurkha Veteran Welfare Committee is due to take place 27 March 2024.

In order to facilitate in depth technical discussion about welfare and pension concerns, a working group was set up. The membership of the working group includes Government of Nepal representatives, Gurkha veterans and widows as well as MOD and officials from other relevant Government departments. The working group met on: 30 November 2022, 15 December 2022, 15 June 2023, and the 11 September 2023. The next working group is due to meet on the 21 February 2024.

The Government’s view is that the Gurkha Pension Scheme is fair. Gurkha pensions are different, but these differences are objectively and reasonably justified and well suited to the circumstances of the time. The legal basis for Gurkha pensions has been upheld by three Judicial Reviews since 2003, including a case that went to the European Court of Human Rights.

The Tripartite Agreement 1947 (TPA 1947) is an agreement between the UK, Nepal and India that provides the formal basis for the employment of the Brigade of Gurkhas within the British Army. There are no Tripartite discussions currently.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the projected in-service date is for the first Chinook H-47 extended-range helicopters.

The Review Note for the Chinook extended range helicopter programme is due to be assessed by the Ministry of Defence Investment Approvals Committee in Quarter 1 2024 and will inform any future decisions affecting the current programme of record.

As the assessed costs and schedule for the programme are currently under consideration it would be inappropriate to disclose the figures and programme timelines until a full review has taken place.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what his timetable is for taking a final decision on the procurement of Chinook H-47 extended-range helicopters.

The Review Note for the Chinook extended range helicopter programme is due to be assessed by the Ministry of Defence Investment Approvals Committee in Quarter 1 2024 and will inform any future decisions affecting the current programme of record.

As the assessed costs and schedule for the programme are currently under consideration it would be inappropriate to disclose the figures and programme timelines until a full review has taken place.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the estimated cost for the procurement of new Chinook H-47 extended-range helicopters is as of 5 February 2024.

The Review Note for the Chinook extended range helicopter programme is due to be assessed by the Ministry of Defence Investment Approvals Committee in Quarter 1 2024 and will inform any future decisions affecting the current programme of record.

As the assessed costs and schedule for the programme are currently under consideration it would be inappropriate to disclose the figures and programme timelines until a full review has taken place.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 2 February 2024 to Question 11259 on Warrior Vehicles: Repairs and Maintenance, when did the policy of cannibalisation begin; and how many Warriors have been cannibalised to sustain the remaining fleet.

The policy concerning the cannibalisation process for all Army equipment has been in place since 2005. No Warrior Infantry Fighting Vehicles have been cannibalised to sustain the remaining fleet.

Following the decision to cancel the Warrior Capability Sustainment Programme and reduce the in-service fleet by 172 platforms, salvage is occurring on all disposal platforms to ensure serviceable components are not wasted and are used to improve the sustainability of the current fleet.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what his planned timetable is for the retirement of Tranche 1 Typhoon fighter jets.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Norwich South (Clive Lewis) on 19 December 2023 to Question 6237 which remains extant.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what number and proportion of UK jobs are in the (a) aerospace and (b) defence industry in each constituency as of 2 February 2024.

This information is not held in the format requested.

However, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) does hold a regional breakdown of direct jobs supported in UK industry by MOD expenditure. In Financial Year (FY) 2021-22 MOD expenditure supported an estimated 209,000 direct and indirect jobs in UK industry. In that same period the breakdown of direct jobs supported by MOD expenditure in each region was:

Region

FY2021-22

UK Total

130,000

East Midlands

6,900

East of England

6,200

London

8,200

North East

900

North West

16,600

Northern Ireland

600

Scotland

12,200

South East

29,100

South West

37,400

Wales

4,500

West Midlands

5,000

Yorkshire and The Humber

2,500

The MOD regional expenditure with UK industry and commerce and supported employment report for FY2021-22 can be found here: MOD regional expenditure with UK industry and commerce and supported employment 2021/22 (revised August 2023) - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department has spent on the Crowsnest Airborne Early Warning system.

As of 31 December 2023, the CROWSNEST Programme has spent £425.662 million. This is within the original approved whole life budget for the programme of £459 million.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what is the full operating capability and out of service date for the Crowsnest Airborne Early Warning system.

The Crowsnest Airborne Early Warning system achieved initial operating capability in July 2023 and is on track to achieve full operating capability next year in time to support a Carrier Strike Deployment in 2025.

Under current plans CROWSNEST will retire on 31 December 2029. The capability was not extended in the Integrated Review 2021.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Pashto and Dari language specialists have worked on the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy scheme in each month since April 2021.

Between October 2021 and January 2022 three Pashto and Dari language specialists worked on the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) scheme. Two have been working on the ARAP scheme since February 2022.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total cost for his Department was of was the Batch II River-class offshore patrol vessels.

In regard of contract values for the Batch 1 and Batch 2 Type 26 Frigates, the Type 31 Frigates, and the Batch II River-class Offshore Patrol Vessels, I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 12 December 2023 to Question 4914 and to the answer I gave on 7 February 2024 to Question 12110 to the hon. Member for East Lothian (Kenny MacAskill).

Other relevant costs include a contract worth some £70 million awarded to Thales for the provision of equipment and technical services for a Type 31 shore-based mission test and integration facility.

I am withholding the wider programme costs including the costs for capability insertion and Government Furnished Equipment for the two Frigate programmes project as its disclosure could be prejudicial to the commercial interests of our industrial partners, BAES Systems and Babcock.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total cost to his Department is of (a) the core contract, (b) capability insertion, (c) Government furnished equipment and (d) other relevant aspects of the Type 26 frigate programme.

In regard of contract values for the Batch 1 and Batch 2 Type 26 Frigates, the Type 31 Frigates, and the Batch II River-class Offshore Patrol Vessels, I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 12 December 2023 to Question 4914 and to the answer I gave on 7 February 2024 to Question 12110 to the hon. Member for East Lothian (Kenny MacAskill).

Other relevant costs include a contract worth some £70 million awarded to Thales for the provision of equipment and technical services for a Type 31 shore-based mission test and integration facility.

I am withholding the wider programme costs including the costs for capability insertion and Government Furnished Equipment for the two Frigate programmes project as its disclosure could be prejudicial to the commercial interests of our industrial partners, BAES Systems and Babcock.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total cost to his Department is of (a) the core contract, (b) capability insertion, (c) Government furnished equipment and (d) other relevant aspects of the Type 31 frigate programme.

In regard of contract values for the Batch 1 and Batch 2 Type 26 Frigates, the Type 31 Frigates, and the Batch II River-class Offshore Patrol Vessels, I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 12 December 2023 to Question 4914 and to the answer I gave on 7 February 2024 to Question 12110 to the hon. Member for East Lothian (Kenny MacAskill).

Other relevant costs include a contract worth some £70 million awarded to Thales for the provision of equipment and technical services for a Type 31 shore-based mission test and integration facility.

I am withholding the wider programme costs including the costs for capability insertion and Government Furnished Equipment for the two Frigate programmes project as its disclosure could be prejudicial to the commercial interests of our industrial partners, BAES Systems and Babcock.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what is the timeline for the Command Support Air Transport (CSAT) Recapitalisation Phase 2 programme.

The 30-month contract extension was successfully awarded to Centreline Aviation Ltd for operation of the two MOD Command Support Air Transport (CSAT) Envoy Falcon 900LX aircraft to September 2026.

The Pre-Qualification Questionnaire (PQQ) for the competition of CSAT Envoy Recapitalisation Phase 2 programme was released to industry on 12 December 2023, with strong industry return of interest to date.

The MOD will evaluate the PQQ responses and confirm its choice to industry bidders during May 2024. The subsequent Invitation to Tender remains in progress and is due to be released to industry in January 2025. The CSAT Phase 2 Full Business Case is scheduled for Investment Approvals Committee in January 2026, with transition to full military registration/operated service for both aircraft due to commence from July 2026.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the status of the New Medium Helicopter programme is as of 2 February 2024.

Positive progress is being made towards launching the next stage of the competition, and we are currently in the process of securing final cross-Government approval.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what his planned timetable is for integrating the Sting Ray Torpedo onto the Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft.

Integration of Sting Ray Mod 1 has commenced. The associated schedule is still being developed, but the intent is to integrate this sovereign capability at the earliest opportunity.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Pashto and Dari language specialists worked in his Department in each year since 2010.

We have deemed language specialist to be a service person holding an in date formal MOD language assessment of Level 2 and above (even if not actively using the language day to day), and any civil servant (Burnham Lecturer) or military person employed in teaching languages to defence personnel on an ongoing permanent basis or supporting operations.

Detailed historical data on those personnel ‘in date’ before 2018 is unavailable, we only know the number of exams that were passed in the respective years going back to 2012. We have not included those for the purposes of this answer. The information available is in the following table:

Serial

Language

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 24)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 23)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 22)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 21)

Numbers 'in date'
(Dec 19)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 18)

1

Russian

163

155

111

106

80

81

2

Arabic

99

117

121

132

187

196

3

Farsi

38

42

38

40

21

24

4

Mandarin

15

22

18

22

12

12

5

Cantonese

9

With Mandarin as Chinese to mid 23

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

6

Dari/Pashtu

5

16

5

8

9

13

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Arabic language specialists worked in his Department in each year since 2010.

We have deemed language specialist to be a service person holding an in date formal MOD language assessment of Level 2 and above (even if not actively using the language day to day), and any civil servant (Burnham Lecturer) or military person employed in teaching languages to defence personnel on an ongoing permanent basis or supporting operations.

Detailed historical data on those personnel ‘in date’ before 2018 is unavailable, we only know the number of exams that were passed in the respective years going back to 2012. We have not included those for the purposes of this answer. The information available is in the following table:

Serial

Language

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 24)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 23)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 22)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 21)

Numbers 'in date'
(Dec 19)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 18)

1

Russian

163

155

111

106

80

81

2

Arabic

99

117

121

132

187

196

3

Farsi

38

42

38

40

21

24

4

Mandarin

15

22

18

22

12

12

5

Cantonese

9

With Mandarin as Chinese to mid 23

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

6

Dari/Pashtu

5

16

5

8

9

13

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Farsi language specialists worked in his Department in each year since 2010.

We have deemed language specialist to be a service person holding an in date formal MOD language assessment of Level 2 and above (even if not actively using the language day to day), and any civil servant (Burnham Lecturer) or military person employed in teaching languages to defence personnel on an ongoing permanent basis or supporting operations.

Detailed historical data on those personnel ‘in date’ before 2018 is unavailable, we only know the number of exams that were passed in the respective years going back to 2012. We have not included those for the purposes of this answer. The information available is in the following table:

Serial

Language

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 24)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 23)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 22)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 21)

Numbers 'in date'
(Dec 19)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 18)

1

Russian

163

155

111

106

80

81

2

Arabic

99

117

121

132

187

196

3

Farsi

38

42

38

40

21

24

4

Mandarin

15

22

18

22

12

12

5

Cantonese

9

With Mandarin as Chinese to mid 23

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

6

Dari/Pashtu

5

16

5

8

9

13

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Cantonese Chinese language specialists worked in his Department in each year since 2010.

We have deemed language specialist to be a service person holding an in date formal MOD language assessment of Level 2 and above (even if not actively using the language day to day), and any civil servant (Burnham Lecturer) or military person employed in teaching languages to defence personnel on an ongoing permanent basis or supporting operations.

Detailed historical data on those personnel ‘in date’ before 2018 is unavailable, we only know the number of exams that were passed in the respective years going back to 2012. We have not included those for the purposes of this answer. The information available is in the following table:

Serial

Language

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 24)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 23)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 22)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 21)

Numbers 'in date'
(Dec 19)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 18)

1

Russian

163

155

111

106

80

81

2

Arabic

99

117

121

132

187

196

3

Farsi

38

42

38

40

21

24

4

Mandarin

15

22

18

22

12

12

5

Cantonese

9

With Mandarin as Chinese to mid 23

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

6

Dari/Pashtu

5

16

5

8

9

13

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Mandarin Chinese language specialists worked in his Department in each year since 2010.

We have deemed language specialist to be a service person holding an in date formal MOD language assessment of Level 2 and above (even if not actively using the language day to day), and any civil servant (Burnham Lecturer) or military person employed in teaching languages to defence personnel on an ongoing permanent basis or supporting operations.

Detailed historical data on those personnel ‘in date’ before 2018 is unavailable, we only know the number of exams that were passed in the respective years going back to 2012. We have not included those for the purposes of this answer. The information available is in the following table:

Serial

Language

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 24)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 23)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 22)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 21)

Numbers 'in date'
(Dec 19)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 18)

1

Russian

163

155

111

106

80

81

2

Arabic

99

117

121

132

187

196

3

Farsi

38

42

38

40

21

24

4

Mandarin

15

22

18

22

12

12

5

Cantonese

9

With Mandarin as Chinese to mid 23

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

6

Dari/Pashtu

5

16

5

8

9

13

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Russian language specialists worked in his Department in each year since 2010.

We have deemed language specialist to be a service person holding an in date formal MOD language assessment of Level 2 and above (even if not actively using the language day to day), and any civil servant (Burnham Lecturer) or military person employed in teaching languages to defence personnel on an ongoing permanent basis or supporting operations.

Detailed historical data on those personnel ‘in date’ before 2018 is unavailable, we only know the number of exams that were passed in the respective years going back to 2012. We have not included those for the purposes of this answer. The information available is in the following table:

Serial

Language

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 24)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 23)

Numbers 'in date'
(Jan 22)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 21)

Numbers 'in date'
(Dec 19)

Numbers 'in date'
(Sep 18)

1

Russian

163

155

111

106

80

81

2

Arabic

99

117

121

132

187

196

3

Farsi

38

42

38

40

21

24

4

Mandarin

15

22

18

22

12

12

5

Cantonese

9

With Mandarin as Chinese to mid 23

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

Counted with Mandarin

6

Dari/Pashtu

5

16

5

8

9

13

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the outflow was from the Royal Fleet Auxiliary in each year since 2010.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave to him on 15 November 2023 to Question 54.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) original and (b) current in service date is for the New Medium Helicopter.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 27 April 2023 to Question 182236 to the right hon. Member for North Durham (Mr Kevan Jones).

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Royal Navy’s press release of 9 January 2024, entitled HMS Richmond heads to Gulf to support Diamond and Lancaster safeguard shipping, when he plans HMS Richmond will arrive on station.

The Department does not normally comment on deployments due to operational sensitivity, however in this case, as announced by the Secretary of State for Defence, the Department can confirm that HMS RICHMOND arrived on 5 February 2024 to replace HMS DIAMOND. This follows HMS DIAMOND’s service on operations defending shipping against continued Houthi attacks.

HMS RICHMOND now takes on the mantle, safeguarding shipping in the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden alongside other Royal Navy, UK & NATO Partners, as part of the UK’s enduring commitment to ensuring Freedom of Navigation, and maintaining security of global shipping lanes.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy o the ability of the UK to field a wholly sovereign Carrier Strike Group.

The composition and size of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) deployments are tailored to meet the operational requirement and all options are continuously reviewed to ensure optimum Royal Navy output. A UK Carrier Strike Group can routinely deploy and operate with allies and partners, including those from Joint Expeditionary Force and NATO. Regardless of any integration of international escorts and aircraft during a deployment, we will always retain a sovereign capability giving us the ability to operate the UK Carrier Strike Group in an independent sovereign manner.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people were rejected from joining the Armed Forces due to (a) anaphylaxis and (b) allergies in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people were rejected from joining the Armed Forces due to high blood pressure in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people were rejected from joining the Armed Forces due to (a) Raynaud’s phenomenon and (b) vasospastic disease in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people were rejected from joining the Armed Forces due to dermatitis in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people were rejected from joining the Armed Forces due to asthma in each year since 2010.

This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many aerial threats has HMS Diamond shot down since arriving in the Red Sea.

Since her arrival at the Red Sea, HMS Diamond has engaged and shot down nine aerial threats in self-defence.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many times a UK Carrier Strike Group with a wholly sovereign air wing and escort fleet has sailed on (a) exercise and (b) deployment since 2020.

The UK Carrier Strike Group (UKCSG) has conducted three deployments since 2020. Sovereign aircraft, escorts and support ships have formed the core of the UKCSG, but each deployment has also involved contributions from partner nations. All three deployments included UKCSG participation in a range of multinational operations and exercises.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the £2.5 billion military aid for Ukraine in 2024-25, announced on 12 January 2024, whether that funding includes his Department's operational costs for NATO bases.

As in previous years, we expect the £2.5 billion to cover a broad range of support to Ukraine including rapid procurement and gifting of equipment, development of international capability coalitions and training support through Op INTERFLEX. Precise allocations will be decided before the beginning of the next financial year in April.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the £2.5 billion military aid for Ukraine in 2024-25, announced on 12 January 2024, whether that funding includes his Department's operational costs.

As in previous years, we expect the £2.5 billion to cover a broad range of support to Ukraine including rapid procurement and gifting of equipment, development of international capability coalitions and training support through Op INTERFLEX. Precise allocations will be decided before the beginning of the next financial year in April.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the £2.5 billion military aid for Ukraine in 2024-25, announced on 12 January 2024, if he will provide a breakdown of how he plans to divide that funding.

As in previous years, we expect the £2.5 billion to cover a broad range of support to Ukraine including rapid procurement and gifting of equipment, development of international capability coalitions and training support through Op INTERFLEX. As previously announced, £200 million of the £2.5 billion will be spent on thousands of military drones for Ukraine. Precise allocations will be decided before the beginning of the next financial year in April.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Royal Navy ships have been deployed to the Gulf region in each year since 2010.

The Royal Navy has a long-standing maritime presence in the Gulf region, focussed on promoting peace and stability, as well as ensuring the safe flow of global trade. The Gulf region includes the Red Sea, The Gulf of Aden, the Arabian Sea, the Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Gulf.

The table below provides a breakdown of each time an RN ship entered the Gulf region. This demonstrates a changed Royal Navy operating model. Episodic deployments have been incrementally replaced by permanently deployed vessels and long deployments. For example, a Type 23 frigate has been permanently deployed to the region since 2019. The vessel has two crews, providing a more efficient and higher level of operational availability.

Fluctuations in the data reflect periodic surges when multiple RN units deployed to the region. For example, the Carrier Strike Group deployment to the Indo-Pacific in 2021 increased the numbers of vessels in the region.

Year

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

Number of Ships

20

22

22

22

20

17

13

13

13

12

12

16

8

6

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department plans to make the CEO of Defence Equipment & Support an Additional Accounting Officer.

The DE&S CEO has now formally joined the Defence Board. This is the most senior committee in the MOD, responsible for top level strategic leadership and plans for generating military force. This amendment to the Defence Board’s membership ensures that DE&S will take a fuller, more integrated role in setting the Department’s broader strategic direction.

Defence Design is undertaking a complete review of how we work as a Department. As part of this initiative, we will look at whether the CEO of DE&S should be an Additional Accounting Officer, as the Second Permanent Secretary and Director General Nuclear already are. Any changes from the current Accounting Officer arrangements will flow from the future model. At present, the Permanent Secretary remains the Accounting Officer for the Military Commands and the CEO DE&S is able to escalate any concerns as required.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department is using external (a) consultants and (b) experts for the development of Defence Design.

Defence Design is led and directed by the Ministry of Defence. External consultants are supporting Defence Design providing specialist support in areas such as operating system design and change. We are taking a collaborative approach meaning we are engaging with a broad spectrum of experts and colleagues from across Defence, wider Government, industry and academia.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which Minister in his Department has responsibility for Defence Design.

The Secretary of State for Defence has overall responsibility for Defence Design, which is undertaking a complete review of how we work as a department.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what role the Chief of the Defence Staff has in Defence Design.

As one of the senior sponsors of Defence Design, the Chief of the Defence Staff is actively involved in helping to shape and improve future ways of working across the defence enterprise.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what changes to the Levene model he plans to introduce as a result of Defence Design.

Defence Design is a productivity-enhancing initiative, driven from the centre but involving every part of the Defence enterprise, with two key priorities: first, for Defence to operate as effectively and efficiently as possible; secondly, to successfully achieve our outcomes in an ever more volatile world. To do this, we are undertaking a complete review of how we work as department, seeking to ensure we are a coherent system.

The work started in Spring 2023 and is anticipated to last between 18 and 24 months, which includes the need to simplify our processes and associated decision-making. As we design the future operating model, we will pilot improvements in priority areas across the system to drive change iteratively and quickly, aiming for significant changes to be in place from April 2024.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many German personnel are training in the UK with the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force.

As of 1 February 2024 there are 26 German personnel training with the British Army, one German person training with the Royal Navy and 22 German personnel training with the Royal Air Force, for a combined total of 49 German personnel training with the British Armed Forces.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many UK-German joint military exercises took place in 2023.

The UK and Germany undertook five joint military exercises in 2023. It should be noted this answer excludes multinational exercises (NATO etc.)

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) original and (b) current out of service date is for the Army’s Pinzgauer vehicles.

Original Out of Service Date – 2030

Current Out of Service Date – 2030

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) original and (b) current out of service date is for the Army’s Panther vehicles.

Both the original and current out of service date for Panther is 2037.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) original and (b) current out of service date is for the Army’s remaining Stormer Armoured Vehicles.

Both the original and current out of service date is 2026.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) original and (b) current out of service date is for the Army’s (i) Mastiff, (ii) Ridgeback and (iii) Wolfhound protected mobility vehicles.

The original out of service dates was 2024 and the current out of service date is 2028.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) original and (b) current out of service date is for the Army’s Bulldog vehicle.

Both the original and current out of service date for Bulldog is 2030.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the (a) original and (b) current out of service date is for the Army’s Foxhound vehicles.

Foxhound Protected Patrol Vehicle:

Original Out of Service Date – 2030

Current Out of Service Date – 2030

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of ARAP (a) pending, (b) rejected and (c) approved applicants identified as having served in a triples unit are residing in a third country.

In third countries as of 31 January 2024, there are approximately 635 principal applicants awaiting an eligibility decision, 8,513 principal applicants deemed ineligible for relocation under the ARAP scheme, and 458 eligible principal ARAP applicants awaiting onward travel. Unfortunately, it is not possible to provide a breakdown of these figures according to job role.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) are committed to support the continued relocation of eligible Afghans and their families out of third countries, and into the UK, as quickly as possible. To date, we have brought approximately 15,300 applicants to safety in the UK under the ARAP scheme.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much Department has allocated for the Land Mobility Pipeline procurement projects.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave to him on 19 June 2023 to Question 188678 regarding the Land Mobility Programme (formerly the Protected Mobility Programme).

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what programmes are included in the British Army’s Land Mobility Pipeline; and what their associated in-service dates are.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 20 June 2023 to Questions 188841 and 188867 regarding the Land Mobility Programme (formerly the Protected Mobility Programme).

The Programme’s Strategic Outline Case will be presented for approval in March 2024, therefore the platforms to be delivered and their expected in-service dates are yet to be formally endorsed.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has plans to purchase Spanish-built VAMTAC vehicles for the army.

The Army is considering multiple platforms to replenish its short-range air defence following the Granting in Kind of Stormer vehicles to Ukraine in 2022. While discussions are ongoing, no decision has been made and further information cannot be disclosed due to commercial sensitivities.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the in service date for the Multi-Role Support Ship is.

As set out in the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the Multi-Role Support Ship is anticipated to be in service in the early 2030s.

The Multi-Role Support Ship Programme is currently in its pre-concept phase. The focus is on determining the requirement and on setting the programme up for success ,with work ongoing to ensure affordability. It is too early to confirm details such as the estimated budget or precise in service dates.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the estimated budget for the Multi-Role Support Ship programme is.

As set out in the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the Multi-Role Support Ship is anticipated to be in service in the early 2030s.

The Multi-Role Support Ship Programme is currently in its pre-concept phase. The focus is on determining the requirement and on setting the programme up for success ,with work ongoing to ensure affordability. It is too early to confirm details such as the estimated budget or precise in service dates.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of ARAP cases are pending a decision.

As of 31 January 2024, there are 1,992 ARAP-principal applicants that are awaiting a decision. Many of these are new applicants.

Each ARAP application is reviewed on a case-by-case basis and is honoured or scrutinised based on their own merits in line with the published ARAP policy. The Minstry of Defence is working diligently to identify every eligible principal applicant and provide a safe passage for them to relocate to the UK as quickly as possible.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people that have relocated to the UK under the (a) Afghan relocations and assistance policy and (b) Afghan citizens resettlement scheme are residing in service family accommodation.

As of 2 February 2024, our records show 1,843 Afghans (principal applicants and family members) eligible for the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy scheme (ARAP) are currently in settled Service Family Accommodation (SFA) across the United Kingdom.

SFA properties are also used to provide short-term, transitional accommodation for some ARAP-eligible families on arrival to the United Kingdom. 850 Afghans (principal applicants and family members) are currently in transitional SFA prior to onwards movement into longer-term, settled accommodation.

SFA is available to ARAP eligible applicants and family members only. The Home Office are responsible for administering the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS).

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department plans to procure a very-short range air defence system (VSHORAD) capability for the army.

The British Army does not use the NATO Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) definition for its Air Defence assets. However, the Army’s High Velocity Missile and Lightweight Multirole Missile can engage targets at very short range, providing a very short range air defence capability to Land Forces.

Through the Land Ground Based Air Defence programme, work is ongoing to replace our STORMER based and dismounted systems and the Army is considering further complementary very short and short range capabilities to defeat a range of aerial threats.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of ARAP (a) pending, (b) rejected and (c) approved applicants identified as having served in a triples unit are residing in the UK.

Unfortunately, we are unable to break down ARAP figures by job role. It is also not possible to provide an accurate location for pending and ineligible applicants, as we rely on them to update us with their location should they choose to move.

However as of 6 February 2024, 15,300 ARAP eligible Afghans – principal applicants and their family members - are residing safely in the UK.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what information his Department holds on the number and proportion of ARAP applications that have been pending a decision for more than (a) three, (b) six, (c), 12, (d) 18 and (e) 24 months.

As of 6 February 2024, 96,676 total applications have been made for ARAP of which 94,551 (98%) have been decided. Of the 2,125 still pending a decision:

  1. 422 (20%) have waited for 6 months
  2. 333 (16%) have waited for 12 months
  3. 268 (13%) have waited for 18 months
  4. 207 (10%) have waited for 24 months.

These are all complex cases that the Ministry of Defence are working hard to resolve at pace, often alongside colleagues across Government.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the longest outstanding Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy case without an eligibility decision was as of 30 January 2024.

As of 30 January 2024, the longest outstanding ARAP application awaiting an eligibility decision was submitted on 7 May 2021. This is an unusual case concerning a deceased applicant.

This individual did not perform a role that would ordinarily be granted ARAP eligibility nor did the individual die in the course of their duties. The application is being taken forward by their son.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total sum paid by the dependents of non-UK citizens was who served in the armed forces for (a) four and (b) five years and were granted indefinite leave to remain in (i) 2021, (ii) 2022 and (iii) 2023.

All applications for Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK are submitted to, and decided by, the Home Office. The Ministry of Defence does not therefore hold information about the number of applications submitted by or granted to Serving personnel and their dependants; the length of Service at the point of application; or the fee paid.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total sum paid by non-UK citizens was who served in the armed forces for (a) four and (b) five years and were granted indefinite leave to remain in (i) 2021, (ii) 2022 and (iii) 2023.

All applications for Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK are submitted to, and decided by, the Home Office. The Ministry of Defence does not therefore hold information about the number of applications submitted by or granted to Serving personnel and their dependants; the length of Service at the point of application; or the fee paid.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many non-UK citizens who served in the Armed Forces for (a) four and (b) five years applied for indefinite leave to remain and had to pay visa fees in (i) 2021, (ii) 2022 and (iii) 2023.

All applications for Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK are submitted to, and decided by, the Home Office. The Ministry of Defence does not therefore hold information about the number of applications submitted by or granted to Serving personnel and their dependants; the length of Service at the point of application; or the fee paid.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the first Brigade combat teams to receive Boxer mechanised infantry vehicles.

The first two UK Boxer were delivered in December 2023, allowing for Ministry of Defence trials to start. The trials are being supported by 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers of the 20th Armoured Infantry Brigade Combat Team who will be the first British Army Unit to receive Boxer.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2024 to Question 10015 on BOWMAN Combat Radio System, what assessment his Department has made of how future proof the Bowman system is.

My Written Statement dated 14 December 2023 confirmed that we will continue to work with General Dynamics to ensure they deliver the planned update to sustain the in-service Bowman System, while ensuring we remain able to meet all our operational requirements. The update, alongside our own development efforts, will deliver new hardware and software ensuring troops on the frontline continue to have a secure communications system, enabling them to effectively communicate across the battlespace. As the BCIP 5.7 project is still in development and subject to approvals the procurement strategy is yet to be confirmed.

There are currently six people within the Army Headquarters working on the BCIP 5.7 project, supported by the Tactical Systems (TacSys) Service Executive within Defence Digital.

The LETacCIS programme has a full-time Senior Civil Servant (2*) Senior Responsible Owner, Joy Senior, who has responsibility for the BCIP 5.7 project as part of the wider LETacCIS programme.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2024 to Question 10015 on BOWMAN Combat Radio System, what assessment his Department has made of the security of the Bowman system.

My Written Statement dated 14 December 2023 confirmed that we will continue to work with General Dynamics to ensure they deliver the planned update to sustain the in-service Bowman System, while ensuring we remain able to meet all our operational requirements. The update, alongside our own development efforts, will deliver new hardware and software ensuring troops on the frontline continue to have a secure communications system, enabling them to effectively communicate across the battlespace. As the BCIP 5.7 project is still in development and subject to approvals the procurement strategy is yet to be confirmed.

There are currently six people within the Army Headquarters working on the BCIP 5.7 project, supported by the Tactical Systems (TacSys) Service Executive within Defence Digital.

The LETacCIS programme has a full-time Senior Civil Servant (2*) Senior Responsible Owner, Joy Senior, who has responsibility for the BCIP 5.7 project as part of the wider LETacCIS programme.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2024 to Question 10015 on BOWMAN Combat Radio System, who the prime contractor for Bowman 5.7 is.

My Written Statement dated 14 December 2023 confirmed that we will continue to work with General Dynamics to ensure they deliver the planned update to sustain the in-service Bowman System, while ensuring we remain able to meet all our operational requirements. The update, alongside our own development efforts, will deliver new hardware and software ensuring troops on the frontline continue to have a secure communications system, enabling them to effectively communicate across the battlespace. As the BCIP 5.7 project is still in development and subject to approvals the procurement strategy is yet to be confirmed.

There are currently six people within the Army Headquarters working on the BCIP 5.7 project, supported by the Tactical Systems (TacSys) Service Executive within Defence Digital.

The LETacCIS programme has a full-time Senior Civil Servant (2*) Senior Responsible Owner, Joy Senior, who has responsibility for the BCIP 5.7 project as part of the wider LETacCIS programme.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2024 to Question 10015 on Bowman Combat Radio System, how many people are working on the Bowman 5.7 project team.

My Written Statement dated 14 December 2023 confirmed that we will continue to work with General Dynamics to ensure they deliver the planned update to sustain the in-service Bowman System, while ensuring we remain able to meet all our operational requirements. The update, alongside our own development efforts, will deliver new hardware and software ensuring troops on the frontline continue to have a secure communications system, enabling them to effectively communicate across the battlespace. As the BCIP 5.7 project is still in development and subject to approvals the procurement strategy is yet to be confirmed.

There are currently six people within the Army Headquarters working on the BCIP 5.7 project, supported by the Tactical Systems (TacSys) Service Executive within Defence Digital.

The LETacCIS programme has a full-time Senior Civil Servant (2*) Senior Responsible Owner, Joy Senior, who has responsibility for the BCIP 5.7 project as part of the wider LETacCIS programme.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2024 to Question 10015 on BOWMAN Combat Radio System, who the senior responsible owner is for the Bowman 5.7 project.

My Written Statement dated 14 December 2023 confirmed that we will continue to work with General Dynamics to ensure they deliver the planned update to sustain the in-service Bowman System, while ensuring we remain able to meet all our operational requirements. The update, alongside our own development efforts, will deliver new hardware and software ensuring troops on the frontline continue to have a secure communications system, enabling them to effectively communicate across the battlespace. As the BCIP 5.7 project is still in development and subject to approvals the procurement strategy is yet to be confirmed.

There are currently six people within the Army Headquarters working on the BCIP 5.7 project, supported by the Tactical Systems (TacSys) Service Executive within Defence Digital.

The LETacCIS programme has a full-time Senior Civil Servant (2*) Senior Responsible Owner, Joy Senior, who has responsibility for the BCIP 5.7 project as part of the wider LETacCIS programme.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress his Department has made developing organic overwatch capabilities for the army.

The Army’s organic overwatch programme is exploring the use of ground-launched systems for both mechanised and armoured forces. The programme is currently in its concept phase.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) personnel, (b) vehicles, (c) ships, (d) aircraft and (e) brigade combat (i) teams, (ii) squadrons and (iii) formations the UK contributed to exercise Steadfast Defender 2024.

Exercise STEADFAST DEFENDER is ongoing, running from January to June this year. The UK's participation will continue to showcase our role as a leading ally within NATO. Approximately 20,000 UK Service personnel are scheduled to participate, supported by eight Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary ships and cutting-edge aircraft, such as the F35B. Crucially, our commitments will demonstrate our ability to deploy Defence capability at scale, and sustain it at range.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2024 to Question 10015 on Bowman Combat Radio System, what the delivery date is for Bowman 5.7.

The Bowman ComBAT Infrastructure and Platform (BCIP) 5.7 project delivery dates are subject to ongoing discussions and pending approvals in 2024. It would be prejudicial to commercial negotiations to reveal the Department’s budget for the BCIP 5.7 project.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2024 to Question 10015 on Bowman Combat Radio System, what the budget is for the Bowman 5.7 project.

The Bowman ComBAT Infrastructure and Platform (BCIP) 5.7 project delivery dates are subject to ongoing discussions and pending approvals in 2024. It would be prejudicial to commercial negotiations to reveal the Department’s budget for the BCIP 5.7 project.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 10 of the Integrated Review Refresh 2023, CP 811, published in March 2023, how much of the £560 million announced in autumn 2022 for war stocks replenishment has been (a) allocated and (b) awarded to contractors.

To date, contracts have been awarded for £445 million of the £560 million resilience package announced in autumn 2022. The funding was spread over two financial years, and work progresses to commit the remainder of the funding as soon as possible.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what information his Department holds on the number of mercenaries in private military companies operating alongside Russian Armed Forces in Ukraine since February 2022.

We estimate that approximately 350,000 Russian military personnel have been killed or wounded since the start of the conflict. We also estimate that over 2,600 Russian main battle tanks, 4,900 armoured vehicles (armoured personnel carriers and infantry fighting vehicles), 101 fixed wing aircraft, 1,400 artillery pieces, six surface ships and one submarine has been destroyed since the start of the conflict.

Since February 2022, we estimate over 78,000 personnel have served with the Wagner Private Military Company, including both recruited prisoners and regular Wagner contractors, and over 7,000 personnel have served with the 'Redut' Private Military Company. There are also numerous other smaller Private Military Companies serving alongside the Russian Armed Forces in Ukraine which we are unable to provide estimates for. The deaths of personnel from these organisations are not reflected in Russian official military death tolls, however Wagner Group mercenaries likely suffered approximately 40,000 wounded and 20,000 killed.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate his Department has made of the number of Russian (a) main battle tanks, (b) armoured vehicles, (c) fixed wing aircraft, (d) artillery pieces, (e) surface ships and (f) submarines destroyed in Ukraine since February 2022.

We estimate that approximately 350,000 Russian military personnel have been killed or wounded since the start of the conflict. We also estimate that over 2,600 Russian main battle tanks, 4,900 armoured vehicles (armoured personnel carriers and infantry fighting vehicles), 101 fixed wing aircraft, 1,400 artillery pieces, six surface ships and one submarine has been destroyed since the start of the conflict.

Since February 2022, we estimate over 78,000 personnel have served with the Wagner Private Military Company, including both recruited prisoners and regular Wagner contractors, and over 7,000 personnel have served with the 'Redut' Private Military Company. There are also numerous other smaller Private Military Companies serving alongside the Russian Armed Forces in Ukraine which we are unable to provide estimates for. The deaths of personnel from these organisations are not reflected in Russian official military death tolls, however Wagner Group mercenaries likely suffered approximately 40,000 wounded and 20,000 killed.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate his Department has made of the number of Russian armed forces personnel (a) killed in action and (b) wounded in Ukraine since February 2022.

We estimate that approximately 350,000 Russian military personnel have been killed or wounded since the start of the conflict. We also estimate that over 2,600 Russian main battle tanks, 4,900 armoured vehicles (armoured personnel carriers and infantry fighting vehicles), 101 fixed wing aircraft, 1,400 artillery pieces, six surface ships and one subma