James Daly Portrait

James Daly

Conservative - Bury North

First elected: 12th December 2019


Ballot Secrecy Bill [HL]
1st Mar 2023 - 7th Mar 2023
Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill
19th Oct 2022 - 29th Nov 2022
Justice Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 15th Mar 2022
Home Affairs Committee
2nd Nov 2021 - 15th Mar 2022
Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill [HL]
9th Feb 2022 - 10th Feb 2022
Public Service Pensions and Judicial Offices Bill [HL]
19th Jan 2022 - 27th Jan 2022
Down Syndrome Bill
19th Jan 2022 - 26th Jan 2022
Commercial Rent (Coronavirus) Bill
1st Dec 2021 - 14th Dec 2021
Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill
3rd Nov 2021 - 18th Nov 2021
Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill
9th Nov 2021 - 14th Nov 2021


Oral Question
Monday 4th March 2024
14:30
Oral Question No. 23
What the eligibility criteria for the Community Ownership Fund are.
Scheduled Event
Friday 15th March 2024
Private Members' Bills - Main Chamber
Pets (Microchips) Bill: Second Reading
View calendar
Department Event
Tuesday 26th March 2024
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
26 Mar 2024, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 293 Conservative No votes vs 2 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 179 Noes - 294
Speeches
Wednesday 28th February 2024
Oral Answers to Questions
What action has my right hon. Friend taken to ensure that no new regulatory borders between Great Britain and Northern …
Written Answers
Thursday 29th February 2024
Members' Staff: ICT
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the policy of the Parliamentary Digital …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 10th March 2020
Conduct of the Competition and Markets Authority
That this House recognises JD Sports Fashion plc (JD Sports) as a leading UK retailer and one of the largest …
Bills
Tuesday 12th December 2023
Pets (Microchips) Bill 2023-24
A Bill to make provision regarding pets with microchips; and for connected purposes.
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th October 2023
4. Visits outside the UK
Name of donor: Coalition for Global Prosperity (CGP) (funded by the Eleanor Crook Foundation)
Address of donor: 1 Horse Guards …
EDM signed
Monday 5th October 2020
The Maltby Miners Welfare Institute
That this House notes the proposed sale of the Maltby Miners Welfare Institute, the Stute, by CISWO, the coal mining …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 5th July 2023
Safety cameras Bill 2022-23
A Bill to require the Secretary of State to publish revised guidance on the deployment, visibility and signing of speed …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, James Daly has voted in 850 divisions, and 5 times against the majority of their Party.

1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
James Daly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
13 Oct 2020 - Public Health: Coronavirus Regulations - View Vote Context
James Daly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 82
24 Jun 2020 - Demonstrations (Abortion Clinics) - View Vote Context
James Daly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Conservative No votes vs 56 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 47
17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
James Daly voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
10 Dec 2021 - Prayers - View Vote Context
James Daly voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 33 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 3 Noes - 53
View All James Daly Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
(29 debate interactions)
Alison Thewliss (Scottish National Party)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Home Affairs)
(16 debate interactions)
Margaret Hodge (Labour)
(13 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(86 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(38 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all James Daly's debates

Bury North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Revoke local government powers to charge CAZ, LEZ, and ULEZ.

The Mayor's proposed extension of ULEZ over a short timeframe could negatively impact millions of people and businesses across SE England.

Amend legislation to make it a legal requirement for a driver to stop & report accidents involving cats.

Hundreds of thousands of people signed numerous petitions calling for actions that the Government has included in the Kept Animals Bill. The Government should urgently find time to allow the Bill to complete its journey through Parliament and become law.

Many missing microchipped pets are never reunited as it’s optional to scan & check microchip registration. It’s time veterinary professionals, authorities and rescues checked pet & keeper match on the original database at a pets 1st consultation or yearly checkup. It’s their only chance to get home

A healthy young dog with RBU was euthanised. The person who requested euthanasia was not the registered keeper.

Bring in a law which enforces professional football clubs to have at least 51% fan ownership similar to how the Bundesliga operates this rule.

The Government should use the recently established fan led review of football to introduce an Independent Football Regulator in England to put fans back at the heart of our national game. This should happen by December 2021.

Now that we have left the EU, the UK has the ability to finally stop the importation of Shark Fins. They had previously stated that 'Whilst in the EU, it is not possible to unilaterally ban the import of shark fins into the UK.'

Plenty of dogs from UK breeders & rescues need homes. Transporting young pups long distances is often stressful, before being sold for ridiculous prices to unsuspecting dog-lovers. Government must adjust current laws, ban this unethical activity on welfare grounds & protect these poor animals ASAP.

Leading veterinary and welfare bodies are concerned by the alarming rise in ear-cropped dogs in the UK. Ear cropping is illegal in the UK and an unnecessary, painful mutilation with no welfare benefit. The practice involves cutting off part of the ear flap, often without anaesthesia or pain relief.

I would like the government to review and increase the pay for healthcare workers to recognise the work that they do.

To revoke the Immigration Health Surcharge increases for overseas NHS staff. The latest budget shows an increase of £220 a year for an overseas worker to live and work in the UK, at a time when the NHS, and UK economy, relies heavily on them.

We would like the government to support and regard social care: financially, publicly and systematically on an equal par as NHS. We would like parliament to debate how to support social care during COVID-19 and beyond so that it automatically has the same access to operational and financial support.

Give NHS workers who are EU and other Nationals automatic UK citizenship if they stay and risk their own lives looking after the British people during the COVID crisis.

EU law recognises animals as sentient beings, aware of their feelings and emotions. Animals are at risk of losing these vital legal protections, post-Brexit. We want a BetterDealForAnimals: a law that creates a duty for all Ministers in the UK to fully regard animal welfare in policy making.


Latest EDMs signed by James Daly

22nd September 2020
James Daly signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 5th October 2020

The Maltby Miners Welfare Institute

Tabled by: Alexander Stafford (Conservative - Rother Valley)
That this House notes the proposed sale of the Maltby Miners Welfare Institute, the Stute, by CISWO, the coal mining charity; acknowledges that miners have paid for the Stute over the years out of their wages to safeguard their mining heritage; is disappointed that CISWO has chosen to put the …
7 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Oct 2020)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 5
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
10th March 2020
James Daly signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 10th March 2020

Conduct of the Competition and Markets Authority

Tabled by: James Daly (Conservative - Bury North)
That this House recognises JD Sports Fashion plc (JD Sports) as a leading UK retailer and one of the largest private sector employers in the North West, including 4,000 staff at its Bury headquarters; notes JD Sports merger with Footasylum plc, the Rochdale based retailer, which the Competition and Markets …
4 signatures
(Most recent: 11 Mar 2020)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 1
Labour: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
View All James Daly's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by James Daly, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


James Daly has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by James Daly

Monday 27th February 2023

4 Bills introduced by James Daly


A Bill to make provision regarding pets with microchips; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 24th March 2023

A Bill to make provision regarding pets with microchips; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 6th May 2022

A Bill to make provision regarding pets with microchips; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 12th December 2023
Next Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 15th March 2024
Order Paper number: 11
(Unlikely to be Debated - would require unanimous consent to progress)

A Bill to make provision regarding pets with microchips; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 23rd September 2020
(Read Debate)

92 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
19th Feb 2024
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the policy of the Parliamentary Digital Service is on (a) the rights of access to parliamentary (i) emails and (ii) electronic devices for line managers of hon. Members’ staff and (b) providing access to parliamentary (A) emails and (B) electronic devices to parliamentary staff funded via short money; and whether the Parliamentary Digital Service has issued guidance to political parties on these matters.

Members are the Controllers for the personal data held by their Parliamentary offices. This includes the data and information stored on the Parliamentary-provided devices and network accounts of their Parliamentary staff, including staff funded by short money.

In almost all circumstances, access is only provided to the data held in a Member’s parliamentary account or devices (or those of their staff) by the Parliamentary digital Service (PDS) on the instruction of that Member in their capacity as Controller. This is in line with the UK General Data Protection Regulation (UK GDPR) data processing contract between each Member and the Administration.

As the Controller, a Member can instruct PDS to grant themselves, or members of their Parliamentary staff, access to the accounts and devices assigned to other staff in their own office.

Devices funded by short money that have been ordered through PDS are managed by PDS. In line with the UK GDPR data processing contract between individual Members and the Administration, PDS would facilitate access to the information stored on these devices at the instruction of the Controller.

Although no specific guidance has been issued by PDS to political parties on this issue, the Administrations of both Houses of Parliament have a data processing contract that applies to Controllers using Parliament’s IT systems. The contract for Members of both Houses includes a service description that sets out how Members are using Parliament’s IT systems to process the personal data which they are responsible for.

10th Jul 2023
To ask the Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, how many Parishes currently have interregnums in the Diocese of Manchester.

The appointment of parish priests is a matter for diocesan bishops. The information is not held centrally by the National Church Institutions.

You may wish to enquire with the Manchester Diocese: https://www.manchester.anglican.org/about-us/our-staff/

or with the Bishop of Manchester: https://www.manchester.anglican.org/about-us/bishops/bishopmanchester.php

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what Government support is available to assist local authorities and veterans groups to create Veterans Hubs providing a wide range of services to ex-forces personnel.

Veterans have access to wide ranging support, wherever they live in the UK. In addition to the large number of national initiatives delivered by this Government in support of the Veterans’ Strategy, we recognise the hugely important role that charities and local communities play, through initiatives such as Armed Forces and veterans’ hubs.

The Government supports these projects through the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust, which distributes funds of £10M per annum for projects that support the Armed Forces community, including veterans. This year, the Government has provided an additional £10M to the Trust to deliver projects supporting veterans’ mental health needs. While eligibility varies depending on the programme, funding is often available to both Local Authorities and charitable organisations.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what funding is available to assist in the establishment of an Armed Forces Hub in Bury to ensure that veterans in Bury, Ramsbottom and Tottington have access to the best support services and facilities.

Veterans have access to wide ranging support, wherever they live in the UK. In addition to the large number of national initiatives delivered by this Government in support of the Veterans’ Strategy, we recognise the hugely important role that charities and communities play, through initiatives such as Armed Forces and veterans’ hubs. The Government supports these projects through the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust, which distributes funds of £10M annually for projects to support the Armed Forces community, including veterans.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effect of a potential fall in wholesale energy prices on future levels of domestic energy prices.

Despite the recent fall in wholesale energy prices, energy markets remain volatile, and prices are still well above historical norms. Suppliers typically buy energy in advance of when it is delivered and Ofgem determines a maximum price they can charge consumers to recover the cost of this through the price cap. This means there can be a delay between changes in wholesale prices and these being reflected in consumer bills.

The Government’s Energy Price Guarantee (EPG) will save a typical household around £900 this winter.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to harness science and innovation for the purposes of the Government’s levelling up agenda.

The Levelling Up White Paper sets out how we will maximise the contribution of innovation to levelling up by building on existing and emerging strengths across the country. This includes a commitment to increase public investment in R&D outside the Greater South East by at least one third over the Spending Review period and at least 40 percent by 2030; making levelling up one of the objectives of our R&D investment strategy and aiming for the regions outside the Greater South East to receive at least 55% of BEIS’ R&D budget by 2024/25; and investing £100 million as part of piloting new Innovation Accelerators supporting three UK city regions to become major, globally competitive centres for research and innovation.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to deliver new nuclear power.

This Government is committed to nuclear power as part of the country’s future diverse energy mix. Hinkley Point C is under construction and, when operational, will supply 3.2GW of secure, low carbon electricity for around 60 years, providing enough power for around 6 million homes. The Government is in constructive negotiations over Sizewell C in Suffolk. To further develop the project, the Government entered into a Combined Option agreement of £100 million with EDF on 27th January.

The Government has also announced a £385million Advanced Nuclear Fund. From this, £210million has been awarded to Rolls-Royce SMR to develop their small modular reactor design and their continued advanced modular reactor development. The Government also announced a new £120 million Nuclear Enabling Fund to provide targeted support to address barriers to entry for future nuclear. Further details on the fund will be announced in due course.

Later this year, the Government will publish a nuclear roadmap setting out the government’s strategy in more detail. The Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill is currently in Parliament. This will introduce a Regulated Asset Base model for nuclear projects and reduce the obstacles to financing new nuclear projects.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that (a) local authorities correctly categorise businesses for the Restart Grant application and (b) there is consistency across local authorities in the funds granted to (i) bridal shops and (ii) other businesses.

The primary principle of the Restart Grant scheme is to support businesses that offer in-person services, where the main service and activity takes place in a fixed rate-paying premises, in the relevant sectors. Non-essential retail businesses, such as bridal shops, will be able apply for Restart Grants of up to £6,000. Businesses in the hospitality, leisure, personal care and gym sectors are able to apply for grants of up to £18,000.

If a business operates services that could be considered non-essential retail and also fall into another category, such as hospitality in the higher funding threshold, the main service can be determined by assessing which category constitutes 50% or more of their overall business.

The main service principle will determine which threshold of funding a business receives. Businesses will need to declare which is their main service. Local Authorities will need to exercise their reasonable judgement to determine whether or not a business is eligible for grants under which funding threshold and be satisfied that they have taken reasonable and practicable steps to pay eligible businesses and to pay them the correct amount

Throughout the pandemic, BEIS officials have worked closely with Local Authorities to ensure that grants are delivered as quickly as possible, while safeguarding public funds.   As the range of grants available has increased, officials have continued regular briefings with all 314 Local Authorities to provide the latest guidance and respond to questions. Ministers have also held regular conversations with leaders and chief executives.

20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much financial support the Government has provided to the hospitality sector in Bury North constituency during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has brought forward a substantial package of financial support for the hospitality sector during the COVID-19 pandemic. At the Budget, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £65 billion three-point plan to provide support for jobs and businesses (including the hospitality sector), with extensions to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, self-employed support, business grants, loans and VAT cuts – bringing total fiscal support to over £407 billion.

17th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what financial support is available to community boxing clubs in England; and if she will make a statement.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key Government priority, we recognise the positive impact participating sport can have on individuals wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

Sport England - the Government’s Arm’s Length Body - has invested more than £12 million into boxing over the last five years including £2.3 million to support boxing clubs through the immediate challenges of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and can offer a positive alternative to those who are at-risk of being drawn into serious violence, gang culture and criminal behaviour. Participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

In November 2022, the Ministry of Justice announced a £5 million Sport Fund to deliver “sport for crime prevention” programmes. Funding will deliver grants to around 200 local projects which deliver targeted support for children considered to be at-risk of entering the justice system due to identified need or additional vulnerabilities. The fund will be delivered in partnership with a consortium of national sector-leading experts in the sport for crime prevention space, formed by StreetGames, The Sport for Development Coalition and the Alliance of Sport in Criminal Justice.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential positive impact of grass roots boxing clubs in their local communities; and if she will make a statement.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key Government priority, we recognise the positive impact participating sport can have on individuals wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

Sport England - the Government’s Arm’s Length Body - has invested more than £12 million into boxing over the last five years including £2.3 million to support boxing clubs through the immediate challenges of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and can offer a positive alternative to those who are at-risk of being drawn into serious violence, gang culture and criminal behaviour. Participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

In November 2022, the Ministry of Justice announced a £5 million Sport Fund to deliver “sport for crime prevention” programmes. Funding will deliver grants to around 200 local projects which deliver targeted support for children considered to be at-risk of entering the justice system due to identified need or additional vulnerabilities. The fund will be delivered in partnership with a consortium of national sector-leading experts in the sport for crime prevention space, formed by StreetGames, The Sport for Development Coalition and the Alliance of Sport in Criminal Justice.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the financial viability of grass roots boxing clubs.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key Government priority, we recognise the positive impact participating sport can have on individuals wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

Sport England - the Government’s Arm’s Length Body - has invested more than £12 million into boxing over the last five years including £2.3 million to support boxing clubs through the immediate challenges of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and can offer a positive alternative to those who are at-risk of being drawn into serious violence, gang culture and criminal behaviour. Participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

In November 2022, the Ministry of Justice announced a £5 million Sport Fund to deliver “sport for crime prevention” programmes. Funding will deliver grants to around 200 local projects which deliver targeted support for children considered to be at-risk of entering the justice system due to identified need or additional vulnerabilities. The fund will be delivered in partnership with a consortium of national sector-leading experts in the sport for crime prevention space, formed by StreetGames, The Sport for Development Coalition and the Alliance of Sport in Criminal Justice.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the (a) contribution of grass roots boxing clubs make to reducing crime and (b) effect of that contribution on reducing costs associated with anti-social behaviour.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key Government priority, we recognise the positive impact participating sport can have on individuals wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

Sport England - the Government’s Arm’s Length Body - has invested more than £12 million into boxing over the last five years including £2.3 million to support boxing clubs through the immediate challenges of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and can offer a positive alternative to those who are at-risk of being drawn into serious violence, gang culture and criminal behaviour. Participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

In November 2022, the Ministry of Justice announced a £5 million Sport Fund to deliver “sport for crime prevention” programmes. Funding will deliver grants to around 200 local projects which deliver targeted support for children considered to be at-risk of entering the justice system due to identified need or additional vulnerabilities. The fund will be delivered in partnership with a consortium of national sector-leading experts in the sport for crime prevention space, formed by StreetGames, The Sport for Development Coalition and the Alliance of Sport in Criminal Justice.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to widen access to culture and heritage.

The Government is committed to ensuring as many people as possible can access our world-class museums, galleries and heritage sites, regardless of their background or where they live. Our Arm’s-Length Bodies deliver much of this good work.

For example, following a request from HM Government to ensure that the taxpayer subsidy it allocates is more equitably spread around the country, Arts Council England will be investing £446 million each year in 2023-2026 to support 990 organisations across the whole of England. This is more than ever before, and in more places than ever before.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to encourage collaborative and constructive negotiations and agreements for rights to install telecommunications apparatus.

The Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Bill contains measures to encourage the use of Alternative Dispute Resolution mechanisms, which are specifically aimed at encouraging more collaborative and constructive negotiations.

However, the government recognises that legislation is not the only way in which better collaboration can be achieved. Officials from my department have held monthly Access to Land Workshops over the last 12-18 months, which cover a number of workstreams and attract attendance from stakeholders across the telecommunications industry, including site provider representatives. I am pleased to say that these workshops have made excellent progress and one of the outputs of this work is the creation of a new industry body, which in time will continue this work independently of DCMS.

I understand that this body will be called the National Connectivity Alliance and that so far it has appointed a steering group of 24 members from across all parts of the telecommunications sector. It aims to bring together stakeholders from across the telecommunications industry to discuss issues of mutual interest, to improve collaboration and understanding and to be a forum where members can share best practice.

I welcome this development and fully support the creation of this body and wish them every success for the future. I hope that site providers and the telecommunications industry share my sentiments and will work together to ensure its success.

9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department plans to provide support to smaller organisations that were unable to apply to the third round of the Culture Recovery Fund as a result of the shorter application window of 11 days.

Previous recipients of the Culture Recovery Fund in urgent need of CRF support who were unable to meet the deadline for Continuity Support can consider whether they meet the criteria for ACE’s Emergency Resource Support - which has been designed so that any eligible organisation in urgent need can access support - and make an application to that programme if appropriate. This ACE route is open to previous recipients and non-recipients, who can request Permission to Apply until 30 September.

The question refers to Arts Council England’s (ACE) application window, and therefore this answer likewise refers to ACE processes and to applicants who could have applied through ACE, rather than through the other DCMS Arms Length Bodies involved in delivering the Culture Recovery Fund. Different considerations apply for processes run by other Arms Length Bodies.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department has taken to (a) evaluate the effect of covid-19 restrictions on grassroots boxing and (b) support England Boxing with guidance for enabling boxing training to resume as covid-19 restrictions are eased.

Sports and physical activity are crucial for our mental and physical health. That’s why we have continued to make sure that people can exercise throughout the national restrictions and why we have ensured that grassroots and children’s sport is front of the queue when easing those restrictions.

On Monday 22 February, the Prime Minister announced a roadmap out of the current lockdown in England. The government has introduced a step approach to the return of outdoor and indoor sport areas across England. Each full step of the roadmap will be informed by the latest available science and data and will be five weeks apart in order to provide time to assess the data and provide one week’s notice to businesses and individuals.

National Governing Bodies, including England Boxing, for contact sports have developed action plans in line with the governments Combat Sport Framework which takes into account the level of risk of their sport and how they can work to mitigate it to minimise COVID-19 transmission risk. This has been reviewed by government to ensure it is consistent with the overarching government guidance.

At step 2 of the Roadmap, contact combat sports can resume at phase 2 of the Contact Combat Sports framework for children and at phase 1 for adults. Outdoors, these sports are exempt from social gathering limits as they are organised sport. Indoors, adults must only only take part in individual activity and children can take part in groups of up to 15.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what Government support is available for the provision of facilities and to encourage participation in grass roots cricket.

Sport and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health, and are a vital weapon against coronavirus.

Government has provided unprecedented support to businesses through tax reliefs, cash grants and employee wage support, which many sport clubs have benefited from. Sport England has also provided £270 million directly to support community sport clubs and exercise centres through this pandemic. This includes £6,599,437 investment in cricket to 1,362 projects.

On 26 January Sport England also published their strategy ‘Uniting the Movement’ and as part of this have committed an extra £50million to help grassroots sports clubs and organisations affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

Furthermore, in the last 10 years (since 2011), Sport England has invested more than £85 million of National Lottery and Exchequer funding in community sports organisations and facilities for participation in cricket. For the period 2017/22 Sport England has invested £11,202,500 in the England and Wales Cricket Board.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, steps his Department is taking to support the cultural sector in the north of England.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has taken steps to ensure unprecedented levels of support has been provided to the cultural sector in the North of England. In 2020/2021, over £350 million has been invested in over 900 organisations based in the North via Arts Council England and the introduction of the Culture Recovery Fund.

The £300m additional funding for the Culture Recovery Fund announced at Budget 2021 will continue to support key cultural organisations up and down the country to help the sector as audiences begin to return, and to ensure a vibrant future for the culture sector as the nation recovers from the pandemic. This support is in addition to the extension of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, and the continued reduction in VAT, which has supported many creatives and organisations across the North of England.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to encourage participation in grass roots sports.

Sports and physical activity are crucial for our mental and physical health. The Chief Medical Officer is clear that being physically active is important to long-term health and crucial for keeping people healthy. That’s why we have continued to make sure that people can exercise throughout the national restrictions, and why we have ensured that grassroots and children’s sport is front of the queue when easing those restrictions.

On Monday 22 February, the Prime Minister announced a roadmap out of the current lockdown in England. The government has introduced a step approach to the return of outdoor and indoor sport areas across England. From 8 March, sport has been able to take place in school for all children, or as part of wraparound activities if children are attending in order to enable their parents to work, seek work, attend education, seek medical care, or attend a support group. Any organised outdoor sport was able to restart on 29 March.

The Government has provided unprecedented support to the sport sector to ensure these facilities are able to open. Beyond elite level sport, £100 million of funding has now been provided to support local authority leisure centres. Sport England are also providing £220 million directly to support community sport clubs and exercise centres through this pandemic, including their £35 million Community Emergency Fund. Sport England’s new strategy, ‘Uniting the Movement’, dedicated an additional £50 million to support grassroots sports clubs and organisations.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to allow 16 year olds to work more than two hours on a Sunday.

The Government aims to allow children to take up opportunities for suitable part-time work, whilst ensuring that proportionate safeguards are in place so that their education, health, and wellbeing are not jeopardised.

The Department wants to ensure that the correct balance between enabling children to benefit from employment opportunities and protecting educational attainment is achieved. Based on the evidence we have, the current limits on hours achieve this. The Department will continue to keep this under review.

13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many participants on Skills Bootcamps have attended job interviews; and of those participants, how many and what proportion have been offered a job following an interview.

We have now published the outcome data from wave 1 of the Skills Bootcamps, delivered between September 2020 and 31 March 2021. This outcome data shows that Skills Bootcamps are supporting individuals to access new opportunities and are helping them progress in their careers.

Between September 2020 and March 2021, over 2000 participants completed a Skills Bootcamp, of which at least 54% of individuals achieved a positive outcome as a result. A positive outcome is defined as a new full or part time job or apprenticeship, a new role, or increased responsibilities with their current employer. For the self-employed, a positive outcome is defined as access to new opportunities.

In addition to these recorded outcomes, published research for wave 1 of the Skills Bootcamps highlights that three quarters of learners felt the training met or was meeting their needs, and 79% were satisfied with their course overall.

A guaranteed interview is a key part of the Skills Bootcamps offer in wave 2 and for all future delivery. Detailed data about attended job interviews is not available as part of outcomes data from wave 1 of the Skills Bootcamps. However, the department is currently commissioning impact evaluations for waves 2 and 3 of the Skills Bootcamps, which will provide further evidence and learning to inform future delivery. We are working with providers in wave 2 of the programme to ensure they provide consistent and accurate data.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the PE and Sport Premium for the 2021-22 academic year will be announced.

The Department is aware of the importance of giving schools as much notice as possible of future funding. We will confirm arrangements for the primary physical education and sport premium for the 2021/22 academic year as soon as possible.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to support maintained nursery schools.

Maintained nursery schools (MNSs) are an important part of the early years sector and provide valuable services, especially in disadvantaged areas.

Early years providers, including MNSs, have continued to receive early education entitlements funding during the COVID-19 outbreak. We have also re-confirmed around £60 million, nationally, in supplementary funding for MNSs for the financial year 2021-22.

Like private nurseries, MNSs typically rely on private income for a significant proportion of their income, unlike most state-funded schools. Therefore, we have ensured that access to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) is also available to MNSs, in line with published guidance. On 3 March 2021, my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced that the CJRS will be extended until the end of September 2021. As long as staff meet the other criteria for the scheme, schools and early years providers are able to furlough their staff if they have experienced a drop in either their income from parents or government. MNSs were also able to access free school meals vouchers via Edenred.

This government remains committed to the long-term funding of maintained nursery schools, and any reform to the way they are funded will be accompanied by appropriate funding protections.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to improve educational and developmental outcomes for children with SEND.

Our ambition is for every child, no matter what challenge they face, to have access to a world-class education that sets them up for life. Supporting children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) to access high quality teaching and specialist professional care is a priority for this government.

The cross-government SEND Review is looking at ways to improve the SEND system, including better outcomes for children and young people with SEND, with help offered early in genuine partnership with families. Our ambition is to publish proposals for public consultation in the spring.

We have announced a major investment in special needs education, including an additional £730 million into high needs in the 2021-22 financial year, coming on top of the additional £780 million in the 2020-21 financial year, which means high needs budgets will have grown by over £1.5 billion, nearly a quarter, in just 2 years. We are also investing £300 million capital funding in the 2021-22 financial year for new places for children and young people with SEND, a significant single-year increase in our capital investment in new high needs places.

We are also supporting local SEND services. On 10 February 2021, we announced over £42 million of funding for projects to support children and young people with SEND in financial year 2021-22. This investment will ensure that specialist organisations around the country can continue their work to help strengthen local area performance, support families and provide practical support to schools and colleges. Crucially, it will strengthen participation of parents and young people in the SEND system, ensuring they have a voice in designing policies and services and have access to high quality information, advice and support. It includes £27.3 million specifically to support families on low incomes raising children with disabilities or serious illnesses.

Finally, we recognise that the COVID-19 outbreak has had a particular impact on children and young people. We are committed to helping all pupils, including those with SEND, make up learning lost as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. The government has announced £1.7 billion to give education settings support to help pupils get back on track, including additional funding, tutoring, early language support and summer schools. Sir Kevan Collins has also been appointed as the Education Recovery Commissioner and is considering how schools and the system can more effectively target resources and support at pupils in greatest need.

6th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether (a) Greater Manchester Combined Authority or (b) any other councils within that Combined Authority (i) applied for and (ii) secured funding through the Air Quality Grant scheme 2022-23.

Defra did not receive or accept any applications from Greater Manchester Combined Authority or any councils within the combined authority as part of the Air Quality Grant scheme 2022-23.

79 applications were received from councils for this year’s scheme. 44 applicants were provided with funding totalling £10.7 million, which is helping them to develop and implement measures to benefit schools, businesses and communities and reduce the impact of air pollution on people’s health. Examples include supporting programmes that will educate doctors, nurses and social care workers about air quality; support for an e-cargo bike library helping local businesses in Norfolk to cut operating costs while lowering their emissions; and data collection to develop and deliver a traffic management plan that will reduce congestion and improve traffic flow across Derbyshire.

The air quality grant scheme sits alongside a further£883 million made available as part of the government’s NO2 Plan to support local authorities in cleaning up transport and cutting levels of nitrogen dioxide down to legal levels in the shortest possible time.

Under the 2017 UK Plan for Tackling Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) Concentrations, Greater Manchester authorities are required to take urgent action to address NO2 pollution and develop plans to bring levels to within legal limits in the shortest possible time.

Greater Manchester’s review in July 2022 identified they would not be fully compliant with legal limits before 2027 without action, with 79 points of exceedance predicted in 2023. We have reviewed Greater Manchester’s proposals and identified a number of gaps in the evidence, meaning it is not yet possible to understand how the proposed approach will achieve compliance with NO2 limits in the shortest possible time. We have requested further evidence from the Greater Manchester authorities to enable us to consider the plans further.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department is taking steps to ensure that healthy animals are not euthanised by vets prior to consultation with the owner.

In 2021, we worked closely with the veterinary profession to provide greater assurance that alternatives to euthanasia are explored before a healthy dog is put down. Following these discussions, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RVCS) agreed to incorporate the principle of scanning a microchip before such euthanasia into the guidance that underpins their Code of Professional Conduct. This applies to all veterinary surgeons practising in the United Kingdom.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to ensure microchips in cats are scanned when found following a road traffic collision; and if she will make a statement.

The Government has committed to introducing compulsory cat microchipping and this will increase the likelihood that cats injured or killed on roads can be reunited with their keeper.


It is established good practice for local authorities to scan any cat found by the roadside so that the owner can be informed. Highways England has clear guidelines for contractors to follow when they find a deceased cat.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to inform local authorities on best practice guidance on scanning microchips of deceased cats found on the roadside.

The Government has committed to introducing compulsory cat microchipping and this will increase the likelihood that cats injured or killed on roads can be reunited with their keeper.


It is established good practice for local authorities to scan any cat found by the roadside so that the owner can be informed. Highways England has clear guidelines for contractors to follow when they find a deceased cat.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of the Pets (Microchips) Bill.

The Government’s favoured approach is to work collaboratively with all parties to effect positive change without the need for legislation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what air quality monitoring data his Department has received from (a) the Greater Manchester Combined Authority and (b) each borough within the Greater Manchester region in 2021.

The UK Air website provides data from monitoring sites within the Greater Manchester region, including locally managed sites and sites managed by DEFRA. This data is accessible through the data selector tool, found through the following URL:

https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/interactive-map?network=nondefraaqmon

An interactive map of monitoring sites in the UK provides information on all the monitoring sites in the Greater Manchester region, and can be accessed through the following URL:

https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/data/datawarehouse

The Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) submit to Defra a single Annual Status Report via The Greater Manchester Air Quality Working Group, led by Transport for Greater Manchester, representing the ten authorities that constitute the GMCA – Bolton, Bury, Manchester, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, and Wigan. The Annual Status Report submitted in 2021 (covering 2020) can be viewed on the GMCA website via the URL below.

https://secure.manchester.gov.uk/downloads/download/4166/air_quality_reports

This report includes the air quality monitoring data for 2020. Data for 2021 will be submitted as part of this years’ Annual Status Report expected later this year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps are available in the event that a local authority does not give a ruling on a Definitive Map Modification Order within a reasonable timeframe.

Anyone who has applied to the local highway authority for a modification to the area's definitive map and statement and has not been advised of the authority's decision within 12 months, can apply in writing to the Secretary of State for a direction. The Secretary of State may direct the authority to decide the application by a certain date.

The decisions are made by a Planning Inspector on behalf of the Secretary of State, and a link to this guidance can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/schedule-14-direction-apply-to-the-secretary-of-state-for-a-direction

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking with Cabinet colleagues to support the incorporation of Tuks Law and Gizmo’s Law into statute.

This Government launched a public consultation on cat and dog microchipping and scanning in England which ended on 17 February 2021. The consultation asked for views on compulsory scanning of animal’s microchips prior to euthanasia (Tuk’s Law) and dead cats found by the roadside (Gizmo’s Legacy). The responses are currently being analysed and the Government will issue its response later this year.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps the Government is taking to increase trade links with Azad Kashmir.

HM Government continues to work with Pakistan to increase trade and improve the terms of our trading relationship. Pakistan benefits from the Enhanced Framework in our Generalised Scheme of Preferences (GSP) and total trade in goods and services (exports plus imports) between us was £2.4 billion in the four quarters to the end of Q3 2020.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what progress her Department has made on negotiating a free trade agreement with Pakistan.

HM Government continues to work with Pakistan to improve the terms of our trading relationship.

Pakistan is already granted trade preferences under the Enhanced Framework of our Generalised Scheme of Preferences (GSP) and we are currently reviewing GSP to make it simpler and more generous for both our partners and businesses to use.

A public consultation on GSP will be launched in the coming months.

16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with which (a) foreign countries and (b) administrative regions of foreign countries that issue their own driving licences his Department has an agreement for mutual recognition of documents; and whether his Department is taking steps to reach such agreement with other countries and regions.

The UK continues to exchange and recognise licences originating from all European Economic Area (EEA) countries. Arrangements are in place with all EEA countries for the recognition and exchange of the vast majority of GB licences.

Outside of the EEA, mutual driving licence exchange agreements are in place with the following designated countries:

Andorra

Gibraltar

South Africa

Australia

Hong Kong

Switzerland

Barbados

Japan

Taiwan

British Virgin Islands

Monaco

Ukraine

Canada

New Zealand

United Arab Emirates

Cayman Islands

Republic of Korea

Zimbabwe

Falkland Islands

Republic of North Macedonia

Faroe Islands

Singapore

Work is currently progressing on arrangements with a further seven countries:

Albania

Moldova

Sri Lanka

Kosovo

San Marino

Malaysia

Serbia

I also recently met with an official delegation from Kenya to discuss existing arrangements with them as well.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which rail lines have been fully electrified since 1997; of those, how many miles were electrified; which rail lines are in the process being electrified as of October 2023; and of those, how many miles are being electrified.

From 1997/98 to 2009/10, around 63 miles of track were electrified in Great Britain (this figure excludes around 7 miles of an electrical format conversion on the North London Line).

From 2010/11 to 2022/23, around 1265 miles of track have been electrified.

Major projects since 2010 have included the North-West Electrification programme and the Great Western Electrification Programme.

A number of electrification projects are currently underway, this includes the Midland Main Line (MML), the TransPennine Route Upgrade (TRU) and Wigan to Bolton Electrification. As of October 2023, 31.3 miles has been electrified on the MML between Bedford and Corby, with 22.4 miles from Kettering to Wigston due to be complete between 2023 and 2024. TRU is expected to be complete by 2028, with 70 miles of line being electrified between Manchester Victoria and York, alongside two subprojects between Church Fenton and York and Manchester Victoria to Stalybridge which amount to approximately 18 miles.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which local transport authorities have introduced lane rental schemes; how much mileage is covered by each scheme; what the average reduction in roadworks has been in the areas that have implemented those schemes; and how much money has been raised in fines from utility companies for overrunning works in those areas in each year since the inception of lane rental schemes.

The Government recently published a plan for drivers which included support for further Lane Rental schemes, which reduce roadworks by incentivising utilities to avoid the busiest roads at the busiest times helping to reduce congestion caused by road works. The Department will be consulting on requiring local authorities with Lane Rental schemes to use at least 50% of any surplus on pothole repairs or resurfacing poor quality roads.

There are currently four schemes in operation which publish annual monitoring and evaluations of their own schemes, and which include information relating to the impact of lane rental on works carried out by utility companies. These can be found on Transport for London’s and Kent County Council’s websites. Surrey and West Sussex County Councils are yet to publish their evaluations due to the recent implementation. As scheme coverage can vary year on year, these authorities will be best placed to advise on current mileage.

Ongoing discussions are now taking place with other local authorities, and I would encourage all Members of Parliament to press their own Local Authorities to implement lane rental schemes.

The Department commissioned an independent evaluation of lane rental pilot schemes, which was published in 2016. The evaluation estimated that Lane Rental led to 3000 fewer days of congestion on the highways network.

We do not collect nor hold information on fines relating to overrunning works carried out by utility companies. This is held by highway authorities.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
7th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much funding his Department has provided for new buses in Greater Manchester in the latest period for which data is available; and how many and what proportion of the buses that have been purchased with that funding were manufactured in the UK.

The Department for Transport has allocated over £1.1 billion of taxpayer funding to Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) through the five-year City Regional Sustainable Transport Settlement (CRSTS) and Zero Emission Bus Regional Areas (ZEBRA) scheme.

While the Department for Transport (DfT) allocate funding for schemes, it is up local authorities and operators how they manage the tender process and who they chose to manufacture the buses on their networks.

As part of the ZEBRA scheme, GMCA was awarded £35.7m to deliver 170 zero emission buses (ZEBs). These buses will be manufactured by Volvo. The body of these buses are manufactured in Egypt by Volvo’s partner MCV.

GMCA has been allocated £1.07bn through its City Region Sustainable Transport Settlement. The city region has chosen to allocate some of this funding towards the purchase of 100 ZEBs, which will be produced by UK manufacturer Alexander Dennis Limited, based in Scarborough and Falkirk. GMCA have informed DfT that they intend to use further CRSTS funding to deliver additional ZEBs.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
14th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many road casualties there have been involving (a) cars, (b) vans and (c) motorcycles per billion miles travelled in the latest period for which data is available.

The Department does not publish information on casualty rates for all casualties involved in road collisions by vehicle type. The published casualty rates are only where the casualty is in the same vehicle type as the relevant vehicle mileage by vehicle type. For example, the car occupant casualty rate only includes car occupant casualties per billion vehicle miles travelled by cars, irrespective of whether the collision may have involved casualties of other road users, such as pedal cyclist casualties and pedestrians.

These casualty rates for users of (a) cars, (b) vans and (c) motorcycles per billion miles travelled in the latest period for which data is available, 2021, is given in the table below:

Reported road casualty rates by severity and road user type, Great Britain: 2021

Per billion vehicle miles

Road user type

(a) Car

320

(b) Light goods vehicle

72

(c) Motorcycle

6,259

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
29th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many zero emission buses have been (a) ordered and (b) are currently operational.

We are committed to supporting the introduction of at least 4,000 zero emission buses and achieving an all zero-emission bus fleet across the UK. Since February 2020, across the UK, an estimated 4,193 zero emission buses have been funded, of which 1,288 have been ordered and 1,017 are on the road. These numbers are not official statistics: they are based on the latest information and are therefore subject to change. They do not include complete figures for the number of buses that have been ordered or on the road in the devolved nations.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has made of an assessment of the feasibility of introducing secondary legislation to require drivers to stop and report an accident with a cat.

It would not be possible to do this without amendment to primary legislation.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many (a) deaths and (b) serious injuries occurred per million miles travelled on (i) roads and (ii) railways in each of the last 10 years.

The rate of deaths and serious injuries for different modes of transport, including road and railways, covering each of the last 10 years for which data are available, can be found in the table below.

Passenger casualty rates per billion passenger kilometres by mode (road, air, rail and water): Great Britain, from 2006

Transport mode

Severity

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Air

Killed

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Air

KSI

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

Rail

Killed

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.2

0.2

Rail

KSI

80.2

85.5

82.8

91.0

88.0

87.8

80.4

80.0

84.7

136.1

103.4

Water

Killed

0.8

0.0

0.0

0.8

1.6

0.8

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Water

KSI

92.6

43.2

39.6

47.4

44.9

43.1

18.4

67.2

68.5

53.7

22.7

Bus or coach

Killed

0.2

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.4

0.3

0.3

Bus or coach

KSI

13.1

12.5

13.2

12.5

11.8

12.1

9.7

12.0

10.6

11.9

11.0

Car

Killed

1.4

1.3

1.2

1.2

1.1

1.2

1.2

1.1

1.1

1.2

1.2

Car

KSI

21.9

21.3

19.8

20.3

19.3

18.6

17.5

17.8

17.3

17.2

17.7

Van

Killed

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.5

0.4

0.3

0.4

0.4

0.4

Van

KSI

5.9

6.1

6.1

6.2

6.0

5.2

4.9

5.4

5.1

4.8

5.5

Motorcycle

Killed

71.9

72.9

72.0

71.3

76.5

66.3

73.2

75.0

72.5

75.8

70.6

Motorcycle

KSI

1,495.2

1,593.8

1,520.3

1,587.5

1,522.4

1,475.9

1,394.4

1,380.6

1,316.1

1,276.8

1,268.8

Pedal cycle

Killed

21.0

21.9

20.9

19.6

18.4

18.8

18.1

17.5

17.1

16.5

16.4

Pedal cycle

KSI

907.7

885.1

908.9

898.6

878.5

839.3

813.4

797.9

744.5

524.9

660.7

Pedestrian

Killed

23.2

22.2

20.3

23.3

20.8

22.0

22.1

20.9

22.0

15.0

16.3

Pedestrian

KSI

425.9

437.4

387.3

405.1

381.0

349.2

334.1

332.9

327.6

204.9

243.5

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average time was for processing a drivers medical check by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency in the latest period for which data is available; and how many and what proportion of outstanding checks are waiting for third parties to provide medical information.

The current average time to make a licensing decision in cases where the driving licence applicant has declared a medical condition is 81.18 working days. This figure includes new applications, notifications and renewals for both Group 1 (cars and motorcycles) and Group 2 (HGV and bus) drivers. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)’s business plan target is to make a licensing decision within 90 working days in 90 per cent of cases for applications received from October 2022.

On 31 January the DVLA was dealing with 139,238 driving licence applications where a medical condition must be investigated before a licence can be issued. In 78,124 of these cases, the DVLA is awaiting information from third parties (including NHS health care professionals or the customer themselves) before any further action can be taken.

The length of time taken to deal with an application depends on the medical condition(s) involved and whether further information is required before a decision on whether to issue a licence can be made. It is important to note that the majority of applicants renewing an existing licence will be able to continue driving while their application is being processed, providing they have not been told not to drive by a doctor or optician.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
11th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many and what proportion of registered keepers of vehicles are not readily traceable or contactable.

Based on the latest available data, the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is confident that 92.44% (46,707,158) of the keepers on record are contactable and traceable based on the information held on the DVLA’s records.

Of the remaining 7.56% of vehicles, 5.85% (2,957,366) are shown on the DVLA’s records as being ‘in trade’. These are vehicles for which the DVLA has been notified that the previous keeper has sold or disposed of the vehicle to a motor trader. Until the DVLA is notified of a new keeper they will remain shown as “in trade”. This is a legitimate status for a vehicle record until the vehicle is sold on or otherwise disposed of by the motor trader.

A further 1.36% (686,074) are vehicles that are taxed or notified as being kept off the road but there is no current registered keeper on the DVLA’s records. In some cases these will be vehicles which have recently been sold and the DVLA has not yet been notified of the new keeper.

The remaining 0.35% (175,782) are vehicles for which the DVLA does not have a full address on record which may make tracing a keeper more difficult.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
7th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the pass rates were for each driving instructor in England in the latest period for which data is available; and whether his Department is taking steps to (a) increase quality standards in that profession and (b) introduce recognition for driving instructors with consistently high pass rates.

The pass rates of individual approved driving instructors (ADI) are not published. Not all driving test candidates are taught to drive by an approved instructor and so not all completed driving tests will contain data relating to an ADI. It is also a matter of choice, by the ADI, to display their certificate of registration when they put forward a candidate for test.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
7th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will ensure that the seven mile, 20 mile, and 30 mile rule is adhered to when making changes to driving test centre locations, ensuing that those in urban areas are no more than seven miles from a centre, those in small towns are never more than 20 miles from a driving test centre and those in the most rural areas are never more than 30 miles from a driving test centre.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency is in the process of reviewing the distance to travel criteria policy. Adhering to the seven miles, 20 miles, and 30 miles rule will form part of that review.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
7th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent cost benefit analysis he has carried out on requiring HGV drivers to renew their licence at 45 and every five years thereafter until they hit 65 and then every year; and what assessment he has made of the effect of those requirements on levels of recruitment and retraining of HGV drivers.

While age on its own is not a reliable indicator of health, it is widely accepted that the likelihood of developing conditions which may affect fitness to drive increases with age. The licence renewal process provides for the driver to make a declaration regarding their health and to submit a medical report that is completed by a doctor following an examination. This process is designed to be balanced and proportionate and reflect the greater road safety risks posed by the driving of larger vehicles.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with his Italian counterpart on the right of former UK residents living in Italy to use their UK driving licence.

The Secretary of State for Transport discussed the mutual exchange of driving licences with Minister Enrico Giovannini on 3 May 2022. Further constructive engagement has followed at official level with both sides working at pace to finalise a new bilateral agreement to allow people resident in Italy to exchange their UK licence for an Italian one without needing to take a driving test and vice versa.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has plans to reinstate hard shoulders on SMART motorways.

In November 2021, the Transport Select Committee published its Third Report of Session 2021-22 following its inquiry into the rollout and safety of smart motorways. The Committee agreed that the Government was right to focus on upgrading the safety of All Lane Running (ALR) smart motorways rather than reinstating the hard shoulder, which the Committee recognised could put more drivers and passengers at risk of death or serious injury on our roads.

Having carefully considered the Committee’s report, the Department is taking forward all its recommendations. This includes pausing the roll-out of ALR smart motorway schemes yet to commence construction until five years of safety data is available for ALR smart motorways introduced before 2020. We are continuing to act to make sure all existing ALR smart motorways are as safe as possible with over £900m being invested, including for the construction of additional emergency areas and the roll-out of Stopped Vehicle Detection technology across existing ALR motorways.

20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, who has statutory responsibility for suspending or removing an existing bus lane; and what the statutory procedure is for undertaking that action.

Local traffic authorities have powers to install, suspend or remove bus lanes and are responsible for doing so on their road networks. This requires a Traffic Regulation Order.

The process for making Orders is set out in the Local Authorities’ Traffic Orders (Procedure) (England and Wales) Regulations 1996. If a bus lane is to be removed, an Order will be required to revoke the original Order creating it.

20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what Government support is available to support the provision of (a) fixed speed cameras and (b) other traffic calming measures in (i) Bury North constituency and (ii) England.

The Department provides £258 million/year (£260 million in 21/22) to local highways authorities in England, outside London, through the Integrated Transport Block for small scale transport schemes, including road safety measures. The Integrated Transport Block is not ring-fenced, allowing authorities to spend their allocations according to their own priorities. It is therefore for each authority to decide how it allocates its resources and which transport improvement projects to support.

Bury Council is part of the Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA), which retains an increased proportion of business rates in 2021-22 in place of the Integrated Transport Block.

19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent estimate her Department has made of the proportion of people currently classed as (a) economically inactive, (b) unemployed for any length of time and (c) unemployed for over nine months who have (i) a driving licence and (ii) access to a car, motorbike or other form of private motorised transport.

The information requested is not held by the department.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he is taking to help long-term unemployed people back into work; what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the availability of such support; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for Work and Pensions is responsible for getting people into work and making work pay.

We do this through our core Jobcentre offer which provides a range of options to those seeking employment, including face-to-face time with work coaches and interview assistance.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have got jobs as a result of the Way to Work campaign as of 25 July 2022.

As of 25 July, 539,200 unemployed Universal Credit (UC) claimants and Job Seekers Allowance (JSA) claimants have moved into work during the Way to Work Campaign between 31 January and 30 June 2022.

This total figure is composed of our into work measure to the end of June for Universal Credit claimants (498,500) and the equivalent information for JSA claimants (40,800). Figures are rounded to the nearest 100.

The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics but is provided in the interests of transparency and timeliness.

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Cost of Living Payments have been processed since 14 July 2022.

Since the 14th July, the government has processed around 8.4m cost of living payments, worth around £2.7 billion, to eligible claimants who are due to receive the £326 support from DWP or HMRC. There will be some cases – such as those who gained entitlement to the DWP or HMRC cost of living payment at a later date – that will be paid later.

Over 7.2m payments have been processed by DWP and over 1.1m payments have been processed by HMRC. Numbers may not add up due to rounding.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure that the tender process for Help to Claim retains adequate face-to-face provision.

The Department is committed to providing the best possible support for all our claimants, including the most vulnerable in society, in both making and maintaining their claim.

From the 1st April 2022, we plan to replace ‘Help to Claim’ with the ‘Future Support Offer’. The competition to deliver this support has recently closed and we will announce more details in due course.

Until 31st March 2022, Citizens Advice and Citizens Advice Scotland will continue to deliver the Help to Claim support, mainly through their telephony and web chat channels. However, both organisations have started re-introducing face to face support within a number of sites, in line with Government guidance, and we will continue to support them with this.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce isolation of elderly people in local communities.

The Government is working with partners to support local areas to share and learn from best practice examples. This includes working with the Local Government Association to provide guidance on how local councils can tackle loneliness and providing a space for organisations to share resources on the Tackling Loneliness Hub.

The Levelling Up White Paper set out ambitions to improve wellbeing and pride in place across the country. We know that connected communities that provide people with opportunities to develop strong social relationships are an important part of delivering those ambitions.

In addition, social prescribing is a key component of the National Health Service Universal Personalised Care and is a way for general practitioners or local agencies to refer people to a link worker. Link workers connect people to community groups and statutory services for practical and emotional support. Social prescribing can work well for those who are socially isolated or whose wellbeing is being impacted by non-medical issues.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the 10 Year Cancer Plan will include targeted action to improve outcomes for the less survivable cancers including cancers of the brain, stomach, lungs, pancreas, oesophagus and liver.

Following the call for evidence for a 10 year cancer plan earlier this year, we received more than 5,000 submissions. We are currently reviewing these responses.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of improvements in outcomes for the less survivable cancers, including cancers of the brain, stomach, lungs, pancreas, oesophagus and liver over the last 20 years.

No specific assessment has been made.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Statute of Limitation of three years will apply to people who are considering approaching NHS Resolution Pathway for medical negligence claims as a result of the IMMDS Review, particularly Transvaginal Mesh Injury.

Time limits for personal injury cases are governed by the Limitation Act 1980. The standard period for bringing a personal injury claim is three years from the date on which the cause of action accrued or three years from the injured person’s date of knowledge, if later. Under section 33 of the Act, the court has discretion to extend this period if it considers it would be equitable to do so, having regard to the various factors listed in this section. NHS Resolution will review claims received in the light of the factors listed in section 33 of the Act.

29th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress he has made on making pectus surgery available as a treatment on the NHS.

There are a range of surgical and non-surgical treatments available through the National Health Service in England to manage pectus deformity and individuals may be referred to a thoracic surgical clinic for advice. Treatment options are determined by an assessment of the type of pectus deformity, degree of deformity, simple versus mixed deformity and whether the deformity is isolated or part of a syndrome.

In most cases, while surgery can correct the chest wall deformity, surgical intervention does not take place. The majority of people experience only mild physical or psychological symptoms associated with having a pectus deformity. In these cases, non-surgical options include posture, exercise programmes, bracing and psychological support.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support is available for teenage cancer patients.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have established a task and finish group to review psychosocial support for people affected by cancer, including young people. NHS England and NHS Improvement are also preparing a toolkit of existing good practice and guidelines to help systems to improve psychological support and mental health care.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jun 2021
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on supporting areas experiencing an increase in covid-19 infection rates.

We continue to strengthen our partnership between local and national public health experts, local government and the National Health Service and employers to coordinate our response to the virus and share resources and intelligence to increase our impact. NHS Test and Trace initiated a programme to pilot additional interventions to improve compliance with self-isolation and encourage people to come forward for testing, particularly in areas of enduring transmission and variant of concern outbreaks.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what financial support is available to local authorities and CCG’s to assist families affected by suicide.

Under the NHS Long Term Plan, we have set out our plans to invest £57 million to support local suicide prevention plans and establish suicide bereavement support services in all areas of England by 2023/24. We have committed that all local systems will have suicide bereavement support services providing timely and appropriate support to families and staff by 2023/24 and have provided funding to 40% of local systems in 2020/21 for them to establish and deliver such services.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department has taken steps to ensure that (a) Azad Jammu Kashmir and (b) Gilgit Baltistan receive a fair share of UK bilateral overseas development aid for Pakistan.

Our aid in Pakistan is allocated to UK strategic priorities, which include global health security; girls' education; climate change; human rights and freedom of religious belief. We work to ensure that UK aid in Pakistan is focused on the most vulnerable, while achieving the maximum impact.

The FCDO maintains an online Development Tracker tool, which contains information about specific programming in Pakistan: https://devtracker.fcdo.gov.uk/

23rd May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to help ensure that high street bank branches remain open.

The Government recognises the importance of appropriate access to banking. However, decisions on opening and closing branches are a commercial decision for banks and building societies.

The largest banks and building societies have been signed up to the Access to Banking Standard since 2017, which commits them to ensure that customers are well informed about branch closures, the bank’s reasons for closure and options for continued access to banking services.

Guidance from the Financial Conduct Authority also sets out its expectation of firms when they are deciding to reduce their physical branches or the number of free-to-use ATMs. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of planned branch closures on their customers’ everyday banking and cash access needs and consider possible alternative access arrangements. This ensures that the implementation of closure decisions is undertaken in a way that treats customers fairly.

Alternative options for access can be via telephone banking, through digital means such as mobile or online banking, and the Post Office. The Post Office Banking Framework allows 99% of personal banking and 95% of business banking customers to deposit cheques, check their balance and withdraw and deposit cash at 11,500 Post Office branches in the UK.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) student and (b) student dependent visa applications were received by his Department in the first two weeks of January (i) 2023 and (ii) 2024.

Our published data on student and student dependent visa applications up to September 2023 can be found in the available migration statistics on GOV.UK: www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/immigration-system-statistics-data-tables#entry-clearance-visas-granted-outside-the-uk

Figures up to 31 December 2023 will be published in the next release. January 2024 figures will be published in due course.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether there are regulatory (a) provisions and (b) other measures in place on public filming of police officers during the performance of their duties which is intended to harass or intimidate those officers.

Policing by its very nature can be a demanding job. The wellbeing of our police is a priority for this Government and it is vital that we protect our officers from any form of harassment, abuse or assault as they work bravely to protect our communities. We will continue to work closely with policing partners and help Chief Constables in their duty to support their workforce effectively.

There are no provisions in place which prohibit an individual from taking photographs or filming in public places. This extends to the filming of police officers and buildings unless the behaviour of the person filming represents a genuine security risk or risk to the personal information of staff to be misused.

Whilst individuals are not prohibited from filming in public places, behaviour which intentionally causes harassment, alarm or distress is prohibited under the Public Order Act 1986. The Protection from Harassment Act 1997 also makes it a criminal offence to pursue a course of conduct amounting to harassment. Whether these offences apply to individual cases will depend on the circumstances.

The NPCC have released national guidance on persons recording police in public spaces. This also sets out the legislation that does apply when the officers suspect terrorism: NPCC Guidance.

The College of Policing have also published guidance as part of their Media Relations APP and the Public Order APP.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has held discussions with law enforcement agencies on members of the public filming (a) police officers and (b) police station car parks.

Policing by its very nature can be a demanding job. The wellbeing of our police is a priority for this Government and it is vital that we protect our officers from any form of harassment, abuse or assault as they work bravely to protect our communities. We will continue to work closely with policing partners and help Chief Constables in their duty to support their workforce effectively.

There are no provisions in place which prohibit an individual from taking photographs or filming in public places. This extends to the filming of police officers and buildings unless the behaviour of the person filming represents a genuine security risk or risk to the personal information of staff to be misused.

Whilst individuals are not prohibited from filming in public places, behaviour which intentionally causes harassment, alarm or distress is prohibited under the Public Order Act 1986. The Protection from Harassment Act 1997 also makes it a criminal offence to pursue a course of conduct amounting to harassment. Whether these offences apply to individual cases will depend on the circumstances.

The NPCC have released national guidance on persons recording police in public spaces. This also sets out the legislation that does apply when the officers suspect terrorism: NPCC Guidance.

The College of Policing have also published guidance as part of their Media Relations APP and the Public Order APP.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to reduce knife crime.

Tackling knife crime is a priority and the Government is determined to crack down on the scourge of violence devastating our communities.

We are supporting the police every step of the way in this effort. We have given them more powers and resources to go after criminals and take knives and other dangerous weapons off our streets, including through the recruitment of 20,000 additional officers and increasing police funding.

The Government has made £130.5m available this year to tackle serious violence, including murder and knife crime. This includes: £35.5m for Violence Reduction Units (VRUs) which bring together local partners to deliver a range of early intervention and prevention programmes and tackle the drivers of violence in the 18 areas worst affected by serious violence; £30m to support the police to take targeted action in parts of England and Wales most affected by serious violence through the Grip programme, which uses data to identify violence hotspots and target operational activity in those areas; and £20m for new early intervention programmes that will help stop young people from being drawn into violence, including cognitive behavioural therapy, family therapy, as well as specialist support in crisis moments such as when a person is admitted to A&E with a knife injury.

We have also invested £200m over 10 years for the Youth Endowment Fund, which is funding projects to support children and young people at risk of violence and exploitation and to steer them away from crime.

We acknowledge there is more to do which is why we are bringing forward the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill so the law-abiding majority can be confident they are safe. The Bill includes: Serious Violence Reduction Orders, which will give the police the power to stop and search adults already convicted of knife or offensive weapons offences; the Serious Violence Duty, which will require authorities and bodies delivering public services to collaborate to prevent and reduce serious violence in their areas; and offensive weapons homicide reviews which will be introduced to improve the national and local understanding of causes, patterns, victims and perpetrators of violence and homicide.

We have also prohibited certain particularly dangerous types of knife through the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 and have introduced the offence of possessing specified offensive weapons in private. The Act also introduced Knife Crime Prevention Orders which will provide the police with a vital means to steer those most at risk away from serious violence. On 5 July 2021 we introduced a pilot for KCPOs across the Metropolitan Police area.

10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to tackle online child sexual abuse and exploitation.

The Government is firmly committed to tackling this horrific crime and keeping our children safe online here in the UK and working with partners around the world to address this complex and evolving threat.

The UK’s Online Safety Bill will, for the first time, place a duty on tech companies to keep their users safe, with a greater responsibility to remove and limit the spread of illegal content. We are also engaging with tech companies through our international partners to keep children safe from online sexual abuse, securing agreement to a G7 action plan which includes driving greater endorsement of the Voluntary Principles to Counter Online Child Sexual Exploitation and Abuse and to take meaningful action to report against progress.

We are also continuing to work with law enforcement partners to improve technologies and capabilities to identify offending and bringing offenders to justice. This includes significant investment into the transformation of the Child Abuse Image Database programme, and the National Crime Agency resulting in an estimated 800 arrests or voluntary attendances, and an estimated 1,000 children safeguarded or protected every month.

We are determined to deliver on the commitments to tackling this horrific complex crime and we will continue to work with partners to achieve our goals as set out in the Tackling Child Sexual Abuse Strategy published in January 2021.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department plans to take steps to reform the use of Release Under Investigation.

The Government is aware of the issues around the process of Released Under Investigation (RUI) and the impact this can have on both suspects and victims. Following a public consultation on pre-charge bail, ending in May 2020, the Government is now seeking to introduce significant reforms through the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

While RUI is not a process set out in legislation, the reforms in the Bill will help limit its usage by creating a pre-charge bail system that works better for the police, victims and suspects. This includes the removal of the perceived presumption against pre-charge bail and the creation of a new duty to seek the views of alleged victims before releasing suspects on pre-charge bail, where it is necessary and proportionate to do so.

Alongside this change, the Government has established a new power for the College of Policing in the Bill to issue national statutory guidance on pre-charge bail which will help address the use of Released Under Investigation. We will also be monitoring forces closely with an enhanced data collection on use pre-charge bail and RUI in the future.

20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel from a BAME background have been nominated for a military honour which was not awarded in the last 10 years; and what representations his Department has received on posthumously awarding Walter Daniel Tull a military honour in recognition of his service in World War One.

Nominations for military honours which are subsequently unsuccessful are not retained by the Government.

The Government has received many representations requesting that Lieutenant Walter Tull be awarded an honour in recognition of his bravery. Although his actions were no doubt courageous, it is a longstanding principle of our national honours and awards system not to make retrospective awards. This policy dates back to an Army Order of 1919 that stated that no further awards would be given for services in First World War. This principle remains in force today.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the white paper entitled Levelling Up the United Kingdom, published on 2 February 2022, whether he is taking steps with Cabinet colleagues to include policies on increasing voter registration among disabled citizens in the Disability Action Plan.

The Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC) is taking steps to support the participation of disabled people in the electoral process.

This includes making registering to vote as easy and accessible as possible. The Individual Electoral Registration Digital Service also complies with accessibility standards set by GDS.

It is the responsibility of individual Electoral Registration Officers and the Electoral Commission to raise awareness of and ensure registration of all eligible people. Recognising those responsibilities, DLUHC works closely with organisations representing disabled people and the electoral sector and helps to facilitate conversations and sharing best practice between local authorities and such bodies.

9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the Written Statement of 6 December 2022, HCWS416, on An Update on Levelling Up, whether his Department is taking steps to advise local authorities which are part-way through planning inspectorate examinations on their strategic frameworks and local plans.

Due to my quasi-judicial role in the planning process I cannot comment on a specific local plan. It is the role of the independent Inspector, appointed by the Secretary of State, to test plans against current national policies through examination. The Government is consulting on its proposed approach to updating the National Planning Policy Framework until 2 March 2023. Any subsequent updates to policies and guidance are expected to be introduced later in the Spring, taking into account the responses received. At that stage, it will be for authorities with plans already submitted for examination, together with the Inspector, to determine how to proceed.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what steps he is taking to support leaseholders who were negatively affected by ground rent clauses in property transactions prior to 2010.

The Government is committed to creating a more transparent housing system that works for everyone. We have brought forward legislation that sets ground rents on newly created leases to zero through the Leasehold Reform (Ground Rent) Act 2022, which came into force on 30 June 2022.

We understand the difficulties some existing leaseholders face with high and escalating ground rents. This is why we asked the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) to investigate potential mis-selling of homes and unfair terms in the leasehold sector.

The CMA have secured commitments benefiting over 20,000 leaseholders, including commitments to return doubling ground rent terms to original rates. These settlements will help to free thousands more leaseholders from unreasonable ground rent increases. The CMA continue to engage with a number of firms and we urge other developers to follow suit.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps the Government has taken to protect the green belt from development.

This Government is committed to protecting and enhancing the Green Belt and there are strong protections for Green Belt land provided in the National Planning Policy Framework. A local authority can alter the boundary of Green Belt land only in exceptional circumstances and where it can demonstrate that it has fully examined all other reasonable options for meeting its development need.

This means that the authority should show that it has used as much brownfield land as possible, optimised development densities, and discussed with neighbouring authorities whether they could accommodate some of the development needed. The Framework also makes clear that most new building is inappropriate in the Green Belt and should be refused planning permission unless there are very special circumstances.

Some examples of these circumstances are listed in the Framework, such as buildings for agriculture, or limited infilling in villages. The protection of Green Belt land will continue under the reforms of the planning system currently under consideration.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much financial support the Government allocated to Bury Council in financial year 2020-21.

Bury Council’s Core Spending Power rose from £135.6 million in 2019-20 to £145.4 million in 2020-21, a 7.2% increase in cash terms. In addition, the council has received £28.1 million in direct funding to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020-21, of which £15.6 million is unringfenced grant. The council will also have received other grants from government departments for specific purposes.

9th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress he has made on implementing the End-to-End Rape Review Action Plan.

The Government has made strong progress on implementing the End-to-End Rape Review Action Plan, published on 18 June 2021, which is focused on improving the system response to rape and ensuring more victims see justice. The most recent six-monthly Progress Report is available here: End to End Rape Review Progress Report - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Our progress on implementing the End-to-End Rape Review Action Plan includes:

  • We are more than quadrupling funding for victim and witness support services by 2024/5, up from £41m in 2009/10.

  • As of September 2022, we have fully rolled out pre-recorded cross examination (Section 28) for victims of sexual and modern slavery offences in all Crown Courts across England and Wales. This is being used in over 150 cases per month.

  • In December we launched a new 24/7 support line for victims of rape and sexual abuse, meaning every victim can now access free, confidential emotional support whenever and wherever they need it.

  • The police and Crown Prosecution Service are rolling out a new investigatory model for rape, which focuses on the suspect’s – rather than the victim’s – behaviour, called Operation Soteria. The model is now in operation across nineteen police forces with a national rollout planned to start from June 2023.

Overall, we have delivered on the vast majority of actions set out in the plan and continue to make steady and sustained progress towards this Government’s ambition to return volumes of cases being referred to the police, charged by the Crown Prosecution Service, and going to court to at least 2016 levels by the end of this parliament. The latest data shows that we are on track to meet each of these ambitions ahead of schedule:

  • In October- December 2022, there were 1,079 total police referrals, more than double the 2019 quarterly average (461) and up by 41% compared to the 2016 quarterly average (766). Over the last quarter, total police referrals went up by 8% (999 to 1,079).

  • In October – December 2022 we recorded 472 CPS charges, nearly double the 2019 quarterly average (244), 12% below the 2016 quarterly average (538). Over the last quarter CPS charges remained stable (slight fall from 473 to 472).

  • In October - December 2022 we recorded 509 Crown Court receipts, more than double the 2019 quarterly average (231), 8% below the ambition of 553 per quarter. Over the last quarter, Crown Court receipts increased by 8% (from 473 to 509).

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps she is taking to help tackle the time taken by the Probate Registry to (a) deal with enquiries from legal practitioners and members of the public and (b) process applications.

HMCTS is currently onboarding new staff to address Probate contact, and as a result of recent focus on clearing stopped cases, we have seen a reduction in the average time to handle calls. Legal Practitioners can track the progress of their digital applications through their MyHMCTS account.

Despite the unprecedented challenges faced by the Probate Service during the Covid-19 pandemic, the average length of time taken for a grant of probate following the receipt of the documents required has been maintained at between four to six weeks. Probate resource is being stabilised and will result in more staff being focussed on issuing grants to further drive-up disposals.

The most recently published information regarding combined waiting times for a grant of probate, on paper and digital cases, covers April 2021 to June 2021 and is published on gov.uk via Family Court Statistics Quarterly (Table 25): Family Court Statistics Quarterly: April to June 2021 - GOV.UK. (www.gov.uk)

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the criminal legal aid spend of his Department was in financial years (a) 2018-19, (b) 2019-20 and (c) 2020-21.

Statistics on legal aid volumes and expenditure are published at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics, and are updated on a quarterly basis. The most recent period for which data is available covers up to and including December 2020.

Figures have therefore been provided for the three most complete financial years as well as the three most recent calendar years for which data is presently available.

Data on the first three quarters only of the 2020/21 Financial Year is also available at gov.uk; figures for the complete financial year will be published on 24 June 2021.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to support the long-term financial sustainability of criminal legal aid.

The Government is taking steps to review the long-term sustainability of the Criminal Legal Aid market. Last year, as part of phase one of this review, we injected up to £51m per annum into Criminal Legal Aid, in areas of work that practitioners told us mattered the most. This year we launched the second phase, an independent review, led by Sir Christopher Bellamy QC, that will consider the sustainability of the whole Criminal Legal Aid system so that it can meet demand now and into the future, provide an effective and efficient service that ensures value for money for the taxpayer and provide defendants with high-quality advice from a diverse range of practitioners. Sir Christopher will submit his recommendations to the Lord Chancellor later this year.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
3rd Mar 2021
What steps his Department is taking to strengthen Northern Ireland’s place in the UK.

The Government places great importance on the Union, and Northern Ireland’s integral place within it. We are using Northern Ireland’s centenary to promote Northern Ireland on the world stage and showcase the contribution of its people, places and products to our United Kingdom.

We have just signed Heads of Terms for the Derry-Londonderry City Deal, which includes a £105m UK Government investment, showing our commitment to levelling up across the UK.

In addition to the £2bn we have committed through New Decade New Approach, we have supported the Executive with £3.3bn to tackle Coronavirus. The £400m New Deal for Northern Ireland will boost economic growth, supporting businesses across Northern Ireland to invest.

We will continue working tirelessly for our family of nations, ensuring it is a Union of people that works for everyone.

3rd Nov 2021
What assessment he has made of the effect of the 2021 Budget and Spending Review on people and local communities in Scotland.

The Scottish Government will receive the biggest funding settlement since devolution began in 1998. An extra £4.6 billion a year in Barnett Consequentials on top of the block grant means a record £41 billion a year for the Scottish Government. So, there can be no excuses for underfunded public services in Scotland.

Alister Jack
Secretary of State for Scotland