Diane Abbott Portrait

Diane Abbott

Independent - Hackney North and Stoke Newington

First elected: 11th June 1987


Justice Committee
5th Jan 2022 - 29th Nov 2022
Shadow Home Secretary
6th Oct 2016 - 5th Apr 2020
Scottish Rural Affairs Committee
21st Jan 2020 - 29th Feb 2020
Women and Equalities Committee
8th Jan 2020 - 9th Jan 2020
Committee on Privileges
1st Jan 2018 - 1st Jul 2018
Shadow Secretary of State for Health
27th Jun 2016 - 6th Oct 2016
Shadow Secretary of State for International Development
14th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Public Health)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2013
Foreign Affairs Committee
16th Jul 1997 - 11th May 2001
Foreign Affairs: Entry Clearance Sub-Committee
25th Nov 1997 - 19th Nov 1998
Treasury Committee
15th Nov 1995 - 21st Mar 1997
Member, Labour Party National Executive Committee
1st Jan 1994 - 1st Jan 1997
Treasury & Civil Service Sub-Committee
17th May 1989 - 8th Nov 1995
Treasury & Civil Service
15th May 1989 - 8th Nov 1995


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Diane Abbott has voted in 600 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Mar 2021 - Coronavirus - View Vote Context
Diane Abbott voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 21 Labour No votes vs 176 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 484 Noes - 76
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Diane Abbott voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour No votes vs 142 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
View All Diane Abbott Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Priti Patel (Conservative)
(16 debate interactions)
Kit Malthouse (Conservative)
(11 debate interactions)
Kemi Badenoch (Conservative)
President of the Board of Trade
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(77 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(14 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(12 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Diane Abbott's debates

Hackney North and Stoke Newington Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Make specialist training mandatory for all police and other government agencies that support black women and girls affected by domestic abuse. Police and agencies should have culturally appropriate training to better understand the cultural needs of black women affected by domestic abuse.


Latest EDMs signed by Diane Abbott

6th March 2024
Diane Abbott signed this EDM on Monday 11th March 2024

Cost of living payment at National Museums Liverpool

Tabled by: Kim Johnson (Labour - Liverpool, Riverside)
That this House fully supports the staff at National Museums Liverpool (NML) engaging in strike action in an ongoing dispute over pay; notes that last year 206 employers in the public sector agreed to pay each worker a one-off £1,500 payment to part-compensate for inflation rises and hardship caused by …
23 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 17
Independent: 3
Scottish National Party: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
24th January 2024
Diane Abbott signed this EDM on Monday 11th March 2024

Support for families of British Palestinians

Tabled by: Drew Hendry (Scottish National Party - Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey)
That this House absolutely condemns the ongoing conflict in Gaza; further condemns the futile and tragic loss of life and the impact on all Palestinians; notes with specific concern the situation of Salim Ghayyada’s 40 immediate family members who have been forced to abandon their homes in Gaza City and …
34 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 21
Labour: 5
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
View All Diane Abbott's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Diane Abbott, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Diane Abbott has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Diane Abbott

Friday 25th February 2022

Diane Abbott has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

1 Bill co-sponsored by Diane Abbott

Plastics (Wet Wipes) Bill 2021-22
Sponsor - Fleur Anderson (Lab)


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what discussions she has had with her counterparts in Canada and Australian on the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to ban conversion therapy.

Officials in the Equality Hub are in discussion with international policy counterparts, to fully understand the detail and impact of other jurisdictions’ measures and to inform the Government’s next steps. However, we must ensure a ban on conversion therapy works here and that is why we have committed to launching a consultation in September. We want to hear from a wide range of voices on how best to protect people from conversion therapy while ensuring the medical profession can continue to work in line with best practice, defending freedom of speech, and upholding religious freedom. This will be vital for ensuring the action we take is informed, effective and proportionate.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to take specific steps to promote and encourage teachers to undertake training on racial bias, discrimination and anti-racism.

Racism has no place in education and providers have a responsibility to ensure they take a zero-tolerance approach to all forms of racism towards staff and students. All educational institutions should be inclusive and welcoming for students and staff from all backgrounds.

To be awarded qualified teacher status, trainees must demonstrate all of the Teachers’ Standards at the appropriate level, including Teacher Standard One, which requires teachers to have a clear understanding of the needs of all pupils and set goals that stretch and challenge young people of all backgrounds and abilities. Section 2 of the Teachers’ Standards’ is also clear that teachers must treat all pupils with dignity, building relationships rooted in mutual respect; and show tolerance and respect for the rights of others.

Once teachers pass initial teacher training, they enter into two years of funded support through the Early Career Framework, which requires early career teachers to be trained and supported to develop their understanding of maintaining fair and inclusive school environments. This is supplemented by a reformed suite of National Professional Qualifications (NPQs) to provide training and support for teachers and school leaders at all levels to improve outcomes for young people, including a specialist NPQ in Leading Behaviour and Culture that focuses upon the skills and knowledge required to have a positive impact on the wellbeing, motivation and behaviour of their pupils and create a school culture of high-expectations.

Beyond training, school leaders are responsible for ensuring their workforce has appropriate training to meet the needs of all pupils, which is in line with the department’s position on school autonomy and school leaders being best placed to assess the needs of their pupils and workforce.

The Public Sector Equality Duty also requires public bodies, including maintained schools and academies to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination and other conduct prohibited by the Equality Act 2010; advance equality of opportunity for people who share a protected characteristic and people who do not share it; and foster good relations across all characteristics. The department has published guidance for schools on how to comply with their duties under the Equality Act 2010 at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/equality-act-2010-advice-for-schools.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he has taken to review (a) guidance and training for teachers and school staff and (b) guidelines on child safeguarding in relation to strip and intimate searches undertaken by police officers on school grounds.

The department is currently reviewing the ‘searching, screening and confiscation at school’ guidance. As part of this review, officials are engaging with teaching unions, the third sector and other government departments, including the Home Office, to gather views on changes for consideration, including the roles of parents, the police and teachers in these challenging situations.

The department will aim to publish revised guidance in the summer, alongside the recently consulted on ‘behaviour in schools’ guidance, and the ‘keeping children safe in education’ guidance. This will ensure that all schools are clear on their duties relating to safeguarding and protecting the welfare of all pupils. This co-ordinated approach will enable the department to take a comprehensive view of what improvements can be made across our school safeguarding advice and guidance, and whether changes are needed to the ‘working together to safeguard children’ statutory guidance.

22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to introduce a legal requirement for schools to inform the parents or guardians of children before a police officer initiates a strip search or intimate search of a child.

The department is clear that any use of strip searching must be carried out in accordance with the law and with full regard for the dignity and welfare of the individual being searched, particularly if the individual being searched is a child.

The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) Code C, Annex A, paragraph 11 (c) is clear in stating that an ‘appropriate adult’ must be present in circumstances where a child is to be strip searched. Code C, paragraph 1.7 (a) (i) of the act is equally clear that in the case of a juvenile, an ‘appropriate adult’ means the parent or guardian of the child in the first instance. Other options are available if attendance by the parent or guardian is not possible.

The department is urgently reviewing the ‘searching, screening and confiscation at school’ guidance. This will include consideration of when it is appropriate to inform parents before a search takes place. The review is taking place alongside the ongoing consultation on the ‘behaviour in schools’ guidance. The department will decide its next steps based on the results of this review and the consultation.

14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what policies his Department is consideing in relation to diversifying the curricula.

The Department is committed to an inclusive education system which recognises and embraces diversity and supports all pupils to tackle racism and have the knowledge and tools to do so. As part of the statutory curriculum, pupils should be taught about different societies and how different groups have contributed to the development of Britain.

The Government is currently considering the recommendations in the report by the Commission for Race and Ethnic Disparities (CRED), including on curriculum resources, and assessing the next steps for future policy. In recognition of the extensive scope of recommendations, my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, has established a new Inter Ministerial Group to review recommendations. The group will be chaired by my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.

The report recommendation is for curriculum resources and is not a change in the statutory curriculum. In particular, the report calls for resources that complement and enhance the content and quality of lessons taught in all schools, so that all children can are taught about the UK and the evolution of our society.

As the report highlights, there is a wide range of high quality teaching resources on black history or other culturally diverse curriculum content throughout the curriculum, including those produced by education publishers, voluntary organisations and subject associations, and remote education resources from the Oak National Academy.

The Government will publish its response to CRED later this year.

14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which (a) institutions and (b) stakeholders he has met with recently to discuss diversifying the curricula.

As part of a broad and balanced curriculum, pupils should be taught about different societies, and how different groups have contributed to the development of Britain.

The Department regularly engages with teachers and other stakeholders on the curriculum, including on diversity and inclusion. There is already a wide range of high-quality teaching resources on culturally diverse curriculum content throughout the curriculum, including those produced by education publishers, voluntary organisations and subject associations, and remote education resources from the Oak National Academy.

The Government is currently considering the recommendations in the report by the Commission for Race and Ethnic Disparities, including on curriculum resources, and assessing the next steps for future policy. In recognition of the extensive scope of recommendations, my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, has established a new Inter Ministerial Group to review recommendations. The group will be chaired by my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.

14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department is planning to take specific steps to support the educational experiences and outcomes of Caribbean heritage students, other than the measures that his Department is taking to support disadvantaged pupils generally; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is focused on raising education standards for all pupils, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Department does not design education policy to exclusively target certain groups of pupils based on ethnicity.

The Department recognises that the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak has been felt most heavily by disadvantaged children and young people.

In June 2020, the Department announced a £1 billion catch up package, which includes £350 million for the National Tutoring Programme to increase the availability of high quality tuition for the most disadvantaged children and young people, helping to accelerate their education and tackle the attainment gap.

In February 2021, the Department committed to funding of £700 million for summer schools, expansion of our tutoring programmes and a Recovery Premium for the next academic year. The £302 million Recovery Premium for state funded primary and secondary schools, builds on the Pupil Premium, to further support pupils who need it most.

The Department is also considering the education recommendations from the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities.

14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to take specific steps to increase the recruitment of Black and Asian teachers.

Apply for Teacher Training is a new application service for initial teacher training (ITT). To support recruitment, Apply has been designed to be as simple and user friendly as possible and it has been extensively tested with a diverse range of potential applicants. Currently, Apply is in public beta, running alongside the existing application service for teacher training. As we roll the service out further, we will continue to develop and test interventions to support people from diverse backgrounds to become teachers.

The Department’s ‘Teaching – Every Lesson Shapes A Life’ recruitment campaign is targeted at audiences of students/recent graduates and potential career changers of all races and backgrounds, and we take every effort to ensure that our advertising is fully reflective of this across the full range of marketing materials we use.

Alongside a focus on recruitment, it is important we retain people from diverse backgrounds. From September 2021, all new trainee teachers will be entitled to at least three years of evidence-based professional development and support. This starts with ITT, based on the new ITT Core Content Framework, which sets out a core minimum entitlement for all trainees, describing the fundamental knowledge and skills that ITT providers must draw upon when designing and delivering their programmes.

Following on from their training, all new teachers will be entitled to two years of funded high quality professional development, including the support of a dedicated mentor, through the Early Career Framework reforms. Schools will receive additional funding so new teachers can spend time away from the classroom for this extra training and mentoring. Together, these reforms will ensure that all new teachers will develop the expertise and confidence they need to thrive in the classroom.

Our new suite of National Professional Qualifications, available from September 2021, will make sure that we continue to develop our best teaching and leadership talent, whatever their background.

14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he is taking steps to (a) support, (b) retain and (c) support the promotion of Black and Asian teachers.

Apply for Teacher Training is a new application service for initial teacher training (ITT). To support recruitment, Apply has been designed to be as simple and user friendly as possible and it has been extensively tested with a diverse range of potential applicants. Currently, Apply is in public beta, running alongside the existing application service for teacher training. As we roll the service out further, we will continue to develop and test interventions to support people from diverse backgrounds to become teachers.

The Department’s ‘Teaching – Every Lesson Shapes A Life’ recruitment campaign is targeted at audiences of students/recent graduates and potential career changers of all races and backgrounds, and we take every effort to ensure that our advertising is fully reflective of this across the full range of marketing materials we use.

Alongside a focus on recruitment, it is important we retain people from diverse backgrounds. From September 2021, all new trainee teachers will be entitled to at least three years of evidence-based professional development and support. This starts with ITT, based on the new ITT Core Content Framework, which sets out a core minimum entitlement for all trainees, describing the fundamental knowledge and skills that ITT providers must draw upon when designing and delivering their programmes.

Following on from their training, all new teachers will be entitled to two years of funded high quality professional development, including the support of a dedicated mentor, through the Early Career Framework reforms. Schools will receive additional funding so new teachers can spend time away from the classroom for this extra training and mentoring. Together, these reforms will ensure that all new teachers will develop the expertise and confidence they need to thrive in the classroom.

Our new suite of National Professional Qualifications, available from September 2021, will make sure that we continue to develop our best teaching and leadership talent, whatever their background.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to (a) encourage greater standardisation in teacher assessments and (b) discourage racial bias in forthcoming transition from school exams to teacher assessments.

The Department is confident that the system of teacher assessed grades, underpinned by clear guidance published by the Joint Council for Qualifications, will ensure the grades students receive are as fair and consistent as possible. In addition to this guidance, exam boards have provided grade descriptors and exemplar materials to support teachers. The grade descriptors and materials exemplify the established performance standard that is maintained each year by awarding organisations. To ensure that there is a common basis to all teacher assessed grades, teachers are being asked to apply the performance standards described in the grade descriptors to the evidence of students’ work this year.

Students should have confidence in their grades this year and it is vital that teachers are supported to avoid any unconscious bias. Awarding organisations will provide assessment materials, guidance, and training to support centres to make fair, consistent, and evidence-based decisions which are without bias. Ofqual have also published information for centres about making objective judgements this year, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/information-for-centres-about-making-objective-judgements.

Centres will be encouraged to allow students to see the evidence used to determine their grade in advance of that grade being submitted. This transparency should enable any errors or circumstances relating to particular pieces of evidence to be taken into account in advance of the grade submission. Students’ grades will also go through internal and external quality assurance processes to ensure errors are identified and that judgements are as consistent as possible. Internal standardisation will help mitigate the risk of unconscious bias in judgements of students’ grades. Centres will set out how they will ensure objectivity in their centre policies, which will be reviewed by exam boards.

There will also be an appeals system as a safety net to resolve any errors not identified during the earlier parts of the process. The Department has made clear that every student will have the right to appeal their grade.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to improve educational outcomes for (a) pupils and (b) students of Caribbean heritage; and if he will make a statement.

Since 2010, this Government has been committed to raising educational standards for all pupils to ensure that all young people leave school with the knowledge, skills and qualifications they need to succeed in life. The proportion of schools now rated by Ofsted as Good or Outstanding has risen from 68% in 2010 to 86% in 2020. The Department does not design education policy that exclusively targets certain groups of pupils based on ethnicity, but we are focused on tackling the attainment gap that exists between disadvantaged children and their more affluent peers.

We know that the COVID-19 outbreak poses great challenges to the education system. In June 2020, the Department announced a £1 billion catch-up package, which includes £350 million for a National Tutoring Programme to increase access to high-quality tuition for the most disadvantaged children and young people, helping to accelerate their academic progress and directly tackling the attainment gap.

More recently, in February 2021, we committed a further £700 million of funding for the 2021/22 academic year. This package includes a new one off £302 million Recovery Premium for state-funded primary and secondary schools, building on the Pupil Premium, to further support pupils who need it most.

As part of the Government’s commitment to develop a longer-term education recovery plan, Sir Kevan Collins has been appointed as Education Recovery Commissioner and is working with teachers, school and college leaders, educational charities, and families to review how evidence-based interventions can be used to address the impact of education lost due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to (a) promote and (b) support parental involvement in children’s education and academic attainment.

Parental involvement in their child’s education has always been important, and this has been further underlined during the COVID-19 outbreak. The Department realises this is a challenging time for parents, carers and children, and remote education has brought new demands for them and changed how they engage with schools. Parents played a crucial role in their child’s education whilst schools were closed for most pupils.

School attendance is now mandatory for all pupils and the usual rules on school attendance have applied again since 8 March 2021. This includes parents’ duty to secure their child’s regular attendance at school. It is vital that pupils attend school to minimise the longer-term impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on their education, wellbeing and wider development, and that is why education has been prioritised as we begin to relax restrictions.

Evidence tells us that the early years are crucial for a child’s development, and what happens at home plays a vital role. This is why the Department launched Hungry Little Minds, a campaign to encourage parents to engage in activities that support their child’s early education. The campaign aims to communicate that there are simple, everyday things parents can do to help their children’s language and literacy. The campaign is part of our wider work to support parents and families. We provided £5.3 million of grant funding in the 2020-21 financial year to voluntary and community sector organisations to support disadvantaged and vulnerable children in the early years, including support with the home education environment.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to increase racial diversity in teaching and training workforces, particularly in schools and universities that have large proportions of students from Black and Asian backgrounds.

The teaching workforce is more racially diverse than ever before, with recruitment into Initial Teacher Training (ITT) becoming more representative of the wider population. The Department recognises, however, that we must go further to attract and retain the diverse range of talented teachers we need in our classrooms.

To support recruitment, the Department is building and rolling out a new application service for teacher training. The Apply for teacher training service has been designed and extensively tested with a diverse range of potential applicants to ensure it helps remove barriers to teachers applying for ITT courses. Apply for teacher training is currently in public beta, running alongside the existing application service for teacher training. As the Department rolls out the service, we will continue to develop and test interventions to support people from diverse backgrounds in becoming teachers.

Furthermore, the Department’s ‘Teaching – Every Lesson Shapes A Life’ recruitment campaign is targeted at audiences of students, recent graduates, and potential career changers inclusive of all ethnicities, and we take every effort to ensure that our advertising is fully reflective of this across the full range of marketing materials we use.

Alongside a focus on recruitment, it is important the Department continues its work to retain more teachers from diverse backgrounds. This will be supported by our work to ensure that all new entrants to teacher training have the best possible start to the early stage of their career. From September 2020 onwards, new trainee teachers will undergo training based on the ITT Core Content Framework which sets out a core minimum entitlement for all trainees, describing the fundamental knowledge and skills that all new entrants to the profession need to effectively teach and support all children.

Following on from their training, from this September, all new teachers will be entitled to two years of funded high quality professional development including the support of a dedicated mentor, through the Early Career Framework reforms. Schools will receive additional funding so new teachers can spend time away from the classroom for this extra training and mentoring. Together, these reforms will ensure that all new teachers will develop the skills, expertise, and confidence they need to thrive in the classroom.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how his Department plans to (a) narrow the attainment gap and (b) tackle racial inequalities in education through the covid-19 education recovery package and catch-up programme.

The Government is taking steps to close the educational attainment gap and improve the education of disadvantaged children and young people of all ethnic backgrounds. The Department recognises that the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak has been felt most heavily by disadvantaged children and young people, and so it is important that we target support towards these children.

On 24 February, the Department announced a £700 million Education Recovery package, building on the £1 billion provided in 2020. As well as a range of measures to support all pupils to recover lost education, the package includes significant funding aimed at addressing the needs of disadvantaged pupils. This includes a one off £302 million Recovery Premium for the next academic year that will be allocated to schools based on disadvantage funding eligibility. Schools with more disadvantaged pupils will therefore receive larger allocations. Within this package is a £22 million accelerator fund to scale up evidence based approaches that support children and young people in disadvantaged areas.

In June 2020, as part of the £1 billion COVID-19 catch up package, the Department announced £350 million to fund the National Tutoring Programme for disadvantaged students in the 2020/21 and 2021/22 academic year. The programme will provide additional, targeted support for those children and young people who have been hardest hit from disruption to their education as a result of school closures. Teachers and school leaders should exercise professional judgement when identifying which pupils would benefit most from this additional support.

There is extensive evidence that tutoring is one of the most effective ways to accelerate pupil progress, and the Department wants to extend this opportunity to disadvantaged and vulnerable learners. We are funding small group tuition for 16 to 19 year olds and early language skills in Reception classes. The Department is also providing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services. To date, over 1.29 million laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, trusts, local authorities and further education providers.

£200 million will be made available to secondary schools to deliver face to face summer schools. Funding is allocated on the basis of schools’ existing year 7 pupils, but there is flexibility for schools to draw in other pupils should they identify a need. Schools will identify the pupils most in need of support and will be able to target provision based on pupils’ needs.

The ongoing provision of pupil premium funding, which is worth £2.5 billion this financial year, aims to close the attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers. It allows school leaders to tailor the support they provide, based on the needs of their disadvantaged pupils, with the aim of accelerating their progress and improving their educational attainment.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what consultation his Department has undertaken with (a) schools, (b) teachers and (c) relevant stakeholders on diversifying curricula.

As part of a broad and balanced curriculum, pupils should be taught about different societies, and how different groups have contributed to the development of Britain.

The Department regularly engages with teachers and other stakeholders on the curriculum, including on diversity and inclusion. There is already a wide range of high-quality resources on teaching a culturally diverse curriculum content, including those produced by education publishers, voluntary organisations, subject associations, and remote education resources from the Oak National Academy.

The Government is considering the recommendations in the report by the Commission for Race and Ethnic Disparities, including on curriculum resources, and assessing the next steps for future policy. In recognition of the extensive scope of recommendations, my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, has established a new Inter Ministerial Group. The group will be chaired by my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to improve access IT equipment for Black and Asian children living in low-income households.

The Government is providing over £400 million to support remote education and online social care services, including making 1.3 million laptops and tablets available for disadvantaged children and young people.

To date, over 1.29 million laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, trusts, local authorities and further education providers. The Department has also partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help over 30,000 disadvantaged children get online, as well as delivering over 75,000 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, trusts, local authorities or further education providers, who can lend these to children and young people who need them. Allocations of devices to schools and colleges are based on the number of pupils or students they have who are eligible for free school meals or free meals. This approach ensures that support provided by the Government reaches those families that need it most.

4th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential correlation between poverty levels and the lower standard allowance of Universal Credit for those people under 25.

No such assessment has been made.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Universal Credit claimants aged under 25 have at least one child.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in London in receipt of Universal Credit are aged under 25.

The Department regularly publishes Universal Credit statistics. Statistics of the number of people who are on Universal Credit each month, by age and region, are published monthly and are currently available to January 2024 on Stat-Xplore.

Users can log in or access Stat-Xplore as a guest user and, if needed, can access guidance on how to extract the information required.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many GPs who had been previously working in North East London ICS area have left the profession over the last three years.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

17th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data her Department collects on the provision of local retention initiatives in the North East London ICS area.

We are working collectively across providers to support well-being for all our health and care staff, and have developed an overarching programme where staff can access support. More information here: keepingwellnel.nhs.uk

NHS England are developing a network of retention leads to share local practice in Trusts, co-ordinated by their retention team. The NHS England retention programme includes Barts Health where initiatives are being developed that will be shared and rolled out across North East London ICS area.

We are working together to establish a collective response to the cost of living crisis, including exploring flexible workforce spaces for staff. We are also working to develop a single offer of support for all staff which would include financial planning and advice services.

All our Trusts have individually tailored retention programmes, including focusing on career development and training pathways to retain staff.

17th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding has been allocated to North East London ICS to support with GP retention in 2022-23; and how much was spent in that ICS for that purpose in 2021-22.

North East London Integrated Care System (NEL ICS) reports that in 2021/22, it was allocated £460,000 and spent £460,000 on projects across all 7 boroughs. Programmes last year included the introduction of mid-career fellowships, the development of peer support groups for GPs at different career stages and widening participation through Primary Care mentorship and work experience.

NEL ICS was allocated £460,000 for 2022/23, which will be invested in existing and new projects.

NHS England advises that a total of £1.9 million for GP retention schemes was allocated and spent by the ICS/CCGs in 2021/22 and £2.3 million allocated to the Integrated Care Board in 2022/23.

17th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps she is taking to improve GP retention in the North East London ICS area.

We are working with NHS England and Health Education England to increase the general practice workforce in England, including North East London. This includes measures to boost recruitment, address the reasons why doctors leave the profession, and encourage them to return to practice.

The updated GP Contract Framework announced a number of new schemes, alongside continued support for existing recruitment and retention schemes for the general practice workforce. This includes the GP Retention Scheme, the GP Retention Fund, the National GP Induction and Refresher, the Locum Support Scheme, the New to Partnership Payment and the Supporting Mentors Scheme.

To boost recruitment, we have increased the number of GP training places. In 2021/22, we saw the highest ever number of doctors accepting a place on GP training - a record 4,000 trainees, up from 2,671 in 2014.

8th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential effect on covid-19 risk for immunocompromised people after the planned easing of covid-19 restrictions on July 19 2021.

While no specific assessment has been made, a recent study from Public Health England looked at more than one million people in at-risk groups, which found that people who are immunosuppressed are significantly better protected from symptomatic infection following the second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Studies are also underway looking at which groups are less protected through vaccination, which may include groups with weakened immune systems and those with cancers of the blood. The findings will improve our knowledge of the levels of risk. We also recognise that there is a very small group of people who cannot receive the Pfizer BioNTech, Moderna or AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will ring-fence funding for the Palliative Care Unit at the Whipps Cross Hospital.

The proposed redevelopment of Whipps Cross does not involve the reconfiguration of services and envisages the new hospital providing the same core services as today, including the continued provision of high-quality specialist palliative and end of life care. A clinically led review of the model of care for the provision of specialist palliative care and end-of-life care in the new hospital is being undertaken by Barts Health NHS Trust, working closely with local partners and informed by engagement with patients and local interest groups.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact of the reduction in bed capacity at the proposed new hospital at Whipps Cross on bed capacity at (a) Homerton hospital and (b) other local hospitals.

The Whipps Cross redevelopment plans have continued to be tested with North East London Health and Care Partnership Integrated Care System as part of the development of the redevelopment’s outline business case, to ensure the demand and capacity assumptions are aligned with both the local and wider system assumptions.

The new development does not impact bed capacity at Homerton Hospital or other local hospitals. The number of beds in any hospital is not fixed and the way in which the hospital is designed will give greater flexibility to respond to changes in operational pressures, with an appropriate number of beds. The new hospital will have more clinical space than the current hospital, with new clinical departments, increased diagnostic and day case capacity and more single rooms, improving patient experience, privacy and dignity.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent representations she has made to the government of Iran on (a) Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, (b) Anoosheh Ashoori and (c) the other British nationals detained in Iran.

The Foreign Secretary most recently discussed the cases of British dual nationals with the Iranian Foreign Minister on 8 November. The Minister for the Middle East and North Africa raised these cases with the Deputy Foreign Minister on 11 November. Our Ambassador in Tehran regularly raises their cases.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have received an award from the Windrush Compensation Scheme in each quarter since that Scheme was launched.

An individual could have more than one claim under the Windrush Compensation Scheme Rules, for example as a primary claimant, close family member, or as a representative of an estate. In addition, a claim may receive a preliminary, interim and/or full and final payment.

Data on the total number of people who have received a compensation payment is not published. Transparency Data shows how many claims have received a payment under the scheme.

The latest published data, covering the period up to November 2023, is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/windrush-compensation-scheme-data-november-2023. WCS_03 refers; Value of Windrush Compensation Scheme payments made.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
8th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department will accept donations of (a) toys for children at her Department 's short-term holding facilities and (b) funds for the express purpose of procuring toys for children staying at such facilities.

Under contractual arrangements Home Office has Mitie Care & Custod provides, toys and games are for children in Short-Term Holding Facilities (STHF).

All local authorities are under a mandatory duty to comply with the National Transfer Scheme, ensuring all local authorities play a part in caring for unaccompanied children and that responsibility is fairly distributed across the UK.

Local authorities have a statutory duty to protect all children.

1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children are held in the Manston asylum processing centre as of 1 November 2022.

Home Office does not hold the data in the format requested.

18th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Transport since 17 March 2022 on Border Force’s private security contractors in (a) the Port of Dover and (b) Manston Airport.

The Department for Transport is not involved in the asylum operations at Dover or Manston. There have therefore been no discussions with the Department for Transport about the use of private security contractors at the Home Office facilities at Dover and Manston.

18th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what Border Force’s staffing levels were in (a) the Port of Dover and (b) Manston Airport in each quarter since January 2019 to date.

The Home Office does not routinely publish information relating to the number of staff working in specific locations as this would publicise operational practises which, in the wrong hands, could be used to attempt to evade controls at the border and compromise border security.

However, resource and staffing requirements at every port are continually reviewed by Border Force and we work closely with all port operators to try and anticipate demand. Resources are deployed flexibly as and when they are required.

18th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will list the private security companies (a) contracted or (b) sub-contracted to process undocumented migrants in (i) the Port of Dover and (ii) Manston Airport.

The Home Office has a number of arrangements in place to provide security, and custodial staff at the Port of Dover, and at its site in Manston.

These arrangements include the pre-existing Escorting and Related Services Contract with Mite Care and Custody, a contract with Management & Training Corporation (UK) Ltd, and a contract with Bloom Procurement Services who contracts with Definitive PSA Ltd (trading as Interforce) to deliver services for the Department.

Providing number of staff based at Dover and Manston, would reveal information on the security of our borders. It is not possible to provide the level of detail requested on volumes and patterns without impacting national security

18th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will list the (a) value and (b) length of the contracts Border Force holds with (i) MITIE, (ii) Interforce and (iii) Definitive PSA in connection with the processing of undocumented migrants arriving in the Port of Dover.

The Home Office has a number of arrangements in place to provide security, and custodial staff at the Port of Dover, and at its site in Manston.

These arrangements include the pre-existing Escorting and Related Services Contract with Mite Care and Custody, a contract with Management & Training Corporation (UK) Ltd, and a contract with Bloom Procurement Services who contracts with Definitive PSA Ltd (trading as Interforce) to deliver services for the Department.

Providing number of staff based at Dover and Manston, would reveal information on the security of our borders. It is not possible to provide the level of detail requested on volumes and patterns without impacting national security.

18th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what due diligence is undertaken by Border Force in relation to sub-contracting of private security services to deliver public contracts.

Due diligence is an ongoing process carried out during a procurement exercise and varies depending upon the nature and size of the contract being procured. Typical areas considered as part of the selection and due diligence of a potential supplier could include:

  • Financial standing
  • Past performance
  • Capability
  • Experience
  • Security/Cyber Security
  • Whether there are grounds to exclude a supplier
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that children are not strip-searched without a parent, guardian or appropriate adult present.

Strip search is one of the most intrusive powers available to the police and its use should not be a routine occurrence. The Police and Criminal Evidence Act Codes of Practice govern how the police should deploy this power. If the police judge it operationally necessary, then any strip search conducted on a child must be carried out by officers of the same sex, in private and with an appropriate adult present unless both the child and the appropriate adult agree otherwise and in line with safeguarding procedures.

Nobody should be stopped and searched because of their race or ethnicity and safeguards exist to ensure that this does not happen, including statutory codes of practice, use of body worn video to increase accountability and extensive data collection. It is critical that we maintain public confidence in policing and as part of this we will be looking carefully at strengthening the system of local community scrutiny and the value of body-worn video, because transparency is vital.

The MoJ are supporting a project with the National Police Chief’s Council with the aim of addressing the difference in experience of ethnic minority children and adults in police custody. A wide range of agencies and independent advisors have contributed to this work, which engages a number of police forces across the country and builds on existing initiatives in the workplace, including a dedicated Independent Strip Search Scrutiny Panel (ISSSP) in Norfolk & Suffolk Police.

From December 2022 we will be including more detailed custody data in the annual Police Powers and Procedures statistical bulletin which will include data on whether an appropriate adult was called out for a detained child and the number of strip searches & Intimate searches carried out, broken down by age, gender, ethnicity, and offence type.

Further work is underway for the collection of data during stop & searches on the use of strip search. Currently, the Independent Office for Police Conduct is investigating this incident and it is vital we await their findings. However, we will consider all recommendations made for the Home Office as a result of these investigations very carefully.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to tackle race disproportionality in the use of strip searches on children.

Strip search is one of the most intrusive powers available to the police and its use should not be a routine occurrence. The Police and Criminal Evidence Act Codes of Practice govern how the police should deploy this power. If the police judge it operationally necessary, then any strip search conducted on a child must be carried out by officers of the same sex, in private and with an appropriate adult present unless both the child and the appropriate adult agree otherwise and in line with safeguarding procedures.

Nobody should be stopped and searched because of their race or ethnicity and safeguards exist to ensure that this does not happen, including statutory codes of practice, use of body worn video to increase accountability and extensive data collection. It is critical that we maintain public confidence in policing and as part of this we will be looking carefully at strengthening the system of local community scrutiny and the value of body-worn video, because transparency is vital.

The MoJ are supporting a project with the National Police Chief’s Council with the aim of addressing the difference in experience of ethnic minority children and adults in police custody. A wide range of agencies and independent advisors have contributed to this work, which engages a number of police forces across the country and builds on existing initiatives in the workplace, including a dedicated Independent Strip Search Scrutiny Panel (ISSSP) in Norfolk & Suffolk Police.

From December 2022 we will be including more detailed custody data in the annual Police Powers and Procedures statistical bulletin which will include data on whether an appropriate adult was called out for a detained child and the number of strip searches & Intimate searches carried out, broken down by age, gender, ethnicity, and offence type.

Further work is underway for the collection of data during stop & searches on the use of strip search. Currently, the Independent Office for Police Conduct is investigating this incident and it is vital we await their findings. However, we will consider all recommendations made for the Home Office as a result of these investigations very carefully.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Local Child Safeguarding Practice Review into the search of Child Q, what steps she has taken to help ensure that race and ethnicity do not influence the decision to strip search (a) a child and (b) and adult.

Strip search is one of the most intrusive powers available to the police and its use should not be a routine occurrence. The Police and Criminal Evidence Act Codes of Practice govern how the police should deploy this power. If the police judge it operationally necessary, then any strip search conducted on a child must be carried out by officers of the same sex, in private and with an appropriate adult present unless both the child and the appropriate adult agree otherwise and in line with safeguarding procedures.

Nobody should be stopped and searched because of their race or ethnicity and safeguards exist to ensure that this does not happen, including statutory codes of practice, use of body worn video to increase accountability and extensive data collection. It is critical that we maintain public confidence in policing and as part of this we will be looking carefully at strengthening the system of local community scrutiny and the value of body-worn video, because transparency is vital.

The MoJ are supporting a project with the National Police Chief’s Council with the aim of addressing the difference in experience of ethnic minority children and adults in police custody. A wide range of agencies and independent advisors have contributed to this work, which engages a number of police forces across the country and builds on existing initiatives in the workplace, including a dedicated Independent Strip Search Scrutiny Panel (ISSSP) in Norfolk & Suffolk Police.

From December 2022 we will be including more detailed custody data in the annual Police Powers and Procedures statistical bulletin which will include data on whether an appropriate adult was called out for a detained child and the number of strip searches & Intimate searches carried out, broken down by age, gender, ethnicity, and offence type.

Further work is underway for the collection of data during stop & searches on the use of strip search. Currently, the Independent Office for Police Conduct is investigating this incident and it is vital we await their findings. However, we will consider all recommendations made for the Home Office as a result of these investigations very carefully.

22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans the Government has to improve support to children who have been strip searched or intimately searched.

The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) Codes of Practice govern how the police should undertake a strip search. The College of Policing’s Authorised Professional Practice (APP) on Stop and Search provides further guidance for the police on the use of strip search. We expect officers to follow the law and the best practice guidance set by the College of Policing in its APP.

Her Majesty’s inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) inspect police forces’ compliance with the legislation and APP through their programme of PEEL assessments, national thematic inspections and commissions from the Home Secretary and local policing bodies. We expect forces to respond to these recommendations and address failures of compliance with legislation and APP.

Searches involving exposure of intimate parts of the body must be conducted in accordance with the safeguards in paragraph 11 of Annex A of PACE Code C. If a child is strip searched, an appropriate adult must be present to support the child during this process. It is essential that the police and frontline professionals recognise vulnerability in children and young people, regardless of the circumstances around any interaction. To support this the Home Office have funded the National Police Chiefs’ Council’s Vulnerability Knowledge and Practice programme, which shares the very best practice across forces. We also fund the College of Policing’s Public Protection and Safeguarding Leadership programme which ensures senior leaders in policing have a strong understanding of vulnerability.

Any concerns about the use of strip searches should be raised with the relevant force or the Independent Office of Police Complaints (IOPC), who investigate serious matters involving the police. As part of its work, the IOPC is required to consider if there is evidence of criminal wrongdoing or if police officers have a case to answer for misconduct or gross misconduct.

22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has plans to take steps to speed up the time it takes for the IOPC to publish its reports.

The publication of investigation reports usually follows the conclusion of all relevant proceedings and the Independent Office for Police Conduct’s publication policy states that “reports and investigation summaries should normally be published as soon as possible following the conclusion of all related external proceedings.”

In 2020 the Home Office legislated for significant changes to the police disciplinary system, in part to facilitate quicker disciplinary proceedings. Later this year we will publish misconduct data collected since the introduction of the reforms, including on timeliness of proceedings following investigations.

In June 2021 the Home Secretary announced that she would bring forward the next periodic review of the efficiency and effectiveness of the IOPC. This work will begin shortly.

22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to help ensure appropriate guidance is issued to police officers, to prevent unnecessary strip searches or intimate searches of children.

The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) Codes of Practice govern how the police should undertake a strip search. The College of Policing’s Authorised Professional Practice (APP) on Stop and Search provides further guidance for the police on the use of strip search. We expect officers to follow the law and the best practice guidance set by the College of Policing in its APP.

Her Majesty’s inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) inspect police forces’ compliance with the legislation and APP through their programme of PEEL assessments, national thematic inspections and commissions from the Home Secretary and local policing bodies. We expect forces to respond to these recommendations and address failures of compliance with legislation and APP.

Searches involving exposure of intimate parts of the body must be conducted in accordance with the safeguards in paragraph 11 of Annex A of PACE Code C. If a child is strip searched, an appropriate adult must be present to support the child during this process. It is essential that the police and frontline professionals recognise vulnerability in children and young people, regardless of the circumstances around any interaction. To support this the Home Office have funded the National Police Chiefs’ Council’s Vulnerability Knowledge and Practice programme, which shares the very best practice across forces. We also fund the College of Policing’s Public Protection and Safeguarding Leadership programme which ensures senior leaders in policing have a strong understanding of vulnerability.

Any concerns about the use of strip searches should be raised with the relevant force or the Independent Office of Police Complaints (IOPC), who investigate serious matters involving the police. As part of its work, the IOPC is required to consider if there is evidence of criminal wrongdoing or if police officers have a case to answer for misconduct or gross misconduct.

22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent steps she has taken to help ensure that strip searches or invasive searches of children are reviewed (a) on the basis of safeguarding concerns and (b) by an appropriate body that is empowered to act against wrongful strip or invasive searches.

The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) Codes of Practice govern how the police should undertake a strip search. The College of Policing’s Authorised Professional Practice (APP) on Stop and Search provides further guidance for the police on the use of strip search. We expect officers to follow the law and the best practice guidance set by the College of Policing in its APP.

Her Majesty’s inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) inspect police forces’ compliance with the legislation and APP through their programme of PEEL assessments, national thematic inspections and commissions from the Home Secretary and local policing bodies. We expect forces to respond to these recommendations and address failures of compliance with legislation and APP.

Searches involving exposure of intimate parts of the body must be conducted in accordance with the safeguards in paragraph 11 of Annex A of PACE Code C. If a child is strip searched, an appropriate adult must be present to support the child during this process. It is essential that the police and frontline professionals recognise vulnerability in children and young people, regardless of the circumstances around any interaction. To support this the Home Office have funded the National Police Chiefs’ Council’s Vulnerability Knowledge and Practice programme, which shares the very best practice across forces. We also fund the College of Policing’s Public Protection and Safeguarding Leadership programme which ensures senior leaders in policing have a strong understanding of vulnerability.

Any concerns about the use of strip searches should be raised with the relevant force or the Independent Office of Police Complaints (IOPC), who investigate serious matters involving the police. As part of its work, the IOPC is required to consider if there is evidence of criminal wrongdoing or if police officers have a case to answer for misconduct or gross misconduct.

22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to help ensure that the Authorised Professional Practice (APP) is complied with by serving Officers, specifically with reference to stop and search.

The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) Codes of Practice govern how the police should undertake a strip search. The College of Policing’s Authorised Professional Practice (APP) on Stop and Search provides further guidance for the police on the use of strip search. We expect officers to follow the law and the best practice guidance set by the College of Policing in its APP.

Her Majesty’s inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) inspect police forces’ compliance with the legislation and APP through their programme of PEEL assessments, national thematic inspections and commissions from the Home Secretary and local policing bodies. We expect forces to respond to these recommendations and address failures of compliance with legislation and APP.

Searches involving exposure of intimate parts of the body must be conducted in accordance with the safeguards in paragraph 11 of Annex A of PACE Code C. If a child is strip searched, an appropriate adult must be present to support the child during this process. It is essential that the police and frontline professionals recognise vulnerability in children and young people, regardless of the circumstances around any interaction. To support this the Home Office have funded the National Police Chiefs’ Council’s Vulnerability Knowledge and Practice programme, which shares the very best practice across forces. We also fund the College of Policing’s Public Protection and Safeguarding Leadership programme which ensures senior leaders in policing have a strong understanding of vulnerability.

Any concerns about the use of strip searches should be raised with the relevant force or the Independent Office of Police Complaints (IOPC), who investigate serious matters involving the police. As part of its work, the IOPC is required to consider if there is evidence of criminal wrongdoing or if police officers have a case to answer for misconduct or gross misconduct.

1st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children under the age of 18 were (a) referred to the Prevent programme and (b) adopted as a Channel case in the financial year 2020-21.

In the year ending March 2021, there were 1,920 referrals to Prevent for individuals under the age of 18. Of these referrals, 347 (18%) were adopted as a Channel case. It should be noted that there were 32 referrals to Prevent in the year ending March 2021 where the individuals age was unknown.

Please note that we do not collect information on the number of individuals referred into and adopted by the Channel programme, only the number of referrals and adoptions. This is because one person can be referred into Prevent, and adopted onto Channel, multiple times.

The Channel process is entirely voluntary and those that are under-18 must have the consent of their parent/guardian to be adopted as a Channel case.

You can access more information on referrals and adopted cases on the 2020-21 Channel Statistics Publication:

Individuals referred to and supported through the Prevent Programme, England and Wales, April 2020 to March 2021 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children under the age of 18 were referred to Prevent in each year between April 2015 and April 2020 by (a) gender, (b) ethnicity and (c) religion of the individual referred.

Since 2012, 2,897 people have been adopted to Prevent’s voluntary and confidential multi-agency Channel programme, which supports people who are vulnerable to exploitation from terrorist influences.

Below is data on the gender and age of those under the age of 18 who were referred to Prevent and adopted to Channel. Please note the ‘-‘ symbol has been used where the number of individuals in a category is less than 10.

Gender of those under the age of 18 referred to Prevent, 2015/16 to 2019/20

Year

Gender

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Male

2,799

2,367

3,116

2,495

2,532

Female

829

550

436

382

373

Other

-

-

-

-

10

Unknown

-

-

-

-

0

Total

3,630

2,918

3,556

2,879

2,915

Gender of those under the age of 18 adopted as a Channel case, 2015/16 to 2019/20

Year

Gender

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Male

191

176

200

282

320

Female

39

23

13

34

38

Other

0

0

0

0

-

Unknown

0

0

0

0

-

Total

230

199

213

316

360

The Channel process is entirely voluntary and those under-18 must have the consent of their parent/guardian to be adopted as a Channel case.

Recording the ethnicity and religion of individuals who have been considered as a Channel case is not mandatory on the Home Office Case Management Information System. We therefore only hold partial data on the ethnicity or religion of Prevent referrals and Channel cases. This partial data cannot be released as it would create a misleading and inaccurate picture of the ethnic/religious make-up of Channel referrals aged under 18.

24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, , how many children under the age of 18 were adopted as a Channel Case in each year between April 2015 and April by (a) gender, (b) ethnicity and (c) religion of the individual referred.

Since 2012, 2,897 people have been adopted to Prevent’s voluntary and confidential multi-agency Channel programme, which supports people who are vulnerable to exploitation from terrorist influences.

Below is data on the gender and age of those under the age of 18 who were referred to Prevent and adopted to Channel. Please note the ‘-‘ symbol has been used where the number of individuals in a category is less than 10.

Gender of those under the age of 18 referred to Prevent, 2015/16 to 2019/20

Year

Gender

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Male

2,799

2,367

3,116

2,495

2,532

Female

829

550

436

382

373

Other

-

-

-

-

10

Unknown

-

-

-

-

0

Total

3,630

2,918

3,556

2,879

2,915

Gender of those under the age of 18 adopted as a Channel case, 2015/16 to 2019/20

Year

Gender

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Male

191

176

200

282

320

Female

39

23

13

34

38

Other

0

0

0

0

-

Unknown

0

0

0

0

-

Total

230

199

213

316

360

The Channel process is entirely voluntary and those under-18 must have the consent of their parent/guardian to be adopted as a Channel case.

Recording the ethnicity and religion of individuals who have been considered as a Channel case is not mandatory on the Home Office Case Management Information System. We therefore only hold partial data on the ethnicity or religion of Prevent referrals and Channel cases. This partial data cannot be released as it would create a misleading and inaccurate picture of the ethnic/religious make-up of Channel referrals aged under 18.

25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to create small units for the detention of women within existing immigration removal centres; how many women will be detained in those centres; and for what reason the detention estate for women is being expanded by the creation of a new detention centre in Durham.

The immigration removal estate is kept under ongoing review to ensure that the Home Office has sufficient capacity, in the right places and that it provides value for money.

The Home Office has acquired the former Hassockfield Secure Training Centre in County Durham and will open it as an immigration removal centre (IRC) for around 80 women by the autumn. Initial discussions with the planning authority have taken place and work has commenced at the site. An Equality Impact Assessment will be completed as part of this programme of work.

The immigration detention capacity for women is not being expanded. We plan to supplement the new Hassockfield IRC by continuing to provide some detention capacity for women at Colnbrook, Dungavel and Yarl’s Wood IRCs, in order to provide flexibility in placement and shorter escorting journeys for those in detention, including women.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)