Angela Smith

Liberal Democrat - Former Member for Penistone and Stocksbridge

Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (International Development)
21st Oct 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Minister (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Apr 2014 - 18th Sep 2015
Shadow Deputy Leader of the House of Commons
7th Oct 2011 - 15th Apr 2014
Administration Committee
2nd Nov 2010 - 23rd Jan 2012
Opposition Assistant Whip (Commons)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Procedure Committee
26th Jul 2010 - 21st Mar 2011
Transport Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 2nd Nov 2010
Transport Committee
19th Jan 2009 - 6th May 2010
Regulatory Reform
12th Jul 2005 - 6th Nov 2007


Division Voting information

Angela Smith has voted in 2298 divisions, and 12 times against the majority of their Party.

12 Feb 2019 - Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Labour Aye votes vs 225 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 241
30 Jan 2019 - Crime (Overseas Production Orders) Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Labour Aye votes vs 206 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 310 Noes - 257
12 Sep 2018 - EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (FTA) And Investment Protection Agreement (IPA) - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 21 Labour Aye votes vs 143 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 331 Noes - 145
7 Dec 2016 - The Government's Plan for Brexit - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Labour No votes vs 150 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 461 Noes - 89
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 56 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 390
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 65 Labour Aye votes vs 153 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 397 Noes - 223
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Labour No votes vs 41 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 105 Noes - 186
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Labour No votes vs 48 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 101 Noes - 166
19 Oct 2011 - Deferred Division - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 28 Labour Aye votes vs 71 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 306 Noes - 95
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 126 Labour Aye votes vs 184 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 155 Noes - 418
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 132 Labour Aye votes vs 177 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 178 Noes - 392
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Angela Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 156 Labour Aye votes vs 157 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 267
View All Angela Smith Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Theresa May (Conservative)
(47 debate interactions)
George Eustice (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
(34 debate interactions)
Michael Gove (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities
(30 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Leader of the House
(130 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(87 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(81 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Angela Smith's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Angela Smith

28th October 2019
Angela Smith signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 28th October 2019

People's Vote

Tabled by: Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat - East Dunbartonshire)
That this House calls on the Government to bring forward legislation to hold a People’s Vote on whether the United Kingdom should remain a member of the European Union or should leave the European Union on the final terms agreed between the Government and the European Union.
25 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Nov 2019)
Signatures by party:
Liberal Democrat: 19
Labour: 4
Plaid Cymru: 1
Independent: 1
14th October 2019
Angela Smith signed this EDM on Thursday 24th October 2019

Psoriasis Awareness Week

Tabled by: David T C Davies (Conservative - Monmouth)
That this House recognises Psoriasis Awareness Week from 27 October – 3 November 2019 which this year aims to highlight how prospective parents can overcome the potential difficulties in treating psoriasis before, during and after childbirth; notes that the peak onset of psoriasis, which can affect as many as one …
27 signatures
(Most recent: 16 Dec 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 12
Conservative: 6
Scottish National Party: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 2
Independent: 1
View All Angela Smith's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Angela Smith, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Angela Smith has not been granted any Urgent Questions

4 Adjournment Debates led by Angela Smith

Monday 30th October 2017
Tuesday 12th April 2016
Monday 19th January 2015
Wednesday 30th April 2014

Angela Smith has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


274 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3 Other Department Questions
15th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, whether primary legislation is required to implement the proposals on the adult skills budget in the Sheffield City Region Devolution Agreement, announced on 2 October 2015.

One of the conditions for full devolution of adult skills funding in relation to the Sheffield City Region is that Parliament has legislated to enable transfer of the current statutory duties on my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills to secure appropriate facilities for further education for adults from the relevant budget and for provision to be free in certain circumstances. Primary legislation would be needed for that purpose.

17th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many adults were enrolled on (a) Level 4, (b) Level 5 and (c) Level 6 courses in England in each of the last five years.

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) collects and publishes statistics on students enrolled at UK Higher Education Providers.

Table 1b of the Statistical First Release ‘Higher Education Enrolments and Qualifications Obtained in the UK 2013/14’ provides the number of enrolments at both Higher Education Institutions and Further Education Colleges by qualification aim.

https://www.hesa.ac.uk/sfr210

Information on how higher education qualification aims are ascribed to the National Vocational Qualification Levels is available at the following link:

https://www.hesa.ac.uk/index.php?option=com_studrec&task=show_file&mnl=13051&href=a^_^COURSEAIM.html

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what discussions his Department has had with water companies on payment of the living wage in that sector.

My Rt. hon Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills has not had any discussions with water companies on payment of the Living Wage.

The Government supports employers that choose to pay the Living Wage when it is affordable and not at the expense of jobs. Decisions on what wages to set are for employers and workers to agree as long as employers pay at least the national minimum wage.

This Government is committed to improving living standards, particularly for the low paid and the only way to achieve a sustainable increase in living standards is to focus on economic growth, employment and cutting taxes for the low paid. This is exactly what we are doing.

4th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what impact assessment has been prepared by her Department (a) from 1 January 2018 to 23 July 2019 and (b) since 23 July 2019 after discussions at EU XTP and EU XTPO committees on business supply chains as part of preparations for Operation Kingfisher; and if she will place a copy of that assessment in the Library.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
2nd Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to introduce graphic warnings on fireworks packaging.

The Government promotes the safe and responsible use of fireworks by consumers and there is strict legislation in place which regulates their supply and use. The Government is currently working with a range of stakeholders to raise consumer awareness on firework safety.

Under current UK legislation, there are clear requirements on manufacturers to categorise and label fireworks according to their explosive content, safety distances, noise level, or similar. The label must include instructions on safety distances and means of ignition and safety messages.

The Government has no plans to amend legislation on firework packaging.

2nd Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure young children are protected from firework-related injuries.

The Government promotes the safe and responsible use of fireworks by consumers and there is strict legislation in place which regulates their supply and use.

There are age restrictions in place which prevent the sale of fireworks to those under the age of 16 or 18 dependent on the classification of firework. The law also prohibits those under 18 possessing any category F2 or F3 fireworks in a public place subject to very limited exceptions.

The Government is currently working with industry, retailers, charities and others such as the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents and Netmums to promote the safe and responsible use of fireworks and to raise consumer awareness on firework safety.

30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of Swansea Bay tidal lagoon on the manufacturing industry.

Development of a supply chain forms a key part of the Contract for Difference (CFD) negotiation process.

The Hendry Review, which has been considering a number of issues including supply chain opportunities, has now been submitted to the department. We thank Charles Hendry for his hard work and will look carefully at the review’s findings as part of our wider assessment of the future nature of the energy mix and our decarbonisation plans.

We will formally respond in due course.

30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 30 November 2016 to Question 54997, when he expects to receive the Independent Review of Tidal Lagoons led by Charles Hendry.

The Hendry Review has been submitted to the department. We thank Charles Hendry for his hard work and will look carefully at the review’s findings as part of our wider assessment of the future nature of the energy mix and our decarbonisation plans.

We will formally respond in due course.

18th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether and how Ofcom’s assessment of whether mobile providers have achieved their 90 per cent target for land mass coverage by the end of 2017 will be made public.

Ofcom is responsible for enforcing spectrum licence obligations and it plans to publish its assessment of whether mobile providers have met their licence obligations once it has assessed their compliance in early 2018.

11th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether Ofcom’s assessment of whether mobile providers have achieved their 90 per cent target for land mass coverage by the end of 2017 will be published; and if she will make a statement.

Ofcom plans to publish its assessment of whether Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) have met their licence obligations once it has assessed MNO compliance in early 2018.
23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department plans to take to publicise whether mobile providers meet the target for broadband coverage of 90 per cent of UK land mass by the end of 2017.

The regulator Ofcom is responsible for assessing and enforcing the compliance of Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) with their licence obligations to provide voice and text coverage to at least 90% of the UK landmass, alongside Telefonica's (O2's) licence obligation to provide 4G coverage to 98% of the UK population by the end of 2017. Ofcom will assess on the MNOs' compliance in early 2018. It is also a matter for Ofcom to report whether the MNOs met these obligations and it can issue fines to MNOs that fail to meet their licence obligations.

23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of whether mobile providers will reach the target of providing voice and text services to more than 90 per cent of the UK landmass by the end of 2017.

The regulator Ofcom is responsible for assessing and enforcing the compliance of Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) with their licence obligations to provide voice and text coverage to at least 90% of the UK landmass, alongside Telefonica's (O2's) licence obligation to provide 4G coverage to 98% of the UK population by the end of 2017. Ofcom will assess on the MNOs' compliance in early 2018. It is also a matter for Ofcom to report whether the MNOs met these obligations and it can issue fines to MNOs that fail to meet their licence obligations.

23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what penalties will be enacted if mobile providers do not achieve coverage of 90 per cent of UK landmass coverage by the end of 2017.

The regulator Ofcom is responsible for assessing and enforcing the compliance of Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) with their licence obligations to provide voice and text coverage to at least 90% of the UK landmass, alongside Telefonica's (O2's) licence obligation to provide 4G coverage to 98% of the UK population by the end of 2017. Ofcom will assess on the MNOs' compliance in early 2018. It is also a matter for Ofcom to report whether the MNOs met these obligations and it can issue fines to MNOs that fail to meet their licence obligations.

9th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department plans to establish a statutory levy on greyhound racing to help support the welfare of retired greyhounds.

I recently wrote to the betting industry to underline the importance that the government attaches to the existing voluntary agreements between betting and greyhound racing through which funding is provided towards areas including animal welfare.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) is currently undertaking a review of the effectiveness of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010. In addition, the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (EFRA) Parliamentary Select Committee is undertaking an inquiry into greyhound welfare to feed into Defra’s review. My Department has submitted written evidence to EFRA and we will want to consider any recommendations put forward by them as part of Defra’s review of the 2010 Regulations.


24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to introduce education in schools to promote responsible dog ownership.

There are no plans to introduce responsible dog ownership into the curriculum for schools. The Government has committed to no further changes to the National Curriculum this Parliament. Schools have the autonomy to teach responsible pet ownership if they wish to.

22nd Nov 2017
To To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 9 November 2017 to Question 110875, when her Department last reviewed the statutory guidance entitled Supporting pupils with medical conditions at school; and whether any changes have been made to that guidance to address a lack of awareness and compliance in schools.

The department worked with a range of stakeholders including the Health Conditions in Schools Alliance, unions, members of the school workforce and parents and their children on developing the statutory guidance, a draft of which was subject to public consultation in early 2014. Updates to the guidance were made in December 2015, which included clarifying the distinction between statutory and non-statutory guidance and adding references to the special educational needs and disabilities code of practice.

Governing boards should ensure that all schools develop a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions, which is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff. We keep the guidance under review, including in the context of school awareness, and the role it plays in securing accessibility of school policies.

Ofsted’s Common Inspection Framework requires inspectors, in making judgements upon schools, to pay particular attention to the outcomes of a range of groups of pupils, including those with medical needs. Ofsted included guidance to inspectors on this matter in their March 2017 school inspection update, reminding inspectors that they should consider how schools are meeting the needs of pupils with medical conditions.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 9 November 2017 to Question 110875, when her Department plans to review the statutory guidance entitled Supporting pupils with medical conditions at school; and if her Department will amend that guidance to include a requirement for governing bodies to ensure that all schools publish their policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions on the school’s website so that it is readily accessible to parents and school staff.

The department worked with a range of stakeholders including the Health Conditions in Schools Alliance, unions, members of the school workforce and parents and their children on developing the statutory guidance, a draft of which was subject to public consultation in early 2014. Updates to the guidance were made in December 2015, which included clarifying the distinction between statutory and non-statutory guidance and adding references to the special educational needs and disabilities code of practice.

Governing boards should ensure that all schools develop a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions, which is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff. We keep the guidance under review, including in the context of school awareness, and the role it plays in securing accessibility of school policies.

Ofsted’s Common Inspection Framework requires inspectors, in making judgements upon schools, to pay particular attention to the outcomes of a range of groups of pupils, including those with medical needs. Ofsted included guidance to inspectors on this matter in their March 2017 school inspection update, reminding inspectors that they should consider how schools are meeting the needs of pupils with medical conditions.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 9 November to Question 110875, how her Department (a) monitors that governing boards are ensuring that the school’s policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff and (b) responds to governing boards and schools when there is evidence of non-compliance to their statutory obligations.

The department worked with a range of stakeholders including the Health Conditions in Schools Alliance, unions, members of the school workforce and parents and their children on developing the statutory guidance, a draft of which was subject to public consultation in early 2014. Updates to the guidance were made in December 2015, which included clarifying the distinction between statutory and non-statutory guidance and adding references to the special educational needs and disabilities code of practice.

Governing boards should ensure that all schools develop a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions, which is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff. We keep the guidance under review, including in the context of school awareness, and the role it plays in securing accessibility of school policies.

Ofsted’s Common Inspection Framework requires inspectors, in making judgements upon schools, to pay particular attention to the outcomes of a range of groups of pupils, including those with medical needs. Ofsted included guidance to inspectors on this matter in their March 2017 school inspection update, reminding inspectors that they should consider how schools are meeting the needs of pupils with medical conditions.

1st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will amend the statutory guidance entitled Supporting pupils with medical conditions at school to include a requirement for all schools to publish their medical conditions policies.

We know how important it is that children with medical conditions are supported to enjoy a full education. That is why we introduced the duty, under section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014, to require governing bodies to make arrangements to support pupils with medical conditions and have provided statutory guidance outlining schools’ responsibilities in this area.

We keep this statutory guidance under review. We will continue to ensure that it clearly sets out the arrangements that governing boards should be making to support pupils with medical conditions, based on best practice.

All governing boards should ensure that the school's policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff.

14th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions (a) she and (b) her Department have had with animal welfare organisations on the incorporation of animal welfare in the national curriculum.

The Department received representations from animal welfare groups about the inclusion of animal welfare in the science curriculum in response to the consultation on the new National Curriculum.

The new primary science curriculum, introduced from September 2014, focuses on the essential scientific knowledge that children need to be educated citizens. It teaches pupils about the requirements for animals to survive such as appropriate habitat, food, water and air. Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education also provides opportunities for pupils to be taught about animal welfare and teachers are free to decide what further activities they offer on this topic.

25th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she make an assessment of the potential merits of (a) updating and (b) consolidating the regulations on dog control.

The Government considers that the powers and measures contained within dangerous dog legislation allow enforcers such as police and local authorities to take the necessary action in order to prevent and tackle incidents of dangerous dogs. Local initiatives such as Local Environmental Awareness on Dogs (LEAD) can also be adopted in areas where police, local authorities and other interested parties can come together to promote responsible dog ownership.

In addition, early intervention measures such as Community Protection Notices can be issued by local authority officers or police to anyone causing low level anti-social behaviour involving a dog.

The Government last reviewed the law on dangerous dogs in 2014 and made a number of changes. The changes included extending the scope of the offence of allowing a dog to be dangerously out of control from public places to all places; increasing the maximum penalties for allowing a dog to be dangerously out of control; when a dog causes injury or death and when a dog attacks an assistance dog.

The Government realises the importance of quality research to help inform its policy, and in November 2018 Defra commissioned further research in collaboration with Middlesex University to look at responsible ownership across all breeds of dog. The research will consider different approaches and the effectiveness of current dog control measures. The research will also seek to identify and examine the factors and situations that may cause dog attacks and how to promote responsible dog ownership.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with dog welfare organisations on promoting responsible dog ownership in education.

Defra commissioned research on responsible dog ownership with Middlesex University. The research aims to update the review Defra commissioned previously in 2010 which considered risk factors around dog attacks, as well as reviewing the use of enforcement around dog control issues, identifying best practice case studies and how to promote responsible dog ownership. As part of the research, the team will draw on relevant evidence from a number of EU countries including the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium and Spain. The research is due to be completed by the end of 2019. The Government will discuss the findings with stakeholders including dog welfare organisations who have contributed to the research.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she has commissioned research on (a) regulations in relation to dog and (b) responsible dog ownership policies in EU countries.

Defra commissioned research on responsible dog ownership with Middlesex University. The research aims to update the review Defra commissioned previously in 2010 which considered risk factors around dog attacks, as well as reviewing the use of enforcement around dog control issues, identifying best practice case studies and how to promote responsible dog ownership. As part of the research, the team will draw on relevant evidence from a number of EU countries including the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium and Spain. The research is due to be completed by the end of 2019. The Government will discuss the findings with stakeholders including dog welfare organisations who have contributed to the research.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when she plans to publish her Department's research on the effectiveness of dog control.

Defra commissioned research on responsible dog ownership with Middlesex University. The research aims to update the review Defra commissioned previously in 2010 which considered risk factors around dog attacks, as well as reviewing the use of enforcement around dog control issues, identifying best practice case studies and how to promote responsible dog ownership. As part of the research, the team will draw on relevant evidence from a number of EU countries including the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium and Spain. The research is due to be completed by the end of 2019. The Government will discuss the findings with stakeholders including dog welfare organisations who have contributed to the research.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if the Government will bring forward legislative proposals to allow rehoming organisations to rehome well-behaved and suitably assessed section 1 dogs.

I refer my Hon Friend to the reply previously given on June 27 to PQ 267365.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018, how many licences have been issued under those regulations in 2019 for (a) breeding dogs, (b) providing or arranging for the provision of boarding for cats, (c) providing or arranging for the provision of boarding for dogs in kennels, (d) providing or arranging for the provision of day care for dogs, (e) hiring out horses, (f) selling animals as pets and (g) keeping or training animals for exhibition.

Under regulation 29 of The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 it is a requirement for local authorities in England to submit specified information relating to licensable activities in their respective areas. Such information should be submitted to the Secretary of State by 31 May for each preceding year 1 April to 31 March. Local authorities have submitted information to the Secretary of State for this year and Defra is analysing the data. We aim to publish the information later this year.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many local authorities in England have submitted data for 2019 on the number of licences they have issued under the Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018.

Under regulation 29 of The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 it is a requirement for local authorities in England to submit specified information relating to licensable activities in their respective areas. Such information should be submitted to the Secretary of State by 31 May for each preceding year 1 April to 31 March. Local authorities have submitted information to the Secretary of State for this year and Defra is analysing the data. We aim to publish the information later this year.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 3 June 2019 to Question 259124 on Livestock: Animal Welfare, what plans his Department has to introduce benchmark incentives for farmers to maintain and enhance animal health standards.

We are working in partnership with representatives of industry and the veterinary profession to establish a range of interventions to reduce the impacts of endemic disease on farm productivity and animal welfare. By working closely with industry we will ensure that actions are effective and will improve the health of livestock nationally. Our discussions are at an early stage. At present, we have no plans to introduce benchmark standards.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 7 May 2019 to Question 251249, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) reach and (b) effectiveness of its work to communicate with people vulnerable to the effects of air pollution during episodes of high pollution.

The Government does not assess the reach and effectiveness of its communication for each air pollution episode. However, we work closely with Public Health England and a network of health charities to ensure that key health messages reach those who are vulnerable to the effects of air pollution, during episodes of high pollution.

The Government has committed in the 2019 Clean Air Strategy to develop and deliver a personal air quality messaging system to inform the public, particularly those who are vulnerable to air pollution, about the air quality forecast and provide clearer information on air pollution episodes and health advice. This builds on the air quality forecasts and information already published on the Government’s UK-AIR website.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
12th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the National Audit Office report Ensuring food safety and standards published 12 June 2019, what steps is he taking to bring forward new regulations on imported products in preparation for the UK leaving the EU on 31st October 2019; and if he will make a statement.

The Food Standards Agency has welcomed the NAO report ‘Ensuring food safety and standards’. The FSA is already taking steps to address the proposals and is committed to working closely with other parts of government to ensure that a high level of food safety standards is maintained.

When we leave the European Union, we will maintain our current standards. We will keep our existing UK legislation, and the EU Withdrawal Act will convert EU law into UK law as it applies at the moment of departure.

We are committed to maintaining our rigorous standards on animal welfare and food safety after the UK’s withdrawal from the EU - high standards and high quality are what our domestic and global customers demand, and that is what we will provide.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Special Areas of Conservation in England and pursuant to the Answer of 22 February 2019 to Question 221626, how many consents or permissions to burn blanket bog Natural England has successfully (a) revoked and (b) modified.

To date, Natural England has revoked or modified 180 consents or permissions to rotationally burn on protected sites, by developing Long Term Plans or equivalent remedies (Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) Revisions, HLS Extensions or voluntary surrender).

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
5th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Environment Agency will take to ensure the control of water borne disease and infestations within farmed salmon populations.

The Fish Health Inspectorate (FHI) is the organisation responsible for the control of serious diseases of fish and shellfish in aquaculture establishments, including salmon farms and wild populations in England and Wales.

It acts under the Aquatic Animal Health (England and Wales) Regulations 2009 to prevent the introduction and spread of serious fish and shellfish disease. The FHI undertakes its responsibilities through compliance inspections of aquaculture establishments and advice to the industry. It also imposes trade controls on imports of fish and shellfish, investigates disease problems and when a serious disease is detected, implementations of movement controls and other preventative measures.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will (a) take steps through the Agriculture Bill to increase animal health standards and (b) make an assessment of the merits of a resilient approach to disease management to reduce productivity losses and subsequent food shortages.

The Government is highly supportive of a resilient and preventative approach to livestock disease which supports higher productivity in farming and enables wider benefits. The approach was endorsed in responses to our consultation paper Health and Harmony: the future for food, farming and the environment in a Green Brexit. The potential was set out, for example, in ‘Study to Model the Impact of Controlling Endemic Cattle Diseases and Conditions on National Cattle Productivity, Agricultural Performance and Greenhouse Gas Emissions’.

We are now working with industry and veterinary representatives to develop practical plans to further this approach and the Agriculture Bill is drafted to give the Secretary of State powers to make payments to protect and improve the health of livestock and to collect and share data relating to livestock health and traceability.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the merits of a preventative approach to animal health in improving the productivity of agriculture; and what steps he will take to reward farmers that take such an approach.

The Government is highly supportive of a resilient and preventative approach to livestock disease which supports higher productivity in farming and enables wider benefits. The approach was endorsed in responses to our consultation paper Health and Harmony: the future for food, farming and the environment in a Green Brexit. The potential was set out, for example, in ‘Study to Model the Impact of Controlling Endemic Cattle Diseases and Conditions on National Cattle Productivity, Agricultural Performance and Greenhouse Gas Emissions’.

We are now working with industry and veterinary representatives to develop practical plans to further this approach and the Agriculture Bill is drafted to give the Secretary of State powers to make payments to protect and improve the health of livestock and to collect and share data relating to livestock health and traceability.

7th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural affairs, what steps his Department took to alert (a) children, (b) older people, (c) people with health conditions and (d) other vulnerable groups to the pollution episodes that occurred across England between 4-26 April 2019.

During episodes of elevated air pollution (including the episodes between 4-26 April 2019), Defra works closely with Public Health England and a network of health charities to ensure that key health messages are communicated to those who are vulnerable to the effects of air pollution, in addition to communicating through our normal digital channels.

Defra’s Daily Air Quality Index (https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/air-pollution/daqi) assists in understanding air pollution levels and suggests recommended actions and health advice. Such advice applies to anyone experiencing symptoms.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
9th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the Environment Agency ability to carry out all its statutory duties in relation to fisheries; and if he will make a statement.

The EA continues to fulfil its statutory duties in relation to fisheries.

Freshwater fisheries regulation is a core role and unique activity that only the EA can fulfil. The EA makes resources available to deliver current regulations, including the rod and net licensing system; scheduled reviews of Net Limitation Orders; reviewing and consolidating fishery byelaws; making new byelaws where this is necessary to protect stocks; and determining fishery management permit applications.

9th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the Environment Agency’s ability to carry out the management of salmon stocks as a result of recent reductions in funding levels.

The Environment Agency (EA), like the rest of the public sector, is playing its part in reducing the national deficit and delivering more with less. Both Defra and the EA recognise the challenges that reduced funding bring and the EA is adapting its approach accordingly.

In 2015/16, the EA launched a new approach to partnership working to help it deliver more effectively and efficiently. Its 5 Point Approach to Salmon management (published in 2016), is a good example of how it is working with like-minded organisations to deliver shared priorities.

3rd Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System will enable horses to be traced post import.

The Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System has been designed, for a scenario where the UK no longer has access to the Trade Control and Expert System (TRACES), to enable notifications of imports coming into this country, so that appropriate border controls can be carried out and recorded. The notifications reveal the origin of the consignments just as TRACES does now and so can be used to trace a consignment back to its country of origin. It does not itself provide for traceability of movements afterwards, however, once in the UK, horses and other equines must be identified in accordance with UK law and recorded on the UK Central Equine Database (CED). This records the identification details of the equine, including the name and address of the owner. An exception is made for equines from other EU Member States that are only in the UK for a short stay for specific purposes such as competition, racing or breeding, on the basis that they are already fully identified in accordance with EU law. This will include a record having been made in the CED of their Member State of origin.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what checks will be carried out on the documentation required by equines entering the UK once the UK has left the EU.

No new animal health checks at the point of entry will be introduced as a result of the UK leaving the EU. Equines entering the UK from the EU will be required to pre-notify APHA (or DAERA in Northern Ireland) if they are travelling using a UK Health Certificate or from France using a commercial document (UK DOCOM). The UK Health Certificate is a replacement for the existing Intra Trade Animal Health Certificate used for EU trade. The UK DOCOM is a replacement for this existing DOCOM used for the movement of high health status horses from France to the UK.

Equines entering the UK directly from the EU will not be required to do so via a border inspection post. Risk based checks will continue to be undertaken at the point of destination on these equines. Equines entering the UK from third countries will follow the same processes as they do now, with checks undertaken at an approved UK BIP.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of (a) trends in the level of non-compliant movement of equines with (i) fraudulent and (ii) non-existent documentation and (b) the potential effect on biosecurity and animal welfare of conducting spot checks on equines entering at ports after the UK leaves the EU.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency does not hold the information requested because fraudulent or non-compliant movements are not recordable on the TRACES system. It also does not record, in most cases, the ports of departure or entry for equines moving to or from the EU. The information requested is best covered by the local authority and the Intelligence and Regulation Hub.

However, horses with fraudulent or non-existent documentation that are illegally moved would be covered by equine identification legislation in England. The local authorities have a statutory duty to enforce the regulations. Also, there is statutory duty on local authorities to deliver an annual prosecutions return under the Animal Health Act 1981. This information is collated and presented to Parliament at the end of March by APHA and subsequently published (on GOV.UK). This return provides details of expenditure incurred and prosecutions taken under the Act and incidences of disease in imported animals, which details successful prosecutions undertaken by local authorities in England.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System will enable horses to be traced post-import and check-tested.

If we leave the EU without a deal, horse movements into the UK from countries outside the EU will have to be notified before arrival in the UK using the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS). Those horses will need to enter the UK via an appropriate Border Inspection Post in the UK for checks.

Notifications before arrival will also be required for horses coming into the UK from the EU, with the exception of horses travelling from the Republic of Ireland which will be exempt.

For an initial period, these notifications for horses travelling from the EU will not be raised through IPAFFS. The importer should download and complete a notification form from www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-import-of-animals-and-products-food-feed-notify-authorities

This form should then be sent to the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) for all imports coming into England, Wales and Scotland, or to the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) for movements into Northern Ireland.

Those authorities will issue a unique notification number, which is required to complete the health certificate that must accompany consignments. Health certificates are available here: www.gov.uk/government/collections/eu-import-health-certificates

APHA and DAERA will, after the arrival of the horses in the UK, carry out risk-based checks at the final point of destination as they do now.

From autumn 2019, notifications will be made using IPAFFS.

Detailed guidance for importers is available at www.gov.uk/guidance/importing-animals-animal-products-and-high-risk-food-and-feed-not-of-animal-origin-after-eu-exit

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Natural England’s initiative to secure voluntary commitments from upland landowners and managers to suspend the rotational burning of blanket bog habitat in England, how many voluntary commitments were (a) requested by Natural England, (b) made without amendment, (c) made with amendment, (d) refused by the rights-holder and (e) are outstanding.

This is a devolved matter and the below relates to England only.

In February 2018, 213 Voluntary Commitments (VCs) were sent out to landowners. 157 VCs were returned signed, 19 returned refused to sign, and 37 are outstanding. By signing a VC, the landowner or manager is agreeing to suspend rotational burning on blanket bog habitat, as opposed to deep peat soils, and to work with Natural England (NE) to develop Long Term Management Plans or equivalent remedies to modify or revoke any consent concerning rotational burning. The VC is the first step towards the cessation of rotational burning on blanket bog.

To date, NE has revoked or modified 124 consents or permissions by developing Long Term Plans or equivalent remedies such as Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) Revisions, HLS Extensions or voluntary surrender. In total, NE are working to modify or revoke 402 consents or permissions to rotationally burn on blanket bog habitat designated as Special Areas of Conservation (SAC).

NE have issued 6 consents for restoration burning on the following blanket bog Special Areas of Conservation: 2 in the South Pennines SAC and 4 in the North Pennines SAC.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Natural England’s initiative to secure voluntary commitments from upland landowners and managers to suspend the rotational burning of blanket bog habitat in England, what area of deep peat soils is estimated to be located on those estates that have made a voluntary commitment (a) without and (b) with amendment.

This is a devolved matter and the below relates to England only.

In February 2018, 213 Voluntary Commitments (VCs) were sent out to landowners. 157 VCs were returned signed, 19 returned refused to sign, and 37 are outstanding. By signing a VC, the landowner or manager is agreeing to suspend rotational burning on blanket bog habitat, as opposed to deep peat soils, and to work with Natural England (NE) to develop Long Term Management Plans or equivalent remedies to modify or revoke any consent concerning rotational burning. The VC is the first step towards the cessation of rotational burning on blanket bog.

To date, NE has revoked or modified 124 consents or permissions by developing Long Term Plans or equivalent remedies such as Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) Revisions, HLS Extensions or voluntary surrender. In total, NE are working to modify or revoke 402 consents or permissions to rotationally burn on blanket bog habitat designated as Special Areas of Conservation (SAC).

NE have issued 6 consents for restoration burning on the following blanket bog Special Areas of Conservation: 2 in the South Pennines SAC and 4 in the North Pennines SAC.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Natural England’s initiative to secure voluntary commitments from upland landowners and managers to suspend the rotational burning of blanket bog habitat, what area of deep peat soils is estimated to be located on those estates that have (a) refused to sign and (b) not yet signed a voluntary commitment.

This is a devolved matter and the below relates to England only.

In February 2018, 213 Voluntary Commitments (VCs) were sent out to landowners. 157 VCs were returned signed, 19 returned refused to sign, and 37 are outstanding. By signing a VC, the landowner or manager is agreeing to suspend rotational burning on blanket bog habitat, as opposed to deep peat soils, and to work with Natural England (NE) to develop Long Term Management Plans or equivalent remedies to modify or revoke any consent concerning rotational burning. The VC is the first step towards the cessation of rotational burning on blanket bog.

To date, NE has revoked or modified 124 consents or permissions by developing Long Term Plans or equivalent remedies such as Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) Revisions, HLS Extensions or voluntary surrender. In total, NE are working to modify or revoke 402 consents or permissions to rotationally burn on blanket bog habitat designated as Special Areas of Conservation (SAC).

NE have issued 6 consents for restoration burning on the following blanket bog Special Areas of Conservation: 2 in the South Pennines SAC and 4 in the North Pennines SAC.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Special Areas of Conservation in England, how many consents or permissions to burn blanket bog Natural England is seeking to (a) modify and (b) revoke in order to end the practice of burning in that globally important habitat.

This is a devolved matter and the below relates to England only.

In February 2018, 213 Voluntary Commitments (VCs) were sent out to landowners. 157 VCs were returned signed, 19 returned refused to sign, and 37 are outstanding. By signing a VC, the landowner or manager is agreeing to suspend rotational burning on blanket bog habitat, as opposed to deep peat soils, and to work with Natural England (NE) to develop Long Term Management Plans or equivalent remedies to modify or revoke any consent concerning rotational burning. The VC is the first step towards the cessation of rotational burning on blanket bog.

To date, NE has revoked or modified 124 consents or permissions by developing Long Term Plans or equivalent remedies such as Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) Revisions, HLS Extensions or voluntary surrender. In total, NE are working to modify or revoke 402 consents or permissions to rotationally burn on blanket bog habitat designated as Special Areas of Conservation (SAC).

NE have issued 6 consents for restoration burning on the following blanket bog Special Areas of Conservation: 2 in the South Pennines SAC and 4 in the North Pennines SAC.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Special Areas of Conservation in England, how many consents or permissions to burn blanket bog Natural England has successfully (a) revoked and (b) modified to secure the permanent cessation of burning that globally important habitat.

This is a devolved matter and the below relates to England only.

In February 2018, 213 Voluntary Commitments (VCs) were sent out to landowners. 157 VCs were returned signed, 19 returned refused to sign, and 37 are outstanding. By signing a VC, the landowner or manager is agreeing to suspend rotational burning on blanket bog habitat, as opposed to deep peat soils, and to work with Natural England (NE) to develop Long Term Management Plans or equivalent remedies to modify or revoke any consent concerning rotational burning. The VC is the first step towards the cessation of rotational burning on blanket bog.

To date, NE has revoked or modified 124 consents or permissions by developing Long Term Plans or equivalent remedies such as Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) Revisions, HLS Extensions or voluntary surrender. In total, NE are working to modify or revoke 402 consents or permissions to rotationally burn on blanket bog habitat designated as Special Areas of Conservation (SAC).

NE have issued 6 consents for restoration burning on the following blanket bog Special Areas of Conservation: 2 in the South Pennines SAC and 4 in the North Pennines SAC.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Special Areas of Conservation in England, how many consents or permissions Natural England has issued for the practice of restoration burning; and in which Special Areas of Conservation those consents or permissions have been issued.

This is a devolved matter and the below relates to England only.

In February 2018, 213 Voluntary Commitments (VCs) were sent out to landowners. 157 VCs were returned signed, 19 returned refused to sign, and 37 are outstanding. By signing a VC, the landowner or manager is agreeing to suspend rotational burning on blanket bog habitat, as opposed to deep peat soils, and to work with Natural England (NE) to develop Long Term Management Plans or equivalent remedies to modify or revoke any consent concerning rotational burning. The VC is the first step towards the cessation of rotational burning on blanket bog.

To date, NE has revoked or modified 124 consents or permissions by developing Long Term Plans or equivalent remedies such as Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) Revisions, HLS Extensions or voluntary surrender. In total, NE are working to modify or revoke 402 consents or permissions to rotationally burn on blanket bog habitat designated as Special Areas of Conservation (SAC).

NE have issued 6 consents for restoration burning on the following blanket bog Special Areas of Conservation: 2 in the South Pennines SAC and 4 in the North Pennines SAC.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
8th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many fledged hen harriers there were in 2018; how many of these birds were successfully fitted with tracking devices; and what estimate he has made of the number of birds still being tracked by satellite.

During 2018 an estimated 34 hen harriers fledged in England. Natural England fixed satellite tags to five of these birds, of which two were still transmitting at the end of January 2019. Including birds tagged in previous years, Natural England is currently tracking four birds.

The RSPB fitted tags to approximately 30 hen harriers across the UK during 2018. As of November 2018, over two thirds of these tags were transmitting.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
6th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to replace (a) EU LIFE funding and (b) EU BEST funding for programmes after 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Oxford West and Abingdon, Layla Moran, on 1 February 2019, PQ UIN 213461.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
6th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to respond to the European Commission’s infraction procedure on the protection of European blanket bogs from burning in northern England; and if he will make a statement.

The UK has responded to the European Commission’s reasoned opinion of April 2017. A short press release on the reasoned opinion is available on the Commission website.

We do not comment on on-going infraction procedures and as such are unable to provide further detail at this time.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
2nd Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on game meat producers of the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

The Government aims to secure a deep and comprehensive free trade deal with the EU that continues to provide for frictionless, tariff-free trade, supporting the continued success of our agricultural sectors. Our departure from the EU also provides an opportunity for the UK to have an independent trade policy and a new agriculture policy which enables game producers and other sectors to improve their productivity and competitiveness outside of the EU, while also improving our environment. We remain confident in the resilience of our agricultural sectors and their ability to thrive outside of the EU.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the level of year-round labour the food and farming sector will require to remain productive and profitable after the UK leaves the EU.

Defra is considering the latest data, and working with industry to understand labour demand and supply, including both permanent and seasonal workforce requirements.

It is a key priority of this Government to enable an innovative, productive and competitive food supply chain, which invests in its people and skills.

We have announced that the Government will introduce a new pilot scheme for 2019 and 2020 enabling up to 2500 non-EEA migrant workers to come to the UK to undertake seasonal employment in the edible Horticultural sector.

As the UK prepares to leave the EU, Defra is working closely with the Home Office on the UK’s future immigration policy framework. Defra is also working with industry to raise awareness of the career opportunities within the agriculture and food industry to attract domestic workers, and is exploring the potential for innovation and automation in meeting future food and farming labour demands.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
19th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Pet Travel Scheme, when his Department last reviewed the effectiveness of the Animal and Plant Health Agency's Required Method of Operation process with Eurotunnel, P&O, DFDS and other carriers.

Each carrier is subject to an annual liaison visit and a minimum of one additional audit visit to ensure compliance with the agreed procedures set out in the RMOP. Every 2 years the RMOP is formally reviewed and re-approved. It was last reviewed in July 2017.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
17th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs have been imported into the UK via the Pet Travel Scheme in each year since its introduction.

The UK fully harmonised with the EU Pet Travel Scheme requirements in 2012. Data regarding the number of dogs entering Great Britain under the scheme from 2012-2017 can be found below.

Year

Dogs

2012

139643

2013

152075

2014

155444

2015

164836

2016

275876

2017

287016

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs have been imported using the Balai Directive in each year since its introduction; and if he will publish the number of dogs imported from each country of origin for each of those same years.

The UK fully harmonised with the requirements of the Balai Directive for dog movements in 2012. The data for dog imports under the Balai Directive from 2012 to 2017 can be found in the attached Annex.

This data was extracted from the Trade Control and Expert System (TRACES). In some cases imports are recorded on TRACES as ‘Canis familiaris / Felis catus’, so APHA is unable to distinguish between cat or dog imports. These are included in the table in the column ‘Mixed’.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many puppies were seized at the ports of (a) Dover and (b) Folkestone and placed in quarantine under the Puppy Pilot scheme in each month between 1 December 2017 and 30 June 2018.

The number of puppies seized and quarantined at Dover and Folkestone under the Puppy Pilot from 1 December 2017 to 30 June 2018 are as follows:

Puppies quarantined

Month

Dover

Folkestone

Dec-17

20

3

Jan-18

5

0

Feb-18

12

0

Mar-18

5

0

Apr-18

2

1

May-18

5

46

Jun-18

2

0

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
22nd Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans for semi-wild ponies living in areas that are derogated under the Equine Identification Regulations, and which are micro-chipped and identified by an identification document under article 7 of Commission Regulation 504/2008 or article 13 of Commission Implementing Regulation 2015/262, to be included in the central equine database as eligible for slaughter for human consumption; and when he plans to commence that process.

The Central Equine Database will include details of all equines with UK passports. Work to include those semi-wild ponies who are subsequently issued with UK passports will commence shortly.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans his Department has to ensure that payments to farmers currently made under the Basic Payment Scheme will continue to be made once the UK leaves the EU.

This Government has pledged to continue to commit the same cash total in funds for farm support until the end of the Parliament, providing much needed certainty to farmers and landowners.

We will pay the 2019 Basic Payment Scheme in England on the same basis as we do now. We then plan to continue Basic Payment Scheme payments during an ‘agricultural transition’ period in England, which will last a number of years. During this ‘agricultural transition’, we propose to reduce these payments in England, starting with those receiving the highest payments and use the funds released to fund the gradual roll out of a new domestic agriculture policy during the agricultural transition period.

We have not yet taken any decisions on the method for reducing payments or how long the transition should be. We welcome views via our consultation document, ‘Health and Harmony: the future for food, farming and the environment in a Green Brexit’, which was launched on 27 February.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, (a) how many wild animals and (b) of which species are currently licensed in circuses in the UK.

There are two licensed circuses:

Peter Jolly’s Circus

Camel (Camelus bactrianus) 1

Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) 4

Fox (Vulpesvulpes) 1

Racoon (Procyon lotor) 3

Zebra (Equus burchelli chapmani) 3

Zebu (Bos indicus) 1

Blue & Gold Macaw (Ara ararauna) 1

Circus Mondao

Zebra (Equus burchelli chapmani) 1

Camel (Camelus bactrianus) 2

Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) 2

Total - 7 species and 19 animals


George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
19th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the number and countries of origin were of dogs imported into the UK for (a) non-commercial reasons under the Pet Travel Scheme and (b) commercial reasons in 2017.

The total number of dogs entering Great Britain under the Pet Travel Scheme in 2017 was 287,016. The list of countries that these dogs come from are listed in Annex 1.

The purpose of the Pet Travel Scheme is to manage the risk of rabies entering the UK and to ensure appropriate vaccination, at an appropriate age, therefore the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) do not systematically record numbers for all imports from individual countries.

The data for commercial dog imports found in Annex 2 was extracted from the Trade Control and Expert System (TRACES). In some cases imports are recorded on TRACES as ‘Canis familiaris / Felis catus’, so APHA is unable to distinguish between cat or dog imports. These are included in the table in the column ‘Mixed’.

Leaving the European Union provides an opportunity to improve and modernise the legislation in this area and consider how APHA can collect more detail in the future.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
5th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answers of 30 November to Questions 114885 and 114886, how many of the reindeer imported into the UK in 2016 were (a) females, (b) intact males and (c) castrated males; and if he will make a statement.

119 reindeer were imported into the UK in 2016; 51 were female and 68 were male.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency is unable to break down imported males into castrated and intact, because this information is not recorded on TRACES.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
28th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to consult Battersea Dogs and Cats Home and other animal welfare charities on draft legislative proposals to increase the maximum animal cruelty sentence to five years imprisonment.

As announced on 30 September, draft legislation to increase the maximum penalty for animal cruelty to five years will be published for consultation around the turn of the year. We will welcome comments from animal welfare charities who have campaigned for this change.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
21st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when animal welfare charities will be able to comment on draft legislation to increase the maximum sentence for animal cruelty to five years' imprisonment.

As announced on 30 September, draft legislation to increase the maximum penalty for animal cruelty to five years’ imprisonment will be published for consultation around the turn of the year. We will welcome comments from animal welfare charities who have campaigned for this change.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
21st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many reindeer in how many consignments from which countries were imported into the UK in 2016; and if he will make a statement.

The number of reindeer and the number of consignments imported into the UK in 2016 is as follows:

Country from

Consignments

Animals

Finland

3

81

Netherlands

1

17

Sweden*

1

17

Switzerland

1

4

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) is not able to provide any data regarding the number of imports from countries outside the EEA, as data is not available.

* Exports of deer species, including reindeer and moose were banned from Norway and Sweden in October 2016 by the EU Commission as a special measure to protect deer species elsewhere in the EU. The consignment of reindeer from Sweden in the table above were imported into the UK in February 2016.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
21st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the welfare of reindeer imported into the UK for use in Christmas displays and events; and if he will make a statement.

Reindeer are protected by the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and Animal Health and Welfare (Scotland) Act 2006. Under the Acts it is an offence for keepers to cause unnecessary suffering to animals including reindeer, or to fail to ensure the needs of their animals are met to the extent required by good practice. Defra has a welfare Code for farmed deer which offers guidance on their health and welfare, some of which would also be applicable to reindeer.

Certain diseases affecting reindeer are notifiable. These diseases include foot and mouth disease, bluetongue and chronic wasting disease. We are aware of suspected cases of chronic wasting disease which have been disclosed in wild reindeer in Norway. Exports of deer species, including reindeer and moose, have subsequently been banned from Norway and Sweden by the EU Commission as a special measure to protect deer species elsewhere in the EU.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number of fly-tipping incidents on private land in (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15, (c) 2015-16 and (d) 2016-17.

We do not hold information on the number of fly-tipping incidents on private land.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he will appoint a national fly-tipping tsar with responsibility for co-ordinating with national agencies on tackling serious organised criminal gangs, monitoring and reporting on the scale of the problem across public and private land and benchmarking enforcement performance across all relevant agencies.

Tackling fly-tipping is a Government priority. We recently introduced fixed penalty notices of up to £400 for small-scale fly-tipping to give local authorities an alternative to prosecutions and enable them to take a more proportionate enforcement response. We have also enhanced local authorities’ and the Environment Agency’s ability to search and seize vehicles of suspected fly-tippers and cracked down on offenders by strengthening the Sentencing Council’s Guideline for fly-tipping offences.

As part of our waste and resource strategy, we are developing further proposals to tackle fly-tipping. We will enhance partnership working and intelligence sharing between Government agencies and local landowners. Through the National Fly-Tipping Prevention Group we are also working to improve reporting of fly-tipping on private land to better target enforcement, and support local authorities and the Environment Agency to investigate fly-tipping incidents on private land.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to work with local authorities to permit private landowners to dispose of fly-tipped waste free of charge at local authority waste sites.

All private landowners are responsible for dealing with waste that is dumped on their land. We expect all local authorities to investigate fly-tipping incidents on private land and prosecute the fly-tippers when there is sufficient evidence. On conviction, a cost order can be made by the court so that a landowner’s costs can be recovered from the perpetrator. Through the National Fly-tipping Prevention Group we provide advice and guidance to landowners and businesses on measures they can take to prevent fly-tipping on their land.

I will raise charging at local authority waste sites in my next meeting with the Local Government Association.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
9th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 25 July 2017 to Question 5217, how the Government plans for bycatch fish species identified in the European Council of Ministers' General Approach to the North Sea Multi Annual Plan to be restored to and maintained above biomass levels capable of producing maximum sustainable yield in the event that fishing limits are not set in accordance with the Common Fisheries Policy objective to achieve the maximum sustainable yield exploitation rate by 2020 at the latest.

Where Maximum Sustainable Yield targets cannot be determined, due to lack of data, multiannual plans must provide for measures to be based on the precautionary approach. The Government’s view is that the precautionary approach should be strictly evidence-based, with such data-limited bycatch stocks managed on a case-by-case basis and in line with the plans’ objectives. For stocks with a presumption of stability we have supported maintaining TACs at current levels, unless scientific advice suggests otherwise. Where possible we support moving to a full analytical assessment that would enable TACs to be based on the MSY approach.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will support the policy of the European Council of Ministers on the North Sea Multiannual Plan to legally sanction overfishing of bottom dwelling fish stocks such as cod and haddock over the next five years.

The draft North Sea Multi Annual Plan includes an upper range for fishing consistent with Maximum Sustainable Yield. Exploitation rates may be set within this upper range only in certain prescribed circumstances, for example to maintain balance in a mixed fishery. The UK supports this general approach, which we consider to be consistent with the principle of sustainable fisheries.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish all the satellite tracking data of electronically tagged hen harriers collected by Natural England and its predecessor since 2002.

Natural England is currently collating the satellite tracking data on hen harriers from both before and since 2002. Natural England plans to publish the information shortly. There is also an independent analysis of all the satellite tracking data being undertaken, which is due for publication in spring 2018.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
18th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether any of the fishing limits set within the North Sea Annual Plan are at a level that is not capable of producing maximum sustainable yield; and whether there are plans for those limits to be capped at the threshold advised by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.

We remain committed to fishing at MSY. In the North Sea multi-annual plan (MAP), the target fishing mortality ranges and the conservation reference points aim to ensure stocks are fished at rates consistent with maximum sustainable yield. We expect the range and reference points to be reviewed regularly to take account of the latest stock advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.

The North Sea MAP has not yet been adopted and the ranges and reference points set out in the proposal may need to be reviewed to ensure they are consistent with scientific advice for 2018.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the scientific advice used to inform the development of the North Sea Multi Annual Plan.

Advice used to inform the development of the proposed North Sea multi-annual plan has been published by the European Commission. This can be viewed at:

https://ec.europa.eu/info/consultations/multi-annual-plan-north-sea-demersal-fisheries_en

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which stocks will be considered as managed bycatch under the North Sea Multi Annual Plan.

The EU’s North Sea multi-annual plan is still under negotiation. However, the Council of Ministers is seeking to include the following as target species: cod, haddock, plaice, saithe, sole, whiting, anglerfish, northern prawn and nephrops stocks in the North Sea. All other demersal species would be considered as bycatch stocks under the plan. Typical bycatch stocks for example include pollack, ling and turbot.

As a general rule the target species are those species for which there is a full scientific assessment. For bycatch species, a precautionary approach is applied given limited data.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
21st Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to encourage voluntary take-up of CCTV in equine slaughterhouses.

In February 2015, the Farm Animal Welfare Committee (FAWC) published an independent assessment of the use of CCTV in slaughterhouses which concluded that CCTV can offer real benefits, particularly to slaughterhouse operators, but that it cannot replace the need for businesses to have proper monitoring procedures in place.

The vast majority of horses are slaughtered in slaughterhouses in England which have CCTV installed for welfare purposes, although cameras may not be present in all areas. Official Veterinarians also have the power to seize CCTV footage if they suspect that welfare standards are not being met.

Defra continues to encourage slaughterhouses to install CCTV in all areas on a voluntary basis in order to realise the benefits to animal welfare set out in the FAWC report.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
1st Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2017 to Question 60340, whether the Government plans to provide existing levels of CAP Pillar 1 funding for applications that are scheduled to begin to be paid on 1 December 2020.

The Government has guaranteed that the agricultural sector will receive the same level of funding that it would have received under Pillar I of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) until the end of the Multi-Annual Financial Framework in 2020. The last payment window in this Multi-Annual Financial Framework will be that which opens on 1 December 2019 and runs until 30 June 2020.

We will be announcing details of future domestic agricultural policy as soon as possible in order to provide certainty for farmers

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
1st Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2017 to Question 60340, whether the last payment window for the equivalent CAP Pillar 1 funding to which the Government has committed will open in 2019 or in 2020.

The Government has guaranteed that the agricultural sector will receive the same level of funding that it would have received under Pillar I of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) until the end of the Multi-Annual Financial Framework in 2020. The last payment window in this Multi-Annual Financial Framework will be that which opens on 1 December 2019 and runs until 30 June 2020.

We will be announcing details of future domestic agricultural policy as soon as possible in order to provide certainty for farmers

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
25th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether it is her policy that the EU Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive will be incorporated in full into UK law when the UK leaves the EU.

The Prime Minister announced last year our plans for a Repeal Bill that will convert current EU law into domestic British law. Our intention is to ensure a smooth and orderly transition via the Repeal Bill. Without pre-judging what our future relationship with the EU will be or future decisions Parliament may make, this will provide as much certainty as possible by maintaining the existing laws; and this will include laws transposing the EU Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
24th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the contents of the EU Water Framework Directive will be transposed in full into UK law as part of the Great Repeal Bill.

The Prime Minister announced last year our plans for a Repeal Bill that will convert current EU law into domestic British law. Our intention is to ensure a smooth and orderly transition via the Repeal Bill. Without pre-judging what our future relationship with the EU will be or future decisions Parliament may make, this will provide as much certainty as possible by maintaining the existing laws; and this will include the laws that transpose the EU Water Framework Directive.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
7th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to her Department's consultation on the review of animal establishments licensing in England, which closed on 12 March 2016, when she plans to publish draft regulations on the licensing of animal establishments, and if she will make a statement.

The Government proposes to publish a next steps document shortly which will set out our proposals for the animal establishments licensing review, following analysis of the 1,700 responses to the consultation.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many reindeer in how many consignments and from which countries have been imported into the UK in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) are not able to provide any data regarding the number of imports from non-EU countries, as these are covered by a commodity code in TRACES which will not allow us to break the species down as far as reindeer for third country imports.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) does not hold data on how long reindeer survive after they are imported into the UK. Reindeer are protected by the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and Animal Health and Welfare (Scotland) Act 2006. It is an offence to cause unnecessary suffering and for keepers to fail to ensure their needs are met to the extent required by good practice. Defra has a welfare Code for farmed deer which offers guidance on their health and welfare, some of which would also be applicable to reindeer.

See the table below:

Year

Country from

Count of Consignments

Sum of Quantities

2011

Denmark

1

2

Finland

4

125

Sweden

2

43

2011 Total

7

170

2012

Finland

3

59

2012 Total

3

59

2013

Finland

6

97

Norway

1

12

Sweden

1

86

2013 Total

8

195

2014

Finland

4

72

Sweden

7

148

2014 Total

11

220

2015

Finland

3

62

Norway

1

16

Sweden

4

96

2015 Total

8

174

Grand Total

37

818

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what legal requirements govern the importation, movement and keeping of reindeer in the UK; and if she will make a statement.

Reindeer are protected by the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and Animal Health and Welfare (Scotland) Act 2006. It is an offence to cause unnecessary suffering and for keepers to fail to ensure their needs are met to the extent required by good practice. Defra has a welfare Code for farmed deer which offers guidance on their health and welfare, some of which would also be applicable to reindeer.

Certain diseases affecting reindeer are notifiable. These diseases include foot and mouth disease, bluetongue and chronic wasting disease. We are aware of suspected cases of chronic wasting disease which have been disclosed in wild reindeer, and potentially also moose, in Norway. Exports of deer species, including reindeer and moose, have subsequently been banned from Norway and Sweden by the EU Commission as a special measure to protect deer species elsewhere in the EU.

Imports of reindeer from the rest of the EU to the UK are subject to the import controls outlined below:

  • They must be identified in accordance with the requirements of Article 6 of Council Directive 92/65/EEC and be registered by the competent authority in such a way that the holding of origin can be traced.

  • They must not be intended for slaughter under a programme for the eradication of an infectious disease.

  • They must not have been vaccinated against foot and mouth disease and must satisfy the control measures to be applied in the event of a foot and mouth outbreak.

  • They must not come into contact with ungulates other than those of a similar health status.

  • They must come from a holding that is not subject to any restrictions for animal health reasons.

  • They must have been kept on the holding of origin since birth or for at least 30 days, before despatch.

  • They must come from an officially tuberculosis-free/officially brucellosis-free herd/holding or from a holding where it/they was/were subjected with negative results to the tests laid down in Article 6(2)(b) [tuberculosis and brucellosis] of Council Directive 92/65/EEC.

  • If both the destination and origin of the animals are establishments approved in accordance with Annex C of the Balai Directive, the consignment should be accompanied by the certificate laid down in Annex E III of Council Directive 92/65/EEC. Otherwise, the consignment must be accompanied by the certificate corresponding to the specimen given in Annex E I to Council Directive 92/65/EEC, signed by an official veterinary surgeon of the country of origin.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many reindeer imported into the UK in the last five years have survived for longer than two years; and if she will make a statement.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) are not able to provide any data regarding the number of imports from non-EU countries, as these are covered by a commodity code in TRACES which will not allow us to break the species down as far as reindeer for third country imports.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) does not hold data on how long reindeer survive after they are imported into the UK. Reindeer are protected by the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and Animal Health and Welfare (Scotland) Act 2006. It is an offence to cause unnecessary suffering and for keepers to fail to ensure their needs are met to the extent required by good practice. Defra has a welfare Code for farmed deer which offers guidance on their health and welfare, some of which would also be applicable to reindeer.

See the table below:

Year

Country from

Count of Consignments

Sum of Quantities

2011

Denmark

1

2

Finland

4

125

Sweden

2

43

2011 Total

7

170

2012

Finland

3

59

2012 Total

3

59

2013

Finland

6

97

Norway

1

12

Sweden

1

86

2013 Total

8

195

2014

Finland

4

72

Sweden

7

148

2014 Total

11

220

2015

Finland

3

62

Norway

1

16

Sweden

4

96

2015 Total

8

174

Grand Total

37

818

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if her Department will support European Commission proposals on total allowable catch quotas in 2017 for data-limited stocks at the Fisheries Council meeting in December 2016.

The UK supports the management of data-limited stocks on a case-by-case basis, informed by all available evidence including directional trends in fishing mortality, stock biomass and fishing effort. It will be on this basis that Government will consider the Commission’s proposal on fishing opportunities for 2017 for data-limited stocks.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the effect of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 on the population of types of dog prohibited under section 1 of that Act; and if she will make a statement.

There are, as of 30 November 2016, 3,275 dogs on the Index of Exempted Dogs (dogs that are legally exempt from the general prohibition on certain types of dogs). If the relevant types of dogs were not prohibited the population of these dogs is likely to be higher

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in reducing the number of attacks by dogs on people.

In 2014, the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 formed part of a wider review into tackling irresponsible ownership of dogs. That review resulted in several changes to the law on dangeorus dogs such as the extension of the offence of allowing a dog to be dangerously out of control to all places and increasing the maximum penalties for such an offence. Early intervention action was also made possible through new measures contained within the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime & Policing Act 2014, which came into force in 2015. These provisions have supported the minimisation of dog attacks on people.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) fish stocks and (b) total allowable catches are fished (i) at or below and (ii) above maximum sustainable yield; and what progress her Department has made towards its strategy that all fish stocks are fished at maximum sustainable yield by 2020.

We are making good progress towards sustainable fishing with more stocks than ever now being fished at Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). 31 stocks of the 59 with full analytical assessment in the North East Atlantic (and surrounding waters) were fished in accordance with MSY in 2014, compared with just 19 in 2004[1].

Earlier this year, the UK’s provisional assessment for 2016 indicated that 24 stocks for which the UK has quota will be fished at or below maximum sustainable yield (MSY). A significant majority of these will be fished (a) at MSY rather than (b) below it; information on the specific stocks has been placed in the House Library.

We will be seeking to increase the number of stocks being fished in accordance with MSY in 2017 at the Fisheries Council in December.

[1] Reports of the Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF) – Monitoring the performance of the Common Fisheries Policy (STECF-16-05) – CORRIGENDUM to STECF-16-03. 2016. https://stecf.jrc.ec.europa.eu/documents/43805/55543/2016-03_STECF+16-05+Monitoring+performance+CFP+CORRIGENDUM_JRC100945.pdf

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department plans to follow European Commission advice on adopting maximum sustainable yield for fish stock that has improved as a result of the data-limited precautionary approach.

The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) have made significant efforts in recent years to assess stocks where analytical maximum sustainable yield (MSY) assessments and estimates are not available and we support both developing MSY proxies in such cases, as well as moving towards full analytical MSY assessments for any stocks whenever supported by available science and evidence.

When a stock first moves from a data-limited assessment to an analytical MSY assessment, it can result in a large change in the advised Total Allowable Catch (TAC) due to the incorporation of additional evidence such as recruitment, both actual and predicted, rather than reflecting a real change in a stock’s dynamics. Therefore, in some cases it may be appropriate to have a short-term staged transition towards MSY.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to her Department's consultation on the review of animal establishments licensing in England, which closed on 12 March 2016, when she plans to publish draft regulations on the licensing of animal establishments; and if she will make a statement.

The Government proposes to publish a next steps document shortly which will set out our proposals for the animal establishments licensing review, following analysis of the 1,700 responses to the consultation.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she plans to review the sentencing available for offences committed under the Animal Welfare Act 2006.

Sentencing of those found guilty of a criminal offence is a matter for the courts. Magistrates’ courts use sentencing guidelines published by the Sentencing Council to assist them when deciding the appropriate penalty for a particular offence. The Sentencing Council is currently undertaking a review of the guidelines.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the maximum permitted penalty is for an attack by a person on an assistance dog in England and Wales.

The maximum penalty for an attack by a person on an assistance dog is 6 months’ imprisonment or an unlimited fine or both.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the sentencing available for offences committed under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 was last reviewed.

Sentencing of those found guilty of a criminal offence is a matter for the courts. Magistrates’ courts use sentencing guidelines published by the Sentencing Council to assist them when deciding the appropriate penalty for a particular offence. The Sentencing Council is currently undertaking a review of the guidelines.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department has made an assessment of whether there is a link between trends in the level of offences committed under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and trends in the level of offences of domestic violence in the last 10 years.

The Government is aware of research that suggests there may be links between trends in different criminal offences such as offences against animals and offences against people, such as the recent research by Malcolm Plant, et al at Teeside University.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department has made an assessment of whether there is a link between trends in the level of offences committed under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and trends in the level of aggravated offences against the person in the last 10 years.

The Government is aware of research that suggests there may be links between trends in different criminal offences such as offences against animals and offences against people, such as the recent research by Malcolm Plant, et al at Teeside University.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many of the dogs listed on the index of exempted dogs have subsequently been deemed dangerously out of control for the purposes of Section 3 of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991.

The Government does not keep records of dogs that have been found to be dangerously out of control.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what advice or guidance her Department has issued to (a) the Police, (b) local authorities and (c) rescue centres on implementation of section 1 of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991.

Since taking over responsibility for the policy on dangerous dogs Defra has published two guidance documents about the Dangerous Dogs Act. Although this guidance was mainly aimed at the police and local authorities it was available to everyone.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of dog attacks on people were committed by (a) dogs prohibited under section 1 of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and (b) dogs which are not prohibited under section 1 of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in each of the last three years.

Specific details of the type or breed of dog involved in attacks are not held centrally. However, information held by Defra on reported dog attacks show that nine pit bull terriers were involved in eight of the 30 total fatal dog attacks since 2005.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs are listed on the index of exempted dogs in (a) England, (b) Wales and (c) Scotland.

The total number of live dogs on the Index of Exempted Dogs as of 30 November 2016 was 3,275. This number constituted of: (a) 3,149 dogs in England; (b) 118 dogs in Wales; and (c) 8 dogs in Scotland.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the population is of pit bull terriers in the UK.

The total number of live dogs on the Index of Exempted Dogs as of 30 November 2016 was 3,275. This number consisted of: (1) 3.149 dogs in England; (b) 118 dogs in Wales; and (c) 8 dogs in Scotland. the overwhelming number of these dogs are pitbull terriers.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she plans to review the maximum prison sentence available for offences under the Animal Welfare Act 2006.

The Sentencing Council provide courts with guidelines for imposing appropriate sentences on offenders. It is currently reviewing the existing guidelines, including in relation to animal cruelty cases. The Sentencing Council is working on new guidelines which will be implemented in May 2017.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs have been returned to their owners under the Interim Exemption Scheme through the Dangerous Dogs Exemption Schemes (England and Wales) Order 2015 since that Scheme was introduced.

The Government does not keep a record of those instances wherein police allow dogs to be retained by their owners pending the outcome of the court’s decision. Individual police forces may hold their own records of this information.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 16 September 2016 to Question 45492, on Fisheries, if her Department will publish, for each instance in which an exception to reaching targets is granted, what the reasons for that exemption are.

The Government supports setting EU Total Allowable Catches (TACs) at Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) in 2017 wherever possible. In accordance with the provisions of Council Regulation 1380 / 2013 a delay in reaching MSY beyond 2017 would be allowed if a proposed TAC reduction would seriously jeopardise the social and economic sustainability of the fishing fleets involved. A decision may also be taken by the Council not to do so if it would merely increase the discarding of fish especially in a mixed fishery.

It would not be feasible to account fully for all the cases where the final outcome differs from the range of options recommended by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, including advice on fishing at MSY and this information is not published by the EU.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will take steps to (a) ensure that Total Allowable Catch (TAC) quotas are set in line with scientific advice and (b) where necessary remove such TACs from the list fixing TACs at the same level for the next two years under the Joint Statement by the Council and Commission, Council document PECHE 491 15502/15 REV1, where there are negative trends in stock biomass for data-limited stocks.

The Government supports setting Total Allowable Catches (TACs) in line with the available scientific advice. The Government agrees with the joint statement made by Council and the European Commission at last year’s December Council that it is desirable to maintain the 2015 TAC level for certain specified data limited stocks, where the perception of the state of those stocks does not change significantly.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make it her policy to ensure that total allowable catch quota top-ups for stocks subject to the landing obligation in 2017 will not increase the total catch and associated fishing mortality above scientifically advised levels.

The total allowable catch (TAC) figures proposed by the European Commission for quota stocks for 2017 are based on scientific advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. The forthcoming negotiations at December Council where the TAC figures for 2017 will be finalised will take into account the scientific advice provided.

Before the introduction of the landing obligation, TACs were set at a lower level to account for the mortality caused by discarding. Once stocks come under the landing obligation, TAC top-ups are allocated by the European Commission to account for discarding no longer taking place. The rationale for top-ups is that although top-ups result in extra quota being directed to fishermen, the total catch mortality will not increase, as fishermen will be landing what they catch.

TAC uplift provides practical flexibility to the fishing industry and helps them to adapt to the landing obligation during its phased introduction from 2015 to 2019. The UK Government supports this approach.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how she plans to consult the public on her Department's 25 year environment plan after it has been published.

The first step towards developing the plan will be to publish soon the framework which will be open to all to contribute. We will use the feedback from this to help develop the full plan itself next year.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when her Department plans to publish its 25 year environment plan.

The first step towards developing the plan will be to publish soon the framework which will be open to all to contribute. We will use the feedback from this to help develop the full plan itself next year.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
5th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs have been processed under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in each year since 1992; and if she will make a statement.

Section 1 of the 1991 Act prohibits certain types of dog, but the courts may permit some dogs to be retained by their keeper under strict conditions and registered with the Index of Exempted Dogs pursuant to a statutory exemption scheme. The number of new dogs registered with the Index per year is in the table below. The sum of these figures does not equate to the total number of dogs registered on the Index.

Data on the number of dogs destroyed under section 1 or the subject of proceedings under section 3 (dog being dangerously out of control) are not collected centrally.

Year

Number of Dogs

1992

545

1993

9

1997

11

1998

35

1999

25

2000

15

2001

4

2002

7

2003

0

2004

6

2005

1

2006

6

2007

185

2008

330

2009

394

2010

730

2011

683

2012

678

2013

722

2014

676

2015

550

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many areas will be involved in the badger cull in 2016; and what estimate she has made of the cost to the public purse of that cull.

Decisions on licence applications will be announced before the start of badger control operations. The cost will depend on the number of applicants authorised to proceed.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the average cost is of (a) the current bovine TB skin test and (b) the gamma interferon test; and what assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of each of those tests.

  1. The average cost per bTB skin test.

    Costs will vary between regions but as an example; for 105 animals per test instruction, the average cost is £288.88 which equates to £2.75 per animal tested

    (This is the based on invoice costs as paid to Veterinary Delivery Partners divided by the number of test instructions and animals tested respectively.)

  2. The gamma test cost IFNG Test Cost:

Cost per test for:

Single test

5+ tests

10+ tests

High Specificity Test

£30.00

£24.70

£22.30

High Sensitivity Test

£22.00

£18.00

£16.25

The standard IFNG blood test is a comparative test, like the tuberculin skin test.

High Specificity Test for Officially TB Free herd cattle only.

This reduces the likelihood of false-positive results, but at the expense of a lower Sensitivity (i.e. the probability of detecting infected animals) compared to the basic IFNG test, as follows:

- Sensitivity: 74.0% [95% CI: 70.4 – 83.0]

- Specificity: 99.2% [95% CI: 98.6 – 99.8]

High Sensitivity Test for cattle in TB-restricted herds

This test is the standard IFNG test format and carries the highest Sensitivity (probability of infection detection), but at the expense of a lower Specificity (higher probability of false-positives) as follows:

- Sensitivity 90.0% [95% CI: 87.2 – 92.8]

- Specificity 96.5% [95% CI: 95.3 – 97.7]

The comparative tuberculin skin test has, on average, a Sensitivity of 81.0% [95%CI: 77.3 – 84.7] and Specificity of 99.98% [95%CI: 99.9 - 100].

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) tuberculin skin tests and (b) gamma interferon tests have been conducted in each year since 2010; and how many cases of bovine TB have been detected by each method.

a). Tuberculin skin tests carried out each year between 2010 and 2015 in England:-

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

5,367,553

5,496,051

5,857,660

6,283,185

6,927,096

7,300,970

b). Number of gamma interferon tests carried out each year between 2010 and 2015 in England:-

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

16,274

16,131

26,117

34,096

65,536

74,509

Gamma interferon tests are supplementary blood tests, which are performed in herds already under TB restrictions to supplement the skin test and speed up the detection of infected animals. Therefore, such tests could not generate any new herd breakdowns (‘cases’) in 2010-2015. i.e. the number of new cases of bTB detected by gamma interferon tests in England in all those years was nil.

All the new cases of bTB were detected by skin testing of cattle herds or individual animals, with the exception of a small proportion that were first identified through routine post-mortem meat inspection of cattle. Slaughterhouse cases trigger approximately 15% of the total number of new bTB breakdowns detected each year in England.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make it her policy to adopt the gamma interferon test as the primary standardised test to detect TB in cattle.

The tuberculin skin test is the internationally accepted standard for detection of infection with M. bovis for the purposes of trade. The tuberculin skin test is more specific than the interferon gamma test but less sensitive (see PQ 41639). Thus the interferon gamma test is only used in specific circumstances in TB-affected herds in combination with the skin test to help with early identification and removal of TB infected animals and reduce the risk of spread of disease.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many consignments of dogs were exported from the UK to Hong Kong in 2015; and how many dogs were in each such consignment.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency issued export health certificates for 235 consignments of dogs to be exported to Hong Kong during 2015, relating to 267 dogs in total.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many consignments of dogs were exported from the UK to Hong Kong in the last 12 months; and how many dogs were exported within those consignments.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency have issued export health certificates for 281 consignments of dogs to be exported to Hong Kong within the last 12 months, relating to 309 dogs in total. To date 266 of these consignments have been confirmed, relating to 293 dogs in total.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of an offence under the Deer Act 1991 in 2015.

The Government is committed to tackling wildlife crime. The UK National Wildlife Crime Unit, which is part-funded by Defra, monitors and gathers intelligence on illegal activities, including those relating to badger persecution and poaching, which are UK wildlife crime priorities. The Unit also provides assistance to police forces when required.

Court proceedings data for 2015, including those for the offences listed above, are planned for publication by the Ministry of Justice in due course.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of an offence under the Wild Animals (Protection) Act 1996 in each police force area in 2015.

The Government is committed to tackling wildlife crime. The UK National Wildlife Crime Unit, which is part-funded by Defra, monitors and gathers intelligence on illegal activities, including those relating to badger persecution and poaching, which are UK wildlife crime priorities. The Unit also provides assistance to police forces when required.

Court proceedings data for 2015, including those for the offences listed above, are planned for publication by the Ministry of Justice in due course.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of an offence under the Hunting Act 2004 in each police force area in 2014.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Foyle, Mark Durkan, on 23 June 2015, PQ3270.

2014 figures for the number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty at all courts for offences under the Hunting Act 2004 are set out, by police force area in England and Wales, in table 1.

Table 1: Number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty at all courts for offences under the Hunting Act 2004 (1), by police force area, England and Wales, 2014(2)(3)

Police force area

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Avon and Somerset

5

-

Bedfordshire

-

-

Cambridgeshire

3

-

Cheshire

-

-

Cleveland

2

-

Cumbria

2

-

Derbyshire

-

-

Durham

3

3

Essex

-

-

Gloucestershire

-

-

Hampshire

-

-

Hertfordshire

-

-

Humberside

17

13

Kent

3

3

Lancashire

5

5

Leicestershire

1

-

Lincolnshire

4

2

Merseyside

-

-

Metropolitan Police

-

-

Norfolk

4

-

Northumbria

3

3

North Yorkshire

-

-

Nottinghamshire

-

-

South Yorkshire

-

-

Staffordshire

-

-

Suffolk

7

4

Surrey

-

-

Sussex

-

-

Thames Valley

2

2

West Mercia

3

-

West Yorkshire

-

-

Wiltshire

-

-

England and Wales

64

35

(1) Includes Section 1,3(1)(2), 5(1)(a)(b)(c)(d), 5 (2)(a)(b)(c) and 6 of Hunting Act 2004.

(2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.

There are no figures available for 2015.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of an offence under the Hunting Act 2004 in each police force area in 2015.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Foyle, Mark Durkan, on 23 June 2015, PQ3270.

2014 figures for the number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty at all courts for offences under the Hunting Act 2004 are set out, by police force area in England and Wales, in table 1.

Table 1: Number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty at all courts for offences under the Hunting Act 2004 (1), by police force area, England and Wales, 2014(2)(3)

Police force area

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Avon and Somerset

5

-

Bedfordshire

-

-

Cambridgeshire

3

-

Cheshire

-

-

Cleveland

2

-

Cumbria

2

-

Derbyshire

-

-

Durham

3

3

Essex

-

-

Gloucestershire

-

-

Hampshire

-

-

Hertfordshire

-

-

Humberside

17

13

Kent

3

3

Lancashire

5

5

Leicestershire

1

-

Lincolnshire

4

2

Merseyside

-

-

Metropolitan Police

-

-

Norfolk

4

-

Northumbria

3

3

North Yorkshire

-

-

Nottinghamshire

-

-

South Yorkshire

-

-

Staffordshire

-

-

Suffolk

7

4

Surrey

-

-

Sussex

-

-

Thames Valley

2

2

West Mercia

3

-

West Yorkshire

-

-

Wiltshire

-

-

England and Wales

64

35

(1) Includes Section 1,3(1)(2), 5(1)(a)(b)(c)(d), 5 (2)(a)(b)(c) and 6 of Hunting Act 2004.

(2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.

There are no figures available for 2015.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of an offence under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 in 2015.

The Government is committed to tackling wildlife crime. The UK National Wildlife Crime Unit, which is part-funded by Defra, monitors and gathers intelligence on illegal activities, including those relating to badger persecution and poaching, which are UK wildlife crime priorities. The Unit also provides assistance to police forces when required.

Court proceedings data for 2015, including those for the offences listed above, are planned for publication by the Ministry of Justice in due course.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department plans to make an assessment of the environmental effects of the disposal of imported (a) animal blood, faeces and urine and (b) other biological by-products in rural areas of the UK.

We have no plans to make such an assessment.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the rural productivity plan published by her Department in August 2015, when she will publish the calls for evidence on reviewing the planning and regulatory constraints facing rural businesses and the measures that can be taken to address them.

The Rural Planning Review Call for Evidence will be published jointly by Defra and the Department for Communities and Local Government shortly.

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 13 January 2016 to Question 21517, whether funding for the Farming Recovery Fund has been increased since its extension to farmers affected by recent flooding in Yorkshire and Lancashire.

We will pay out on all eligible claims from farmers. Extending the Farming Recovery Fund to eligible farmers in Lancashire and Yorkshire impacted by Storm Eva will therefore increase the total amount that will be paid out from the fund.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
20th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many partridge (a) eggs for hatching, (b) chicks and (c) poults were imported into England from each EU country in the last year for which figures are available.

Information is available for live birds and hatching eggs. The number imported from each EU Member State in 2015 was as follows:



Partridge (Perdix\Alectoris)

Pheasant (Phasianus)

Mixed

EU Country

Number

EU Country

Number

EU Country

Number

Live Birds

France

278,638

France

5,811,323

France

70,253



Belgium

50,500










Hatching Eggs



Germany

320






France

9,423486






Portugal

24,120






Denmark

2,000






Spain

93,600






Poland

48,170



George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
20th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many pheasant (a) eggs for hatching, (b) chicks and (c) poults were imported into England from each EU country in the last year for which figures are available.

Information is available for live birds and hatching eggs. The number imported from each EU Member State in 2015 was as follows:



Partridge (Perdix\Alectoris)

Pheasant (Phasianus)

Mixed

EU Country

Number

EU Country

Number

EU Country

Number

Live Birds

France

278,638

France

5,811,323

France

70,253



Belgium

50,500










Hatching Eggs



Germany

320






France

9,423486






Portugal

24,120






Denmark

2,000






Spain

93,600






Poland

48,170



George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
19th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the environmental effects of the use of imported fox urine for the purposes of trail hunting.

The Government has no plans to make an assessment or issue guidance on the import and use of fox urine for the purpose of trail hunting.

19th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what guidance her Department issues on the import and use of fox urine for the purpose of trail hunting.

The Government has no plans to make an assessment or issue guidance on the import and use of fox urine for the purpose of trail hunting.

14th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of (a) the potential economic merits of water attenuation and retention by sustainable drainage systems and (b) the capital and maintenance costs of sustainable drainage systems.

The previous coalition Government prepared an impact assessment for sustainable drainage policy, evaluated as fit for purpose by the Regulatory Policy Committee in February 2014. The impact assessment was informed by research available on Defra’s Science and Research Projects website.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she plans to extend the Farming Recovery Fund to provide support for farmers in all areas affected by the recent flooding.

We have extended the Farming Recovery Fund to allow eligible farmers in Lancashire and Yorkshire impacted by storm Eva, which hit over Christmas Day and Boxing Day, to be able to apply for support.


The deadline for applications has been extended from 18 March 2016 to 1 April 2016 to provide further time for affected farmers to apply.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
5th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 20 October 2015 to Question 11893, when her Department plans to publish an assessment of the effectiveness of the Soil Protection Review and cross-compliance inspection regime in reducing soil erosion; and what penalties there are for landowners who do not take steps to reduce soil erosion.

Defra published the report ‘An Assessment of the implementation of the Soil Protection Review (SPR) 2010 and soil management practices in England’ in 2012. The report considered the overall impact of the SPR on soil management practices in England including on erosion.


Defra introduced new national standards for agricultural soils under cross compliance in January 2015 which apply to recipients of Common Agricultural Policy funding. The Government is monitoring the implementation of the new rules.


The penalty regime for cross compliance is set out in the Cross Compliance Guidance 2016 at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/guide-to-cross-compliance-in-england-2016

17th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to ban the use of electric shock and prong collars for dogs before 2020.



Currently, we are looking to include strict advice on the use of these devices in a revised version of the Code of Practice for the Welfare of Dogs. If the devices were to be used in compliance with an amended Code, it would only be as a last resort and on the advice of a veterinary surgeon or a suitably qualified behaviourist or dog trainer and by a competent operator. The revised Code could be adduced as evidence in court in order to determine whether an animal welfare offence has been committed. The impact of the revised Code will be assessed before any decisions are taken on possible future legislative action.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
15th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the threat to human health and safety from poor canine welfare at breeding establishments; and if she will make a statement.

There are a number of diseases that can be passed between animals and humans (these are known as zoonotic diseases). Those affecting dogs include bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. One of the standard conditions of holding a dog breeding establishment is that all reasonable precautions must be taken to prevent and control the spread of infectious or contagious diseases.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 25 November 2015 to Question 17199, when she will publish the outcome of her Department's review of animal licensing legislation; and if she will make a statement.

The Government’s proposals on the review of the animal licensing legislation will be made available shortly.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people in Wales have been prosecuted under sections (a) 1(3), (b) 3(1) and (c) 3(3) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in each year since 1991; and if she will make a statement.


The number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' court under Section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871, within Wales police force areas, from 1997 to 2014 (the latest available), can be viewed in table 1

The number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' court for selected offences under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, within Wales police force areas, from 1991 to 2014 (the latest available), can be viewed in table 2


Dog attacks are not recorded centrally. However, the attached table provides numbers of successful prosecutions against people who have allowed a dog to be dangerously out of control for each of the last two years for which figures are available.


Table 1


Number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' court under Section 2(1) of the Dogs Act 1871, within Wales police force areas(2), 1997 to 2014 (3)(4)
Number of proceedings

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

97

116

82

64

69

57

45

29

26

17

2007

2008(5)

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014


18

15

4

8

6

4

5

7



(1) Own a dangerous dog not kept under control (2) The Police force areas within Wales are: North Wales, Gwent; South Wales, Dyfed-Powys (3) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (4) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data collection process and their inevitable limitation are taken into account when those data are used. (5) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates' court for April, July and August 2008.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice Ref: PQC16790


Table 2


Number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' court for selected offences(1) under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, within Wales police force areas, 1991 to 2014 (3)(4) Number of proceedings


1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000


0

41

54

13

28

24

27

44

66

90


2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008(5

2009

2010


79

78

76

89

73

66

77

72

78

96


2011

2012

2013

2014



104

143

100

98


(1) Includes offences under section 1(3), 3 (1) and 3(3) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 which came into effect on 12 August 1991 (2) the Police force areas within Wales are: North Wales, Gwent; South Wales; Dyfed-Powys (3) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (4) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (5) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates' court for April, July and August 2008.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice Ref: PQC16879

.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people in Wales have been subject to proceedings in a magistrates' court for offences under the Dogs Act 1871 in each year since 1997; and if she will make a statement.


The number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' court under Section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871, within Wales police force areas, from 1997 to 2014 (the latest available), can be viewed in table 1

The number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' court for selected offences under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, within Wales police force areas, from 1991 to 2014 (the latest available), can be viewed in table 2


Dog attacks are not recorded centrally. However, the attached table provides numbers of successful prosecutions against people who have allowed a dog to be dangerously out of control for each of the last two years for which figures are available.


Table 1


Number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' court under Section 2(1) of the Dogs Act 1871, within Wales police force areas(2), 1997 to 2014 (3)(4)
Number of proceedings

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

97

116

82

64

69

57

45

29

26

17

2007

2008(5)

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014


18

15

4

8

6

4

5

7



(1) Own a dangerous dog not kept under control (2) The Police force areas within Wales are: North Wales, Gwent; South Wales, Dyfed-Powys (3) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (4) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data collection process and their inevitable limitation are taken into account when those data are used. (5) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates' court for April, July and August 2008.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice Ref: PQC16790


Table 2


Number of persons proceeded against at magistrates' court for selected offences(1) under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, within Wales police force areas, 1991 to 2014 (3)(4) Number of proceedings


1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000


0

41

54

13

28

24

27

44

66

90


2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008(5

2009

2010


79

78

76

89

73

66

77

72

78

96


2011

2012

2013

2014



104

143

100

98


(1) Includes offences under section 1(3), 3 (1) and 3(3) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 which came into effect on 12 August 1991 (2) the Police force areas within Wales are: North Wales, Gwent; South Wales; Dyfed-Powys (3) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (4) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (5) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates' court for April, July and August 2008.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice Ref: PQC16879

.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs in Wales have been placed on the register of exempt dogs under section 4A and section 4B procedures under the Dangerous Dogs (Amendment) Act 1997 in each year since 1997; and if she will make a statement.

The number of dogs in Wales that have been placed on the Index of Exempted Dogs under Section 4A and Section 4b of the Dangerous Dogs (Amendment) Act 1997 in each complete year since 1997 is in the table below. There were no recorded entries in Wales for the period 1997 – 2003.

Year

Number of Dogs

2004

1

2005

1

2006

0

2007

2

2008

7

2009

7

2010

9

2011

17

2012

33

2013

41

2014

35

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the prevalence of bovine TB was in each (a) month and (b) county from 1996 to 2008.

The Department publishes data back to 1996 for England, Wales and Scotland and at a GB level.


Monthly statistics at a county level on bovine TB since 1996 will be published in December.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
27th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will publish regional data on the prevalence of bovine TB between 1996 and 2008.

Detailed statistics on bovine TB from 1998 to 2010, including at county levels, can be found on the archived Defra website at:


http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130402151656/http://archive.defra.gov.uk/foodfarm/farmanimal/diseases/atoz/tb/stats/index.htm.


In addition, the annual surveillance report Bovine tuberculosis: Infection status in cattle in England includes the monthly proportion (and 12-month moving average) of cattle herds under TB movement restrictions as a result of TB breakdown in each TB risk region of England, in the period January 1986 to December 2014 (see Figures 3.2(a) and 3.2(b)). County prevalence values for 2014 are presented in Figure 3.4. The report is available online at:


https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/467803/england-surveillance-report14.pdf

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the cross-compliance inspection regime in reducing soil erosion.

Defra commissioned research, published in 2012, to evaluate the implementation of the Soil Protection Review (SPR). The research took the form of a telephone survey of 800 claimants, with 30 in-depth interviews across a sample of farms by region, farm type and size.


Following recommendations by the Farming Regulation Task force, a review of the SPR was conducted. In January 2015, new national standards for agricultural soils under cross compliance were introduced. These rules require farmers in receipt of payments under CAP to prevent soil erosion, to maintain soil cover and to protect the level of organic matter in their soils.

The Government will continue to monitor the implementation of the new rules.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 12 October 2015 to Question 10625, which organisations the Government has met to discuss amendments to the Hunting Act 2004.

Details of Ministers' meetings with external organisations are published up to 31 March 2015 and can be accessed on GOV.UK at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ministerial-quarterly-transparency-information-january-to-march-2015


Further publications of Ministerial meetings will be published in due course.

14th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans her Department has to evaluate the effectiveness of the Soil Protection Review form in reducing soil erosion.

Defra commissioned research, published in 2012, to evaluate the implementation of the Soil Protection Review (SPR). The research took the form of a telephone survey of 800 claimants, with 30 in-depth interviews across a sample of farms by region, farm type and size.


Following recommendations by the Farming Regulation Task force, a review of the SPR was conducted. In January 2015, new national standards for agricultural soils under cross compliance were introduced. These rules require farmers in receipt of payments under CAP to prevent soil erosion, to maintain soil cover and to protect the level of organic matter in their soils.

The Government will continue to monitor the implementation of the new rules.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what guidance her Department provides for farmers on reducing soil erosion on their land.

The Government published Cross Compliance in England: soil protection standards 2015 in January 2015. The guidance provides advice on how to identify soil erosion and on how to minimise erosion from cropping practices, livestock and vehicles.

Farmers can access advice from the Farming Advice Service (FAS). The FAS is a service funded by Defra to help farmers understand and meet the requirements of Cross Compliance and other regimes, including the European Directives on water protection.

Farmers can also seek advice under the Catchment Sensitive Farming (CSF) project, which is run by Natural England in partnership with the Environment Agency and Defra. CSF raises awareness of diffuse water pollution from agriculture by giving free training and advice to farmers in priority catchments.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what consultations her Department held with animal welfare organisations before laying the draft Hunting Act 2004 (Exempt Hunting) (Amendment) Order 2015.

The Government has received representations from a wide range of interested parties both for and against any repeal or amendment to the Hunting Act 2004.

The measures proposed in the draft Hunting Act 2004 (Amendment) Order 2015 would not remove the ban on hunting. Given this we judged that more consultation would not have been likely to add to the information available to us.

17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what representations her Department has received on amendments to the Hunting Act 2004.

The Government has received representations from a wide range of interested parties both for and against any repeal or amendment to the Hunting Act 2004.

The measures proposed in the draft Hunting Act 2004 (Amendment) Order 2015 would not remove the ban on hunting. Given this we judged that more consultation would not have been likely to add to the information available to us.

17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions her Department has had with the (a) police, (b) Crown Prosecution Service and (c) Law Commission on the draft Hunting Act 2004 (Exempt Hunting) (Amendment) Order 2015.

The Government has received representations from a wide range of interested parties both for and against any repeal or amendment to the Hunting Act 2004.

The measures proposed in the draft Hunting Act 2004 (Amendment) Order 2015 would not remove the ban on hunting. Given this we judged that more consultation would not have been likely to add to the information available to us.

17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans her Department has to bring forward further amendments to the Hunting Act 2004.

The Government stands by its manifesto commitment to give Parliament the opportunity to repeal the Hunting Act on a free vote, with a Government Bill in Government time.

17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reason the Government withdrew the draft Hunting Act 2004 (Exempt Hunting) (Amendment) Order 2015.

While the debate on the Statutory Instrument did not take place, the Government has not withdrawn the Draft Hunting Act 2004 (Amendment) Order 2015.

17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions her Department had with the Scottish Government on the Protection of Wild Mammals Act (Scotland) 2002 prior to tabling the draft Hunting Act 2004 (Exempt Hunting) (Amendment) Order 2015.

The Government has received representations from a wide range of interested parties both for and against any repeal or amendment to the Hunting Act 2004.

The measures proposed in the draft Hunting Act 2004 (Amendment) Order 2015 would not remove the ban on hunting. Given this we judged that more consultation would not have been likely to add to the information available to us.

9th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department showed the Countryside Alliance the Hunting Act 2004 (Exempt Hunting) (Amendment) Order 2015 in draft prior to publication; and what representations she received from that organisation on the matters covered by that Order prior to its publication.

Defra followed normal practice for developing the Hunting Act 2004 (Exempt Hunting) (Amendment) Order 2015. Defra has received representations from a number of organisations about the repeal of the Hunting Act 2004. It received no representations from the Countryside Alliance on the Hunting Act 2004 (Exempt Hunting) (Amendment) Order 2015 prior to its publication.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many meetings (a) she and (b) ministers in her Department have had with Bright Crop to discuss apprenticeships in the agricultural sector in the last six months.

Neither the Secretary of State nor I have met Bright Crop to discuss apprenticeships in the last six months. However, I have met them previously and we are involving them in developing the skills and careers elements of our long-term Food and Farming Plan and have invited them to one of the regional events we are holding to gather views and evidence on the future of the sector.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
21st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when her Department plans to roll out the badger cull policy to other regions beyond the trial culls in Somerset and Gloucestershire.

As part of our measured approach to tackling bovine TB and achieving disease control benefits, Natural England has authorised badger culling in Dorset this year in addition to Somerset and Gloucestershire.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
21st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when her Department plans to start the next round of trial badger culls in (a) Somerset and (b) Gloucestershire.

Start dates are for cull companies to decide, not my Department. I can confirm that I have been notified that culling operations have started in both Gloucestershire and Somerset.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
16th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when she intends to bring forward legislative proposals to prohibit the use of wild animals in circuses.

A ban on the use of wild animals in travelling circuses is a manifesto commitment and will be introduced as soon as parliamentary time allows. In the interim, the welfare of the 18 wild animals still being used by travelling circuses in England is protected by the Welfare of Wild Animals in Travelling Circuses (England) Regulations 2012

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many meetings her Department has had with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills on trebling the the number of apprenticeships in the food, farming and agri-tech sector.

Officials in Defra and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills meet regularly to discuss how to treble the number of apprenticeships in food, farming and agri-tech. We will continue to work closely with other government departments and the food and farming sector to achieve the Government’s commitment on apprenticeships.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to achieve the commitment to treble the number of apprenticeships in the food, farming and agri-tech sector.

Defra is working with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to achieve the Government’s commitment to treble the number of apprenticeships in food, farming and agri-tech. This will be an important part of the Government’s overall programme to increase apprenticeships during this Parliament.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department has taken to tackle abuse of the Pet Travel scheme.

We take evidence of the illegal importation of pets very seriously. The action we are taking to tackle this trade is focused on three areas.

Firstly, responsibility for stopping the illegal movement of puppies begins in the country where they are born, and we will continue to raise instances of abuse of the pet travel scheme with the relevant countries.

Secondly, we are maintaining effective border controls. The UK carries out more checks on pets at the border than most other EU Member States and stringent penalties are in place where people are found to be breaking the rules.

Thirdly, the illegal trade is driven by demand for cheap, pedigree puppies and we have published guidance on the steps pet owners can take to avoid buying an illegally imported pet. https://www.gov.uk/buying-a-cat-or-dog

Recent changes to the EU pet travel scheme introduced measures designed to improve the security of the regime and the traceability of the pet passport. A new minimum age of 12 weeks for rabies vaccination has also been introduced, which means that pet animals from EU countries must be at least 15 weeks old to enter the UK.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will implement the recommendations of the Dogs' Trust report, The Puppy Smuggling Scandal, published in November 2014.

The Dogs Trust’s report highlights that responsibility for stopping the illegal movement of puppies begins in the country where they are born. The UK Chief Veterinary Officer has written to the authorities in the countries highlighted in the report to remind them of their duty to ensure that the welfare of pets intended for sale is safeguarded. Investigations were launched in both countries and appropriate action was taken against vets found to be at fault, including the suspension of licences. We will continue to alert the authorities in any Member State where we become aware of issues in relation to the operation of the pet travel scheme.

The UK carries out more checks on pets at the border than most other EU member states and stringent penalties are in place where people are found to be breaking the rules.

The illegal trade is driven by demand for cheap, pedigree puppies and we have published guidance on the steps pet owners can take to avoid buying an illegally imported pet. See: https://www.gov.uk/buying-a-cat-or-dog.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress she has made on establishing the Farming Inspection Taskforce; and when she plans to make an announcement on that issue.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency and Rural Payments Agency are working closely to develop proposals. Any decisions in this area will be announced by the Secretary of State when made.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans she has to change the number of farm inspections in each year.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency and Rural Payments Agency are working closely to develop proposals. Any decisions in this area will be announced by the Secretary of State when made.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to her Department's report, Better for Business, published in April 2014, what progress she made in cutting guidance to farms by 80 per cent by March 2015; and if she will make a statement.

Following publication of the Better for Business report, the target date for achieving the reduction in guidance was set at May 2015. By that date Defra and its regulators had reduced guidance by 80%.

The project continues and we expect this figure to increase over the next few months. This reform enables businesses and the public to understand more easily what they have to do to comply with the law and to find this information more quickly, including guidance for farms.


George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Answer of 30 June 2014 to Question 201927, what progress she has made on reforming the 516 agricultural regulations as part of the Red Tape Challenge.

My written statement of 25 March provides full details of the legislative reforms delivered by Defra during the previous Parliament, about a third of which relate to agricultural regulations.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many extra staff have been (a) hired and (b) reassigned from other roles in the Rural Payments Agency to manage applications for the Basic Payment Scheme in 2014-15.

The Rural Payments Agency uses a flexible resourcing approach, moving people onto different activities according to business need:

(a) The RPA have not hired any additional people to manage Basic Payment Scheme applications so far, but are in the process of taking on 68 agency temps who will start in the next two weeks. During May and June there were approximately 150 people from across the Defra, its agencies and NDPBs who were trained to work in Drop in Centres with RPA staff to cover the extended opening times.

(b) During April and May, RPA re-deployed approximately 50 people from outside the Operations directorate onto Basic Payment Scheme activities (including the Helpline and in Drop in Centres). During June approximately 80 people from outside of Operations have been deployed onto Basic Payment Scheme activities (including carrying out basic checks). These people will shortly be moving onto the next phases of data capture.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many apprenticeships there are in the (a) agriculture, (b) horticulture, (c) animal care, (d) food and (e) agri-tech sectors.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills publish data online showing Apprenticeship Programme Starts by Sector Framework, including agriculture, horticulture, animal care and food manufacture:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/416508/apprenticeships-starts-by-sase-framework.xls

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time staff were employed at the Rural Payments Agency in each of the last five years.

The table below illustrates the split between a) full-time and b) part-time staff employed at the RPA in the period requested. Figures shown are headcount as at the end of each financial year.

End of Fin. Year

31 March 2011

31 March 2012

31 March 2013

31 March 2014

31 March 2015

Full Time

2097

1923

1720

1533

1570

Part Time

609

605

538

529

564

Total

2706

2528

2258

2062

2134

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether Government funding has been allocated to increase the number of apprenticeships in the food, farming and agri-tech sector.

The Government’s commitment to treble the number of apprenticeships in food, farming and agri-tech is a key part of the Government’s overall programme to increase apprenticeships, which is led and funded by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. The future funding of apprenticeships will, as with all Government expenditure be considered as part of the next Spending Review. Our priority is to grow the number of apprenticeships and we will fund accordingly.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many apprenticeships will be created at (a) intermediate, (b) advanced and (c) higher level in the food, farming and agri-tech sectors in 2015-16 and 2016-17.

The Government does not have targets for intermediate, advanced or higher level apprenticeships. Apprenticeships are real jobs with training. The locations and sectors where apprenticeships are available are determined by employers offering opportunities. The Food and Drink Federation recently pledged to increase the number of level 3 apprentices in food and drink manufacturing by 20% by 2017.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions she has had with representatives of the food and farming industry on apprenticeships.

The Secretary of State has discussed apprenticeships during a number of meetings with the food and farming industry. We will continue to do so as we take forward proposals for a long-term plan to promote growth in our food and farming sector.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
11th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the implications for its policies of the findings of the report, The Greyhound Industry: Don't bet on fair treatment, published by the Dogs Trust on 1 January 2015.

Defra officials attended the launch of the document on 3 June 2015. The report will be considered in the context of the ongoing 5 year review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010 on which Defra plans to consult later this year.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
5th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government will cover the costs of any bridging finance from commercial banks for farmers suffering delays in receiving support from the Basic Payments Scheme.

The RPA expects to pay the vast majority of payments early in the payment window which runs from December to June. As such we do not expect to provide cover for bridging finance from commercial banks for farmers

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
5th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Rural Payments Agency will cover the costs of any bridging finance from commercial banks for farmers suffering delays in receiving support from the Basic Payments Scheme.

The RPA expects to pay the vast majority of payments early in the payment window which runs from December to June. As such we do not expect to provide cover for bridging finance from commercial banks for farmers

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the effect of the changes to the law concerning dog control made in the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.

The early warning notices brought in by the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 came into force in October 2014 and it is too early to make an assessment of their effectiveness. However, the table attached shows the number of successful prosecutions brought under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 for allowing a dog to be dangerously out of control in 2014. The period for June to December covers the period when the amendments to the 1991 Act by the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 came into force.

Table 1

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under selected sections of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Legislation

Outcome

January

To

May

June

To

December

Total

Section 3(1) Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

444

325

718

553

1,163

878

Section 3 Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

-

-

3

2

3

2

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 1009 - 1010 & 1013

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when she plans to start the third phase of badger cull pilots in Somerset and Gloucestershire.

Start dates have yet to be decided by the two cull companies in Gloucestershire and Somerset.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans she has to extend badger culling to areas outside the pilots in Somerset and Gloucestershire in the next 12 months.

The Government is committed to our strategy to make England free of bovine TB, of which culling badgers in areas where the disease is rife is a key element. Options for how to proceed in extending the policy to other areas are still being considered.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the statement made by the Minister of State for Farming, Food and the Marine Environment to the Western Morning News on 25 May 2015, what the scientific evidential basis is for the statement that there is not a great deal of difference in practical terms between shooting badgers and shooting other wildlife.

The Chief Veterinary Officer has advised that based on the evidence of two annual culls, his view is that the likelihood of suffering in badgers culled by controlled shooting remains comparable with the range of outcomes reported when other culling activities, currently accepted by society, have been assessed, such as deer shooting.

A copy of the Chief Veterinary Officer’s advice is available at

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/bovine-tb-chief-veterinary-officers-advice-on-outcome-of-year-2-of-the-badger-culls

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of an offence under section 2 of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1871 in England in 2014.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under Section 3 and 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 can be viewed in Table 1 and Section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871, in England in 2014, can be viewed in Table 2.

Criminal justice statistics for 2015 are planned for publication in spring 2016.

Centrally held data cannot separately identify whether or not an attack took place in a public or a private place. This information may be held in individual court files, which could only be inspected at disproportionate cost.

With regard to the calendar split, no defendants were proceeded against at magistrates’ courts on the enhanced offences until June 2014; hence data for May has been retained together and a split from June to December presented.

Meanwhile, data reported to the Ministry of Justice, and held on the Court Proceedings Database, pertaining to criminal cases which were concluded at all courts in England and Wales between 20 October 2014 and 31 December 2014 (latest currently available) indicate that none of the Criminal Behaviour Orders (CBOs) issued were as a result of a conviction for a criminal offence specifically relating to dogs under the anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policy Act 2014.

The Ministry of Justice holds no information centrally on Community Protection Notices or injunctions related to powers under this Act.

Table 1

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under selected sections of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Legislation

Outcome

January

To

May

June

To

December

Total

Section 3(1) Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

444

325

718

553

1,163

878

Section 3 Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

-

-

3

2

3

2

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 1009 - 1010 & 1013

Table 2

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under the Dogs Act 1871, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Proceeded against

Found guilty

59

10

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 101

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of an offence under section 3 of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in England for allowing a dog to attack an assistance dog between 13 May 2014 and 13 May 2015.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under Section 3 and 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 can be viewed in Table 1 and Section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871, in England in 2014, can be viewed in Table 2.

Criminal justice statistics for 2015 are planned for publication in spring 2016.

Centrally held data cannot separately identify whether or not an attack took place in a public or a private place. This information may be held in individual court files, which could only be inspected at disproportionate cost.

With regard to the calendar split, no defendants were proceeded against at magistrates’ courts on the enhanced offences until June 2014; hence data for May has been retained together and a split from June to December presented.

Meanwhile, data reported to the Ministry of Justice, and held on the Court Proceedings Database, pertaining to criminal cases which were concluded at all courts in England and Wales between 20 October 2014 and 31 December 2014 (latest currently available) indicate that none of the Criminal Behaviour Orders (CBOs) issued were as a result of a conviction for a criminal offence specifically relating to dogs under the anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policy Act 2014.

The Ministry of Justice holds no information centrally on Community Protection Notices or injunctions related to powers under this Act.

Table 1

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under selected sections of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Legislation

Outcome

January

To

May

June

To

December

Total

Section 3(1) Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

444

325

718

553

1,163

878

Section 3 Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

-

-

3

2

3

2

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 1009 - 1010 & 1013

Table 2

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under the Dogs Act 1871, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Proceeded against

Found guilty

59

10

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 101

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) Community Protection Notices, (b) injunctions and (c) Criminal Behaviour Orders have been served for dog-related offences under the Anti-social Behaviour Crime and Policing Act 2014 since 20 October 2014.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under Section 3 and 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 can be viewed in Table 1 and Section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871, in England in 2014, can be viewed in Table 2.

Criminal justice statistics for 2015 are planned for publication in spring 2016.

Centrally held data cannot separately identify whether or not an attack took place in a public or a private place. This information may be held in individual court files, which could only be inspected at disproportionate cost.

With regard to the calendar split, no defendants were proceeded against at magistrates’ courts on the enhanced offences until June 2014; hence data for May has been retained together and a split from June to December presented.

Meanwhile, data reported to the Ministry of Justice, and held on the Court Proceedings Database, pertaining to criminal cases which were concluded at all courts in England and Wales between 20 October 2014 and 31 December 2014 (latest currently available) indicate that none of the Criminal Behaviour Orders (CBOs) issued were as a result of a conviction for a criminal offence specifically relating to dogs under the anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policy Act 2014.

The Ministry of Justice holds no information centrally on Community Protection Notices or injunctions related to powers under this Act.

Table 1

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under selected sections of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Legislation

Outcome

January

To

May

June

To

December

Total

Section 3(1) Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

444

325

718

553

1,163

878

Section 3 Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

-

-

3

2

3

2

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 1009 - 1010 & 1013

Table 2

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under the Dogs Act 1871, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Proceeded against

Found guilty

59

10

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 101

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of offences under section 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in England in a (i) public and (ii) private place between 13 May 2014 and 31 December 2014.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under Section 3 and 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 can be viewed in Table 1 and Section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871, in England in 2014, can be viewed in Table 2.

Criminal justice statistics for 2015 are planned for publication in spring 2016.

Centrally held data cannot separately identify whether or not an attack took place in a public or a private place. This information may be held in individual court files, which could only be inspected at disproportionate cost.

With regard to the calendar split, no defendants were proceeded against at magistrates’ courts on the enhanced offences until June 2014; hence data for May has been retained together and a split from June to December presented.

Meanwhile, data reported to the Ministry of Justice, and held on the Court Proceedings Database, pertaining to criminal cases which were concluded at all courts in England and Wales between 20 October 2014 and 31 December 2014 (latest currently available) indicate that none of the Criminal Behaviour Orders (CBOs) issued were as a result of a conviction for a criminal offence specifically relating to dogs under the anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policy Act 2014.

The Ministry of Justice holds no information centrally on Community Protection Notices or injunctions related to powers under this Act.

Table 1

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under selected sections of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Legislation

Outcome

January

To

May

June

To

December

Total

Section 3(1) Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

444

325

718

553

1,163

878

Section 3 Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

-

-

3

2

3

2

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 1009 - 1010 & 1013

Table 2

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under the Dogs Act 1871, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Proceeded against

Found guilty

59

10

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 101

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of offences under section 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in England between 1 January 2014 and 12 May 2014.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under Section 3 and 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 can be viewed in Table 1 and Section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871, in England in 2014, can be viewed in Table 2.

Criminal justice statistics for 2015 are planned for publication in spring 2016.

Centrally held data cannot separately identify whether or not an attack took place in a public or a private place. This information may be held in individual court files, which could only be inspected at disproportionate cost.

With regard to the calendar split, no defendants were proceeded against at magistrates’ courts on the enhanced offences until June 2014; hence data for May has been retained together and a split from June to December presented.

Meanwhile, data reported to the Ministry of Justice, and held on the Court Proceedings Database, pertaining to criminal cases which were concluded at all courts in England and Wales between 20 October 2014 and 31 December 2014 (latest currently available) indicate that none of the Criminal Behaviour Orders (CBOs) issued were as a result of a conviction for a criminal offence specifically relating to dogs under the anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policy Act 2014.

The Ministry of Justice holds no information centrally on Community Protection Notices or injunctions related to powers under this Act.

Table 1

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under selected sections of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Legislation

Outcome

January

To

May

June

To

December

Total

Section 3(1) Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

444

325

718

553

1,163

878

Section 3 Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Proceeded

Against

Found

Guilty

-

-

3

2

3

2

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 1009 - 1010 & 1013

Table 2

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under the Dogs Act 1871, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Proceeded against

Found guilty

59

10

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. Ref: 271-15 PQC 101

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what representations she has received supporting repeal of the Hunting Act 2004 since 7 May 2015.

Since 7 May 2015, Defra has received a variety of representations both for and against repeal of the Hunting Act 2004 from non-government organisations and the public.

3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to repeal the Hunting Act 2004 in this parliamentary Session.

The Government has said that it will give Parliament the opportunity to repeal the Hunting Act on a free vote, with a government bill in government time.

3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what representations she has received from the farming community about applications to the Basic Payment Scheme.

Our focus remains on ensuring that the Basic Payment Scheme claimants are able to submit their claims by the deadline, indeed as of 8 June 2015 the RPA have received 58,836 completed claims, which is in line with the number of claims received in previous years.

In order to help farmers to be able to submit their claims by the deadline the Rural Payments Agency has 50 drop in centres open, 10 mobile support units in operation and a dedicated helpline. The deadline for claim submission is fixed by the regulation, although in recognition of the additional complexity the EU has already extended the deadline to the 15 June. Farmers and agents have received all the information and forms they need to submit claims. Support to farmers will still be available during the late claim period which runs to 10 July where applications can still be received but will incur a penalty.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans her Department has to help farmers who do not meet the deadline for applications to the Basic Payment Scheme.

Our focus remains on ensuring that the Basic Payment Scheme claimants are able to submit their claims by the deadline, indeed as of 8 June 2015 the RPA have received 58,836 completed claims, which is in line with the number of claims received in previous years.

In order to help farmers to be able to submit their claims by the deadline the Rural Payments Agency has 50 drop in centres open, 10 mobile support units in operation and a dedicated helpline. The deadline for claim submission is fixed by the regulation, although in recognition of the additional complexity the EU has already extended the deadline to the 15 June. Farmers and agents have received all the information and forms they need to submit claims. Support to farmers will still be available during the late claim period which runs to 10 July where applications can still be received but will incur a penalty.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress has been made on the technical difficulties over online access for applications to the Basic Payment Scheme; and if she will make a statement.

Our focus remains on ensuring that the Basic Payment Scheme claimants are able to submit their claims by the deadline, indeed as of 8 June 2015 the RPA have received 58,836 completed claims, which is in line with the number of claims received in previous years.

In order to help farmers to be able to submit their claims by the deadline the Rural Payments Agency has 50 drop in centres open, 10 mobile support units in operation and a dedicated helpline. The deadline for claim submission is fixed by the regulation, although in recognition of the additional complexity the EU has already extended the deadline to the 15 June. Farmers and agents have received all the information and forms they need to submit claims. Support to farmers will still be available during the late claim period which runs to 10 July where applications can still be received but will incur a penalty.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what her policy objectives were in introducing the Dangerous Dogs Exemption Schemes (England and Wales) Order 2015 (S.I., 2015, No. 138); and if she will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for Crawley on 4 March 2015, PQ UIN 225448.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, according to TRACES, how many and what species of reptiles were imported into the UK from (a) within and (b) outside the EU in (i) 2013 and (ii) 2014; and if she will make a statement.

TRACES does not hold a complete record of reptile imports into the UK because it only records consignments of species that require a CITES certificate.

Movements of reptiles from European Union (EU) Member States to the UK which do not require a CITES certificate are accompanied by a hard copy of the health certificate. However, information about these consignments is not recorded on TRACES.

The figures below refer only to those species for which a CITES licence is required. Third Country totals are not broken down into “families” as this would require each certificate to be interrogated.

Reptiles

From EU to UK in 2013

From EU to UK in 2014

From Third Countries to UK in 2013

From Third Countries to UK in 2014

Rhynchocephalia

4

0

Sauria

2022

186

Serpentes

289

3

Testudinata

148

3035

Crocodylia

0

307

Total

2463

3531

129592

101592

The number of reptiles imported into the EU from Third Countries, taken from Eurostat is as follows:

2013- EU Member States imported 1,379,146 live reptiles from outside the EU.

2014- EU Member States imported 1,443,213 live reptiles from outside the EU.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what information her Department holds on the number of reptiles that were imported into the EU in (a) 2013 and (b) 2014; and if she will make a statement.

TRACES does not hold a complete record of reptile imports into the UK because it only records consignments of species that require a CITES certificate.

Movements of reptiles from European Union (EU) Member States to the UK which do not require a CITES certificate are accompanied by a hard copy of the health certificate. However, information about these consignments is not recorded on TRACES.

The figures below refer only to those species for which a CITES licence is required. Third Country totals are not broken down into “families” as this would require each certificate to be interrogated.

Reptiles

From EU to UK in 2013

From EU to UK in 2014

From Third Countries to UK in 2013

From Third Countries to UK in 2014

Rhynchocephalia

4

0

Sauria

2022

186

Serpentes

289

3

Testudinata

148

3035

Crocodylia

0

307

Total

2463

3531

129592

101592

The number of reptiles imported into the EU from Third Countries, taken from Eurostat is as follows:

2013- EU Member States imported 1,379,146 live reptiles from outside the EU.

2014- EU Member States imported 1,443,213 live reptiles from outside the EU.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will distribute guidance on dog waste management for both onsite and offsite disposal to ensure puppy breeders manage waste in accordance with environmental and health guidelines.

Businesses have a duty of care to make sure that waste, including dog faecal matter, is managed and disposed of in a way which does not cause harm to human health and the environment. Dog faecal matter may only be disposed of at a site in accordance with an environmental permit or registered exemption, under the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2010.

There is existing guidance on the disposal of dog faecal matter provided by the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (CIEH). The CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Dog Breeding Establishments is available at: http://www.cieh.org/WorkArea/showcontent.aspx?id=50814.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with her counterpart in Ireland on enforcement of the Balai Directive for racing greyhounds travelling to the UK; and how many racing greyhounds were declared through TRACES in the last 12 months.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply previously given on 26 January 2015, PQ UIN 221245.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when her Department plans to announce emergency conservation measures to protect sea bass stocks.

At December Fisheries Council, the UK secured a commitment to work further on emergency measures to protect bass during the 2015 spawning season. My Department wrote to the European Commission on 19 December 2014 asking it to consider emergency measures for the sea bass fishery, under Article 12 of the Common Fisheries Policy Regulation. Following further work with the UK and other interested Member States the European Commission announced proposed measures on 19 January. These will be brought in by the European Commission. Once the final form of the measures is determined and they have been adopted, my Department will confirm the details.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how long she plans that the consultation for the 2015 review of the Greyhound Regulations (England) 2010 will take.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 16 January 2015 to Parliamentary Questions 220577 and 220578.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
19th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with her counterpart in Ireland on the enforcement of the Balai Directive for racing greyhounds travelling to the UK; and how many racing greyhounds were recorded as having been moved from Ireland to the UK in each of the last three years.

The Secretary of State has not had any discussions with her counterpart in Ireland regarding enforcement of the Balai Directive for racing greyhounds travelling to the UK.


There is no information on the number of racing greyhounds moved from Ireland to the UK. The European Commission’s system for recording animal movements between EU Member States does not require information to be recorded on the breed of dog being moved.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what level of fishing mortality reduction her Department considers sufficient for the conservation and recovery of sea bass stocks.

The advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) in 2014 was that fishing mortality for sea bass should be reduced by 61%. Measures currently under discussion for introduction this year need to make substantial progress towards this objective.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recorded number of sea bass was discarded in the (a) Irish and (b) Celtic Sea by UK registered vessels in each of the last five years.

Under long standing Irish national measures to protect bass stocks their commercial fishing vessels are not permitted to land bass for sale, which means a degree of discarding of bass by-catch from mixed fishing activity will occur. We have no data available to us, however, on the level of such discards by Irish vessels.

For UK vessels we have discard estimates for the last five years combined for the Irish and Celtic Seas. These relate to otter trawlers, netters and beam trawlers, based on the numbers of sampled trips (see table (b)). We do not sample hook and line boats although these report a sizeable fraction of bass landings in these areas, as survival rates for discarded bass from commercial rod-and line or hand-line boats (under 10 metre inshore vessels) are considered potentially relatively high.

(a) Numbers (thousands) and weight (tonnes) landed and discarded for sampled fleets (otter, nets, beam) in Irish and Celtic Seas, raised to fleet landings for each gear, based on at-sea observer sampling by the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas).

Number '000s

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Mean

Landed

48

36

29

39

30

36

Discarded

8

9

10

10

4

8

% discarded

14

20

25

21

11

18

Tonnes

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Mean

Landed

107

58

71

94

80

82

Discarded

3

3

4

6

2

3

% discarded

3

5

5

6

2

4

(b) Number of trips sampled, Irish and Celtic Seas

No. trips sampled

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Total

Beam trawls

1

1

2

Netters

4

4

16

12

10

46

Otter trawls

23

20

21

21

12

97

Grand Total

28

24

38

33

22

145

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recorded number of sea bass were discarded in the (a) Irish and (b) Celtic Sea by Irish vessels in each of the last five years.

Under long standing Irish national measures to protect bass stocks their commercial fishing vessels are not permitted to land bass for sale, which means a degree of discarding of bass by-catch from mixed fishing activity will occur. We have no data available to us, however, on the level of such discards by Irish vessels.

For UK vessels we have discard estimates for the last five years combined for the Irish and Celtic Seas. These relate to otter trawlers, netters and beam trawlers, based on the numbers of sampled trips (see table (b)). We do not sample hook and line boats although these report a sizeable fraction of bass landings in these areas, as survival rates for discarded bass from commercial rod-and line or hand-line boats (under 10 metre inshore vessels) are considered potentially relatively high.

(a) Numbers (thousands) and weight (tonnes) landed and discarded for sampled fleets (otter, nets, beam) in Irish and Celtic Seas, raised to fleet landings for each gear, based on at-sea observer sampling by the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas).

Number '000s

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Mean

Landed

48

36

29

39

30

36

Discarded

8

9

10

10

4

8

% discarded

14

20

25

21

11

18

Tonnes

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Mean

Landed

107

58

71

94

80

82

Discarded

3

3

4

6

2

3

% discarded

3

5

5

6

2

4

(b) Number of trips sampled, Irish and Celtic Seas

No. trips sampled

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Total

Beam trawls

1

1

2

Netters

4

4

16

12

10

46

Otter trawls

23

20

21

21

12

97

Grand Total

28

24

38

33

22

145

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when her Department plans to publish a consultation document for the 2015 review of the Greyhound Regulations (England) 2010.

Defra will be shortly going out to key animal welfare and greyhound industry stakeholders to collect evidence on the effectiveness of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010. Defra then plans to hold a public consultation on the implications of the evidence collected in early summer, with the aim of publishing the final findings of the review later in 2015.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what groups and organisations she plans to consult in the 2015 review of the Greyhound Regulations (England) 2010.

Defra will be shortly going out to key animal welfare and greyhound industry stakeholders to collect evidence on the effectiveness of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010. Defra then plans to hold a public consultation on the implications of the evidence collected in early summer, with the aim of publishing the final findings of the review later in 2015.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to ensure that commercial dog waste from breeding establishments is not reaching the human or animal food chains and water supply.

Local authorities have powers under commercial dog breeding legislation to inspect such establishments. Inspectors are able to check that dog waste is being disposed of in accordance with guidance.

Any waste produced may only be disposed of at a site that operates under an environmental permit or a registered exemption granted by the Environment Agency.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to monitor the disposal of commercial dog waste from breeding establishments and other places dogs may be kept.

Local authorities have powers under commercial dog breeding legislation to inspect such establishments. Inspectors are able to check that dog waste is being disposed of in accordance with guidance.

Any waste produced may only be disposed of at a site that operates under an environmental permit or a registered exemption granted by the Environment Agency.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what guidance her Department issues to commercial dog breeding establishments on the disposal of faeces, bedding, dog carcasses and other waste.

Commercial dog breeding establishments are licensed by local authorities. The Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Dog Breeding Establishments 2013 reminds local authority inspectors and dog breeders how to dispose of dog waste and from where to get more detailed information on this issue.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department will complete the coastal footpath project by the target year of 2020; what the cost to date of that project is; and from which budgets funds have been allocated for the completion of the path.

We are committed to completing the coastal path around England by 2020. As announced by the Deputy Prime Minister, extra funding will be made available and we are discussing this with HM Treasury.

To date, Natural England has incurred establishment costs of £137,238 on the three stretches of the coast where the right of access under the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 has been implemented. Natural England has estimated further establishment costs of £851,730 on the six stretches where it has submitted coastal access reports to the Secretary of State, but where the right of access has not yet been implemented.

Natural England's staff costs for delivering costs coastal access are included within its overall staff budget. Natural Englad is also incurring additional costs for publishing and advertising coastal access reports, and for agreements which it has entered with access authorities to provide it with a range of access advice and to carry out preliminary work in relation to the coastal path.

The Department has spent £85,590 in meeting the costs incurred by the Planning Inspectorate in determining a number of objections which have been made to proposals in Natural England's coastal acces reports.

7th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate his Department has made of the potential economic benefits of an ecologically coherent network of marine protected areas in UK waters.

The Impact Assessment for the designation of the first tranche of Marine Conservation Zones assessed the economic benefits of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Marine Protected Areas are expected to result in increases in ecosystem services including provisioning (i.e. increased fish numbers), regulating (i.e. climate regulation), cultural and recreational services. Overall, networks are likely to have additional benefits, such as an increase in biological resilience to adapt to changed conditions. While it is not possible to fully monetise the economic benefits of MPAs the Government is continually reviewing and developing the evidence base in this area with a wide range of interested parties.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate his Department has made of the economic cost of the degradation of natural capital in the UK's marine environment.

The UK's Marine Strategy Part One (Marine strategy part one: UK initial assessment and good environmental status - Publications - GOV.UK) assessed the cost of degradation of the UK's marine environment. It estimated benefits forgone in a range of £5 million to £50.6 million from the degradation of marine assets, although this was only a partial estimate. The Natural Capital Committee has already considered how natural capital concepts can be applied to the marine environment and Defra is considering its advice.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of the UK's seabed is protected from the fishing practice of bottom trawling.

A single figure would not give an accurate picture of the area of the UK's seabed that is protected from the practice of bottom trawling. This is due to the various fishing method restrictions used, including full spatial closures, seasonal closures and those based on the size of fishing vessels. Additionally, as Defra is only responsible for fisheries management for parts of the UK,with Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities leading in the 0-6 nautical miles area, this data is not held in one place.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of the seabed within the UK's Exclusive Economic Zone is designated as marine protected areas; and what proportion of such areas exclude the fishing practice of bottom trawling.

Around 9.4% of the UK continental shelf, as defined by the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, Part V, Article 76, is designated as Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). This area includes all of the UK Exclusive Economic Zone.

The closure of fisheries in MPAs located in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland is a matter for their respective administrations. Therefore, information on the proportion of such areas in the UK is not readily available. As part of Defra's revised approach to fisheries management, 17 new byelaws have been introduced to protect vulnerable habitats from damaging bottom trawling activities in MPAs. Details of these byelaws, including the boundaries of closed areas, are available at:

- Cornwall Closed Area European Marine Site: http://www.cornwall-ifca.gov.uk/new_byelaw

- Devon & Severn mobile gear protection byelaw: http://www.devonandsevernifca.gov.uk/News

- Eastern European Marine Site byelaw: http://www.eastern-ifca.gov.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=137&Itemid=202

- Isles of Scilly European Marine Site byelaw: http://www.scillyifca.gov.uk/European_Marine_Sites

- Kent and Essex Bottom towed gear byelaw: http://www.kentandessex-ifca.gov.uk/i-want-to-find-out-about/regulations/keifca-byelaws/keifca-district-byelaws/

- North Eastern Humber Estuary European Marine Site byelaw: http://www.ne-ifca.gov.uk/legislation-and-byelaws/byelaw-regulations/

- North Eastern Flamborough Head byelaw: http://www.ne-ifca.gov.uk/legislation-and-byelaws/byelaw-regulations/

- North Western European Marine Site byelaw (named byelaw 6): http://www.nw-ifca.gov.uk/

- Northumberland mobile gear byelaw: http://www.nifca.gov.uk/byelaws/new-ems-byelaw/

- Northumberland Seagrass protection byelaw: http://www.nifca.gov.uk/byelaws/new-ems-byelaw/

- Southern Seagrass protection byelaw: http://www.southern-ifca.gov.uk/

- Southern Bottom towed gear byelaw: http://www.southern-ifca.gov.uk/

- Sussex Prohibition of fishing byelaw: http://www.sussex-ifca.gov.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=143&Itemid=205

- Four new MMO byelaws linked below:

http://www.marinemanagement.org.uk/protecting/conservation/ems-byelaws.htm

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
11th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether agreement has been reached to extend to 2020 the reduction to household water bills for South West Water customers.

The Government announced the decision to fund South West Water to enable it to cut bills by £50 per year for all household customers in the Budget 2011. Households in the South West have received the reduction since April 2013. The understanding has always been that this reduction would continue for the duration of both the current spending review and the next.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what facilities exist for the retention and care of non-native wildlife species confiscated in the UK; where those facilities are located; and how many times such non-native wildlife species confiscated have been returned to the people or location where they were first confiscated.

Non-native wildlife specimens (including plants) may be retained for various reasons by the Police, UK Border Force (UKBF), Royal Botanic Gardens Kew (RBG Kew), local authorities and other organisations such as the RSPCA.

RBG Kew has a Plant Quarantine Unit and keeps records of all plant material entering its collections but not records of confiscated specimens that are returned to the people or location they were confiscated from.

UKBF re-homes seized wildlife after having consulted with the Joint Nature Conservation Committee, the UK's CITES scientific authority for fauna, on appropriate location. It has not been UK practice to return wildlife to countries of export as there is no guarantee of its return to the wild or that it will not re-enter illegal trade. UKBF does not disclose publically the locations where seized items are held. All seized animals remain the property of the crown.

No police-run facilities exist for the retention and care of non-native wildlife species confiscated in the UK: each case is dealt with on an ad-hoc basis. Information about returned specimens is not held centrally.

Defra does not hold information about holding facilities used by local authorities and other organisations.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will support the policy of the European Council of Ministers on the North Sea Multiannual Plan to legally sanction overfishing of bottom dwelling fish stocks such as cod and haddock over the next five years.

The draft North Sea Multi Annual Plan includes an upper range for fishing consistent with Maximum Sustainable Yield. Exploitation rates may be set within this upper range only in certain prescribed circumstances, for example to maintain balance in a mixed fishery. The UK supports this general approach, which we consider to be consistent with the principle of sustainable fisheries.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, pursuant to the White Paper, The Future Relationship Between the United Kingdom and the European Union, Cm. 9593, published on 12 July 2018, what remaining frictions there will be for (a) exporters and (b) importers.

The UK is proposing a common rulebook for goods, covering only those rules necessary to provide for frictionless trade at the border. UK firms could continue to manufacture products for export that meet the regulatory requirements of third countries.

The UK has also proposed the business-friendly Facilitated Customs Arrangement, which would see the UK mirroring the EU’s customs approach to ensure all goods have complied with EU customs processes - thus removing the need for customs processes between the UK and the EU.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to ensure that the Food Standards Agency is able to uphold food safety standards after the UK leaves the EU.

The Department is committed to ensuring that the Food Standards Agency (FSA) maintains the high standards of food safety and consumer protection that we currently enjoy in this country. Leaving the European Union does not change the FSA’s top priority which is to ensure that food in the United Kingdom remains safe and is what it says it is.

One of FSA’s main priorities is to have a robust and effective regulatory regime which will mean business can continue as normal. All FSA’s exit plans are either complete or on schedule to deliver in time for day one of exit. As part of this, the Department has laid 18 EU Exit Statutory Instruments on behalf of the FSA to ensure that our high standards of food hygiene and safety will be maintained in a no deal scenario.

7th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department is making on producing a public information campaign to educate the general public on the health impacts of air pollution, particularly in instances of moderate or high pollution episodes.

Public Health England and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) are exploring whether social marketing can assist in awareness-raising about air pollution.

The Joint Air Quality Unit (JAQU) is planning a national-level campaign to support Clean Air Zones (CAZ) from summer 2019. This will raise awareness of the risks presented by high concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and the implementation of charging CAZ. It will also promote long-term behaviour change by encouraging the public to change travel habits and reduce NO2 emissions.

The JAQU has also provided a CAZ communications toolkit to support local authorities in their local communications work. It contains key messages, frequently asked questions, useful statistics, infographics and other content to ensure a consistent approach is taken to raising awareness and to encourage drivers to consider alternative options in terms of travel and vehicle choice.

Defra is developing a communication strategy on domestic combustion for launch before the next winter burning season.

13th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of adults with atopic dermatitis in (a) Penistone and Stocksbridge constituency, (b) England and (c) the UK.

This data is not available, however, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence estimates that atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema) is a common skin condition that affects between 2–10% of adults.

13th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Early Access to Medicines Scheme in encouraging pharmaceutical companies to launch promising and innovative medicines in the UK.

The Life Sciences Industrial Strategy set out our vision of being a world-leader in developing and bringing to market innovative medicines to improve life-chances of United Kingdom patients. It highlighted the importance of evolving and simplifying the access system for new medicines by implementing, and building on, the findings of the Accelerated Access Review.

The Early Access to Medicines Scheme (EAMS) is an essential part of delivering on this ambition. It has been effective in encouraging companies to bring their products to the UK and market them. The figures below show increasing engagement from industry as the scheme has progressed.

Year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

Number of Promising Innovative Medicines awarded

8

6

17

20

Number of Scientific Opinions awarded

1

8

3

7

The EAMS task group has been established to provide a forum for industry to engage with the Government, the devolved administrations and arm’s length bodies, driving further improvements to the scheme and making the UK a more attractive place to test and deliver new pharmaceuticals.

13th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure patients in England with (a) skin conditions and (b) atopic dermatitis are able to access to new innovative treatments.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body that provides guidance on the prevention and treatment of ill health and the promotion of good health and social care. NICE has published a range of guidance products for the management of skin conditions, including technology appraisals, guidelines and quality standards, which can be accessed at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/conditions-and-diseases/skin-conditions/skin-conditions--general-and-other#technology-appraisal-guidance

National Health Service commissioners are legally required to fund treatments recommended by NICE in its technology appraisal guidance.

The Government takes the issue of ensuring rapid access to innovative therapies very seriously, which is why on 3 November 2017, we published our response to the Accelerated Access Review. We set out plans to give patients quicker access to life-changing treatments and make the United Kingdom the best place in the world for industry to invest and innovate.

21st Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many horses and ponies were slaughtered in UK abattoirs (a) with no CCTV, (b) with no CCTV installed in stunning, killing or bleeding areas and (c) with CCTV in all areas in 2016.

The Food Standards Agency has the following data on numbers of equines slaughtered in approved premises in England. There were no operating equine slaughter premises in Wales during the year 2016.

Type of CCTV in slaughterhouse

Number of horses slaughtered between 1 January 2016 and 31 December 2016

With no CCTV

136

With no CCTV installed in stunning, killing or bleeding areas

3,077

With CCTV in all areas

115

7th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to increase psychology support for adults with muscle-wasting conditions in south Yorkshire.

NHS England is responsible for commissioning specialised neurological services, including services for patients with neuromuscular disorders. NHS England has published a service specification for neurological care that sets out what providers must have in place to offer evidence-based, safe and effective services.

The specification can be found at the following link:

www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/d04-neurosci-spec-neuro.pdf

NHS providers, working with local area teams, may establish patient access to neuromuscular care advisers if they consider it would benefit service provision; such decisions are a local matter.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether Public Health England will be responsible for drafting and publishing the obesity strategy.

The Childhood Obesity Strategy, which will be launched in the summer, is being led by the Department with input from across Government, including Public Health England.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the timetable is for the publication of the obesity strategy; and what role (a) Public Health England and (b) his Department is playing in the drafting of that strategy.

The Childhood Obesity Strategy, which will be launched in the summer, is being led by the Department with input from across Government, including Public Health England.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which private sector companies (a) provided financial resources, (b) submitted evidence and (c) provided any in-kind support during the development of the new Eatwell Guide.

No private sector companies provided financial resources or in-kind support during the development of the Eatwell Guide.

An external reference group was convened to provide advice to Public Health England (PHE) on the approaches to developing the model. Representatives from health, voluntary sector and industry (including trade and levy organisations), were members and provided routes of engagement.

Outside of reference group involvement, 25 individuals/organisations provided unofficial written comments directly to PHE; two of which were private sector companies.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether his Department will be responsible for drafting and publishing the obesity strategy.

The Childhood Obesity Strategy, which will be launched in the summer, is being led by the Department with input from across Government, including Public Health England.

17th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department plans to take to encourage NHS foundation trusts to follow the statutory guidance implementing the adult autism strategy.

The guidance for implementing the adult autism strategy for the NHS and local authorities is statutory. Therefore, NHS foundation trusts are expected to follow the guidance and the Department will be working with NHS England and other stakeholders to ensure it is widely disseminated and followed in the NHS.

16th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions his Department has had with organisations representing health and care workers on the development of the draft statutory guidance implementing the adult autism strategy.

A number of events around the draft guidance for implementing the Adult Autism Strategy have taken place during the consultation period which began on 7 November and closed on 19 December 2014. These events included representatives of National Health Service provider and commissioning organisations.

In addition, the consultation was widely promoted to health and social care organisations, by third sector partners and through social media networks to reach a wide range of people and groups, including adults with autism, families and carers, and health and social care organisations that plan, commission and provide services for people with autism and their families.

22nd Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what progress he has made in establishing the largest marine sanctuaries in the southern oceans; and whether those marine sanctuaries remain one of the primary goals of his Department’s Blue Belt policy.

The UK is a leading advocate for marine protection across the Southern Ocean. The UK secured agreement for the first Marine Protected Area (MPA) designated by the international Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) and we strongly supported the Ross Sea region MPA, which was agreed in 2016. The UK is a co-proponent for MPA proposals in the Weddell Sea and in East Antarctica, both of which will be presented to the next CCAMLR meeting in October for adoption. We are also playing a leading role in developing an MPA proposal for the Antarctic Peninsula.

The Blue Belt initiative is primarily focused on British waters around the UK Overseas Territories and we remain committed to protecting 4m square kilometres of UK waters by 2020. South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands and the British Antarctic Territory both fall within the CCAMLR Convention Area, and the UK therefore works within CCAMLR to underpin protection measures implemented within our own waters.

19th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what proportion of the South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands marine protected area is legally designated as a fully no-take area.

The South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands sustainable use MPA, established to deliver defined conservation outcomes, covers 86% of the maritime zone. No commercial fishing licences are granted across the remaining 14% of the maritime zone.

There are a number of legal provisions in place for the effective management and conservation of the South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands sustainable use MPA including: no-take zones from the coast to 12 nautical miles around Shag Rocks and South Georgia and 3 nautical miles from the South Sandwich Islands coast covering 2%; an additional pelagic no-take zone extending 12 nautical miles South Sandwich Islands coast; total ban on commercial bottom trawling; depth restrictions on fishing for the Marine Stewardship Council certified toothfish fishery protecting 92% of the sea floor habitats; and prohibitions on krill fishing during the summer breeding period (1 November to 31 March).

19th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many kilometres of the South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands marine protected area are legally designated as fully no-take areas.

The South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands sustainable use MPA, established to deliver defined conservation outcomes, covers 1.074 million km2. No commercial fishing licences are granted across the remaining 166,207 km2 of the maritime zone.

There are a number of legal provisions in place for the effective management and conservation of the South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands sustainable use MPA. There are approximately 20,500 km2 of full no-take zones; 18,000 km2 of additional pelagic no-take zones; prohibitions of long-line fishing across 989,000 km2; and a complete ban on commercial bottom trawling.

19th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what proportion of the South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands marine protected area is permanently closed to krill fishing.

The South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands sustainable use MPA, which covers 86% of the maritime zone, permits sustainable, highly precautionary fishing activities to take place. No commercial fishing licences are granted across the remaining 14% of the maritime zone.

There are permanent pelagic no-take zone around South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, from the coast out to 12 nautical miles. Through the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, krill fishing is restricted around South Sandwich Islands to 15% of the scientifically determined total allowable catch for the region, deemed highly precautionary. In addition to these international measures domestic regulations also prohibit fishing during the breeding period of the krill-eating penguins, seals and other natural predators and natural exclusion by sea ice in winter further restricts human activity.

19th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many kilometres of the South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands marine protected area is permanently closed to krill fishing.

The South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands sustainable use MPA, established to deliver defined conservation outcomes, covers 1.074 million km2. No commercial fishing licences are granted across the remaining 166,207 km2 of the maritime zone.

The permanent pelagic no-take zone extends 12 nautical miles around South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands covering 38,500 km2. In addition to the highly precautionary international regulations through the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, there are seasonal closures during the breeding period of the krill-eating penguins, seals and other natural predators (1 November to 31 March) across the entire 1.074 million km2 MPA and natural exclusion by sea ice in winter further restricts human activity.

19th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of biodiversity in the South Sandwich Islands.

The South Sandwich Islands are remote and as a consequence data-poor in comparison to other Subantarctic regions. There is also a very real threat to the ecology of the South Sandwich Islands from volcanism, with recent eruptions from the volcanoes on Zavodovski, Saunders and Bristol.

Recent scientific work indicates that unlike penguin colonies on the Antarctic Peninsula, the penguin colonies on the South Sandwich Islands are stable. To further enhance our understanding of the South Sandwich Islands, the UK's Blue Belt initiative has funded a scientific expedition to visit the South Sandwich Islands in late January 2019, allowing information to be collected on a variety of topics, including on krill and on the benthic communities that inhabit the seabed. UK scientists are also leading work within international scientific research programmes to improve our understanding of this and the wider Southern Ocean region.

19th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what proportion of the Government of South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands' total annual revenues came from commercial fishing operations licensed to operate within the (a) South Georgia and (b) South Sandwich Islands Exclusive Economic Zone in the last three years.

The financial accounts of Government of South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands are freely available on their website.

For 2016, the latest year for which accounts have been published, the total annual revenue from the sale of commercial fishing activities in South Georgia was 73% of the (£5,586k) and for South Sandwich Islands 1.8% (£134K). These figures do not include associated economic activity such as harbour fees and non-revenue outcomes such as scientific research.

24th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Burmese counterpart on prisoners of conscience in that country.

The release of political prisoners has been an early priority for the new NLD-led government, with over 100 having been released since Friday.

The UK Government has long campaigned on the issue of political prisoners in Burma and we welcome this quick action.

14th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to promote trade and diplomatic connections with the Commonwealth.

The UK is committed to maintaining and strengthening its economic and diplomatic engagement with the Commonwealth. The Prime Minister, my right hon. Friend the Member for Witney (Mr Cameron) led a strong UK delegation to the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting (CHOGM) in Malta in November. He announced funding for a number of initiatives including to help the Commonwealth’s small island states develop their maritime economies.

The UK pressed to ensure that trade issues were covered in the CHOGM communique. Commonwealth leaders agreed to advance global trade negotiations and in particular ratify the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement.

I and The Minister for Trade and Investment, the right hon the Lord Maude of Horsham, took part in the Commonwealth Business
Forum in Malta. Lord Maude addressed the opening plenary on leveraging trade networks across the Commonwealth, and pushed for progress on free trade agreements to facilitate and increase trade between Commonwealth countries. He also held a number of bilateral meetings to discuss trade and investment opportunities. The UK continues to be a strong supporter of the Commonwealth Enterprise and Investment Council which organised the Business Forum and is expanding business networks across the Commonwealth.

25th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what information his Department holds on the number of foreign nationals who have been reported as missing from foreign-flagged fishing vessels in Falkland Islands waters in each of the last five years.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office does not hold this information. Such data is collected and is held by the Falkland Islands Government who have devolved responsibility for the Falkland Islands' fishing industry.

The honourable Member should contact the Department for Natural Resources within the Falkland Islands Government who can supply her with this information.

25th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what support his Department has provided to the Falkland Islands government to tackle modern slavery on foreign fishing vessels operating in Falkland Islands waters.

The licensing, legislation, regulations and management of the fishing industry on the Falkland Islands is a devolved responsibility of the Falkland Islands Government.

The Falkland Islands Government maintains a rigorous fisheries licensing regime to ensure all vessels operate to the highest possible standards and investigates all allegations of abuse on fishing vessels within Falklands' waters.

The British Government is committed to tackling modern slavery wherever it exists in the UK, and around the world.

25th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many of the (a) vessels and (b) companies which have been sold licences to fish in the Falkland Islands in each of the last three years have been found guilty of criminal behaviour in other legal jurisdictions.

The honourable Member should contact the Department for Natural Resources within the Falkland Islands Government, who can supply her with this information.

25th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Taiwanese government on labour conditions on board Taiwanese-flagged vessels operating in Falkland Islands waters in each of the last two years.

The British Trade and Cultural Office in Taipei has held discussions with the Taiwanese authorities over fishing issues around the Falklands, most commonly regarding fishing licences.

Although we have not raised labour conditions aboard Taiwanese flagged vessels in recent conversations, we are seeking to approach the Taiwanese authorities on this issue.

The Falkland Islands Government has devolved responsibility for the Falkland Islands' fishing industry, including its legislation, regulations, and licensing.

4th Oct 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish the detailed planning assumptions of the Border Delivery Group for each month since January 2019.

The Government recently published its reasonable worst case planning assumptions on 11 September, setting out the Government’s assessment as of 2 August.

Planning assumptions are held under constant review, to reflect the latest evidence and analysis of the potential impact of leaving the EU without a deal. The Government’s updated planning assumptions will be published in due course.
18th Jul 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the White Paper, The future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union, Cm. 9593, published on 12 July 2018, what types of goods will be excluded from the proposed Facilitated Customs Arrangement with the EU.

The Facilitated Customs Arrangement (FCA) would remove the need for customs processes between the UK and the EU, while allowing the UK to set its own tariffs for goods imported from non-EU countries.

Where a good reaches the UK border, and the destination can be robustly demonstrated by a trusted trader, it will pay the UK tariff if it is destined for the UK and the EU tariff if it is destined for the EU. This is most likely to be relevant to finished goods.

Where a good reaches the UK border and the destination cannot be robustly demonstrated at the point of import, it will pay the higher of the UK or EU tariff. Where the good’s destination is later identified to be a lower tariff jurisdiction, it would be eligible for a repayment from the UK Government equal to the difference between the two tariffs. This is most likely to be relevant to intermediate goods.

The government is seeking to maximise the number of traders who will not need to interact with a voluntary repayment mechanism. It is estimated up to 96 per cent of UK goods trade would be most likely to pay the correct or no tariff upfront.

6th Dec 2017
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the timetable is for proposed charges on single-use plastic items to come into effect; and if he will make a statement.

At the Budget, the Chancellor announced his intention to launch a call for evidence on whether the tax system or charges can be used to reduce the amount of single-use plastic we waste. Once we have analysed the responses to this call for evidence, the government will outline how we intend to proceed.

11th Jul 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many employers will be required to pay the apprenticeship levy in (a) Penistone and Stocksbridge constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber.

The Apprenticeship Levy was introduced in April 2017. Therefore it is not yet possible to produce the number of employers that are paying the levy by region or parliamentary constituency. In addition, it may not be possible to publish these numbers for some geographical areas if there are only a few employers in an area, as the rules about statistical disclosure may apply if there are very small numbers.

The most recent UK wide forecasts of the number of employers paying the levy are found in the Department for Education release:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/545145/Apprenticeships_-expected_levy_and_total_spend_-_Aug_2016.pdf.

Across the UK, this estimates that around 20,000 employers will pay the levy.

11th Jul 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of employers in Penistone and Stocksbridge constituency that will not be required to pay the apprenticeship levy.

The Apprenticeship Levy was introduced in April 2017. Therefore it is not yet possible to produce the number of employers that are paying the levy by region or parliamentary constituency. In addition, it may not be possible to publish these numbers for some geographical areas if there are only a few employers in an area, as the rules about statistical disclosure may apply if there are very small numbers.

The most recent UK wide forecasts of the number of employers paying the levy are found in the Department for Education release:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/545145/Apprenticeships_-expected_levy_and_total_spend_-_Aug_2016.pdf.

Across the UK, this estimates that around 20,000 employers will pay the levy.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps he is taking to reduce the length of time it takes to charge a person after an offence has taken place within the constabulary area of South Yorkshire.

The effective management of investigations, including the prompt communication of their outcomes, is an operational matter for the police.

After an arrest, the police need to carry out further investigations before a charge is brought then the police may release a suspect on pre-charge bail or release them under investigation (RUI).

The National Police Chief’s Council has recently published guidance on the use of pre-charge bail and RUI. The guidance sets out the steps the police should take to make sure the prompt completion of their investigations, whether suspects are released with or without pre-charge bail. The Home Office will continue to support the police in their efforts to prevent and investigate crimes, including by providing the biggest increase in police funding since 2010.

17th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been (a) charged and (b) convicted for offences under section 46 of the Crime and Security Act 2010 in each year since 2011; and if she will make a statement.

The Home Office holds data on crimes recorded by the police that are covered by the notifiable offence list. Notifiable offences are those crimes that could possibly be tried by a jury plus a few additional closely related summary offences dealt with by magistrates, such as assault without injury.
Crimes covered under section 46 of the Crime and Security Act 2010 are non-notifiable and therefore for not held by the Home Office.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many project licence applications under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were (a) granted and (b) refused on the basis of the results of the harm-benefit analysis carried out on those applications by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit.

I refer the Hon. Member to the response I previously provided to her question on 4 February 2016 (24508). The Home Office does not keep records of applications that have been rejected / refused or withdrawn at the concept or at the drafting stage.

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to Advice Note: 05/2015, paragraph 9 of the Harm-Benefit Analysis Process, how many project licences applications under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were recommended by the Animals and Science Regulation Unit in each year since 2012.

The Harm-Benefit Analysis (HBA) is undertaken, on behalf of the Secretary of State, by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors, all of whom are veterinary or medically qualified and trained in assessing research proposals. The HBA is the process of considering a research proposal to make a judgement whether the likely harms that the animals will experience are justified by the likely benefits. Under section 18 of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, inspectors advise the Secretary of State who decides whether and on what terms a project licence should be granted.

The number of project licences which were recommended for grant by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors between 2012 and 2015 are shown in table 1, column (c).

The Secretary of State has not rejected any of the recommendations for granting project licences made by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors between 2012 and 2015.

The Home Office does not keep records of applications that have been rejected or withdrawn at the concept or drafting stage [24507]. The Home Office does not keep records of which applications were withdrawn as a result of advice from the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors.

The Home Office refers project licence applications to both the Animals in Science Committee and external independent assessors for critical review. The number of project licences referred to both is given in Table 1 columns (a) and (b) respectively for the years 2012-15.

Year

(a) Project licence applications referred to the Animals in Science Committee[1]

(b) Project licence applications referred to independent assessors

(c) Project licences granted

2012

9

4

626

2013

3

0

604

2014

4

1

474

2015

3

0

577

[1] Prior to 2013 the independent advisory body was entitled the ‘Animals Procedures Committee’

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many project licence applications under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were (a) granted and (b) not granted on the basis of the harm-benefit analysis.

The Harm-Benefit Analysis (HBA) is undertaken, on behalf of the Secretary of State, by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors, all of whom are veterinary or medically qualified and trained in assessing research proposals. The HBA is the process of considering a research proposal to make a judgement whether the likely harms that the animals will experience are justified by the likely benefits. Under section 18 of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, inspectors advise the Secretary of State who decides whether and on what terms a project licence should be granted.

The number of project licences which were recommended for grant by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors between 2012 and 2015 are shown in table 1, column (c).

The Secretary of State has not rejected any of the recommendations for granting project licences made by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors between 2012 and 2015.

The Home Office does not keep records of applications that have been rejected or withdrawn at the concept or drafting stage [24507]. The Home Office does not keep records of which applications were withdrawn as a result of advice from the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors.

The Home Office refers project licence applications to both the Animals in Science Committee and external independent assessors for critical review. The number of project licences referred to both is given in Table 1 columns (a) and (b) respectively for the years 2012-15.

Year

(a) Project licence applications referred to the Animals in Science Committee[1]

(b) Project licence applications referred to independent assessors

(c) Project licences granted

2012

9

4

626

2013

3

0

604

2014

4

1

474

2015

3

0

577

[1] Prior to 2013 the independent advisory body was entitled the ‘Animals Procedures Committee’

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraph 12 of Advice Note: 05/2015 on the Harm-Benefit Analysis Process, how many project licence applications were withdrawn at the (a) concept and (b) draft stage as a result of advice from the Animals in Science Regulation Unit that the application would clearly fail the harm-benefit analysis in each year since 2012.

The Harm-Benefit Analysis (HBA) is undertaken, on behalf of the Secretary of State, by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors, all of whom are veterinary or medically qualified and trained in assessing research proposals. The HBA is the process of considering a research proposal to make a judgement whether the likely harms that the animals will experience are justified by the likely benefits. Under section 18 of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, inspectors advise the Secretary of State who decides whether and on what terms a project licence should be granted.

The number of project licences which were recommended for grant by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors between 2012 and 2015 are shown in table 1, column (c).

The Secretary of State has not rejected any of the recommendations for granting project licences made by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors between 2012 and 2015.

The Home Office does not keep records of applications that have been rejected or withdrawn at the concept or drafting stage [24507]. The Home Office does not keep records of which applications were withdrawn as a result of advice from the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors.

The Home Office refers project licence applications to both the Animals in Science Committee and external independent assessors for critical review. The number of project licences referred to both is given in Table 1 columns (a) and (b) respectively for the years 2012-15.

Year

(a) Project licence applications referred to the Animals in Science Committee[1]

(b) Project licence applications referred to independent assessors

(c) Project licences granted

2012

9

4

626

2013

3

0

604

2014

4

1

474

2015

3

0

577

[1] Prior to 2013 the independent advisory body was entitled the ‘Animals Procedures Committee’

27th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times project licence applications were referred to an independent assessor in each year since 2012.

The Harm-Benefit Analysis (HBA) is undertaken, on behalf of the Secretary of State, by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors, all of whom are veterinary or medically qualified and trained in assessing research proposals. The HBA is the process of considering a research proposal to make a judgement whether the likely harms that the animals will experience are justified by the likely benefits. Under section 18 of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, inspectors advise the Secretary of State who decides whether and on what terms a project licence should be granted.

The number of project licences which were recommended for grant by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors between 2012 and 2015 are shown in table 1, column (c).

The Secretary of State has not rejected any of the recommendations for granting project licences made by the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors between 2012 and 2015.

The Home Office does not keep records of applications that have been rejected or withdrawn at the concept or drafting stage [24507]. The Home Office does not keep records of which applications were withdrawn as a result of advice from the Animals in Science Regulation Unit inspectors.

The Home Office refers project licence applications to both the Animals in Science Committee and external independent assessors for critical review. The number of project licences referred to both is given in Table 1 columns (a) and (b) respectively for the years 2012-15.

Year

(a) Project licence applications referred to the Animals in Science Committee[1]

(b) Project licence applications referred to independent assessors

(c) Project licences granted

2012

9

4

626

2013

3

0

604

2014

4

1

474

2015

3

0

577

[1] Prior to 2013 the independent advisory body was entitled the ‘Animals Procedures Committee’

17th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many seizures of reptiles there were by the Border Force under the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) in (a) 2013 and (b) 2014; how many individual animals were so seized in each such year; and if she will make a statement.

The data requested on the seizures of reptiles by Border Force can be found in the below table:

Seizure YearNumber of SeizuresQuantity Seized
20139477
2014161232

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the outcome of the recent Illegal Wildlife Trade conference and the resulting London Declaration; and what steps she plans to take to ensure that animal welfare is a key element of her Department's response to that declaration.

The Home Office recognises that the illegal wildlife trade is not only a serious threat to our environment, but is also a transnational criminal industry worth billions of pounds every year, and one which drives corruption and insecurity and undermines efforts to cut poverty and develop sustainable economic opportunities.

I was therefore pleased that world leaders from over forty nations, including key states such as Botswana, Chad, China, Gabon, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Tanzania, and Vietnam, alongside the United States and Russia, gathered in London on 13 February 2014 and made a political commitment to take actions to eradicate the demand for illegal wildlife products, strengthen law enforcement, ensure effective legal frameworks, and to reduce the incentive for communities in source countries to get involved in the trade by supporting the development of alternative, sustainable livelihoods. I co-chaired part of the proceedings to underline the Home Office's commitment to this issue.

The Home Office will continue to work with other departments to ensure that the Government delivers on the UK Commitment to Action on the Illegal Wildlife Trade.

20th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what advanced satellite monitoring and drone technologies his Department has made available to support implementation of the Blue Belt policy around the (a) Ascension Islands and (b) British Indian Ocean Territory.

There are currently no funded programmes relating to satellite monitoring or drone technologies that support the implementation of Blue Belt policy around the Ascension Islands and British Indian Ocean Territory.

8th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what plans his Department has to commemorate the 70th anniversary of VJ Day.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave during Defence questions on 8 June 2015 (Official Report, columns 893-894) to the hon. Member for Houghton and Sunderland South (Bridget Phillipson).

3rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department has made an estimate of the number of hotels and hostels by local authority which are (a) below and (b) above 18 metres in height that have high pressure laminate cladding.

The Department has commenced a data collection exercise which will enable us to build a picture of external wall systems in use on high rise residential buildings. This exercise will collect data on residential buildings 18 metres and over covering private and social buildings, student accommodation and hotels.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
3rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department has made an estimate of the number of student accommodation blocks (a) below and (b) above 18 metres in height in each local authority areas that have high pressure laminate cladding.

The Department has commenced a data collection exercise which will enable us to build a picture of external wall systems in use on high rise residential buildings. This exercise will collect data on residential buildings 18 metres and over covering private and social buildings, student accommodation and hotels.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
3rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department has made an estimate of the number of hospitals by local authority which are (a) below and (b) above 18 metres in height that have high pressure laminate cladding.

The Department has commenced a data collection exercise which will enable us to build a picture of external wall systems in use on high rise residential buildings. This exercise will collect data on residential buildings 18 metres and over covering private and social buildings, student accommodation and hotels.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
3rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department has made an estimate of the number of care homes by local authority which are (a) below and (b) above 18 metres in height that have high pressure laminate cladding.

The Department has commenced a data collection exercise which will enable us to build a picture of external wall systems in use on high rise residential buildings. This exercise will collect data on residential buildings 18 metres and over covering private and social buildings, student accommodation and hotels.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
3rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to ensure new builds are meeting fire safety requirements.

The primary responsibility for compliance with the Building Regulations, including fire safety, rests with the person carrying out the building work. This is the builder or developer. Most building work is subject to building control either by the local authority or a private approved inspector, on a spot-check basis. It is the responsibility of the building control body to take all reasonable steps to assess compliance. However, responsibility for compliance remains with the builder or developer.

On 5 July, the Government published a clarified version of Approved Document B (fire safety) to help responsible parties to understand what steps they could take to ensure that their building complies with the building regulations.

We are currently consulting on how we propose to take forward legislative reform for building and fire safety in higher-risk residential buildings implementing recommendations made by Dame Judith Hackitt’s Independent Review.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
14th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many dwellings were built as part of a development that included sustainable drainage systems in England and Wales in each of the last five years;

The information requested is note collected by the Department. Sustainable drainage systems are delivered locally in line with national planning policy and building regulations. National planning policy in England has clear requirements relating to sustainable drainage systems including that priority should be given to their use if development is considered in areas at risk of flooding. These requirements are underpinned by planning guidance, including guidance on sustainable drainage systems which was strengthened last year. Additionally, developers must comply with the building regulations which give priority to sustainable drainage systems in their hierarchy of arrangements for dealing with rainwater.


Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the average time it takes to process criminal cases in the courts in South Yorkshire in the most recent period for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on the average length of time taken from first listing to completion, quarterly from June 2010 to December 2018, and can be found in the timeliness-transparency-q4-2018 file: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/790261/Transparency_files.zip

Filter LCJB area: South Yorkshire LCJB, data can then be filtered by court type.

Data for the quarter ending March 2019 will be published in June 2019.

The South Yorkshire Local Criminal Justice Board and the agencies involved keep performance regularly under review and take action when required.

We are working together across the Criminal Justice System to ensure the smooth running of our courts, as well as using new technology and initiatives to reduce delays and outstanding cases at the Crown Court are at the lowest levels nationally since 2000. We have a world-leading justice system and performance levels are continually kept under close review to ensure changes in demands are met.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were prosecuted under the (a) Protection of Badgers Act 1992, (b) Deer Act 1991 and (c) Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996 in 2017; and if he will make a statement.

The number of people prosecuted and convicted for offences under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992, Deer Act 1991, Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996 and Hunting Act 2004 in 2017 can be found in published ‘Experimental statistics: Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code data tool’ available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/738814/HO-Code-Tool-2017.xlsx

The specific offences to search for are:

  • ‘Summary offences under the Deer Act 1991 – e.g. taking, injuring or killing deer’ (offence code: 12111)
  • ‘Offences under the Hunting Act 2004
    • ‘Hunting a wild mammal with a dog’ (offence code: 12113)
    • ‘Knowingly permitting land to be entered or used in the course of hunting a wild mammal with dogs’ (12114)
    • ‘Knowingly permitting a dog to be used in the course of hunting a wild mammal’ (12115)
    • ‘Participating in a hare coursing event’ (12116)
    • ‘Attending a hare coursing event’ (12117)
    • ‘Knowingly facilitating a hare coursing event’ (12118)
    • ‘Permitting land to be used for the purpose of a hare coursing event’ (12119),
    • ‘Entering a dog for a hare coursing event’, ‘Permitting a dog to be entered for a hare coursing event’, ‘Controlling or handling a dog at a hare coursing event’ (all 12120)

  • ‘Offences under Protection of Badgers Act 1992’ – ‘offences of cruelty to badgers and special protection for badgers and their setts’ (offence code: 10822)[1]
  • ‘Offences under Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996’ – ‘cruelty to a wild mammal’ (offence code: 10825)

Where there are no codes available for the year 2017 (or other years), this means that there have been no prosecutions or convictions under that offence code in that year.

[1] Offences under both the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and Protection of Badgers Act 1992 should not be included as it is not possible to identify whether all of the individual offences within this offence group are related to badgers.

18th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were found guilty of offences under the (a) Protection of Badgers Act 1992, (b) Deer Act 1991, (c) Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996 and (d) Hunting Act 2004 in 2017; and if he will make a statement.

The number of people prosecuted and convicted for offences under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992, Deer Act 1991, Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996 and Hunting Act 2004 in 2017 can be found in published ‘Experimental statistics: Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code data tool’ available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/738814/HO-Code-Tool-2017.xlsx

The specific offences to search for are:

  • ‘Summary offences under the Deer Act 1991 – e.g. taking, injuring or killing deer’ (offence code: 12111)
  • ‘Offences under the Hunting Act 2004
    • ‘Hunting a wild mammal with a dog’ (offence code: 12113)
    • ‘Knowingly permitting land to be entered or used in the course of hunting a wild mammal with dogs’ (12114)
    • ‘Knowingly permitting a dog to be used in the course of hunting a wild mammal’ (12115)
    • ‘Participating in a hare coursing event’ (12116)
    • ‘Attending a hare coursing event’ (12117)
    • ‘Knowingly facilitating a hare coursing event’ (12118)
    • ‘Permitting land to be used for the purpose of a hare coursing event’ (12119),
    • ‘Entering a dog for a hare coursing event’, ‘Permitting a dog to be entered for a hare coursing event’, ‘Controlling or handling a dog at a hare coursing event’ (all 12120)

  • ‘Offences under Protection of Badgers Act 1992’ – ‘offences of cruelty to badgers and special protection for badgers and their setts’ (offence code: 10822)[1]
  • ‘Offences under Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996’ – ‘cruelty to a wild mammal’ (offence code: 10825)

Where there are no codes available for the year 2017 (or other years), this means that there have been no prosecutions or convictions under that offence code in that year.

[1] Offences under both the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and Protection of Badgers Act 1992 should not be included as it is not possible to identify whether all of the individual offences within this offence group are related to badgers.

29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions Ministers of her Department have had with their counterparts in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on the maximum sentence available to the courts for offences under the Animal Welfare Act 2006.

The Government keeps maximum penalties under review.

Details of all ministerial meetings are published in the transparency returns on gov.uk.

29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment her Department has made of trends in the level of the recidivism rate of persons who have committed offences under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in the last 10 years.

The reoffending rate for those who committed an offence under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 was on average just over one percent over the last eight years.

Data on reoffending rates for people convicted of offences under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 is available up to 2014, with a one year follow-up period. Data for 2015 and 2016 will be available in due course.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of domestic abuse victims in child contact cases in the family court have been in receipt of legal aid in each year since 2010.

This data is not centrally recorded and could only be obtained by incurring disproportionate costs.

10th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what average hourly rate is paid to (a) external solicitors and (b) Treasury Solicitor staff working on developing the residence test for legal aid.

Legal aid is a fundamental part of our justice system, but resources are not limitless. Legal aid is paid for by the taxpayer and at all times we must strive to ensure that public confidence is maintained in the system.

We believe that in principle, individuals should have a strong connection to the UK in order to benefit from the civil legal aid scheme. We have therefore proposed to introduce a residence test for civil legal aid requiring applicants to be lawfully resident in the UK, Crown Dependencies or British Overseas Territories at the time they apply for civil legal aid and have resided there lawfully for at least 12 continuous months in the past.

The civil legal aid residence test is part of the Legal Aid Transformation Programme, which consists of a number of work-streams.

In April 2014, the Department’s Legal Directorate was absorbed by the Treasury Solicitor’s Department. There is no record of the hours spent by Treasury Solicitor staff in the Legal Directorate advising on the legal aid residence test policy. Treasury Solicitor staff in the Department’s Legal Directorate do not record the time spent on advising on developing the residence test for legal aid or charge the Department an hourly rate for work undertaken. The Department has not engaged any Treasury Solicitor staff on developing the policy on the residence test beyond those employed within the Department’s Legal Directorate.

No external barristers (other than Treasury Counsel) or external solicitors were engaged by the Department on developing the residence test for legal aid. It is not possible to separate work carried out by Treasury Counsel on the development of the policy of the residence test as one work-stream from the wider programme or from the litigation relating to the policy.

10th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many hours have been spent by (a) external solicitors, (b) external barristers, (c) Treasury Solicitor staff and (d) Treasury Counsel engaged by his Department for advice on the legal aid residence test policy.

Legal aid is a fundamental part of our justice system, but resources are not limitless. Legal aid is paid for by the taxpayer and at all times we must strive to ensure that public confidence is maintained in the system.

We believe that in principle, individuals should have a strong connection to the UK in order to benefit from the civil legal aid scheme. We have therefore proposed to introduce a residence test for civil legal aid requiring applicants to be lawfully resident in the UK, Crown Dependencies or British Overseas Territories at the time they apply for civil legal aid and have resided there lawfully for at least 12 continuous months in the past.

The civil legal aid residence test is part of the Legal Aid Transformation Programme, which consists of a number of work-streams.

In April 2014, the Department’s Legal Directorate was absorbed by the Treasury Solicitor’s Department. There is no record of the hours spent by Treasury Solicitor staff in the Legal Directorate advising on the legal aid residence test policy. Treasury Solicitor staff in the Department’s Legal Directorate do not record the time spent on advising on developing the residence test for legal aid or charge the Department an hourly rate for work undertaken. The Department has not engaged any Treasury Solicitor staff on developing the policy on the residence test beyond those employed within the Department’s Legal Directorate.

No external barristers (other than Treasury Counsel) or external solicitors were engaged by the Department on developing the residence test for legal aid. It is not possible to separate work carried out by Treasury Counsel on the development of the policy of the residence test as one work-stream from the wider programme or from the litigation relating to the policy.

10th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much in total has been paid to (a) each external solicitor, (b) each external barrister, (c) Treasury Solicitor staff and (d) Treasury Counsel engaged by his Department for advice on the policy development of the legal aid residence test.

Legal aid is a fundamental part of our justice system, but resources are not limitless. Legal aid is paid for by the taxpayer and at all times we must strive to ensure that public confidence is maintained in the system.

We believe that in principle, individuals should have a strong connection to the UK in order to benefit from the civil legal aid scheme. We have therefore proposed to introduce a residence test for civil legal aid requiring applicants to be lawfully resident in the UK, Crown Dependencies or British Overseas Territories at the time they apply for civil legal aid and have resided there lawfully for at least 12 continuous months in the past.

The civil legal aid residence test is part of the Legal Aid Transformation Programme, which consists of a number of work-streams.

In April 2014, the Department’s Legal Directorate was absorbed by the Treasury Solicitor’s Department. There is no record of the hours spent by Treasury Solicitor staff in the Legal Directorate advising on the legal aid residence test policy. Treasury Solicitor staff in the Department’s Legal Directorate do not record the time spent on advising on developing the residence test for legal aid or charge the Department an hourly rate for work undertaken. The Department has not engaged any Treasury Solicitor staff on developing the policy on the residence test beyond those employed within the Department’s Legal Directorate.

No external barristers (other than Treasury Counsel) or external solicitors were engaged by the Department on developing the residence test for legal aid. It is not possible to separate work carried out by Treasury Counsel on the development of the policy of the residence test as one work-stream from the wider programme or from the litigation relating to the policy.

8th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been (a) arrested, (b) cautioned, (c) proceeded against and (d) convicted of an offence under the provisions of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 in each year since their enactment.

The number of offenders cautioned and defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 (which came into force on 1 April 2010), in England and Wales, from 2010 to 2013 (latest available) can be viewed in the table.

Arrest data is not held by the Ministry of Justice.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions under the Hunting Act 2004 there were in 2013; how many of those prosecutions were successful; and what offences these prosecutions involved.

Court proceedings data for 2013 are planned for publication in May 2014.