Lord Robathan Portrait

Lord Robathan

Conservative - Life peer

2 APPG memberships (as of 25 Aug 2021)
Belize, Cycling and Walking
3 Former APPG memberships
Indonesia, Oman, Saudi Arabia
EU Internal Market Sub-Committee
5th Jun 2018 - 23rd Apr 2020
Trade Union Political Funds and Political Party Funding Committee
28th Jan 2016 - 29th Feb 2016
Statutory Instruments (Joint Committee)
3rd Nov 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Statutory Instruments (Select Committee)
3rd Nov 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
7th Oct 2013 - 15th Jul 2014
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
6th Sep 2012 - 7th Oct 2013
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Armed Forces Bill Committee
17th Jan 2011 - 8th Mar 2011
Opposition Deputy Chief Whip (Commons)
10th Dec 2005 - 6th May 2010
Administration Committee
14th Dec 2005 - 12th Jul 2007
Shadow Minister (Defence)
1st Jul 2004 - 10th Dec 2005
International Development Committee
8th Dec 2003 - 8th Nov 2004
Shadow Minister (International Development)
1st Jun 2003 - 30th Oct 2003
Shadow Spokesperson (Trade and Industry)
1st Jun 2002 - 1st Jun 2003
International Development Committee
14th Jul 1997 - 19th Nov 2002


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Thursday 10th June 2021
Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development etc.) (England) (Amendment) Order 2021
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 189 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 104 Noes - 241
Speeches
Thursday 16th September 2021
Afghanistan: British Equipment and Training

My Lords, it is not the fault of Her Majesty’s Government that NATO has suffered a humiliating defeat and disaster …

Written Answers
Tuesday 13th July 2021
Coronavirus
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the total number of hospitalisations of patients with COVID-19 since 1 March 2020.
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Robathan has voted in 164 divisions, and 7 times against the majority of their Party.

1 Dec 2020 - Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (All Tiers) (England) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Robathan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 27 Conservative Aye votes vs 178 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 64 Noes - 246
4 Nov 2020 - Health Protection (Coronavirus) (Restrictions) (England) (No. 4) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Robathan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 165 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 30 Noes - 376
28 Sep 2020 - Coronavirus Act 2020: Temporary Provisions - View Vote Context
Lord Robathan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative Aye votes vs 166 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 99 Noes - 198
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Robathan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Conservative Aye votes vs 125 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 112 Noes - 388
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Robathan voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 127 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 355 Noes - 77
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Robathan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 156 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 93 Noes - 418
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Robathan voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative Aye votes vs 151 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 401
View All Lord Robathan Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
(48 debate interactions)
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(24 debate interactions)
Lord True (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
(18 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(47 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(13 debate contributions)
Home Office
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Robathan's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Robathan, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Robathan has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Robathan has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Robathan has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Robathan has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


20 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1st Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many successful prosecutions have taken place under the Coronavirus Act 2020 as a result of court proceedings.

The main criminal offence under the Coronavirus Act relates to potentially infectious persons who refuse to co-operate with the police or public health officers, when they are required to be screened for COVID-19.

There have been no successful prosecutions of any offence created by the Coronavirus Act 2020. A review of completed prosecutions to the end of August 2020 show that 141 cases were incorrectly charged under the Act; because there was no evidence they applied to potentially infectious people, which is what this law covers.

However, data on prosecutions under the Health Protection (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020 shows that under the Regulations there have been 227 prosecutions resulting in guilty pleas, and 6 prosecutions found guilty after trial to the end of August. Data released by the National Police Chiefs Council also shows that 18,912 Fixed Penalty Notices have been issued under the Regulations between 27 March and 21 September by police forces across England and Wales.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
1st Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many deaths from COVID-19 there were among patients in hospital aged under 60 with no pre-existing medical conditions; and what assessment they have made of these deaths.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Robathan,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking how many deaths from COVID-19 there were among patients in hospital aged under 60 with no pre-existing medical conditions (HL8682).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes statistics on deaths in England and Wales and produces a monthly report[1] on provisional deaths involving COVID-19. Mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration. In England and Wales, deaths should ideally be registered within 5 days of the death occurring, but there are some situations that result in the registration of the death being delayed[2].

National Records for Scotland[3] and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency[4] are responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in Scotland and Northern Ireland respectively.

Information on pre-existing health conditions is available based on the conditions mentioned on the death certificate. Our reports on deaths involving COVID-19 contained analysis of pre-existing conditions, most recently based on death occurrences between 2 March and 30 June 2020 that were registered up until 4 July 20201. Our data on pre-existing conditions does not include a place of death breakdown so data has been provided separately instead for deaths involving COVID-19 by place of death.

Table 1 below shows the number of deaths involving COVID-19 that did not have a pre-existing condition, and all deaths involving COVID-19, for persons aged under 60 years, occurring in England and Wales between 2 March and 30 June 2020. Table 2 shows the number of deaths involving COVID-19 by place of death, for persons of all ages, registered in England and Wales between 28 December 2019 and 25 September 2020.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number of deaths involving coronavirus (COVID-19) that had no pre-existing conditions, and all deaths involving COVID-19, persons aged under 60 years, occurring between 2 March and 30 June 2020 and registered by 4 July, England and Wales[5][6][7][8]

Age group

Deaths involving COVID-19 with no pre-existing conditions

Deaths involving COVID-19

0-59

542

3299

Source: ONS

Table 2: Number of deaths involving coronavirus (COVID-19) by place of death, persons, all ages, registered between 28 December 2019 and 25 September 2020, England and Wales[9][10][11][12]

Place of death

Deaths involving COVID-19

Home

2,513

Hospital (acute or community, not psychiatric)

33,556

Hospice

756

Care Home

15,601

Other communal establishment

226

Elsewhere

204

Source: ONS

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsinvolvingcovid19englandandwales/deathsoccurringinjune2020

[2]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/impactofregistrationdelaysonmortalitystatisticsinenglandandwales/2018

[3]https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/

[4]https://www.nisra.gov.uk/

[5]These figures represent death occurrences rather than death registrations.

[6]All figures for 2020 are provisional.

[7]Includes deaths where COVID-19 (ICD-10 codes U07.1 and U07.2) was mentioned anywhere on the death certificate including as the underlying cause of death.

[8]Includes deaths of non-residents.

[9]These figures represent death occurrences rather than death registrations.

[10]All figures for 2020 are provisional.

[11]Includes deaths where COVID-19 (ICD-10 codes U07.1 and U07.2) was mentioned anywhere on the death certificate including as the underlying cause of death.

[12]Includes deaths of non-residents.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many deaths of individuals under the age of 65 have been attributed to COVID-19 since 1 February; and of those, how many of those individuals did not have comorbidities.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Robathan,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking how many deaths of individuals under the age of 65 have been attributed to COVID-19 since 1 February; and of those, how many of those individuals did not have comorbidities (HL8386).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing mortality statistics for deaths registered in England and Wales. The most recent year for which mortality statistics are available is 2019 however we do publish provisional statistics for weekly death registrations which are currently published for deaths registered up to 11 September 2020. National Records Scotland (NRS) and Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) are responsible for publishing the number of deaths registered in Scotland and Northern Ireland respectively.

Cause of death is defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10). Deaths involving COVID-19, defined as either as a contributory or underlying cause of death are identified by the ICD-10 codes U07.1 and U07.2.

The most recent weekly deaths data, based on date of registration, shows that there were 5,550 deaths involving COVID-19 registered for individuals under the age of 65 between 1 February and 11 September 2020.

The latest data available on deaths involving COVID-19 by age group and pre-existing conditions was published in ‘Deaths involving COVID-19, England and Wales: deaths occurring in June 2020’. These figures are based on the date of occurrence rather than date of registration. These data show that there were 5,364 deaths involving COVID-19 that occurred between March and June 2020 to individuals under the age of 65. Of these, 772 (14.4%) did not have a pre-existing condition.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/deathsregisteredinenglandandwalesseriesdrreferencetables

[2]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/weekending11september2020

[3]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsinvolvingcovid19englandandwales/deathsoccurringinjune2020

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
9th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the total number of hospitalisations of patients with COVID-19 since 1 March 2020.

NHS England began collecting data on the number of patients hospitalised with COVID-19 from 20 March 2020. From 20 March 2020 to 4 July 2021, the number of such patients hospitalised in England is 407,019.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Bethell on 1 December (HL Deb, cols 717–21), what assessment they have made of the efficacy of lockdowns in preventing the transmission of COVID-19.

Evidence suggests that more stringent interventions tend to reduce the reproduction number of the virus.

The lockdown imposed in late March and the changes in behaviour that preceded this had a high level of uptake and resulted in a rapid reduction in the reproduction number ‘R’ from about 2.5-3.0 to about 0.5-0.7. That is a reduction in ‘R’ of about 2, or a reduction in transmission of 75%. We continue to review the efficacy of measures.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Bethell on 1 December (HL Deb, cols 717–21), what assessment they have made of the life expectancy of people dying from COVID-19 compared with those dying from other illnesses.

Data are not available to estimate the life expectancy of people who are dying from COVID-19 or dying from other illnesses.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Bethell on 1 December (HL Deb, cols 717–21), how many hospitals have no spare bed capacity; and how many beds are currently occupied above the seasonal norm.

Data on overall spare hospital bed capacity is not collected in the format requested. Data collections on hospital beds are divided into key bed subgroups, including general and acute beds, critical care beds and mental health beds. Hospital bed capacity is not fixed and can be scaled according to requirement.

Additionally, there is no official agreed seasonal norm for bed occupancy.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Bethell on 1 December (HL Deb, cols 717–21), how many beds are currently occupied in each of the NHS Nightingale Hospitals.

Nightingale hospitals are activated based on local clinical decisions in response to patient demand. The National Health Service will flex Nightingale capacity to address demand as has been done throughout the pandemic. As at week commencing 18 January 2021, the NHS Nightingale Hospital Exeter is providing inpatient services to COVID-19 patients from 48 beds. The NHS Nightingale Hospital North West and the NHS Nightingale Hospital London are providing ‘step-down’ care to non-covid-19 patients and provide 36 and 64 beds respectively. Other Nightingale sites at Harrogate and Bristol are supporting NHS elective and diagnostic services but are not providing inpatient services.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) doctors, and (2) nurses, employed by the NHS have died as a result of COVID-19; and how many of those had comorbidities.

The Office for National Statistics publishes mortality data for deaths involving COVID-19 for healthcare workers and social care workers in England and Wales. The last iteration of this release showed that in England there were 305 deaths involving among healthcare workers and 307 deaths among social care workers registered between 9 March and 12 October 2020 in England, aged 20-64 years, using their last known occupation.

The definition of healthcare workers used will include not only those employed in the National Health Service but wider healthcare sector workers. No information is published relating to comorbidities these staff may have had.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many NHS (1) doctors, (2) nurses, and (3) other workers, aged (a) 18–24, (b) 25–29, (c) 30–34, (d) 35–39, (e) 40 or more, years old have (i) contracted, and (ii) died as a result of, COVID-19.

The Department does not hold the information on the number of National Health Service staff that have contracted or died as a result of COVID-19 in the format requested.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the report by Sir John Jenkins Muslim Brotherhood review: main findings, published in December 2015, what recent assessment, if any, they have made of the Muslim Brotherhood.

The Government remains committed to reviewing any groups or individuals whose actions may pose a national security threat to the UK. These reviews are undertaken on the basis of credible evidence and we will continue to consider any new evidence on the Muslim Brotherhood's activities against the UK's legal thresholds.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any Minister or Government representative has met Ibrahim Mounir since his appointment as Secretary General of the International Organisation of the Muslim Brotherhood.

There have been no meetings between Ibrahim Mounir and Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office officials or Ministers since the conclusion of the 2015 Muslim Brotherhood Review.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are reviewing the decision not to include Russia in Schedule 3ZA of High-Risk Third Countries in the Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing (Amendment) (High Risk Countries) Regulations 2021; and if not, why not.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. The Minister will write directly to the Member with a response shortly.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
28th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have classified the poisoning of Sergei and Yulia Skripal on 4 March 2018 as a terrorist attack.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Dissolution. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what evidence they have identified of money obtained as the proceeds of crime in Russia being laundered in the UK.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Dissolution. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Goldie on 27 July (HL6983), whether any military training establishments, specifically (1) Britannia Royal Naval School Dartmouth, (2) Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, and (3) Royal Air Force College Cranwell, have confined all trainees to barracks due to concerns about COVID-19.

Britannia Royal Naval School Dartmouth has implemented COVID-19 control measures, including the operation of a restricted leave policy throughout COVID-19, to protect the Royal Navy's training output in line with its Defence commitments and above all, ensure a safe and secure COVID-19 training environment for its staff and trainees, following as far as practicable, PHE guidance at all times.

Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (RMAS) - All Army recruits, including Officer Cadets at RMAS, have been confined to Army barracks at some stage during the HMG directed Covid-19 restricted movement period. Trainees and staff were released to travel home only for emergencies or in exceptional circumstances.

RAF College Cranwell - there have been no instances where all personnel at RAFC (Royal Air Force College) Cranwell have been confined to their personal accommodation due to concerns about COVID-19. During the peak of ‘lockdown’ all personnel accommodated at RAFC Cranwell were required to stay at the station, unless there were extenuating circumstances requiring weekend leave. The right to weekend leave was decided on an individual basis.

As lockdown restrictions have now eased, personnel are able to visit family and local community facilities, provided that the extant COVID-19 regulations are adhered to.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it is their policy that Armed Forces personnel be confined to barracks during the COVID-19 pandemic; and if so, whether any such policy has applied to (1) personnel undergoing training at depots, schools, bases and officer training establishments, (2) directing staff at such training establishments, and (3) all trained personnel of whatever rank.

It is not Defence policy that Armed Forces personnel be confined to barracks during the COVID-19 pandemic. The only occasions on which personnel may be confined to their accommodation are if they are self- or household-isolating, or if they are required to isolate for a short period prior to deployment.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many serving personnel in the Armed Forces aged (1) 18–24, (2) 25–29, (3) 30–34, (4) 35–39, (5) 40 or more, years old have (a) contracted, and (b) died as a result of, COVID-19.

As at 17 July 2020 (inclusive), 406 UK Armed Forces personnel had a positive COVID-19 infection test result entered into their medical record. Of which:

  • 57 were aged 18-24 years.
  • 70 were aged 25-29 years.
  • 66 were aged 30-34 years.
  • 61 were aged 35-39 years
  • 152 were aged 40+years

Two of these UK Armed Forces personnel with a positive COVID-19 infection test result subsequently died; both personnel were aged 40+ years.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what measures are in place to ensure that prisoners who may be considered jihadists or have links to similar terrorist organisations are kept segregated from prisoners who formerly served in the UK armed forces.

All terrorist and extremist risk prisoners, including those with known links to terrorist organisations, are managed through a specialist case management process. This process enables us to assess the impact an individual or individuals are having on the stability of prisons and the risk they present to others, including particular groups that may be at risk such as former UK armed forces prisoners and staff.