Lord McColl of Dulwich Portrait

Lord McColl of Dulwich

Conservative - Life peer

Long-Term Sustainability of the NHS Committee
25th May 2016 - 5th Apr 2017
Equality Act 2010 and Disability Committee
11th Jun 2015 - 15th Mar 2016
Draft Modern Slavery Bill
15th Jan 2014 - 3rd Apr 2014
HIV and AIDS Committee in the United Kingdom
20th Dec 2010 - 19th Jul 2011
Committee on the Assisted Dying for the terminally ill Bill
30th Nov 2004 - 7th Apr 2005
Science and Technology: Sub-Committee I
12th Dec 2000 - 18th Nov 2004
Science and Technology Committee (Lords)
6th Dec 1999 - 20th Nov 2003
Science and Technology: Sub-Committee I
23rd Nov 1993 - 3rd Nov 1994


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Monday 17th January 2022
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 157 Conservative No votes vs 9 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 261 Noes - 166
Speeches
Monday 17th January 2022
Eating Disorders
My Lords, does the Minister agree that it is a very serious condition that 71% of the British people over …
Written Answers
Wednesday 5th January 2022
Coronavirus: Vaccination
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many patients do not have access to a vaccination centre within 20 miles; and …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 29th November 2021
Modern Slavery (Victim Support) Bill [HL] 2021-22
A Bill to make provision about supporting victims of modern slavery
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord McColl of Dulwich has voted in 180 divisions, and 7 times against the majority of their Party.

17 Mar 2021 - Domestic Abuse Bill - View Vote Context
Lord McColl of Dulwich voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 207 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 125 Noes - 242
9 Nov 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord McColl of Dulwich voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 44 Conservative No votes vs 147 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 165 Noes - 433
6 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord McColl of Dulwich voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 196 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 312 Noes - 211
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord McColl of Dulwich voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Conservative Aye votes vs 125 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 112 Noes - 388
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord McColl of Dulwich voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 127 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 355 Noes - 77
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord McColl of Dulwich voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 156 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 93 Noes - 418
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord McColl of Dulwich voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 144 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 409
View All Lord McColl of Dulwich Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(31 debate interactions)
Baroness Vere of Norbiton (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
(13 debate interactions)
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(33 debate contributions)
Home Office
(25 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(9 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord McColl of Dulwich's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord McColl of Dulwich, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord McColl of Dulwich has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord McColl of Dulwich has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

8 Bills introduced by Lord McColl of Dulwich


A Bill to prohibit the advertising of prostitution; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading (Minute): House Of Lords
Friday 23rd October 2015

To make provision about human trafficking offences, measures to prevent and combat human trafficking and the provision of support for victims of human trafficking.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Lords
Friday 25th November 2011

A Bill to make provision about supporting victims of modern slavery


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Monday 29th November 2021
(Read Debate)

A bill to make provision about supporting victims of modern slavery


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Monday 13th January 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to improve support for people exiting prostitution; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Tuesday 14th June 2016

First reading took place on 22 May. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled. A bill to make provision for the use of electric personal vehicles on highways.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Tuesday 22nd May 2012

A bill to make provision about human trafficking offences and exploitation, and about measures to prevent and combat human trafficking and provision of support for victims.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Tuesday 15th May 2012

A Bill to make provision for the use of electric personal vehicles on highways.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Wednesday 9th February 2011

Lord McColl of Dulwich has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


47 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many children identified as potential victims of human trafficking have gone missing from local authority care in each financial year from 2009–10 to 2018–19.

Information on the number of looked after children who have been identified as potential victims of human trafficking and who go missing from care is not held centrally.

The latest figures on looked after children who go missing in England as at 31 March are published in Table G1 of the statistical release ‘Children Looked after in England including adoptions: 2018 to 2019’, which is attached and is also available at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019.

Slavery and trafficking of children is a very serious offence and the government is committed to protecting children from this harm. The response to trafficking should be primarily about protecting victims and bringing those who exploit them to justice.

Local authorities are responsible for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of all children in their area, including child victims of modern slavery. The department’s statutory guidance for local authorities on care of unaccompanied migrant children and child victims of modern slavery is clear on authorities’ duties to work with local partners to protect child victims of modern slavery from further risk from their traffickers and preventing exploitation from taking place. In particular, there should be a clear understanding between the local authority and the police of their respective roles in planning for this protection and responding if a child victim of modern slavery goes missing.

Section 48 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 makes provisions for Independent Child Trafficking Advocates, which have been renamed Independent Child Trafficking Guardians (ICTGs). ICTGs are an independent source of advice for trafficked children; somebody who can speak up on their behalf and act in the best interests of the child. Currently, ICTGs have been rolled out to one third of local authorities in England and Wales and the government remains committed to a national rollout.

25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what mechanisms are in place to monitor the number of children identified as potential victims of human trafficking who go missing from local authority care.

Information on the number of looked after children who have been identified as potential victims of human trafficking and who go missing from care is not held centrally.

The latest figures on looked after children who go missing in England as at 31 March are published in Table G1 of the statistical release ‘Children Looked after in England including adoptions: 2018 to 2019’, which is attached and is also available at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019.

Slavery and trafficking of children is a very serious offence and the government is committed to protecting children from this harm. The response to trafficking should be primarily about protecting victims and bringing those who exploit them to justice.

Local authorities are responsible for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of all children in their area, including child victims of modern slavery. The department’s statutory guidance for local authorities on care of unaccompanied migrant children and child victims of modern slavery is clear on authorities’ duties to work with local partners to protect child victims of modern slavery from further risk from their traffickers and preventing exploitation from taking place. In particular, there should be a clear understanding between the local authority and the police of their respective roles in planning for this protection and responding if a child victim of modern slavery goes missing.

Section 48 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 makes provisions for Independent Child Trafficking Advocates, which have been renamed Independent Child Trafficking Guardians (ICTGs). ICTGs are an independent source of advice for trafficked children; somebody who can speak up on their behalf and act in the best interests of the child. Currently, ICTGs have been rolled out to one third of local authorities in England and Wales and the government remains committed to a national rollout.

18th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is any scientific evidence that proves that filters in planes and air conditioning units prevent COVID-19 particles from passing through.

Onboard commercial aircraft, cabin air is pre-filtered through High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters before being mixed with fresh air from outside the aircraft and returned back to the cabin. Airbus claim that “The result is that the mix of fresh and pre-filtered recirculated air supplied by the Environment Control System to passengers in Airbus cabins is very clean and virus-free."

Research published by NASA has looked at the efficiency of HEPA filters, such as those present on Airbus and Boeing aircraft. This research supports Airbus’ claim, showing that HEPA filters have capture efficiencies >99.9% for particles of a similar size to that of the COVID-19 virus.

We are planning new research which aims to understand the effect air re-circulation systems have on the transmission of COVID-19 aboard passenger aircraft.

It is important to note that filters within standard air conditioning units may not be HEPA filters and therefore many not offer the same level of protection, and that air filtration alone will not stop all possible routes of COVID-19 transmission.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports that only two vaccination centres in England offer services to add overseas vaccines to the NHS COVID Pass.

The Department does not recognise the reported figures. Currently, 17 sites are capable of recording overseas vaccinations into the National Immunisation Management System. There is at least one site in each of the seven National Health Service regions in England.

The number of vaccination centres offering this service in England is currently limited due to the rapid expansion of the booster programme. The list of vaccination centres offering this service will be expanded in due course.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many patients do not have access to a vaccination centre within 20 miles; and what assessment they have made of the impact of proximity to a vaccination centre on vaccine uptake.

99% of the population in England live within 10 miles of at least one COVID-19 vaccination site. UK-wide data is not held centrally.

The Department is continuously monitoring COVID-19 vaccine uptake and assessing ways to increase it further – with accessibility being a key driver. To support vaccine deployment and minimise inequalities in uptake, NHS England and NHS Improvement have developed practical guidance for communities to implement a range of interventions to ensure equitable access to COVID-19 vaccinations.

To ensure that uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine is maximised, there are now more sites in England delivering COVID-19 vaccines than at any other point in the programme, with around 3000 in total. This includes delivery though hospital hubs, vaccination centres, mobile/pop-up facilities, Primary Care Network-led sites, and community pharmacy-led sites. The network of vaccination sites has been designed to deliver the expected vaccine supply as quickly as possible and ensure safe and easy access for the whole population. For those in highly rural areas, where a vaccination site may be more difficult to reach there is a standard operating procedure for roving and other mobile delivery models to go directly to these communities.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the NHS app will include information about a British national’s COVID-19 vaccination status where the vaccinations were administered outside the UK.

We have provided a pilot service at selected vaccination centres for residents to request their overseas vaccines are uploaded to the national database. A national service will be launched in December which will support online bookings with further vaccination sites available. AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Moderna and Janssen vaccines in the United States of America, the European Union, the European Economic Area, Canada, Switzerland and Australia regulated by the European Medicines Agency, the Food and Drug Administration, Health Canada, Swissmedic and Therapeutic Goods Administration can generate an NHS COVID Pass. A range of vaccines are administered worldwide and we are working to understand which non-Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency-approved equivalent vaccines we would be confident to recognise in the NHS COVID Pass.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the NHS app will include information about booster vaccinations for COVID-19.

The NHS COVID Pass can now be used to demonstrate proof of a booster or third dose for outbound international travel and this record is available through the NHS App and NHS.UK. Booster vaccinations are not required for domestic certification in England.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the average additional cost to the NHS of every patient moved from Tier 3 to Tier 4 Specialist Weight Management Services.

We are not able to estimate the average additional cost of moving all patients treated in Tier 3 services to management under Tier 4 from existing data. There are currently no national tariffs for Tier 3 specialist weight management services and national tariffs of bariatric surgery vary dependent on the type of procedure.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many patients requiring Tier 3 Specialist Weight Management Services went on to require Tier 4 Specialist Weight Management Services in the latest year for which data are available.

This data is not routinely collected centrally. NHS England and NHS Improvement are in the process of engaging with trusts to better understand the current position on waiting times. A planned National Obesity Audit will provide information on conversion rates from Tier 3 Specialist Weight Management Services to Tier 4 Specialist Weight Management Services.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effect that encouraging GPs to refer patients to medical weight loss clinics would have on levels of obesity.

No direct assessment has been made. However, evidence has shown that general practitioners (GP) referrals are effective at encouraging the uptake of weight management services and subsequently result in increased weight loss for those referred. This evidence has informed the decision to invest £20.4 million in the Weight Management Enhanced Service, which financially incentivises GPs to refer individuals to weight management services. We are committed to evaluating the impact of the 2021/22 Weight Management Enhanced Service.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have (1) to ring fence funding, and (2) to prioritise rehabilitation, for hospital patients who are recovering critical illnesses.

The Government has provided a dedicated national discharge fund, managed by the National Health Service, for the first half of 2021/2022 financial year. In tandem with the existing services commissioned by local authorities and clinical commissioning groups, this discharge fund pays for the cost of post-discharge recovery and support services. This includes bed based and home-based rehabilitation and re-ablement care following discharge from hospital and is funded for up to four weeks.

18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether the behavioural and psychological symptoms of people with dementia have worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have collaborated with the South East Clinical Delivery and Networks to publish guidance for primary care networks and care homes on dementia and older people’s mental health, which includes ways to recognise and support people experiencing behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. They have also made guidance and resources available to address the rehabilitation needs of people living with dementia, including the ‘Dementia wellbeing in COVID-19’ resource.

We have commissioned research through the National Institute for Health Research on how to manage or mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on people with dementia and their carers living in the community and concise helpful summary leaflets were produced.

We will be setting out our plans on dementia for England for future years in due course.

18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that the needs and views of people with dementia are taken into account in any workforce plan that forms part of the forthcoming social care reform proposals.

We are working closely with local and national partners from across the sector, including those with dementia and lived experience of the social care system, to ensure that our approach to reform is informed by diverse perspectives.

Together with stakeholders we are considering how we build back fairer to deliver the sustainable improvements to adult social care that we all want to see. We will bring forward proposals for reform later in 2021, including for the social care workforce.

18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to address the rehabilitative needs of people with dementia who have experienced a significant deterioration in their symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The NHS Long Term Plan commits to the Enhanced Health in Care Homes service model that sets out best practice for dementia care including rehabilitation and reablement.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have also made guidance and resources available to address the rehabilitation needs of people living with dementia, including the ‘Dementia wellbeing in COVID-19’ resource.

In addition, we have commissioned research through the National Institute for Health Research on how to manage or mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on people with dementia and their carers living in the community and concise helpful summary leaflets were produced.

We will be setting out our plans on dementia for England for future years in due course.

12th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when HMRC will start to collect VAT from Uber; and what assessment they have made of the amount of VAT to be collected.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) does not disclose details of the tax affairs of particular taxpayers.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
3rd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many grants of discretionary leave to remain have been made to victims of (1) human trafficking, and (2) modern slavery, with a positive conclusive grounds decision from the National Referral Mechanism in the last three financial years.

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is the UK’s system for identifying and providing access to support for potential victims of modern slavery/human trafficking.

The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at on gov.uk.

The 2021 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery has recently been published and can also be found on gov.uk, as well as statistics on immigration outcomes including figures for grants of discretionary leave.

Statistics on the immigration status and immigration outcomes for victims of modern slavery/human trafficking are not currently published.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish an evaluation of the recovery needs assessment for confirmed victims of modern slavery.

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is the UK’s system for identifying and providing access to support for potential victims of modern slavery.

Potential victims have their individual support needs assessed on entry to the NRM and through contact with their support worker. The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) is conducted after a positive Conclusive Grounds (CG) decision.

The RNA enables support workers to consider whether a victim has any ongoing recovery needs arising from their modern slavery experience.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at gov.uk.

The 2021 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery has recently been published and contains an overview of key RNA trends for the year up to 31 July 2021. This report can also be found on gov.uk. The RNA process is kept under continual internal review. Our approach to victim support will be considered further as part of the 2014 Modern Slavery Strategy review which will be published next year.

There are 251.75 FTE decision makers working in the Single Competent Authority. There are 26.26 decision makers working within the Immigration Enforcement Competent Authority. Both Competent Authorities carry a number of vacancies being filled through recruitment activity.

All decision makers across both Competent Authorities will receive consistent training on NRM decisions, Modern Slavery Discretionary leave decisions (as relevant) and on current statutory guidance. All decision makers will be held to the same standards across the Home Office.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to footnote 42 of the 2021 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery, published on 25 November, when they will publish the Single Competent Authority data on recovery needs assessments.

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is the UK’s system for identifying and providing access to support for potential victims of modern slavery.

Potential victims have their individual support needs assessed on entry to the NRM and through contact with their support worker. The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) is conducted after a positive Conclusive Grounds (CG) decision.

The RNA enables support workers to consider whether a victim has any ongoing recovery needs arising from their modern slavery experience.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at gov.uk.

The 2021 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery has recently been published and contains an overview of key RNA trends for the year up to 31 July 2021. This report can also be found on gov.uk. The RNA process is kept under continual internal review. Our approach to victim support will be considered further as part of the 2014 Modern Slavery Strategy review which will be published next year.

There are 251.75 FTE decision makers working in the Single Competent Authority. There are 26.26 decision makers working within the Immigration Enforcement Competent Authority. Both Competent Authorities carry a number of vacancies being filled through recruitment activity.

All decision makers across both Competent Authorities will receive consistent training on NRM decisions, Modern Slavery Discretionary leave decisions (as relevant) and on current statutory guidance. All decision makers will be held to the same standards across the Home Office.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the average length of support (1) requested under an initial Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) made after a positive conclusive grounds decision, (2) provided (a) under initial RNAs after a positive conclusive grounds decision, and (b) beyond the 45 days post-NRM move on support, (3) requested in subsequent RNAs following an initial RNA, and (4) provided in subsequent RNAs following an initial RNA, between 27 September 2019 and 31 July 2021.

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is the UK’s system for identifying and providing access to support for potential victims of modern slavery.

Potential victims have their individual support needs assessed on entry to the NRM and through contact with their support worker. The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) is conducted after a positive Conclusive Grounds (CG) decision.

The RNA enables support workers to consider whether a victim has any ongoing recovery needs arising from their modern slavery experience.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at gov.uk.

The 2021 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery has recently been published and contains an overview of key RNA trends for the year up to 31 July 2021. This report can also be found on gov.uk. The RNA process is kept under continual internal review. Our approach to victim support will be considered further as part of the 2014 Modern Slavery Strategy review which will be published next year.

There are 251.75 FTE decision makers working in the Single Competent Authority. There are 26.26 decision makers working within the Immigration Enforcement Competent Authority. Both Competent Authorities carry a number of vacancies being filled through recruitment activity.

All decision makers across both Competent Authorities will receive consistent training on NRM decisions, Modern Slavery Discretionary leave decisions (as relevant) and on current statutory guidance. All decision makers will be held to the same standards across the Home Office.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the average length of time for a confirmed victim of modern slavery to receive (1) an initial Recovery Needs Assessment Plan, and (2) a decision on a subsequent Recovery Needs Assessment request for ongoing support, between 27 September 2019 and 31 July 2021.

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is the UK’s system for identifying and providing access to support for potential victims of modern slavery.

Potential victims have their individual support needs assessed on entry to the NRM and through contact with their support worker. The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) is conducted after a positive Conclusive Grounds (CG) decision.

The RNA enables support workers to consider whether a victim has any ongoing recovery needs arising from their modern slavery experience.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at gov.uk.

The 2021 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery has recently been published and contains an overview of key RNA trends for the year up to 31 July 2021. This report can also be found on gov.uk. The RNA process is kept under continual internal review. Our approach to victim support will be considered further as part of the 2014 Modern Slavery Strategy review which will be published next year.

There are 251.75 FTE decision makers working in the Single Competent Authority. There are 26.26 decision makers working within the Immigration Enforcement Competent Authority. Both Competent Authorities carry a number of vacancies being filled through recruitment activity.

All decision makers across both Competent Authorities will receive consistent training on NRM decisions, Modern Slavery Discretionary leave decisions (as relevant) and on current statutory guidance. All decision makers will be held to the same standards across the Home Office.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 23 November 2020 (HL10081), what training will be given to decision makers in the Immigration Enforcement Competent Authority; and how this will differ from training for decision makers in the Single Competent Authority.

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is the UK’s system for identifying and providing access to support for potential victims of modern slavery.

Potential victims have their individual support needs assessed on entry to the NRM and through contact with their support worker. The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) is conducted after a positive Conclusive Grounds (CG) decision.

The RNA enables support workers to consider whether a victim has any ongoing recovery needs arising from their modern slavery experience.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at gov.uk.

The 2021 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery has recently been published and contains an overview of key RNA trends for the year up to 31 July 2021. This report can also be found on gov.uk. The RNA process is kept under continual internal review. Our approach to victim support will be considered further as part of the 2014 Modern Slavery Strategy review which will be published next year.

There are 251.75 FTE decision makers working in the Single Competent Authority. There are 26.26 decision makers working within the Immigration Enforcement Competent Authority. Both Competent Authorities carry a number of vacancies being filled through recruitment activity.

All decision makers across both Competent Authorities will receive consistent training on NRM decisions, Modern Slavery Discretionary leave decisions (as relevant) and on current statutory guidance. All decision makers will be held to the same standards across the Home Office.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what they estimate they have made of the cost of policing Extinction Rebellion protests in (1) 2019, (2) 2020, and (3) 2021; and whether any of those costs have been met by the organisers of the protests.

The highly disruptive tactics used by some protesters cause a disproportionate impact on the surrounding communities and are a drain on public funds. The management of protests, including the tactics they use; their cost; and their resourcing, is an operational matter for the police.

During Extinction Rebellion’s protests of April and October 2019, the Metropolitan Police Service reported that policing operations for the two extended protests cost around £37m - more than twice the annual budget of London's violent crime taskforce.

The right to peaceful protest remains a fundamental tool of civic expression and will not be curtailed by this Government. Protesters are not charged for the costs of policing protests.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their estimate of the cost of policing Extinction Rebellion protests in (1) 2019, (2) 2020, and (3) 2021; and whether any of those costs have been met by the organisers of the protests.

The highly disruptive tactics used by some protesters cause a disproportionate impact on the surrounding communities and are a drain on public funds. The management of protests, including the tactics they use; their cost; and their resourcing, is an operational matter for the police. The PCSC Bill aims to allow the police to take a more proactive approach in managing highly disruptive protests and will increase the police’s ability to prevent protests causing serious disruption to the public,

During Extinction Rebellion’s protests of April and October 2019, the Metropolitan Police Service reported that policing operations for the two extended protests cost around £37m - more than twice the annual budget of London's violent crime taskforce.

The right to peaceful protest remains a fundamental tool of civic expression and will not be curtailed by this Government. Protesters are not charged for the costs of policing protests.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the data provided in the 2020 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery about the average length of support requested under the Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) process, between 27 September 2019 and 30 June 2020, what was the average length of support (1) requested in initial RNAs made after a positive conclusive grounds decision, (2) provided under initial RNAs after a positive conclusive grounds decision, and beyond the 45 days post-NRM move on support, (3) requested in subsequent RNAs following an initial RNA, and (4) provided in subsequent RNAs following an initial RNA.

This Government is committed to stamping out modern slavery and providing victims with the support they need to rebuild their lives.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

The UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2020-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the average length of time for a confirmed victim of modern slavery to receive (1) an initial Recovery Needs Assessment plan, and (2) a decision on a subsequent Recovery Needs Assessment request for ongoing support, between 27 September 2019 and 30 June 2020.

This Government is committed to stamping out modern slavery and providing victims with the support they need to rebuild their lives.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

The UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2020-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many individual confirmed victims of modern slavery had more than one Recovery Needs Assessment due to ongoing support needs, between 27 September 2019 to 30 June 2020.

This Government is committed to stamping out modern slavery and providing victims with the support they need to rebuild their lives.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

The UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2020-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether requests for accommodation under the Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) process referred to in the 2020 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery were received from (a) victims already provided with accommodation under the Victim Care Contract (VCC), (b) victims not provided with accommodation under the VCC at the time of the request, or (c) both; and whether victims not currently accommodated by the VCC are eligible to request accommodation under the RNA process.

The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) process takes place for all confirmed victims of modern slavery who are receiving support through the Victim Care Contract (VCC), including those in both outreach support and those provided with accommodation through the VCC. The RNA process ensures that support is tailored to the victims’ individual recovery needs and informs a tailored move-on plan to help victims transition out of VCC support as appropriate.

Support workers can request any or all three pillars of VCC support – accommodation, financial support and support worker contact – where appropriate for any confirmed victim undergoing the RNA process. VCC accommodation will be provided, or will continue to be provided, where there is an identified recovery need for it and where alternative accommodation options are not available or suitable. If, for any reason, the recovery needs of a confirmed victim change during the approved move-on plan, a further RNA can be completed by the support worker to reflect this.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what training on conducting Recovery Needs Assessments (RNA) and approving RNA plans has been provided to staff (1) of the Salvation Army, (2) subcontractors in the Victim Care Contract, and (3) the Single Competent Authority; and what funds have been provided for such training to be carried out.

All confirmed victims of Modern Slavery will have their support needs assessed by their support worker as part of the Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) process, to inform a tailored move-on plan that is personalised to their specific recovery needs. These assessments are quality assured by the prime contractor (The Salvation Army, ‘TSA’) before being submitted to the Single Competent Authority (SCA) for a decision.

The published RNA guidance provides detailed information for TSA, subcontractors and the SCA on carrying out this process. This document includes guidance on how to complete the RNA form, guidance on when recovery needs arising from modern slavery may require support through the Victim Care Contract (VCC) and where recovery needs may be met by alternative support services. This guidance can be found: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/recovery-needs-assessment-rna-process-guidance.

Staff training for TSA and its subcontractors, including training on the RNA process, is a matter for TSA as the prime contractor. Training costs are met by funds provided through the Home Office’s VCC to deliver these support services.

All new SCA staff working on RNAs receive initial training detailing decision-making practice, the purpose of RNAs, published guidance, legislation, decision types and quality expectations. Following initial training each new Decision Maker (DM) spends a number of weeks shadowing an experienced DM, being shown a variety of decisions being considered and written, and referring back to guidance. This consolidation period allows a new DM to match the theoretical learning with its practical application.

The DM will then be allocated suitable cases of their own to start making decisions for victims. Each DM has a buddy (who is an experienced member of the team) allocated for any support required, and every decision is checked by a Technical Expert for accuracy and quality. The cases assigned increase in variety and complexity, with the buddy system and full checking remaining in place to ensure that every decision is correct and any additional support or learning for the DM is provided. Once the quality and accuracy checking results for a DM are consistently at the standards required, the DM becomes a “signed off” decision maker and moves into Business As Usual checking arrangements.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay on 7 September (HL Deb, cols 620–2), whether they will place in the Library of the House a copy of the analysis of which rights within the EU Anti-Trafficking Directive 2011/36/EU will have direct effect in the UK on 1 January 2021, notwithstanding any court judgments made before the end of the year.

The Government is committed to eradicating human trafficking and the scourge of modern slavery.

As Lord Parkinson rightly noted, the UK currently gives effect to obligations on modern slavery under Council of the Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (ECAT), Article 4 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and the EU Anti-Trafficking Directive (2011/36), through the Modern Slavery Act 2015 and policy guidance.

At the end of the EU Exit transition period in December 2020, the UK will no longer be bound by EU law. The Modern Slavery Act 2015 and relevant policy guidance will be unaffected. The UK will remain bound by international obligations in relation to preventing and combatting human trafficking and modern slavery – most notably ECAT and Article 4 ECHR, neither of which have been impacted by our exit from the EU.

We are implementing a programme of work to transform how we identify and support victims of modern slavery, emphasising our continued commitment to a world-leading system having left the European Union.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 10 March (HL1877), when the next evaluation of the Independent Child Trafficking Guardians will be published.

An evaluation of the Independent Child Trafficking Guardians (ICTG) service within the early adopter sites was published in July 2019 and can be found here (https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/819723/evaluation-independent-child-trafficking-guardians-final-horr111.pdf). This evaluation was conducted on the service provided in the three initial sites of Greater Manchester, Hampshire and Wales between February 2017 and January 2019. Over this time period, 445 children were referred to the ICTG service.

Later this year the Home Office will publish its next evaluation of the ICTG service, which will have a particular focus on the role and impact of the Regional Practice Co-Ordinator and will provide further updates on outcomes of the service including the number of children it supports.

In 2019, the Independent Review of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, made a number of recommendations about ICTGs. In-line with the Government’s response (https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/815410/Government_Response_to_Independent_Review_of_MS_Act.pdf), we are considering these recommendations, alongside evaluation outcomes, which will feed into our future plans for ICTGs.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 11 March (HL1941), how much money has been allocated to fund Independent Child Trafficking Guardians for this (1) financial year, and (2) the next two financial years.

Last year, the Government successfully rolled out Independent Child Trafficking Guardians (ICTGs) to one third of local authorities in England and Wales.

The continued national roll-out of ICTGs will be progressed as part of the recently established NRM Transformation Programme, which is designed to make sure we have a system that effectively identifies and delivers needs-based support for child and adult victims of modern slavery, is legally robust, sustainable and resilient to misuse. We will continue to review how the needs of individual children are best met at local level through the programme.

This financial year, the Home Office has allocated approximately £1.6m to the provision of Independent Child Trafficking Guardians (ICTGs) in the existing six early adopter sites. Home Office budget allocations for 2021/22 and 2022/23 will be determined in the next Spending Review.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many children have been referred to Independent Child Trafficking Guardians since 1 February 2019.

An evaluation of the Independent Child Trafficking Guardians (ICTG) service within the early adopter sites was published in July 2019 and can be found here (https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/819723/evaluation-independent-child-trafficking-guardians-final-horr111.pdf). This evaluation was conducted on the service provided in the three initial sites of Greater Manchester, Hampshire and Wales between February 2017 and January 2019. Over this time period, 445 children were referred to the ICTG service.

Later this year the Home Office will publish its next evaluation of the ICTG service, which will have a particular focus on the role and impact of the Regional Practice Co-Ordinator and will provide further updates on outcomes of the service including the number of children it supports.

In 2019, the Independent Review of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, made a number of recommendations about ICTGs. In-line with the Government’s response (https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/815410/Government_Response_to_Independent_Review_of_MS_Act.pdf), we are considering these recommendations, alongside evaluation outcomes, which will feed into our future plans for ICTGs.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 11 March (HL1946), whether they will now answer the question put, namely how many (1) non-EEA, and (2) non-UK national victims of trafficking with a positive conclusive grounds decision have received support following a recovery needs assessment.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics.

The UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2019-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have (1) to update the guidance on the recovery needs assessments, and (2) to publish an evaluation of the first nine months of the recovery needs assessment.

This Government is committed to providing victims with the support that they need to help re-build their lives.

Since the roll-out of the Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) in September 2019, we have worked collaboratively with The Salvation Army (TSA), TSA’s subcontracted support providers and wider stakeholders to implement this new process and gather wider feedback from frontline staff on aspects of the published guidance.

An updated version of the guidance will be published later in 2020, alongside the introduction of a restructured RNA form which will be amended to reflect feedback from support workers using the form on the front line..

The 2020 Modern Slavery Annual Report, due for publication in October 2020, will include further information about the roll-out of the RNA over the past year.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of victims of human trafficking that have lost Government support and assistance during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Support provided to victims of modern slavery through the Victim Care Contract (VCC) is available to potential and confirmed victims for as long as they have an identified recovery need that cannot be met by alternative services.

A confirmed victim will only be exited from Victim Care Contract (VCC) support where the Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) process finds that there is no longer an ongoing recovery need for VCC support or that the confirmed victim has access to alternative support services to meet their recovery needs, such as local authority housing or mainstream benefits. This process ensures that ongoing support is tailored to the victim’s individual recovery needs arising from their modern slavery experiences.

Contingency planning has, and continues to, ensure essential services and support for all victims of modern slavery is available throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and as lockdown begins to ease. Through the RNA process, we also consider the impact the pandemic is having on access to alternative services which may impact on a victim’s ability to move on from VCC services.

On 6 April, in line with Public Health England guidance, we announced that all individuals accommodated by the VCC would not be required to move on from their Government-funded accommodation for a period of three months. This has now been extended and the policy will remain in place until 6 August 2020.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money has been allocated to fund independent guardians for trafficked children in the current, and each of the last three, financial years; and how much they intend to allocate for such purposes in 2020–21.

Over the last three financial years, the Home Office has allocated approximately £3m to the provision of Independent Child Trafficking Guardians (ICTGs) in early adopter sites, broken down as: 2017/18, £0.5m; 2018/19, £1m; 2019/20, £1.53m. Home Office budget allocations for 2020/21 are currently being agreed.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many victims of human trafficking who receive a positive conclusive grounds decision have (1) had the recovery needs assessment, and (2) been granted additional support; what is the average length of time assigned to victims under the recovery needs assessment; and how many of those who have been granted additional support are waiting for an immigration decision from the Home Office.

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is the UK’s system for identifying and providing access to support for potential victims of modern slavery.

Potential victims have their individual support needs assessed on entry to the NRM and through contact with their support worker while they remain in the system awaiting a conclusive grounds (CG) decision. The Recovery Needs Assessment is conducted after a positive CG.

The RNA enables support workers to consider whether a victim has any ongoing recovery needs arising from their modern slavery experience.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics

The UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2019-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many victims of human trafficking in England and Wales with a positive conclusive grounds decision received discretionary leave to remain in 2018–19, and on what grounds.

The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics and the UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2019-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery

Statistics on the total number of people granted discretionary leave for all reasons can be found at:https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-year-ending-december-2019

A positive conclusive grounds decision does not result in an automatic grant of immigration leave. However, the Single Competent Authority (SCA) will consider whether a grant of discretionary leave is appropriate based on the victim’s individual circumstances and usually after consideration has been made by UK Visas and Immigration of any existing applications for more advantageous forms of leave.

The grounds for granting discretionary leave to victims of modern slavery, which includes human trafficking, slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour, can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/739436/dl-for-victims-of-modern-slavery-v2.pdf

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many victims of human trafficking with a positive (1) reasonable, and (2) conclusive, grounds decision are currently held in immigration detention.

The Home Office does record the number of all individuals referred to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) this information is published quarterly and can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/national-referral-mechanism-statistics-quarter-3-2019-july-to-september

This information does not distinguish between those detained under immigration powers and those living in the community. The reason for this is two-fold, firstly because the NRM referral is not an immigration route by which individuals should regularise their stay in the United Kingdom and secondly, because a person’s status in immigration detention is not permanent and can change.

The use of immigration detention in all cases is subject to regular reviews and consequently, a change in circumstance may result in a different consideration. It is quite possible that an immigration detainee is referred to the National Referral Mechanism during a detention period and is re-leased into the community at any point during that process.

As National Referral Mechanism (NRM) referrals, Reasonable Grounds and Conclusive Grounds decisions are considered separately from immigration enforcement action, there is no central record of those who have received a positive (1) reasonable, and (2) conclusive, grounds decision and are detained under immigration powers. The Home Office therefore does not collate or publish the data requested.

Published data on the number individuals held in immigration detention can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-december-2018/how-many-people-are-detained-or-returned

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to incorporate EU Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims into UK law.

The Government is committed to eradicating human trafficking and the scourge of modern slavery.

The UK currently gives effect to obligations on modern slavery under The Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (ECAT), Article 4 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and the EU Anti-Trafficking Directive (2011/36), through the Modern Slavery Act 2015 and policy guidance.

At the end of the EU Exit transition period in December 2020, the UK will no longer be bound by EU law. The Modern Slavery Act 2015 and relevant policy guidance will be unaffected. The UK will remain bound by international obligations in relation to preventing and combatting human trafficking and modern slavery.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) non-EEA, and (2) non-UK national, victims of trafficking with a positive conclusive grounds decision have received support following a recovery needs assessment.

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is the UK’s system for identifying and providing access to support for potential victims of modern slavery.

Potential victims have their individual support needs assessed on entry to the NRM and through contact with their support worker while they remain in the system awaiting a conclusive grounds (CG) decision. The Recovery Needs Assessment is conducted after a positive CG.

The RNA enables support workers to consider whether a victim has any ongoing recovery needs arising from their modern slavery experience.

The information requested on RNA data does not currently form part of the published NRM statistics. The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-referral-mechanism-statistics

The UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2019-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish guidance about identifying and supporting victims of human trafficking as required under section 49 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

The Government recognises that publishing statutory guidance under section 49 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 is important in ensuring that victims are provided with the support they need to begin rebuilding their lives.

We aim to publish the guidance as soon as possible.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government since 30 January 2017 what percentage of children stopped receiving support from an independent guardian because they had turned 18 years old; and how many of those stopped receiving such support within 18 months of it starting.

Last year, the Government successfully rolled out Independent Child Trafficking Guardians (ICTGs) in one third of local authorities in England and Wales.

In July 2019, the Home Office published an evaluation of ICTGs in early adopter sites, conducted in collaboration with the University of Bedfordshire. The evaluation considered the added value of the ICTG service. It found that 21% of children left the service, from the period of February 2017 to January 2019, because they turned 18. This was the main reason why children left the service. Whilst ICTGs can work with a child for up to 18 months, the evaluation found that the average length of time a child spent in the service was six months. The evaluation can be viewed online via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/an-evaluation-of-independent-child-trafficking-guardians-early-adopter-sites-final-report

The Home Office will publish its next evaluation of the ICTG service later this year.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Slavery and Trafficking Reparation Orders under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 have been made in each financial year since the passing of that Act; how many victims have received compensation as a result of those reparation orders; and what was the (1) total, and (2) average, amount of those compensation awards.

Data centrally held by the Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunal Service records reparation orders issued as part of a community sentence and does not separately identify slavery and trafficking reparation orders issued under the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

The latest available data on community sentences up to 2018 can be found at:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802314/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2018.xlsx

The Independent Review of the Modern Slavery Act, which took place during 2018/19 examined the effectiveness of this provision and the compensation awarded to victims. The Reviewers recommended that this compensation should be at the forefront of the Court’s mind.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) prosecutions, and (2) convictions, for human trafficking-related offences there were in each of the last five calendar years.

The Ministry of Justice has published data on the number of people prosecuted and convicted in England and Wales up to the year ending December 2018 for the following human trafficking-related offences

  • Human trafficking for sexual exploitation;
  • Human trafficking for non-sexual exploitation;
  • Arrange or facilitate travel of another person with a view to exploitation;
  • Commit offence of kidnapping or false imprisonment with intention of arranging travel with view to exploitation; and
  • Commit offence other than kidnapping or false imprisonment with intention of arranging travel with view to exploitation.

Note that the first two offences in this list, were superseded in 2015 by the latter three offences (arrange or facilitate travel of another person with a view to exploitation, commit offence of kidnapping or false imprisonment with intention of arranging travel with view to exploitation, commit offence other than kidnapping or false imprisonment with intention of arranging travel with view to exploitation), all of which are under the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Figures can be found in the table attached. If an offence does not appear in the table, it means there were no prosecutions or convictions for it in the period given.