Lord Marlesford Portrait

Lord Marlesford

Conservative - Life peer

1 APPG membership (as of 22 Jul 2022)
Egypt
European Union Committee
16th May 2012 - 14th May 2014
European Union Committee
8th Dec 2003 - 30th Oct 2007
Statutory Instruments (Joint Committee)
4th Dec 1991 - 17th Mar 1992


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Monday 4th July 2022
CHOGM, G7 and NATO Summits
My Lords, President Putin has more than once suggested that he stands ready, if he thinks it necessary, to use …
Written Answers
Tuesday 26th July 2022
Sizewell C Power Station
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to make a decision on (1) whether to grant Sizewell C …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 1st June 2015
Council Tax Valuation Bands Bill [HL] 2015-16
A Bill to make provision for the introduction of a new set of council tax valuation bands to apply to …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Marlesford has voted in 212 divisions, and 16 times against the majority of their Party.

13 Jan 2021 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 213 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 269
7 Dec 2020 - Conduct Committee Report - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 147 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 408 Noes - 24
9 Nov 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 44 Conservative No votes vs 147 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 165 Noes - 433
9 Nov 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 38 Conservative No votes vs 134 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 148 Noes - 407
21 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 197 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 166 Noes - 237
20 Oct 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 39 Conservative Aye votes vs 158 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 395 Noes - 169
28 Sep 2020 - Coronavirus Act 2020: Temporary Provisions - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative Aye votes vs 166 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 99 Noes - 198
17 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 201 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 280 Noes - 218
23 Jun 2020 - Corporate Insolvency and Governance Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 203 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 160 Noes - 241
23 Jun 2020 - Corporate Insolvency and Governance Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 191 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 155 Noes - 326
20 Jan 2020 - European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 176 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 206 Noes - 186
15 Apr 2021 - National Security and Investment Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 222 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 296 Noes - 232
12 Oct 2021 - Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 148 Noes - 129
12 Oct 2021 - Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 131 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 135 Noes - 135
17 Jan 2022 - Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 157 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 261 Noes - 166
28 Feb 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Marlesford voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 10 Conservative Aye votes vs 85 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 112 Noes - 89
View All Lord Marlesford Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(13 debate interactions)
Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(7 debate interactions)
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(6 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(12 debate contributions)
Ministry of Defence
(3 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Marlesford's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Marlesford, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Marlesford has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Marlesford has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

5 Bills introduced by Lord Marlesford


A Bill to make provision for the management of Parliament Square; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - Report Stage: House Of Lords
Tuesday 27th March 2012

A Bill to make provision for the introduction of a new set of council tax valuation bands to apply to all dwellings bought or sold after 1 April 2000


Last Event - Committee: 1st Sitting (Minutes Of Proceedings): House Of Lords
Friday 22nd April 2016

A Bill to introduce a civil penalty for littering from vehicles and to require local authorities to publish details of contracts relating to litter clearance.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Lords
Friday 19th July 2013


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Tuesday 24th June 2014

First reading took place on 18 July. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled. A bill to introduce a civil penalty for littering from vehicles and to require local authorities to publish details of contracts relating to litter clearance.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Wednesday 18th July 2012

Lord Marlesford has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


92 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6 Other Department Questions
2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what would be the level of financial support for Members if it had been adjusted for inflation since 1 October 2010.

The Daily Allowance rate was introduced on 1 October 2010 at £300 per day. If it had been adjusted annually for inflation by the Consumer Price Index, it would be £379 per day from 1 October 2021.

20th Jul 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker whether the four members of the House of Lords Conduct Committee who are not Members of the House of Lords have full voting rights in any vote of that Committee which involves (1) the culpability of a Member of the House of Lords being investigated, and (2)  the decision as to any penalty on a Member of the House, to be reported for the approval of the House; and to which other Select Committees of the House similar voting rights apply to any outside members of such committees.

Following a consultation exercise and a lengthy debate on 30 April 2019, the House agreed that the lay members of the Conduct Committee should have full voting rights in order to bring a measure of independence to the conduct process. The House has not to date conferred voting rights on external members of other committees. In the House of Commons, the lay members of the Standards Committee (of which there are seven, alongside the seven MPs) have full voting rights, and the Independent Expert Panel which determines appeals and sanctions in cases of bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct is made up entirely of external members.

27th May 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many Members of the House of Lords have so far completed the Valuing Everyone training sessions; how many of these Members submitted feedback on the sessions; and of these responses, how many overall were (1) favourable, and (2) unfavourable.

As at 9 June, 763 Members of the House of Lords have completed Valuing Everyone training. Of these, 492 completed an evaluation form. In response to the question ‘Would you recommend the course to others?’, 460 Members out of 485 (95%) answered ‘yes’. In response to the question ‘Please rate your level of confidence calling out unacceptable behaviour AFTER the course’, 447 Members out of 485 (92%) answered ‘very good’ or ‘good’.

27th May 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what was the cost to the taxpayer of producing the film made for use in the Valuing Everyone training sessions for Members of the House of Lords.

The video made for use in Valuing Everyone training sessions for Members of the Lords cost £6,000.

In feedback following an earlier version of the training sessions, the course providers were explicitly asked by Members to make the video scenario more directly reminiscent of situations that have arisen in the Lords, rather than the previous and more generic video about a female employee and her manager which was used when the sessions were attended by a mixture of MPs and Peers.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what has been the total cost to public funds to date for Members of the House of Lords undertaking Valuing Everyone training.

To date, £82,158 has been spent on Valuing Everyone training for members of the House of Lords. The same training courses have been offered to, and attended by, members of both Houses. This figure includes an assumption of cost per head, as well as 30% share of development costs, pilot sessions and administration fees.

27th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of those who died with COVID-19 in each of the last 20 weeks had received no vaccination against the disease.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Lord Marlesford

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

4 November 2021

Dear Lord Marlesford,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking what percentage of those who died with COVID-19 in each of the last 20 weeks had received no vaccination against the disease (HL3492).

The data requested is provided, for England, in Table 1, using the most recent data we have available. Information on vaccination status is not included on the death certificate. It is obtained by linkage to the vaccination data from the National immunisation Management Service (NIMS) produced by NHS-E. While the Office for National Statistics (ONS) are responsible for the production of mortality data for England and Wales, we do not hold similar data for Wales. National Records Scotland (NRS) and Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) are responsible for statistics pertaining to Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Please note that the numbers of deaths of unvaccinated persons will depend on the changing number of people who are unvaccinated and the changing characteristics of unvaccinated people, which vary due to the selective vaccination roll-out and differences in uptake.

To compare the risk of death in unvaccinated and fully vaccinated individuals, we advise using the age-standardised mortality rates (ASMRs) for deaths involving COVID-19 for unvaccinated persons and for other vaccination statuses in our publication “Deaths involving COVID-19 by vaccination status, England: deaths occurring between 2 January and 24 September 2021” [1]. These take into account the changing size and age structure of the populations with different vaccination status. This data is for England only and covers approximately 86% of all deaths.These ASMRs show that the risk of death involving COVID-19 is much lower in fully vaccinated than in unvaccinated people.

Please note, other factors such as the health of the people who are unvaccinated may differ from the vaccinated population and change over time, which will affect the age-standardised mortality rates.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1] https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsinvolvingcovid19byvaccinationstatusengland/latest

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of the first 100,000 people to die as a result of COVID-19 died in (1) England, (2) Scotland, (3) Wales, and (4) Northern Ireland; how many of those died (a) in hospital, (b) in care homes, and (c) elsewhere; and how many of those were (i) over 80 years old, (ii) over 70 years old, (iii) under 50 years old, (iv) BAME, (v) male, and (vi) female.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

The Lord Marlesford DL
House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

03 March 2021

Dear Lord Marlesford,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking what proportion of the first 100,000 people to die as a result of COVID-19 died in (1) England, (2) Scotland, (3) Wales, and (4) Northern Ireland; how many of those died (a) in hospital, (b) in care homes, and (c) elsewhere; and how many of those were (i) over 80 years old, (ii) over 70 years old, (iii) under 50 years old, (iv) BAME, (v) male, and (vi) female (HL13602).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes statistics on deaths in England and Wales and produces a weekly report[1] on provisional numbers of deaths involving COVID-19. Mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration. National Records for Scotland[2] and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency[3] are responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in Scotland and Northern Ireland respectively.

We cannot precisely organise deaths involving COVID-19 into the ‘first 100,000’ at this time. However, we have provided figures for deaths registered up to the end of Week 2 of 2021 (ending 15 January 2021) which is when deaths involving COVID-19 first passed 100,000 in total.

Table 1 below provides the number of deaths involving COVID-19 in the UK, and the proportion of these in England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. Table 2 provides the number of deaths involving COVID-19 by place of death in each UK country. Table 3 provides the number of deaths involving COVID by age group and sex. Please note that the UK totals in Table 3 are slightly different from Tables 1 and 2, as published data by age group and sex are only available for England and Wales combined (including non-residents) rather than England and Wales as individual countries.

The ONS has published a report on ethnic contrasts in deaths involving COVID-19 in England and Wales[4]. Table 4 shows the number of deaths involving COVID-19 in England and Wales; data have been published for deaths that occurred (rather than were registered) between 2 March 2020 and 28 July 2020. Please note this data includes only deaths that could be linked to the 2011 Census, as this was necessary to obtain ethnic group data. Because the method of calculation is different, the numbers do not relate directly to those in Tables 1 to 3.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number and proportion of deaths involving COVID-19, weeks ending 13 March 2020 to 15 January 2021, England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland [5][6][7][8][9]

-

UK

England

Wales

Scotland1

Northern Ireland

Number of deaths involving COVID-19

104,446

88,974

5,884

7,460

2,128

% of UK total

100.0%

85.2%

5.6%

7.1%

2.0%

Source: ONS, NRS, and NISRA

Table 2: Number of deaths involving COVID-19, weeks ending 13 March 2020 to 15 January 2021 by place of occurrence, England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland [10][11]

Place of death

UK

England

Wales

Scotland1

Northern Ireland

All places of death

104,446

88,974

5,884

7,460

2,128

Home

5,256

4,376

286

459

135

Care home

26,393

21,615

1,267

2,869

642

Hospital

70,793

61,101

4,247

4,116

1,329

Other

2,004

1,882

84

16

22

Source: ONS, NRS and NISRA


Table 3: Number of deaths involving COVID-19, weeks ending 13 March 2020 to 15 January 2021, by broad age group and sex, England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland

Sex

Age group

UK total6

England & Wales6

Scotland

Northern Ireland

People

All ages

103,720

94,132

7,460

2,128

-

Under 1 year

3

2

1

0

-

1-14

9

9

0

0

-

15-44

1,004

941

49

14

-

45-64

9,615

8,777

670

168

-

65-74

15,798

14,305

1,188

305

-

75-84

33,855

30,647

2,478

730

-

85+

43,436

39,451

3,074

911

Males

All ages

56,596

51,693

3,831

1,072

-

Under 1 year

2

2

0

0

-

1-14

4

4

0

0

-

15-44

587

554

27

6

-

45-64

6,188

5,656

433

99

-

65-74

10,036

9,119

729

188

-

75-84

19,848

18,067

1,376

405

-

85+

19,931

18,291

1,266

374

Females

All ages

47,124

42,439

3,629

1,056

-

Under 1 year

1

0

1

0

-

1-14

5

5

0

0

-

15-44

417

387

22

8

-

45-64

3,427

3,121

237

69

-

65-74

5,762

5,186

459

117

-

75-84

14,007

12,580

1,102

325

-

85+

23,505

21,160

1,808

537

Source: ONS, NRS and NISRA


Table 4: Number of deaths involving COVID-19 by ethnic group and sex, deaths occurring 2 March 2020 to 28 July 2020, England and Wales[12][13]

Ethnic group

Sex

Aged 9 to 64 years

Aged 65 to 110 years

Bangladeshi

Male

61

112

Bangladeshi

Female

19

54

Black African

Male

159

188

Black African

Female

85

96

Black Caribbean

Male

95

514

Black Caribbean

Female

67

306

Chinese

Male

16

78

Chinese

Female

8

55

Indian

Male

180

525

Indian

Female

80

357

Mixed

Male

29

144

Mixed

Female

30

99

Other

Male

186

351

Other

Female

85

226

Pakistani

Male

119

286

Pakistani

Female

75

156

White

Male

1,939

20,531

White

Female

1,184

18,201

Source: ONS

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/latest

[2]https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/

[3]https://www.nisra.gov.uk/

[4]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/updatingethniccontrastsindeathsinvolvingthecoronaviruscovid19englandandwales/deathsoccurring2marchto28july2020

[5] Weeks for Scotland run Monday to Sunday rather than Saturday to Friday, so Week 2 of 2021 is week ending 11th January 2021 rather than week ending 15 January 2021

[6] Figures for individual countries exclude deaths of non-residents. Figures for “England and Wales” totals include non-residents of England and Wales; for this reason, UK totals in Table 3 differ from Tables 1 and 2.

[7] Data in Tables 1, 3 and 3 are based on date a death was registered rather than occurred. Data in Table 4 are based on the date a death occurred, registered up to 24 August 2020. There is a delay between a death occurring and it being registered

[8] All figures for 2020 and 2021 are provisional.

[9] The International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition (ICD-10) definitions are as follows: coronavirus (COVID-19) (U07.1 and U07.2). We use the term “involving COVID-19” when referring to deaths that mentioned these ICD-10 codes anywhere on the death certificate, whether as the underlying cause of death or elsewhere.

[10] Deaths at home are those at the usual residence of the deceased (according to the informant)‚ where this is not a communal establishment. Other Communal Establishments include (for example) prisons, student residences, and hotels. Elsewhere includes all places not covered above.

[11] "Other" includes deaths in communal establishments other than hospitals and care homes, in hospices, and that occurred "elsewhere".

[12]Data in Table 4 includes only death records that could be linked to the 2011 Census, to obtain ethnic group data.

[13]The detailed composition of each ethnic group is available to download: https://www.ons.gov.uk/download/table?format=xlsx&uri=/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/updatingethniccontrastsindeathsinvolvingthecoronaviruscovid19englandandwales/deathsoccurring2marchto28july2020/22f0c996.json

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
23rd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 28 May (HL4424), what estimate they have made of the total number of deaths from COVID-19 in the UK in each week since 1 May.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Marlesford,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 28 May (HL4424), about the total number of deaths from COVID-19 in the UK in each week since 1 May (HL7234).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing numbers of deaths registered in England and Wales. The most recent annual figures published are for deaths registered in 2019[1]. However, we do publish provisional weekly deaths registrations, which are currently available for deaths registered up to 10 July 2020[2]. National Records Scotland (NRS) and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) are responsible for publishing the number of deaths registered in Scotland and Northern Ireland respectively.

Cause of death is defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10). Deaths involving COVID-19, as either a contributory or underlying cause of death, are identified by the ICD-10 codes U07.1 and U07.2.

The accompanying dataset2 to our provisional weekly deaths bulletin includes UK data on deaths involving COVID-19, which refer to deaths where COVID-19 was mentioned anywhere on the death certificate.

Table 1 shows the provisional number of deaths involving COVID-19 registered each week in the UK from the week ending 8 May up to the week ending 10 July 2020, broken down by country.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number of deaths involving COVID-19 registered each week in the UK, week ending 8 May up to the week ending 10 July 2020[3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

Week number

Week ended

UK

England

Wales

Scotland

Northern Ireland

19

08-May-20

4,426

3,716

211

415

84

20

15-May-20

4,214

3,624

180

336

74

21

22-May-20

2,872

2,455

134

230

53

22

29-May-20

2,000

1,715

105

131

49

23

05-Jun-20

1,697

1,488

100

89

20

24

12-Jun-20

1,204

1,057

57

69

21

25

19-Jun-20

849

744

39

49

17

26

26-Jun-20

651

574

30

35

12

27

03-Jul-20

561

497

35

18

11

28

10-Jul-20

388

344

22

13

9


[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/deathsregisteredinenglandandwalesseriesdrreferencetables

[2]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/weeklyprovisionalfiguresondeathsregisteredinenglandandwales

[3]Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes U07.1, U07.2

[4]Figures are based on deaths registered up to 1 May 2020

[5]All figures for 2020 are provisional

[6]Weekly deaths for Scotland are produced by NRS: https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/covid19stats

[7]Weekly deaths for Northern Ireland are produced by NISRA: https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/covid19stats

[8]England, Wales and Northern Ireland weekly deaths run from Saturday to Friday, Scotland deaths run from Monday to Sunday

[9]Northern Ireland week allocation differs from other countries. For example, week 1 is week ending 10-Jan. This has been adjusted for the purpose of aggregating the data

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the total number of deaths from COVID-19 in the UK in each week during 2020.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Marlesford,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking what estimate has been made of the total number of deaths from COVID-19 in the UK in each week during 2020 (HL4424).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing weekly numbers of deaths registered in England and Wales. The most recent annual figures published are for deaths registered in 2018[1]. However, we do publish provisional weekly deaths registrations, which are currently published for deaths registered up to 1 May 2020[2]. National Records Scotland (NRS) and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) are responsible for publishing the number of deaths registered in Scotland and Northern Ireland respectively.

Cause of death is defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10). Deaths involving COVID-19 either as a contributory or underlying cause of death are identified by the ICD-10 codes U07.1 and U07.2.

Data can refer to deaths where COVID-19 was mentioned anywhere on the death certificate (and may not always be the underlying cause of death), and deaths where COVID-19 was recorded as the underlying cause of death.The accompanying dataset[3] to our provisional weekly deaths bulletin includes UK data on deaths involving COVID-19, which refer to deaths where COVID-19 was mentioned anywhere on the death certificate.

Table 1 shows the provisional number of deaths involving COVID-19 registered each week in the UK up to 1 May 2020, broken down by country.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number of deaths involving COVID-19 registered each week in the UK, 28 December 2019 to 1 May 2020[4][5][6][7][8][9][10]

Week number

Number of deaths involving COVID-19

UK

England

Wales

Scotland

Northern Ireland

1

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

0

0

0

0

6

0

0

0

0

0

7

0

0

0

0

0

8

0

0

0

0

0

9

0

0

0

0

0

10

0

0

0

0

0

11

5

5

0

0

0

12

113

100

2

10

1

13

607

515

21

62

9

14

3,801

3,330

134

282

55

15

6,889

5,899

304

610

76

16

9,495

8,335

409

650

101

17

9,005

7,806

413

658

128

18

6,676

5,748

281

523

124

Source: Office for National Statistics

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/deathsregisteredinenglandandwalesseriesdrreferencetables

[2]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/weekending1may2020

[3]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/weeklyprovisionalfiguresondeathsregisteredinenglandandwales

[4]Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes U07.1, U07.2

[5]Figures are based on deaths registered up to 1 May 2020

[6]All figures for 2020 are provisional

[7]Weekly deaths for Scotland are produced by NRS: https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/covid19stats

[8]Weekly deaths for Northern Ireland are produced by NISRA: https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/covid19stats

[9]England, Wales and Northern Ireland weekly deaths run from Saturday to Friday, Scotland deaths run from Monday to Sunday

[10]Northern Ireland week allocation differs from other countries. For example, week 1 is week ending 10-Jan. This has been adjusted for the purpose of aggregating the data

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
14th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to make a decision on (1) whether to grant Sizewell C a Development Consent Order, or (2) any commitment of public investment in Sizewell C, before the appointment of a new Prime Minister; and what assessment they have made of the conformity of any such decisions with the Prime Minister’s statement to Cabinet on 6 July that major fiscal decisions should be left for the next Prime Minister.

The Secretary of State granted development consent for the Sizewell C Nuclear Power Station on July 20th 2022, after thorough consideration of all relevant information.

Commercial negotiations on the project are strictly separate from consideration of the application for development consent. To date these negotiations have been constructive, but are ongoing and no decisions have been made.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which minister from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy will be making the decision as to whether Sizewell C will be granted a Development Consent Order.

The decision on the application for development consent for Sizewell C Nuclear Power Station was announced on 20 July 2022. The then Parliamentary Under Secretary of State Paul Scully took the decision on behalf of the Secretary of State who had confirmed that his delegation of the decision-making powers to Minister Scully in respect of the Sizewell C application should continue, notwithstanding Minister Scully’s move to the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the area of land that has been used in England for the installation of solar panels in each of the last five years.

The Government does not hold information on the area of land in England used for solar installations.

Further information is available on GOV.UK.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to remove China General Nuclear from further participation in the Bradwell B and Sizewell C nuclear power projects.

The Government has been holding constructive negotiations with the developer of Sizewell C since January, CGN has a stake in the project up to the point of Final Investment Decision (FID), however no decisions on the project have been taken, including the potential final configuration of investors. The Government has committed to bring at least one large-scale nuclear project to the point of FID by the end of this Parliament and have entered negotiations with Sizewell C on that basis. Any investment in nuclear projects is subject to thorough scrutiny and needs to satisfy our robust legal, regulatory and national security requirements.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the deterioration of the fuel rod sealings at pressure reactors installed in Taishan, China, for the Sizewell C nuclear power project.

As we stated in our response to the consultation on a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) for nuclear published on 14th December 2020, we believe that a RAB is a credible model for funding nuclear projects, as it should reduce the cost of finance and thereby reduce consumer bills.

We are also considering whether a RAB model could be applied to other low carbon technologies, including transport and storage infrastructure for carbon dioxide (outlined in the government’s response to the carbon capture, usage and storage business models consultation).

We have always been clear that any new nuclear project must provide value for money for consumers and taxpayers.

Currently no decisions have been taken concerning Government financing of the Sizewell C nuclear power project, ahead of the final investment decision.

The Government continues to explore the use of a Regulated Asset Base model for new nuclear projects and believes that this could be a viable means by which to finance new projects. Decisions on how the model would be applied to new projects have yet to be taken and would be subject to value for money and all relevant approvals.

BEIS officials are engaged regularly with representatives from both EDF Energy and the Office for Nuclear Regulation (the ONR) on a wide range of matters relating to nuclear reactors.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for them to have a stake in Sizewell C nuclear power project; and whether the financial return accrued by (1) the taxpayer, and (2) private sector investors, would be the same.

As we stated in our response to the consultation on a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) for nuclear published on 14th December 2020, we believe that a RAB is a credible model for funding nuclear projects, as it should reduce the cost of finance and thereby reduce consumer bills.

We are also considering whether a RAB model could be applied to other low carbon technologies, including transport and storage infrastructure for carbon dioxide (outlined in the government’s response to the carbon capture, usage and storage business models consultation).

We have always been clear that any new nuclear project must provide value for money for consumers and taxpayers.

Currently no decisions have been taken concerning Government financing of the Sizewell C nuclear power project, ahead of the final investment decision.

The Government continues to explore the use of a Regulated Asset Base model for new nuclear projects and believes that this could be a viable means by which to finance new projects. Decisions on how the model would be applied to new projects have yet to be taken and would be subject to value for money and all relevant approvals.

BEIS officials are engaged regularly with representatives from both EDF Energy and the Office for Nuclear Regulation (the ONR) on a wide range of matters relating to nuclear reactors.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to legislate to allow the use of a Regulated Asset Base funding model for (1) new nuclear infrastructure, and (2) other energy projects.

As we stated in our response to the consultation on a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) for nuclear published on 14th December 2020, we believe that a RAB is a credible model for funding nuclear projects, as it should reduce the cost of finance and thereby reduce consumer bills.

We are also considering whether a RAB model could be applied to other low carbon technologies, including transport and storage infrastructure for carbon dioxide (outlined in the government’s response to the carbon capture, usage and storage business models consultation).

We have always been clear that any new nuclear project must provide value for money for consumers and taxpayers.

Currently no decisions have been taken concerning Government financing of the Sizewell C nuclear power project, ahead of the final investment decision.

The Government continues to explore the use of a Regulated Asset Base model for new nuclear projects and believes that this could be a viable means by which to finance new projects. Decisions on how the model would be applied to new projects have yet to be taken and would be subject to value for money and all relevant approvals.

BEIS officials are engaged regularly with representatives from both EDF Energy and the Office for Nuclear Regulation (the ONR) on a wide range of matters relating to nuclear reactors.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the response by Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist on 3 February (HL Deb, col 2168), whether they have made a decision to proceed with the construction by EDF of the new nuclear power station Sizewell C; and, if so, when this decision was made.

I assume my noble Friend is referring to our announcement to the House that we are entering negotiations with EDF, in relation to Sizewell C. Our aim is to bring at least one large-scale nuclear project to the point of Final Investment Decision by the end of this Parliament. No decision has yet been taken to proceed with Sizewell C, and the successful conclusion of these negotiations will be subject to full Government, regulatory and other approvals, including value for money.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with Nuclear New Build Generation Company and EDF Energy about the possibility of using the site at Wylfa Newydd to construct EPR nuclear reactors (1) instead of, or (2) in addition to, the site at Sizewell C; and what was the outcome of those discussions.

We continually engage with new nuclear developers to understand the merits of their proposed projects and we remain willing to discuss new nuclear projects with any viable developers and investors wishing to develop sites in the UK, including at the Wylfa site. Hitachi still own the site at Wylfa, we will have discussions with them about the future of the site in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish the Lifecycle Assessment of the Carbon Footprint of the proposed Hinkley Point C (HPC) project report, referenced in the Hinkley Point C application for Development Consent, on which Nuclear New Build Generation Company’s estimate of the level of emissions from Hinkley Point C is based.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy does not hold a copy of the Lifecycle Assessment of the Carbon Footprint of the proposed Hinkley Point C (HPC) project report.

While there are references to the Lifecycle Assessment in the Sustainability Statement which accompanied the application for development consent for the Hinkley Point C nuclear power station (and which was considered by the Examining Authority), a copy of the Lifecycle Assessment was not submitted with the application.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the data collected, and (2) calculations made, by the Nuclear New Build Generation Company of the lifecycle CO2 emissions of the proposed Sizewell C nuclear power project.

Before entering into commitments to support any nuclear project, the Government’s assessment would include whether the project was expected to contribute to the target of net zero emissions by 2050.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution, published on 18 November, what criteria they intend to use to assess the value for money of potential large-scale new nuclear projects.

The Government consulted on a Regulated Asset Base as a possible funding model for new nuclear projects. The consultation set out a proposed test to assess value for money for consumers and taxpayers.

The Government’s response to the consultation was published on 14 December 2020 and is available at the GOV.UK website.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to appoint advisors to assist in assessing the value for money of the proposed Sizewell C nuclear project.

Nuclear power provides a reliable source of low-carbon electricity. The Government is pursuing large-scale new nuclear projects subject to clear value for money for both consumers and taxpayers and all relevant approvals. We continue to engage regularly with developers to understand the available options. The Government uses advisors to support discussions with developers, including on the value for money of proposed new nuclear projects.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to use the Regulated Asset Base model for the financing of the proposed Sizewell C nuclear power station; and what assessment they have made of the impact of those plans on total Government borrowing.

In 2019, the Government consulted on a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) as a possible funding model. A RAB has the potential to reduce the cost of raising private finance for new nuclear projects, thereby reducing consumer bills and maximising value for money for consumers and taxpayers. We will publish our response to the consultation in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to take a direct financial stake in the Sizewell C nuclear power project; and if so, whether any decision to do so would need to occur after the conclusion of the planning process.

The Government is looking at options for the financing of new nuclear projects. In 2019, we consulted on a Regulated Asset Base as a possible funding model that could attract private finance with the potential to bring significant investment for future nuclear projects at a lower cost to consumers, enabling low carbon power to be delivered at scale. We will respond in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential for delay in the consideration of the planning application for the Sizewell C nuclear power project as a result of changes made to submitted proposals by EDF Energy.

The timetable for examining each application for development consent for nationally significant infrastructure projects is for an Examining Authority, appointed by the Planning Inspectorate, to decide. In finalising a timetable, the Examining Authority will take account of the need to ensure that all parties to an examination have an opportunity to consider and comment on the application under consideration. Once the examination commences, the timetable will follow the statutory provisions set out in the Planning Act 2008.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish a Green Paper for public consultation on the energy options available for the UK prior to publishing an energy White Paper.

The Energy White Paper will be published in the Autumn. We will engage our stakeholders in the implementation of its policy package, including through formal consultations, where appropriate.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether China General Nuclear Cooperation’s 20 per cent holding in NNB Generation Company (SZC) Ltd entitles that Cooperation to a nuclear site licence for Sizewell C; and what assessment they have made of the suitability of that cooperation as a nuclear power operator if they subsequently acquired a controlling interest in NNB Generation Company (SZC) Ltd.

All nuclear site licences are assessed and granted by the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR). Site licensees are required to comply with stringent safety and security regulations overseen by the ONR.

A nuclear site licence does not confer any special status on shareholders, regardless of the size of their stake, and does not entitle them to hold a nuclear site licence now or in the future. An individual site licence is not transferable; any significant change in the management structure of NNB Generating Company (SZC) Ltd would trigger a revision and reapproval of the site licence to reflect the new arrangements.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to announce details of the financial funding arrangements for the proposed Sizewell C nuclear power station, in particular the method by which electricity consumers would be protected from future project cost escalation; and what plans they have to publish those details before the Development Consent Order application, accepted by the Planning Inspectorate on 26 June, is considered at Examination.

The Government is reviewing options for the financing of new nuclear projects. In 2019, we consulted on a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) as a possible funding model for future nuclear projects. The consultation sought views from stakeholders on proposed design principles for a nuclear RAB, including risk sharing arrangements with consumers. Our consultation was not project specific, as each project has its own financial considerations. We are currently considering consultation feedback and will respond in due course.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to pause consideration of the application by EDF to construct the proposed Sizewell C nuclear power station at the end of the pre-examination stage, until those who are unable to take part in a virtual examination as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic may take part in an open examination.

The Examining Authority at the Planning Inspectorate will proceed with its consideration of EDF’s application in line with the published guidance on current procedures for Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects. The Planning Inspectorate is considering ways in which the process can be conducted to ensure that Interested Parties are able to take part. There are currently no plans to pause the application at the end of the pre-examination stage. Further information is available at the GOV.UK website.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why the sale of building materials that are required to maintain the standards of residential properties are being restricted during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government has set out that construction and associated activities can continue during the Covid-19 outbreak. No restrictions have been placed upon the sale of building materials. The Government is working with the construction industry to ensure the continued operation of the supply chain, including developing Site and Branch Operating Procedures for firms and merchants.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ban the (1) installation, (2) sale, and (3) use, of wood-burning stoves in private dwellings, in either (a) rural, or (b) urban, areas.

We currently have no plans to introduce a ban on the installation, sale or use of wood-burning stoves in private dwellings. Woodburning stoves are subject to strict controls in terms of emissions of air pollutants and some households in rural areas rely on the use of these appliances to heat their homes. In Smoke Control Areas woodburning stoves use must comply with the relevant legislation restricting smoke emissions. The recently introduced Environment Act 2021 will make it easier for local authorities to enforce these requirements. Outside of these areas, from 1 January 2022, all new solid fuel burning stoves entering the market must adhere to specific air quality standards and in October 2020 we introduced new legislation to phase out the most polluting fuels used for domestic combustion with most measures coming into force on 1 May 2021.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to respond to the letter from the Master of the Company of Gardeners to the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, dated 9 April, about the difficulties experienced by the horticultural industry as a result of the COVID-19 regulations; and what consultation they have conducted into the case for reopening garden centres under conditions which could maintain social distancing.

The Government are aware of the challenging position facing the horticulture industry during this period and are grateful for the letter from the Master of the Company of the Gardeners highlighting some of the issues faced by the sector. A response can be expected from the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs imminently.

The Government continues to assess the decision on garden centres, but concluded at the last review that it was too early to ease any restrictions on such retail environments. Social distancing requirements will continue to be considered in accordance with this review.

Stores can operate Click and Collect services as long as orders are taken online, by telephone or via post and customers remain outside of the store to collect their goods.

In this situation, as generally, businesses are advised to operate with strict adherence to the social distancing guidelines.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government why a 10-mile section of the A12 between Ipswich and Colchester has a 40 mile per hour speed limit; and when this section will return to its previous speed limit.

A temporary 40 mph speed limit is in place on the A12 between Marks Tey and the Four Sisters Interchange as National Highways is currently carrying out a programme of works. These works include resurfacing, barrier replacement, drainage renewal, replacing road studs and road markings and, other safety improvements.

Whilst the works are predominantly carried out during carriageway closures overnight, the 40mph speed limit is currently in place during the day to ensure the safety of road users whilst the works are still incomplete. National Highways anticipates that this temporary speed restriction will be in place until September 2022 when the works are expected to be completed.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 14 April (HL2960), how many people have tested positive for COVID-19 to date; and how many of those who were hospitalised in the UK have died.

To provide a more comprehensive response to a number of outstanding Written Questions, this has been answered by an information factsheet Testing – note for House of Lords which is attached, due to the size of the data. A copy has also been placed in the Library

23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many deaths were recorded in care homes in England in each week since the beginning of 2020.

The information is not collected in the format requested.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government in which NHS ambulance service trust areas paramedics do not have access to full personal protection equipment when transporting suspected COVID-19 patients.

This information is not held.

Regular guidance has been issued to ambulance trusts on the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including on the personal protective equipment (PPE) that should be used in different circumstances. Staff should ensure the correct level of PPE is worn dependent on the patient presentation and the clinical skills that are required during patient care.

We are aware of the concerns about the supply of PPE. COVID-19 is generating unprecedented global demand on the supply chain, combined with a manufacturing slowdown in affected countries. The Government, NHS Supply Chain, and the National Health Service are doing everything to work with industry to secure additional supplies and manufacture further PPE.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the evidence (1) for, and (2) against, the use of protective face masks to limit the spread of COVID-19 between individuals who have to enter public spaces or use public transport to go to work; and in what circumstances they would recommend the use of such masks.

The United Kingdom Government continues to be led by the evidence in our response to COVID-19. Following Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies advice, from 11 May the Government advises the public to consider wearing a face covering in confined indoor settings where social distancing is not possible or where they are more likely to come into contact with people they do not normally meet, for example on public transport or in some shops.

The evidence suggests that wearing a face covering does not protect you, but it may provide some protection for others you come into close contact with if you are infected but have not developed symptoms. It is important to wear face-coverings properly and wash your hands before putting them on or taking them off.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many tests for COVID-19 have been carried out; and what proportion of those have shown positive.

The Government is committed to increasing the capacity of testing to at least 25,000 per day for patients most in need.

As of 9am on 6 April 2020, cumulatively across the United Kingdom, 252,958 tests have concluded. 208,837 people have been tested of which 51,608 tested positive. 5,373 of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for the coronavirus have sadly died.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many patients who are being treated in hospital for COVID-19 have been attached to a ventilator.

Information on the number of patients who are being treated in hospitals for COVID-19 and have been attached to a ventilator is not currently published. We will continue to review what data we make publicly available.

27th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the implications for the British peacekeeping force in Mali of the proposed withdrawal of French troops from that country.

The UK is in contact with our French partners on their planned changes to operations in the Sahel. We have had assurances that France will retain the critical support functions such as force protection, medical and logistical support, which allow the UK to effectively contribute to operations in the Sahel. The UK remains committed to UN peacekeeping.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to make a decision on the future of the long-term partnership between the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO).

The Foreign Secretary announced that we would provide funding to Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO) this year in his statement on ODA allocations to Parliament on 21 April. We have offered VSO funding for the V4D programme until the end of this financial year 2021/22. Officials have also started discussions with VSO on our future relationship.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to help resolve the dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the effect of the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam on the flow of water in the River Nile; and what representations they have made to the governments of (1) Egypt, and (2) Ethiopia, on this issue.

The UK continues to urge all parties involved in the dispute over the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam - Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan - to come to an agreement on the filling and operation of the dam. We support the efforts by the African Union (AU) to help find agreement, and ensure that water resources are managed in a way that ensures their long-term sustainable use for all parties. We continue to speak to all three Governments through our Embassies in those countries, and regularly engage the US and EU as observers to the AU-led process, including through the UK Special Envoy for the Red Sea and the Horn of Africa. The Minister for Africa also raised the issue with the Ethiopian Ambassador on 24 February.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the appointment of Ibrahim Mounir to the role of Acting General Guide of the Muslim Brotherhood; and what assessment they have made of any threat posed by his presence (1) to national security, and (2) to their international relations.

We do not comment on individuals, but the Government keeps under review the views promoted and activities undertaken by the Muslim Brotherhood, including their associates in the UK. Any allegations of threats to UK national security or misuse of charity funding within the UK are robustly investigated and appropriate action taken.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Jul 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how much has been paid in financial support, excluding travel costs, to members of the House of Lords in each of the last 12 months.

The total amount of Daily Allowance paid to Members of the House of Lords in relation to each of the last 12 months was as follows;


Month


Amount
£000s


July 2019


2,122


August 2019


-


September 2019


994


October 2019


2,219


November 2019


252


December 2019


241


January 2020


2,134


February 2020


1,642


March 2020


1,382


April 2020


79


May 2020


223


June 2020


624

Information as at 31 July 2020

11th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to review the immunities given to heads of states from crimes committed in the UK.

Heads of State enjoy the same privileges and immunities as apply to the head of a diplomatic mission, as provided for by Section 20 of the State Immunity Act 1978, which we will give consideration to as part of our day to day business by reference to specific cases as they arise. Any waiver of the immunity must be made expressly by the sending States.

27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether for tax purposes there is any distinction between payments made to farmers under (1) the EU Basic Payment Scheme, (2) the Countryside Stewardship Scheme, and (3) the Environmental Land Management system.

There is no distinction for tax purposes between payments made under the three listed schemes. It is necessary to analyse the purpose and function of any government grant in order to form a view as to how it is likely to be treated for tax purposes. The tax treatment of a payment under any relevant scheme will depend on whether it is a trading receipt, whether it is capital or revenue in nature, and how it is recognised in the accounts of the farmer’s business.

24th Jul 2020
VAT
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 20 May (HL4033), what has been the net income to HM Treasury from VAT in each month since March.

HM Revenue & Customs publish monthly net VAT receipts within the National Statistics release “HMRC tax receipts and National Insurance contributions for the UK”. Since March 2020, HM Revenue & Customs have received the following net VAT monthly amounts:

March 2020: £2,362 million

April 2020: -£897 million

May 2020: -£635 million

June 2020: £1,104 million

Net VAT receipts during this period have been affected by the policy measure providing a deferral of VAT payments. This measure allowed UK VAT registered traders to defer VAT payments between 20 March 2020 and 30 June 2020, up until 31 March 2021.

13th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many taxpayers there were with a gross taxable income (1) over £5,000,000, (2) £1,000,000–£4,999,999, (3) £750,000–£999,999, (4) £500,000–£749,999, (5) £250,000–£499,999, (6) £150,000–£249,999, (7) £100,000–£149,999, (8) £75,000–£99,999, (9) £50,000–£74,999, (10) £30,000–£49,999,and  (11) under £30,000, during the 2018–19 financial year.

The table below contains estimates of UK taxpayer numbers grouped into gross taxable income bands for the 2018-19 financial year:

Taxpayers by range of total taxable income, 2018-19

Range of total income
(lower limit)

Number of taxpayers
(thousands)

£11,850 (a)

19,500

£30,000

7,960

£50,000

2,430

£75,000

789

£100,000

569

£150,000

260

£250,000

125

£500,000

27

£750,000

12

£1 million

18

£5 million

1

Total (b)

31,700

(a) Can include some taxpayers who are not entitled to any/a full Personal Allowance whose total income can be less than the Personal Allowance.

(b) Total may not sum exactly due to rounding.

  1. Taxpayer numbers are rounded to the nearest one thousand and shown to three significant figures where appropriate.

  1. The figures for 2018-19 are based on outturn data derived from the 2016-17 Survey of Personal Incomes (SPI) and projected using economic assumptions consistent with the Office for Budget Responsibility’s March 2019 Economic and Fiscal Outlook.

In addition to the requested information, the estimated number of income tax payers by total income for 2018-19 are published on page 34 of the HMRC UK Income Tax Liability Statistics bulletin.

5th May 2020
VAT
To ask Her Majesty's Government what has been the net income to HM Treasury from VAT in each of the last 12 months.

Monthly Net VAT receipts for the period April 2019 to March 2020 are as follows:

Month

Net VAT (£millions)

April 2019

13,041

May 2019

10,994

June 2019

8,118

July 2019

13,640

August 2019

12,446

September 2019

8,254

October 2019

13,578

November 2019

13,031

December 2019

7,622

January 2020

14,476

February 2020

12,585

March 2020

2,352

Net VAT is the total of Home VAT and Import VAT. Figures are given to the nearest £1 million.

11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the screening of illegal immigrants includes a comparison with biometric details held by the EU in order to detect the entry of terrorists into the UK.

Illegal migrants detected in the UK are subject to comprehensive identity and security checks, including biometric checks.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, in cases involving the extradition of a UK citizen to the United States where there is an outstanding judgment in the UK High Court, the Home Secretary is entitled to await such judgment before making a decision on extradition.

Extradition requests between the UK and the US are governed by Part 2 of the Extradition Act 2003. This sets out the factors that the Home Secretary must consider before making a decision on an extradition request.

Under the Act, the Home Secretary may seek an extension from the court to the time permitted to consider a request.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether all irregular migrants arriving in the UK are tested for COVID-19; what proportion of such migrants have had positive COVID-19 test results; and how many migrants have had to be admitted to hospital as a result of COVID-19 within a week of arrival in the last 10-week period.

All individuals arriving by small boats are tested by the Home Office for COVID-19 using a lateral flow test immediately on arrival. If the result is positive, they are immediately isolated along with any family members.

Testing of migrants arriving in the UK by other irregular means may vary depending on who is the first responder. However, in line with recent updates to the Government’s Coronavirus regulations, new arrivals to Immigration removal centres and residential short-term holding facilities are tested on or by day 2 by PCR test. Within asylum accommodation, the Department of Health and Social Care and the Home Office conduct day 2 and day 8 testing, which is administered and managed by our service provider staff on site.

The Home Office does not routinely publish information on the proportion of migrants testing positive for COVID-19.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what biometric details are taken from irregular migrants who arrive in the UK from France by boat; whether such details are taken from all irregular migrants arriving from France by boat; and whether it is possible for the UK immigration authorities to compare these details with records held by EU member states.

People arriving by small boats across the Channel are subject to stringent checks on arrival in the UK and again as they are processed into the asylum system.

Immediately on arrival, initial identity checks are undertaken for all individuals over the age of five, based on the name given and fingerprints are checked against immigration and Police criminal databases.

Once triaged and moved to appropriate accommodation, arrivals will be subject to additional checks as part of the asylum intake process. This will include identity and biometric enrolment based on fingerprints taken, with details checked against law enforcement, immigration, Police and security databases. There may be some individual cases where these checks are not conducted. It is not possible to check these details against the EU systems to which the UK has access under the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement because use of those systems is only permitted for law enforcement, not immigration purposes.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
27th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to begin recording details of all persons departing the UK; and when they intend to implement any such plans.

We re-introduced exit checks in April 2015 to further complement our work on border security, plus support the Home Office’s wider work to deal with illegal immigration.

Passengers leaving the country on scheduled commercial air, sea and rail routes, on journeys outside the Common Travel Area, go through exit checks.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
27th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have made a recent assessment of the global threat of Islamist terrorism.

The Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre (JTAC) is the UK’s independent centre for analysis and assessment of terrorism. JTAC keeps the UK national threat level under constant review. This is a systematic, comprehensive, and rigorous process, based on the very latest intelligence and analysis of internal and external factors which drive the threat, including international events.

The UK national terrorism threat level remains at SUBSTANTIAL. This means that a terrorist attack is likely.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many persons claiming asylum have been granted either (1) asylum, or (2) permanent leave to remain, in the UK in each of the last 12 months.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum applications in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of initial decisions on asylum applications are published in table Asy_D02 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets. The table attached is derived from published data.

Table 1: Number of people granted protection or leave at initial decision following an asylum claim, by outcome, in the year ending June 2021 (see attached)

The latest available data on grants of settlement (indefinite leave to remain) to individuals previously granted refugee status, humanitarian protection or discretionary leave following an asylum application are published in settlement table se_02_q in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’.

Table 2: Asylum-related grants of settlement in the year ending June 2021 (see attached)

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to show by nationality the number of illegal immigrants who have been taken into custody upon arrival in the UK in the 12 months from September 2020.

The Home Office does not have plans to show by nationality the number of illegal immigrants who have been taken into custody upon arrival in the UK in the 12 months from September 2020.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the annual cost of each illegal migrant that is picked up by Border Force having crossed the English Channel by boat.

Data on the costs of migrants from this specific group is not collected. The cost of the asylum system to the taxpayer was published in the New Plan for Immigration policy statement.

New Plan for Immigration policy statement

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/972517/CCS207_CCS0820091708-001_Sovereign_Borders_Web_Accessible.pdf

Immigration and Protection data

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-and-protection-data-q1-2021

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many illegal immigrants have been deported from the UK in each of the last 12 months.

The Home Office publishes data on the number of returns from the UK in each quarter in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly release’. The latest data on enforced returns (of which ‘deportations’ is a subset) go to the end of March 2021 and are published in Ret_D01 of the Returns detailed tables.

The term 'deportations' refers to a legally-defined subset of returns, which are enforced either following a criminal conviction, or when it is judged that a person’s removal from the UK is conducive to the public good. The published statistics refer to enforced returns which include deportations, as well as cases where a person has breached UK immigration laws and those removed under other administrative and illegal entry powers that have declined to leave voluntarily. Figures on deportations, which are a subset of enforced returns, are not separately available.

The Home Office seeks to return people who do not have any legal right to stay in the UK, which includes people who:

  • enter, or attempt to enter, the UK illegally (including people entering clandestinely and by means of deception on entry);
  • overstay their period of legal right to remain in the UK;
  • breach their conditions of leave;
  • are subject to deportation action; for example, due to a serious criminal conviction and
  • have been refused asylum.
Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many migrants are known to have crossed the English Channel by unauthorised or irregular sea transport and landed in England in each week during 2021.

The Home Office collates figures of channel migrant arrivals for management information purposes, and weekly arrivals data is therefore held. However, the Home Office preference for validation and assurance of data is for monthly figures as weekly data are not representative of trends and other factors that we deem important to understand small boat crossings.

The following figures for both monthly and weekly arrivals of migrants by small boat in 2021 are from a live database, and are subject to revision following those data validation and assurance processes.

Week commencing

Week ending

Total arrivals by small boat

28/12/2020

03/01/2021

58

04/01/2021

10/01/2021

161

11/01/2021

17/01/2021

36

18/01/2021

24/01/2021

0

25/01/2021

31/01/2021

17

01/02/2021

07/02/2021

62

08/02/2021

14/02/2021

0

15/02/2021

21/02/2021

23

22/02/2021

28/02/2021

223

01/03/2021

07/03/2021

150

08/03/2021

14/03/2021

115

15/03/2021

21/03/2021

10

22/03/2021

28/03/2021

327

29/03/2021

04/04/2021

259

05/04/2021

11/04/2021

49

12/04/2021

18/04/2021

82

19/04/2021

25/04/2021

272

26/04/2021

02/05/2021

594

03/05/2021

09/05/2021

130

10/05/2021

16/05/2021

592

17/05/2021

23/05/2021

29

24/05/2021

30/05/2021

528

31/05/2021

06/06/2021

732

07/06/2021

13/06/2021

508

14/06/2021

20/06/2021

352

21/06/2021

27/06/2021

400

28/06/2021

04/07/2021

933

05/07/2021

11/07/2021

642

12/07/2021

18/07/2021

504

19/07/2021

25/07/2021

1529

26/07/2021

01/08/2021

160

02/08/2021

08/08/2021

1282

09/08/2021

15/08/2021

902

16/08/2021

22/08/2021

869

23/08/2021

29/08/2021

0

30/08/2021

05/09/2021

165

06/09/2021

12/09/2021

1862

Date

Total arrivals by small boat

Jan-21

224

Feb-21

308

Mar-21

831

Apr-21

750

May-21

1627

Jun-21

2177

Jul-21

3512

Aug-21

3053

Sep-21 (to 12 Sept)

2027

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the implications for national security of reports that the Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated El Sharq television channel will relocate from Turkey to London.

The Government keeps under review the activities of those associated with the Muslim Brotherhood in the UK in accordance with the five commitments included in the former Prime Minister’s statement to Parliament. The UK Government continues to assess the Muslim Brotherhood’s activities when appropriate to ensure our position is based on the latest information available and we will consider action against the review’s commitments if and where legal thresholds are met.

Broadcasting regulation is a matter for Ofcom, the UK’s independent media regulator. Ofcom sets clear rules and conditions for broadcasters who apply for a license to broadcast in the UK. The Broadcasting Code places standards around harmful and offensive material, incitement of crime, disorder, hatred or abuse, and responsible religious programming.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why they did not offer Asia Bibi asylum in the UK.

I am not able to provide specific information with regards to Asia Bibi’s case as it is a longstanding Government policy not to comment on individual cases. Departing from this policy may put individuals and their family members in danger.

The UK has a proud record of providing protection for people who need it, in accordance with our obligations under the Refugee Convention and the European Convention on Human Rights. However, there is no provision within our Immigration Rules for someone to be allowed to travel to the UK to seek asylum or temporary refuge.

Whilst we sympathise with people in many difficult situations around the world, we are not bound to consider asylum claims from the very large numbers of people overseas who might like to come here. Those who need international protection should claim asylum in the first safe country they reach – that is the fastest route to safety.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish in full the internal review of the Muslim Brotherhood commissioned in April 2014; what assessment they have made of the conclusions contained in the summary report Muslim Brotherhood Review: Main Findings (HC 679), published in December 2015, that the Muslim Brotherhood represents a "revolutionary challenge towards established states" and has "been contrary to national interests and national security"; and what plans they have to undertake a further review of the Muslim Brotherhood.

There are no plans to publish the internal review into the Muslim Brotherhood. Our assessment of the Muslim Brotherhood remains as set out in the summary report published in December 2015.

The UK Government continues to assess the Muslim Brotherhood’s activities when appropriate to ensure our position is based on the latest information available and we will consider action against the review’s commitments if and where legal thresholds are met.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many immigrants have been brought to the UK from the sea between France and England by ships controlled or owned by (1) the Government, or (2) their agencies, in each week during 2020.

We do not routinely publish the information you have requested.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government under what circumstances migrants seeking to travel by sea from France to the UK who are picked up in distress from international waters by UK ships can be returned to France.

The decision as to where to take a person rescued in international waters is a matter for the Coastguard who are responsible for that rescue zone and the master of the ship which has picked them up.

Usually persons will be taken to the nearest safe Port or the home Ports of the rescuing vessel (particularly if a Lifeboat) but there are many factors which could come into play such as any immediate medical or welfare issues.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they are having with the Metropolitan Police Service about actions they are taking to protect the statue of Sir Winston Churchill in Parliament Square from (1) vandalism, (2) criminal damage, or (3) public disorder.

The right to protest peacefully is a long-standing tradition in this country and a vital foundation of our democracy. However, the Government continues to urge the public not to attend further protests. This is important to avoid the spread of coronavirus and the regulations we have in place to protect public health mean large gatherings of people are unlawful.

The rights to peaceful protest do not extend to unlawful activity and the police have powers to deal with any such acts. How the police use these powers is an operational decision.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what requirements have to be fulfilled before a person who has been granted political asylum in the UK can (1) be granted UK citizenship and (2) be issued with a British passport; and what is the shortest period in which this process can be completed.

The requirements for naturalisation as a British citizen can be found on gov.uk at:-

https://www.gov.uk/apply-citizenship-indefinite-leave-to-remain

Before applying for citizenship, a person granted political asylum in the UK should normally apply for permanent residence after they have lived in the UK for five years.

To become a British citizen, you normally need to have held permanent residence in the UK for 12 months, before you submit your application to naturalise, unless you are married or in a civil partnership with a British citizen. The service standard for applications for citizenship to be decided is six months.

After you have become a British citizen, you can apply for British passport which can take approximately four weeks to be processed.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government in what circumstances individual applications for asylum are referred to ministers; what proportion of Home Office decisions on asylum applications are notified to ministers’ private offices (1) before, and (2) after, those decisions are communicated to the applicant for asylum; and how many such decisions have been so notified during the first five months of 2020.

Individual applications for asylum are referred to ministers when they are identified as potentially sensitive or high-profile. Such cases may be referred to Ministers by the relevant case working team if they feel it appropriate or, dependant on the circumstances of the case, when they are raised through MPs representation, or in Parliament; or when specific Ministerial authorisation is required.

The Home Office is unable to state what proportion of decisions on asylum applications are referred to Minister’s private offices, before and/or after those decisions are communicated to the applicant for asylum or how many such decisions have been notified during the first five months of 2020, as this does not form part of any routinely published data and is not held in a reportable format.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many grants of asylum were granted in (1) 2017, (2) 2018, and (3) 2019; and what was the breakdown of nationality of those granted asylum in each of those years.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum applications in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’ (https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release). Data on the number of grants of asylum are published in tables Asy_D02 of the ‘Asylum applications, initial decisions and resettlement’ (attached) datasets, and are broken down by nationality and type of grant (asylum, humanitarian protection, discretionary leave etc.) for all requested years.

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending March 2020.

Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the ‘summary tables’ (attached). The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on asylum and resettlement.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’ (https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?keywords=immigration&content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=relevance).

Annex A (attached) provides the published data from Asy_D02. The data relate to grants made at initial decision and include main applicants only. The pivot table can be used to show data on nationality.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th May 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many members of the House of Lords, recorded as attending sittings of the House or Committees of the House during the 2018–19 financial year claimed (1) over £40,000 (2) £30,000– £39,999 (3) £20,000–£29,999, (4) £10,000– £19,999, and (5) under £10,000, in financial support, excluding travelling costs.

The number of members of the House of Lords in each band was as follows;

Over £40,000

247

£30,000 - £39,999

150

£20,000 - £29,999

93

£10,000 - £19,999

88

£0 - £9,999

224

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Home Office officials who have been charged with criminal offences in connection with their public duties are awaiting trial.

At present there is one former employee who is currently awaiting trial.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many serving police officers are working overseas.

In line with the policy of successive governments, we do not comment on operational policing matters.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many illegal immigrants they have intercepted travelling to the UK, whether on land or at sea, in each of the last 24 months.

We do not routinely publish the information you have requested, we are unable to provide this information, as it could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government under what circumstances passports are (1) cancelled electronically, or (2) seized the police, for persons (a) given custodial sentences in prison, (b) given suspended services in prison, (c) sentenced to community service, (d) on probation, (e) on bail, or (f) remanded in custody.

Passports are cancelled electronically on the HMPO systems when they have been renewed or when a new passport has been issued. This will also occur when passports have been reported lost, stolen or when HMPO is notified that the holder is deceased.

Passports are also cancelled when passport facilities are withdrawn within the terms of the then Home Secretary’s written ministerial statement of 25 April 2013.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many applications for asylum (1) were received, (2) were granted, (3) were refused, and (4) resulted in deportation, in each of the last ten years.

The Home Office publishes data on the outcomes of asylum applications in the https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Data on the number of asylum applications received, granted, refused and those who have applied and have been returned are published in tables Asy_D04 of the ‘Outcome analysis of asylum applications’.

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending December 2018. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the ‘summary tables’. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on asylum and resettlement.

Note: The number of cases which have outcomes that are 'not yet known' will be higher for more recent years as cases are still progressing. These will reduce over time. As a result, data are not comparable over time.

Additional statistics on the number of asylum applications raised each year can be found in table Asy_D01, the number of initial decisions (broken down by grant or refusal) can be found in Asy_D02, and the number of ‘asylum related’ returns can be found in table Ret_05 of the returns summary tables.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’

A summary of the data from Asy_D04, can be found in Annex A.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the average annual cost to public funds of (1) adult asylum applicants, and (2) unaccompanied children seeking asylum.

Asylum costs are published as part of the Home Office transparency data https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/asylum-transparency-data-august-2019. Please see table attached.

The information is not broken down to provide individual costs for asylum applicants and unaccompanied asylum seeking children.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government why the report "Guidance on Collaborative Procurement for Design and Construction to Support Building Safety" recently published by the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities was not dated; which Government department is responsible for ensuring that all Government publications are dated;and what steps they are taking, if any, to ensure that dating practices are implemented throughout Whitehall.

The publication date is automatically published when a department adds or publishes a page to GOV.UK . The Guidance on Collaborative Procurement for Design and Construction to Support Building Safety report was published on 10 January. The PDF’s have also been updated to include a date and will be refreshed on the website.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what status a local government Neighbourhood Development Plan (NDP) has in any consideration by a planning inspector of an application that conflicts with the objectives of the NDP; and what guidance they have made available about the steps to take in the event of any such conflict.

Once adopted, neighbourhood plans become part of the development plan for the local area alongside the Local Plan. Planning law requires that decision takers, including planning inspectors, must determine planning applications in accordance with the development plan (including any neighbourhood plan) unless material considerations indicate otherwise. In addition, the National Planning Policy Framework makes clear that where a planning application conflicts with an up-to-date development plan (including any neighbourhood plan), permission should not usually be granted.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what legislation gives authority to a Neighbourhood Development Plan (NDP); and whether a NDP becomes invalid if there is no local plan which has already taken account of an NDP.

The Localism Act 2011 effected amendments to the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 and the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004, giving effect to Neighbourhood Plans. These amendments set out that once a neighbourhood plan is passed at referendum it becomes part of the development plan for the local area and the basis for decision-making. Planning applications must be determined in accordance with the development plan unless material considerations indicate otherwise. The status of a neighbourhood plan as part of the development plan is unaffected by the absence of a Local Plan.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which English local authorities are known to have invested public funds in the purchase of commercial property in the last two years; and which of those have reported losses to central Government in so doing in the last 12 months.

Government does not routinely collect data from local authorities on individual capital transactions. Local authorities submit financial data returns to Government covering total annual spend on capital investment, categorised by service area rather than asset type. Commercial activities are included in the category of ‘trading expenditure’. Government may collect additional data from local authority published strategies, including on individual authorities, based on a risk-based approach in keeping with its role as steward of the financial system.

Local authorities do not routinely report financial losses of any sort directly to Government. Instead, each local authority manages their financial position at the local level.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist on 2 April (HL2957), whether the Planning Inspectorate will accept Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project applications, including those for Sizewell C nuclear plant, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Planning Inspectorate is continuing to receive applications for Development Consent Orders for nationally significant infrastructure projects, notwithstanding the COVID-19 pandemic. The Inspectorate has published guidance on how it will continue to carry out its duties under the Planning Act 2008 in respect of Development Consent Order applications. We are encouraging developers to consider pragmatic ways of adhering to the requirements on them in these exceptional circumstances to support the continuation of decision-making.

The application for the Sizewell C proposals is due to be submitted in May 2020. When an application is received the Planning Inspectorate have a period of up to 28 days to decide whether or not the application meets the satisfactory standards required to be accepted for examination.

30th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many hours of unpaid work have been completed as part of Community Sentences in each of the last five years.

The number of UPW hours delivered in the last five years are:

  • April 2016 to March 2017: 5,582,445
  • April 2017 to March 2018: 5,382,173
  • April 2018 to March 2019: 5,310,526
  • April 2019 to March 2020: 4,868,990
  • April 2020 to March 2021: 1,356,061

The figures for April 2020 – March 2021 evidence a decline in unpaid work delivery resulting from the pandemic and the need to comply with public health regulations, such as lockdowns and social distancing measures.

Prior to 26th June 2021, Community Rehabilitation Companies were responsible for the delivery of unpaid work. Since then, the new unified probation service has assumed responsibility for unpaid work delivery. This has provided an opportunity to re-energise our work, drive up completion rates and deliver better outcomes. We will deliver better quality and more robust unpaid work placements that are highly visible to the public and that meet both punitive and reparative aims. We want to move away from a reliance on individual placements towards incorporating larger national projects with public bodies and charities and we are keen to involve our stakeholders as much as possible in our plans.

30th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people serving custodial sentences in England and Wales have died from COVID-19.

Verified data on the total number of prisoners who have died having tested positive for COVID-19, or where there was a clinical assessment that COVID-19 was a contributory factor in their deaths, is published on GOV.UK. The latest published figures are for the period up to 30 June in which 149 prisoner deaths were reported. This figure includes those on remand as well as serving custodial sentences. Of these 149 prisoner deaths, 123 are suspected or confirmed to be due to COVID-19. The remaining 27 deaths are believed to be due to other causes, although the individuals had tested positive for COVID-19.

30th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that all Community Sentences are completed.

On 26 June, we transitioned to a new model of probation delivery. These reforms will mean that the delivery of key requirements under community sentences is now the responsibility of the Probation Service. Our new probation service is now responsible for sentence management in both England and Wales, along with Accredited Programmes, Unpaid Work, and Structured Interventions. This simplifies delivery, making it easier for those we work with and giving us greater control of staff and resources to be able to deliver reform. It will strengthen rehabilitation by delivering improved better accredited programmes and other rehabilitative interventions, alongside commissioning specialist services from other organisations.

We have demonstrated our commitment and ability to deliver an effective probation service despite significant challenges during the pandemic. The Probation Service has prioritised public protection and risk management, as well as delivery of advice to courts, whilst ensuring staff, people on probation, victims and the general public remain safe.

Exceptional Delivery Models, which set out how we operate during the pandemic and ensured services could be continued, were implemented across England and Wales. In-person, socially distanced, offender management continued to be the default for those people on probation who posed a higher risk, for example Terrorism Act offenders. For other cohorts, blended supervision models were deployed, involving various combinations of home visits, face to face appointments, telephone or video contact. The delivery of Unpaid Work has been maximised in line with social distancing restrictions throughout the pandemic, keeping staff and offenders safe. Offenders have been working on outdoor projects and those which support the UK’s recovery from Covid-19, and some have completed projects at home where feasible. For Accredited Programmes, we developed alternative delivery formats to enable continued delivery of Programmes remotely or in smaller groups in person where safe to do so, prioritising offenders who posed the highest risk of harm.

As social distancing restrictions ease, we are continuing to increase delivery rates across our services. This includes key requirements such as unpaid work and accredited programmes.

30th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many hours of unpaid work due to be undertaken as part of Community Sentences given (1) before 23 March 2020, and (2) since that date, have been (a) completed, and (b) deferred as a result of COVID-19 restrictions.

As unpaid work is necessarily often delivered in groups, such work was unavoidably adversely affected by Covid-19. However, unpaid work has not been deferred. Probation worked hard to innovate unpaid work delivery so that some placements could continue to be delivered safely, including home based projects for local charities and offenders supporting vaccination centres. Nevertheless, due to the adverse effect on delivery rates, probation have been managing a backlog of requirements. We are working closely with our CJS partners to accelerate the delivery of unpaid work and, where appropriate, apply for unpaid work orders to be extended so that hours can be completed after the original 12-month period specified in the legislation. There are approximately 5m hours of unpaid work on the caseload currently, 4m (80%) are in relation to requirements that are still within their normal delivery window or agreed extension.

Of all UPW requirements on the probation case list as of 26th June 2021

  • For sentences prior to 23/3/2020, 539,236 hours were delivered.
  • For sentences after 23/03/2020, 749,311 hours were delivered.

However, this is a dynamic data set. Some of these requirements are still being worked (yet to reach 12 months from sentencing) and others on the backlog (i.e. post 12 months from sentencing) are being pursued for completion.

There is often a delay in recording completed UPW hours. UPW completed over the weekend of the 26th and 27th of June 2021 is unlikely to be fully represented in this data. While all reasonable efforts have been taken to ensure the accuracy of this data, the inaccuracy inherent in any large-scale administrative data means data should not be assumed to be fully accurate.

27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many individuals are currently serving custodial sentences for terrorist offences in the United Kingdom; and which prisons are used for confining such persons.

As reported in the latest statistics released on gov.uk, there were 184 persons serving custodial sentences for terrorist offences in Great Britain (as of 31 December 2020). A further 25 were being held on remand, ahead of trial or sentencing. Those in custody are assessed according to their individual risk and rehabilitation needs and are held in various prisons across the estate. We do not disclose operational detail regarding the location of all terrorist offenders in prison.

Data detailing the number of people serving custodial sentences for terrorist offences is available at Gov.uk. You can access this information here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000-quarterly-update-to-december-2020

Northern Ireland Security statistics are available and published by the Northern Ireland Office.