Lord Kilclooney Portrait

Lord Kilclooney

Crossbench - Life peer


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Division Votes
Thursday 21st October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
voted Aye
One of 21 Crossbench Aye votes vs 3 Crossbench No votes
Tally: Ayes - 180 Noes - 130
Speeches
Thursday 16th September 2021
Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland: Power-sharing

My Lords, does the noble Lord agree that the protocol is a breach of the Belfast agreement, that it may …

Written Answers
Thursday 5th August 2021
Microprocessors: Manufacturing Industries
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to encourage more manufacturing of electronic chips in the …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Kilclooney has voted in 161 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(14 debate interactions)
Baroness Vere of Norbiton (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
(10 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(6 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department for Transport
(6 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(5 debate contributions)
Home Office
(3 debate contributions)
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View all Lord Kilclooney's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Kilclooney, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Kilclooney has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Kilclooney has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Kilclooney has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Kilclooney has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


39 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what is the total estimated cost of the report The conduct of Lord Maginnis of Drumglass, published on 3 December, including (1) any payments to all members of the Conduct Committee, (2) any payments to the Commissioner for Standards and all members of her staff, and (3) the cost of the publication of the report.

It is not possible to provide an accurate estimate of the cost of the report The conduct of Lord Maginnis of Drumglass as most costs cannot be disaggregated from time spent by members or staff on other work.

1. Member costs

The report into Lord Maginnis was considered at two separate meetings of the Conduct Committee, at the first there were other items on the agenda so claims for attendance were not solely related to consideration of this case. At the second meeting Lord Maginnis’ appeal was the only item on the agenda. All members of the Committee attended for that meeting. HL members can claim attendance allowance for participating in a virtual select committee but those claims may also cover other parliamentary work undertaken that day so it is not possible to say how much they claimed for their work on this case that day. Lay members have so far claimed £1,200 to prepare for and attend that meeting.

2. Payments to the Commissioner and her staff

The costs of the time of the Commissioner for Standards and her office in relation to her investigation in to the complaints against Lord Maginnis cannot be disaggregated from her work on other cases. £5,760 was spent in payment to the external investigator who supported the Commissioner in her investigations into the four complaints.

3. Publication

The report was printed in-house on the same paper used for other parliamentary publications by a permanent staff team therefore the small costs of printing this report cannot be disaggregated from other work.

9th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland on the territorial integrity of the UK; and whether they consider that any such impact arising from the Protocol was justified in order to secure a wider agreement on the terms of the UK's departure from the EU.

The Protocol itself is clear that Northern Ireland remains an integral part of the United Kingdom, its internal market and customs territory.

Lord Frost
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland, whether EU officials at Derry City Airport will check (1) goods arriving from Great Britain, and (2) goods arriving from the Republic of Ireland.

There will be no port or airport at which EU officials will be conducting checks on goods moved between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Under Article 12(2) of the Northern Ireland Protocol, the role of EU officials’ is limited to the right to be present during the activity of UK authorities relating to the implementation and application of EU law under the Protocol, and activities relating to the implementation and application of Article 5 of the Protocol, relating to the movement of goods. All procedures under the Protocol will be carried out by UK authorities. The 17 December 2020 Joint Committee Decision on Article 12 reflects these arrangements.

In practice, this could include EU officials being present at any ports or airports in Northern Ireland where UK authorities are undertaking activities within the scope of Article 12. This would include, for example, Belfast Port, Larne Harbour, Warrenpoint Port, Foyle Port and Belfast International Airport, all of which have been designated as Points of Entry for SPS goods. However, it will be for the EU to decide upon how they propose to allocate those officials present in Northern Ireland, in line with the relevant requirements of the December Joint Committee Decision.

Lord Frost
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland, whether EU officials will check trade arriving by air from Great Britain to Northern Ireland at (1) Belfast City Airport, (2) Belfast International Airport, or (3) Derry City Airport.

There will be no port or airport at which EU officials will be conducting checks on goods moved between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Under Article 12(2) of the Northern Ireland Protocol, the role of EU officials’ is limited to the right to be present during the activity of UK authorities relating to the implementation and application of EU law under the Protocol, and activities relating to the implementation and application of Article 5 of the Protocol, relating to the movement of goods. All procedures under the Protocol will be carried out by UK authorities. The 17 December 2020 Joint Committee Decision on Article 12 reflects these arrangements.

In practice, this could include EU officials being present at any ports or airports in Northern Ireland where UK authorities are undertaking activities within the scope of Article 12. This would include, for example, Belfast Port, Larne Harbour, Warrenpoint Port, Foyle Port and Belfast International Airport, all of which have been designated as Points of Entry for SPS goods. However, it will be for the EU to decide upon how they propose to allocate those officials present in Northern Ireland, in line with the relevant requirements of the December Joint Committee Decision.

Lord Frost
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government at which ports in Northern Ireland will EU officials be stationed to conduct checks on trade between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

There will be no port or airport at which EU officials will be conducting checks on goods moved between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Under Article 12(2) of the Northern Ireland Protocol, the role of EU officials’ is limited to the right to be present during the activity of UK authorities relating to the implementation and application of EU law under the Protocol, and activities relating to the implementation and application of Article 5 of the Protocol, relating to the movement of goods. All procedures under the Protocol will be carried out by UK authorities. The 17 December 2020 Joint Committee Decision on Article 12 reflects these arrangements.

In practice, this could include EU officials being present at any ports or airports in Northern Ireland where UK authorities are undertaking activities within the scope of Article 12. This would include, for example, Belfast Port, Larne Harbour, Warrenpoint Port, Foyle Port and Belfast International Airport, all of which have been designated as Points of Entry for SPS goods. However, it will be for the EU to decide upon how they propose to allocate those officials present in Northern Ireland, in line with the relevant requirements of the December Joint Committee Decision.

Lord Frost
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people in England died in the first three months of 2021 due to (1) flu and (2) COVID-19.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

The Rt Hon. the Lord Kilclooney

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

19 April 2021

Dear Lord Kilclooney,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am replying to your Parliamentary Question asking how many people in England died in the first three months of 2021 due to (1) Flu and (2) COVID-19 (HL14771).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in England and Wales. Mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration.

Cause of death is defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10). Deaths where the underlying cause was Influenza and Pneumonia are defined by the ICD-10 codes J09 to J18, deaths. Where the underlying cause of deaths was COVID-19, these are defined by the ICD codes U07.1, U07.2 and U10.9.

Table 1 below provides the number of deaths, in England, where the underlying cause of death was (1) Influenza and Pneumonia or (2) COVID-19 for the first two months of 2021. Data for March 2021 has not yet been compiled but will be released within our Monthly Mortality Analysis[1] dataset, scheduled for release on 22 April.

The number of deaths for 2021 are provisional.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond


Table 1: Number of deaths where the underlying cause of death was Influenza and pneumonia or COVID-19, in England, 2021[2][3][4][5][6]

Influenza and pneumonia

COVID-19

Month

Number of deaths

Age standardised mortality rate per 100,000 population

Number of deaths

Age standardised mortality rate per 100,000 population

January

1,291

27.4

25,716

545.9

February

1,118

26.3

16,682

392.3

Source: ONS

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/monthlymortalityanalysisenglandandwales

[2]Figures are for deaths registered, rather than deaths occurring, in each calendar year.

[3]Deaths for England exclude non-residents.

[4] Figures for England are based on geographical boundaries as of February 2021.

[5] The International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition (ICD-10) definitions are as follows: Influenza and pneumonia (J09-J18), COVID-19 (U07.1, U07.2 and U10.9).

[6] Figures for 2021 are provisional.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to encourage more manufacturing of electronic chips in the UK.

The semiconductor industry is strategically important with its technology used by many UK industries. We are engaging with businesses as well as key international partners to ensure we continue to have a trustworthy and reliable supply.

The Government is committed to growing the UK manufacturing supply chain, including microelectronics, especially in those areas where there will be significant growth potential, such as Electric Vehicles. The Government continues to encourage appropriate inward investment and trade agreements to allow us to access global expertise and technologies.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, in the event of an erroneous trademarking of a trade name by the Intellectual Property Office, they may reverse the trademarking without the need for further legal action by any aggrieved party.

The IPO’s examiners undertake a stringent examination of any trade mark application before it is accepted for registration, which includes a search of current trade marks. Once accepted, all applications are published for a 2-month window where anyone can lodge observations or launch a legal opposition.

Anyone can submit observations to the IPO and outline reasons why they believe a trade mark should not be registered from the date the application is made until it is registered. This IPO does not charge for this service. The IPO will then consider whether the mark has been accepted in error and can reopen the examination phase if there are grounds to do so.

There are more formal legal routes to oppose a trade mark application or invalidate an existing trade mark registration. Whilst these are formal legal processes, the IPO’s Tribunal service is set up to be a low cost and accessible service.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, in the event of an erroneous trademarking of a trade name by the Intellectual Property Office, they may reverse the trademarking without the need for further legal action by any aggrieved party.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. I will correspond directly with the noble Lord.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many applications have been submitted to the Clean Growth Fund; and how many of those applications were from Northern Ireland.

The Clean Growth Fund considers applications from right across the UK, including Northern Ireland. It will invest in UK companies and create a diverse portfolio spanning the breadth of the Clean Growth sector.

This is a commercially run Fund, managed by Clean Growth Investment Management. Her Majesty’s Government is not involved in investment decisions.

Since the Fund was launched in May 2020, the Fund Manager has received 449 enquiries to date. Of these, there have been a minimum of three expressions of interest from companies based in Northern Ireland. This is a minimum as not all expressions of interest include geographical data.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether students in Northern Ireland will have access to the Turing scheme.

Yes. The Turing scheme will be UK-wide. Universities, colleges, and schools in Northern Ireland will be eligible to bid for funding under the scheme, so that students in Northern Ireland can benefit from the opportunities of study and work placements abroad.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of any problems concerning the recognition of A-level qualifications by universities in the EU.

Recognition of a range of academic qualifications, including qualifications for access to higher education, is covered by the Council of Europe/UNESCO Convention on the Recognition of Qualifications concerning Higher Education in the European Region, to which most countries in the European Region, including the UK, are signatories.

The UK National Recognition Advice Centre (UK NARIC) provides, on behalf of the government, advice on the comparability of international qualifications with those of the UK. UK NARIC is a member of the European network of national information centres that act as a primary contact point for the recognition of international academic qualifications.

18th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether fishing boats based in Northern Ireland have received licences to fish in Irish waters since January 2021; and whether the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland has caused any delay to such licences being issued.

The Marine Management Organisation have shared data with the Commission on Northern Ireland vessels wishing to fish in Republic of Ireland waters and is currently waiting for their response. As yet, no Northern Ireland vessels have received licences to fish in the Irish 0-6nm zone.

We do not have any reason to believe that the Northern Ireland Protocol has had an effect on the issuing of licences.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland has affected the sale of horticultural autumn bulbs from Great Britain to Northern Ireland.

Following the end of the transition period on 1 January 2021, EU Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) rules continue to apply in Northern Ireland under the Northern Ireland Protocol. This upholds the longstanding status of the island of Ireland as a single epidemiological unit, and means that all regulated plants and plant products moving from GB to NI are required to meet the EU’s third country import requirements, including the requirement for regulated goods to be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate.

As announced in the updated operational guidance for the movement of horticultural goods from Great Britain (GB) to Northern Ireland (NI), bulbs or vegetables that have been grown in soil can be sent from GB to NI even if they still have soil attached, while respecting any pest free area requirements.

Under the Government’s successful Movement Assistance Scheme (MAS), businesses moving plants and plant products from GB to NI do not need to pay for the fees associated with inspections and issuance of phytosanitary certificates (PC). The Government announced on 6 April 2021 that MAS will continue to provide traders with advice and guidance via the dedicated MAS helpline and financial support for certain certification costs. The Government will continue to monitor the performance of the scheme and will review it again in three months’ time, to determine how best to provide ongoing support to traders.

Prior to 1 January, data was not collected on the movement of horticultural autumnal bulbs from GB to NI. Although the Plant Health and Seed Inspectorate (PHSI) collect data on the number of bulb phytosanitary applications, comparisons with exports prior to the Northern Ireland Protocol’s implementation cannot be drawn, as consignments of bulbs were not inspected before 1 January 2021.

The Government recognises the importance of this issue and is recording data on the number of PCs issued for regulated plants and plant products, including bulbs, exported to all third countries and for those moved from GB to NI. This enables us to monitor the trade in these goods over time.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of changes to the sale of Northern Ireland dairy milk products in (1) Great Britain, (2) the EU, (3) nations with which the UK has a trade agreement, and (4) nations with which the EU but not the UK has a trade agreement, that will take effect after 31 December.

The UK Government has guaranteed in legislation, via the Internal Market Bill, unfettered access for Northern Ireland's businesses to the rest of the UK internal market from 1 January 2021, ensuring that trade from Northern Ireland to Great Britain continues as it does now. That will mean no declarations, tariffs, new regulatory checks or customs checks, or additional approvals for goods from Northern Ireland businesses to be placed on the UK market. The UK Government has also laid a Statutory Instrument, ensuring a continuity of arrangements for goods from Northern Ireland moving directly into Great Britain from 1 January 2021. This will be available only to Northern Ireland businesses.

There will be no change to the movement of goods between Northern Ireland and EU Member States, including Ireland. The EU is obliged under Article 5 of the Northern Ireland Protocol (NIP) to guarantee tariff free, frictionless access to the Single Market in any scenario from 31 December 2020.

The NIP ensures that Northern Ireland remains in the UK's customs territory. We will negotiate and deliver trade deals on behalf of the whole United Kingdom. Northern Ireland exporters will therefore enjoy the preferential access we negotiate with trading partners around the world.

As part of the UK's customs territory, after 31 December 2020, Northern Irish producers will no longer be able to access preferential trading arrangements under the EU's free trade agreements. As part of the UK's ability to pursue an independent trade policy, the UK Government has, in under two years, agreed trade agreements with 51 countries that have agreements with the EU. Total UK trade with these countries was worth £144 billion in 2019.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people were vaccinated against the common flu in the past 12 months; and how this figure compares with the previous 12 months.

The following table shows the number of people who were vaccinated during the seasonal influenza vaccination programme in 2019/20 and 2020/21. The figures are not directly comparable as the immunisation programme was expanded to more cohorts in 2020/21.

2020/2021

2019/2020

19,158,901

14,468,665

Source:

‘Seasonal influenza vaccine uptake in GP patients: winter season 2020 to 2021. Final data for 1 September 2020 to 28 February 2021’ Public Health England

16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the departure of the UK from the EU, whether the country of Ireland is formally called (1) the Republic of Ireland, or (2) Ireland, in UK law.

It is the UK Government's policy to refer to the country of Ireland as 'Ireland', as can be seen in the latest FCDO geographical names index (March 2021) available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/geographical-names-and-information. The UK's departure from the EU has not changed this.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the government of France about the recognition of proof of vaccine status against COVID-19 issued by the NHS, in (1) England, (2) Scotland, (3) Wales, and (4) Northern Ireland.

We work closely with French partners through the British Embassy in Paris and with the French Embassy in London to ensure that all travel restrictions are communicated to UK nationals, including on the recognition of vaccine status. As of 9 June, travellers from the UK to France who are fully vaccinated do not need to justify an essential reason for travel or self-isolate upon arrival. France accepts proof of vaccination status via the NHS App or an official NHS letter. Full information is available on our FCDO Travel Advice pages, which we update regularly.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the British ambassador to France is appointed to serve the United Kingdom or Great Britain.

Her Majesty's Ambassador to the French Republic is formally approved by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Head of State of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. As an official of Her Majesty's Government, a British Ambassador therefore represents the whole of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Her Majesty's British ambassador to France has discussed the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland with the foreign minister of France.

Ministers and Senior Officials regularly engage with their French counterparts on a range of priority issues. Her Majesty's Ambassador to France has discussed the Northern Ireland Protocol on a number of occasions with Senior Officials and Ministers in the French Government. The Prime Minister and President Macron also discussed the Protocol in the margins of the G7 Leaders Summit on 12 June, where the Prime Minister made clear his desire for pragmatism and compromise on all sides but underlined that protecting the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement in all its dimensions was paramount.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the governments of (1) Russia, and (2) Armenia, to have the location of land mines in Azerbaijan sovereign territory made available to the government of Azerbaijan.

During her visits to Armenia and Azerbaijan in February the Minister for the European Neighbourhood and the Americas highlighted UK concern over the large amount of unexploded ordnance across the region. We understand from Azerbaijani government reports that as of 9 June 2021, 27 Azerbaijanis have been killed and over 100 injured by explosive remnants of war. We are deeply concerned by this ongoing loss of civilian life.

The UK Government continues to urge both countries, most recently at the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe on 3 June, to work together to ensure that humanitarian organisations have unimpeded access to the region and that de-mining maps are urgently provided to ensure the safety of civilians.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the implementation of the agreement to end military conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the Nagorno-Karabakh region; and, in particular, what progress has been made with (1) identifying, and (2) removing, land mines in that region.

The UK Government welcomed the ceasefire agreement between Armenia and Azerbaijan. The Minister for the European Neighbourhood and the Americas has been in regular contact with the Armenian and Azerbaijani Foreign Ministers since the outbreak of hostilities in September. During recent visits to Armenia and Azerbaijan she encouraged both sides to abide by the 10 November trilateral peace deal and settle all outstanding matters through talks under the auspices of the OSCE Minsk Group. The UK Government is aware of the significant dangers posed by large numbers of unexploded ordnance in the region. We continue to evaluate what support we might provide Armenia and Azerbaijan to take forward their removal.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much is being spent by the British Embassy in Dublin on the provision of advice to UK driving licence holders about applying for Irish driving licences before 31 December; which media sources they are paying to advertise this advice; and which other British embassies are expending funds to provide similar advice in other EU nations.

The Cabinet Office regularly publishes expenditure, broken down by supplier, on a monthly rolling basis on GOV.UK, including expenditure on the cross-government Transition public information campaign.

As part of this major campaign, the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office is running a strand of activity focused on UK nationals who live and work in EU and EFTA countries. The campaign focuses on four key actions UK nationals may need to take around residency applications or registrations, healthcare provision, passport validity and driving licences. The messages are tailored for each country so that UK nationals are aware of the actions that may apply to them. Communications centre on digital channels, radio, print media and a range of outreach events run by embassies locally. All activity signposts UK nationals to GOV.UK with specific information for each country.

29th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) missile attacks on the Azeri town of Barda, and (2) who was responsible for those attacks; and what representations they have made to the governments of Azerbaijan and Armenia about such attacks.

The UK Government is aware of reports of attacks on Barda although we have not yet made an assessment on responsibility. The Minister for the European Neighbourhood spoke to the Armenian and Azerbaijani Foreign Ministers on 28 October. She urged both parties to abide by the humanitarian ceasefires and condemned the continued targeting of civilian settlements and infrastructure.

15th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether the missile attack on 11 October on Ganja was a breach of the agreed ceasefire in relation to the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict; how many civilians were killed; and to whom they have made representations about this attack.

We are deeply concerned by reported breaches by both sides of the humanitarian ceasefire. The Minister for the European Neighbourhood and the Americas raised her concerns over the attacks on both Stepanakert and Ganja with the Armenian Charge d'Affaires in London on 13 October and Azerbaijani Foreign Minister Bayramov on 15 October, clearly stating that civilian casualties are unacceptable. Reporting suggests that 10 civilians were killed and 35 injured during the attack on Ganja. We will continue to make representations to both parties regarding the need to urgently cease attacks against civilian settlements.

15th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they recognise the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh as part of the nation of Azerbaijan.

We consider that the Basic Principles for a settlement proposed by the Minsk Group co-chairs provide the basis for a reasonable compromise in this regard, taking due account of the relevant OSCE principles governing relations between member-states. This includes the return of territories surrounding Nagorno-Karabakh to Azerbaijani control and future determination of the final legal status of Nagorno-Karabakh through a legally binding expression of will.

15th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of refugees from the Nagorno-Karabakh region since 1990.

The UK Government does not have an official figure for the number of displaced persons from Nagorno-Karabakh since 1990.

23rd Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to identify a freeport within Northern Ireland.

Freeports will be national hubs for international trade, innovation and commerce, regenerating communities across the UK by attracting new businesses, spreading jobs, investment and opportunity to towns and cities up and down the country.

We want to ensure that the whole of the UK can benefit. We remain committed to establishing at least one Freeport in Northern Ireland as soon as possible.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the implications of the Northern Ireland Protocol for the selection of any Northern Ireland ports as freeports.

We want to ensure that the whole of the UK can benefit from Freeports. The UK Government is holding ongoing discussions with the Northern Ireland Executive to establish at least one Freeport in Northern Ireland as soon as possible.

The Northern Ireland Protocol does not prevent the establishment of Freeports in Northern Ireland. However, it is appropriate that we take the time, working with the Northern Ireland Executive, to ensure the Freeport offer fully aligns with the circumstances in Northern Ireland and our international obligations, and delivers for ports, businesses and communities in Northern Ireland.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
30th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what interest has been paid by the Republic of Ireland for loans made under the Loans to Ireland Act 2010; and when any such loans are expected to be repaid.

The latest statutory report under section 2 of the Loans to Ireland Act 2010 discloses all interest payments made up to 30 September 2020. Since that date, Ireland has made one further regular interest payment, and one further tranche repayment with associated interest. Ireland is scheduled to repay the final tranche in March 2021. The Government continues to expect the loan to be repaid in full and on time.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
16th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is a Common Travel Area between the Republic of Ireland and the UK; whether there is freedom of movement between the Republic of Ireland and the EU; whether there are border checks on EU citizens travelling from the Republic of Ireland to Great Britain; and whether there are border checks on the movement of EU citizens, not from the Republic of Ireland, travelling through Northern Ireland to the rest of the UK.

The Common Travel Area (CTA) facilitates the free movement of people between the between the UK, Ireland and the Crown Dependencies (Isle of Man, Guernsey and Jersey).

As part of the CTA arrangements, the UK does not operate routine immigration controls on journeys from Ireland to the UK, including from Ireland to Great Britain. There are no immigration checks whatsoever on the Northern Ireland-Ireland land border. However, individuals arriving in the UK, regardless of where they enter from, must do so in line with the UK’s immigration framework and we work closely with the Irish Government to prevent abuse of the CTA.

There are no border controls for travel within the UK including from Northern Ireland to Great Britain.

Whether there is freedom of movement between Ireland and the EU is a matter for the Irish government.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether students from the EU are required to apply for visas in order to enrol in boarding schools in Northern Ireland.

Since freedom of movement ended on 31 December 2020, EEA nationals travelling to the UK for the first time to enrol on a course of 6 months or longer at an independent school in the UK, including those with boarding facilities in Northern Ireland, are required to apply for a visa under the Student or Child Student routes.

Irish citizens in the UK have the right to reside, work, study, and access healthcare, social security and public services without requiring permission.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether international boarding school students wishing to study in the UK are required (1) to apply for visas to enrol in a school that is classed as a Highly Trusted Sponsor, and (2) to provide a birth certificate translated into English; if so, what is their estimate of the additional cost for each applicant to provide this information; and what assessment they have made of the extent to which this may act as a deterrent for international students.

The UK welcomes international students and places no limit on the number of international students who can study in the UK.

Our offer to students is competitive internationally and as part of the launch of the Student & Child Student route we have simplified and streamlined the route to make it simpler for students to meet the requirements.

To be able to study in the UK, international students must receive an unconditional offer of a place on a course of study from a licenced Student sponsor listed on the published register of Student sponsors.

A key safeguarding requirement for unaccompanied minors travelling to the UK is for Child Students, and Students under the age of 18, to provide proof of relationship (such as a birth certificate) and consent from their parent or legal guardian for their living and care arrangements during their study in the UK. Proof of relationship is also required where the student is relying on funds held in their parent’s name, to establish the parent has consented to their use.

All documents submitted with an application for permission on the Student or Child Student routes must be in English or accompanied by a certified translation of the document. The cost of translation may differ dependent on the certified translator used and the document being translated.

An impact assessment on the new points-based Student and Child Student routes was published and can be found alongside the Statement of Changes laid in Parliament on 10 September 2020.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the arrangements are for requiring foreign persons who enter the United Kingdom via the Republic of Ireland to comply with a quarantine.

In order to keep overall levels of infection down and in line with many other countries, the Government will introduce a series of measures and restrictions at the UK border.

Firstly, the Government will require all international arrivals to supply their contact and accommodation information. They will also be strongly advised to download and use the NHS contact tracing app. The Government will also require all international arrivals not on a short list of exemptions to self-isolate in their accommodation for fourteen days on arrival into the UK.

Recognising the unique nature of the Common Travel Area, as well as the unique position of Northern Ireland, journeys within the Common Travel Area will be exempt from these measures.

We will continue to work closely with Ireland and the Crown Dependencies on our response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of deploying British armed forces personnel to Northern Ireland in response to the opposition to the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland.

The policing of all public order and protest events within Northern Ireland is the responsibility of the Police Service Northern Ireland (PSNI). The UK Government will continue to work closely with the PSNI. The safety and security of Northern Ireland remains our key commitment. Further policing support required by them would be provided via mutual aid support from other UK police forces. Defence would only provide support following a request from the PSNI via the well-established MACA (mutual aid to civil authority) process once mutual aid from other police forces had been exhausted, or if the support requested required niche capability not held by police forces within the UK. Defence has not received any request from PSNI to support them in relation to the Northern Ireland Protocol. Until such a request is made by the PSNI no assessment or planning on this issue will be undertaken by the MOD.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the Belfast Agreement, (2) the involvement of the Republic of Ireland in the internal affairs of Northern Ireland, (3) Northern Ireland’s status as part of the UK, and (4) human rights in (a) Northern Ireland, and (b) the Republic of Ireland.

This Government remains steadfastly committed to the Belfast Agreement, including the political institutions it seeks to establish and the rights that it guarantees. The Agreement, along with its successors, has been the bedrock of the significant progress that has been made in Northern Ireland over the last 22 years. Any involvement of the Irish Government in the internal affairs of Northern Ireland remains consistent with the well-established three-stranded approach to Northern Ireland affairs in the 1998 Belfast Agreement.

The Agreement confirmed that whether Northern Ireland remains part of the UK depends on the consent of a majority of the people of Northern Ireland. Section 1 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998, reaffirms that Northern Ireland is part of the UK and shall not cease to be so without the consent of its people.

While this Government’s clear preference is for Northern Ireland to remain part of the United Kingdom it has always made clear that, in accordance with the 1998 Agreement, it is for the people of Northern Ireland to decide. It remains the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland's view that a majority of the people of Northern Ireland continue to support Northern Ireland's place in the United Kingdom and that this is unlikely to change for the foreseeable future.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government who are the members of the Northern Ireland Centenary Historical Advisory Panel; and which organisations these members represent.

The establishment of the Centenary Historical Advisory Panel was announced by the Prime Minister in August. This Panel will provide advice to the Centenary Forum, and to the Government, on the historical facts of the centenary, and its work will be guided by the Principles for Remembering. The composition of the Centenary Historical Advisory Panel was confirmed in a press notice published on 9 October:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/centenary-bodies-meet-to-discuss-plans-for-northern-irelands-anniversary.

The composition of the Panel is shown below:

  • Professor Lord Bew MRIA, Emeritus Professor, Queen’s University Belfast
  • Dr Brian Barton, FRHistS, Independent Historian
  • Dr Marie Coleman, FRHistS, SFHEA, Reader in Modern Irish History, Queen’s University Belfast
  • Dr Niamh Gallagher, Lecturer in Modern British and Irish History, University of Cambridge and Fellow of St. Catharine’s College
  • Dr Caoimhe Nic Dháibhéid, Senior Lecturer in Modern History, University of Sheffield
  • Dr Margaret O’Callaghan, Reader in History and Politics, Queen’s University Belfast
  • Professor Henry Patterson, Emeritus Professor of Politics, University of Ulster
  • Professor Graham Walker, Professor of Political History, Queen’s University Belfast

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government who are the members of the Northern Ireland Centenary Forum; and which organisations these members represent.

The establishment of the Centenary Forum was announced by the Prime Minister in August. It is composed of a wide range of perspectives and interests, ensuring diverse voices are heard as we mark this important national anniversary. The composition of the Centenary Forum and the Centenary Historical Advisory Panel was confirmed in a press notice published on 9 October:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/centenary-bodies-meet-to-discuss-plans-for-northern-irelands-anniversary

Its composition is as follows:

  • Doug Beattie MC MLA
  • Eileen Chan-Hu, CRAIC NI
  • Stephen Farry MP
  • Rev. Mervyn Gibson, Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland
  • Ivy Goddard, Inter-Ethnic Forum
  • Peter Harbinson, Invest NI
  • Howard Hastings
  • Jacqueline Irwin, Community Relations Council
  • David Jackson, SOLACE NI
  • Ian Marshall
  • John McGrillen, Tourism NI
  • Paul Mullan, National Lottery Heritage Fund
  • Luke Patterson, NI Youth Parliament
  • Canon David Porter
  • Gavin Robinson MP
  • Cormac Savage, NI Youth Parliament
  • Jonathan Stewart, British Council
  • Liza Wilkinson, TIDES Training
  • Richard Williams, Northern Ireland Screen

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)