Earl of Lytton Portrait

Earl of Lytton

Crossbench - Excepted Hereditary

Became Member: 16th May 2011


Built Environment Committee
14th Apr 2021 - 31st Jan 2023
National Policy for the Built Environment Committee
11th Jun 2015 - 11th Feb 2016
Information Committee (Lords)
16th May 2012 - 30th Mar 2015


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Earl of Lytton has voted in 189 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Earl of Lytton Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Pinnock (Liberal Democrat)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Levelling Up, Communities and Local Government)
(14 debate interactions)
Baroness Scott of Bybrook (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
(13 debate interactions)
Lord Stunell (Liberal Democrat)
(7 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Leader of the House
(19 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(16 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Levelling-up and Regeneration Act 2023
(19,822 words contributed)
Non-Domestic Rating Act 2023
(12,791 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Earl of Lytton's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Earl of Lytton, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


1 Bill introduced by Earl of Lytton


A Bill to make provision for the resolution of disputes concerning the location or placement of boundaries and private rights of way relating to the title of an estate in land; and for connected purposes

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 15th January 2020
(Read Debate)

Earl of Lytton has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 19 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
28th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when they intend to lay statutory instruments under section 76 of the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Act 2022 to introduce transitional provisions.

The Government remains committed to implementing all remaining provisions of Part 2 of the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Act 2022 before the end of 2024. Departmental officials have been prioritising delivery of important measures to help deployment based on extensive engagement with operators, site providers and other stakeholders.

The policy team responsible for the implementation of the PSTI Act, amongst a number of other priorities, is currently staffed by five policy officials below Senior Civil Servant grade, who are supported by legal resource as required.

The team also covers other policy areas, including local authority engagement and street works issues relating to broadband.

The team provides updates to stakeholders on the implementation of the PSTI Act as part of regular, ongoing stakeholder engagement; and recently held two series of roundtable discussions for stakeholders with an interest in the implementation of the PSTI Act in July and September 2023. PSTI Act implementation is raised in many other stakeholder meetings as part of our wider agenda.

Due to the complex nature of the provisions of the PSTI Act that relate to the renewal of relevant leases under the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954, and their interaction with the backdating of rent under that legislation, no final decision has been taken on transitional provisions. However, backdated payments were raised as a key concern during Parliamentary passage, and are something the Department is considering closely. The Department undertook to look carefully at the potential impacts of the backdating of rent when considering the commencement of these provisions and any transitional provisions, and this work is ongoing.

Viscount Camrose
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many civil servants in the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology are currently working on an implementation strategy or transitional provisions for the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Act 2022.

The Government remains committed to implementing all remaining provisions of Part 2 of the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Act 2022 before the end of 2024. Departmental officials have been prioritising delivery of important measures to help deployment based on extensive engagement with operators, site providers and other stakeholders.

The policy team responsible for the implementation of the PSTI Act, amongst a number of other priorities, is currently staffed by five policy officials below Senior Civil Servant grade, who are supported by legal resource as required.

The team also covers other policy areas, including local authority engagement and street works issues relating to broadband.

The team provides updates to stakeholders on the implementation of the PSTI Act as part of regular, ongoing stakeholder engagement; and recently held two series of roundtable discussions for stakeholders with an interest in the implementation of the PSTI Act in July and September 2023. PSTI Act implementation is raised in many other stakeholder meetings as part of our wider agenda.

Due to the complex nature of the provisions of the PSTI Act that relate to the renewal of relevant leases under the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954, and their interaction with the backdating of rent under that legislation, no final decision has been taken on transitional provisions. However, backdated payments were raised as a key concern during Parliamentary passage, and are something the Department is considering closely. The Department undertook to look carefully at the potential impacts of the backdating of rent when considering the commencement of these provisions and any transitional provisions, and this work is ongoing.

Viscount Camrose
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many meetings they have had with industry stakeholders about an implementation strategy and transitional provisions of the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Act 2022.

The Government remains committed to implementing all remaining provisions of Part 2 of the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Act 2022 before the end of 2024. Departmental officials have been prioritising delivery of important measures to help deployment based on extensive engagement with operators, site providers and other stakeholders.

The policy team responsible for the implementation of the PSTI Act, amongst a number of other priorities, is currently staffed by five policy officials below Senior Civil Servant grade, who are supported by legal resource as required.

The team also covers other policy areas, including local authority engagement and street works issues relating to broadband.

The team provides updates to stakeholders on the implementation of the PSTI Act as part of regular, ongoing stakeholder engagement; and recently held two series of roundtable discussions for stakeholders with an interest in the implementation of the PSTI Act in July and September 2023. PSTI Act implementation is raised in many other stakeholder meetings as part of our wider agenda.

Due to the complex nature of the provisions of the PSTI Act that relate to the renewal of relevant leases under the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954, and their interaction with the backdating of rent under that legislation, no final decision has been taken on transitional provisions. However, backdated payments were raised as a key concern during Parliamentary passage, and are something the Department is considering closely. The Department undertook to look carefully at the potential impacts of the backdating of rent when considering the commencement of these provisions and any transitional provisions, and this work is ongoing.

Viscount Camrose
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of orders for backdated rent payments under the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Act 2022.

The Government remains committed to implementing all remaining provisions of Part 2 of the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Act 2022 before the end of 2024. Departmental officials have been prioritising delivery of important measures to help deployment based on extensive engagement with operators, site providers and other stakeholders.

The policy team responsible for the implementation of the PSTI Act, amongst a number of other priorities, is currently staffed by five policy officials below Senior Civil Servant grade, who are supported by legal resource as required.

The team also covers other policy areas, including local authority engagement and street works issues relating to broadband.

The team provides updates to stakeholders on the implementation of the PSTI Act as part of regular, ongoing stakeholder engagement; and recently held two series of roundtable discussions for stakeholders with an interest in the implementation of the PSTI Act in July and September 2023. PSTI Act implementation is raised in many other stakeholder meetings as part of our wider agenda.

Due to the complex nature of the provisions of the PSTI Act that relate to the renewal of relevant leases under the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954, and their interaction with the backdating of rent under that legislation, no final decision has been taken on transitional provisions. However, backdated payments were raised as a key concern during Parliamentary passage, and are something the Department is considering closely. The Department undertook to look carefully at the potential impacts of the backdating of rent when considering the commencement of these provisions and any transitional provisions, and this work is ongoing.

Viscount Camrose
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
23rd Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government which types of defect data they collect when assessing the prevalence of non-cladding defects in residential buildings.

The Department receives quarterly updates from Registered Providers of social housing on progress towards remediating buildings for which they are the Responsible Entity. This includes data on buildings with external and/or internal life-critical fire safety defects. In addition to unsafe cladding, relevant defects may include but are not limited to: compartmentation between dwellings or between dwellings and common parts; inadequate fire stopping or fire barriers; incorrect or missing fire escape signage; inadequate or defective fire detection and alarm systems; unprotected means of escape; and inadequate or defective firefighting equipment or installations.

The Department also receives quarterly updates from developers that have signed the developer remediation contract. This too includes data on buildings with external and/ or internal life-critical fire safety defects.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
23rd Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to ensuring that building owners, whether freeholders, commonhold associations or enfranchised leaseholders, who are required to remedy non ‘life-critical fire safety defects’ have an automatic remedy against the person responsible for the defective construction.

Interested parties including freeholders, leaseholders, commonhold associations or enfranchised leaseholders can potentially look to pursue a previous freeholder, developer and any associated company or person for remediation costs through a remediation contribution order. They also have the potential to pursue developers, contractors, or manufacturers where they are liable for defects which meant one or more dwelling in the building was not fit for habitation when the relevant works were completed.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what is their definition of "life-critical defects" in relation to fire safety risks in buildings.

The definition of “life-critical defects” is in Annex 1 of the developer remediation contract.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact that construction defects relating to fire safety in residential blocks have on the asset value of those buildings.

The Department does not hold information on the impact of construction defects, relating to fire safety, on the asset value of whole buildings. However, I refer the Earl of Lytton to the answer given to Question UIN 22129 On 24 April 2024 on the selling price of individual flats.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government by what date they expect all buildings over 11 metres that require a work assessment to have had their assessments completed.

Developers that signed the developer remediation contract are required to assess and remediate relevant buildings as soon as reasonably practicable. The length of time it may reasonably take to assess and remediate a building will vary depending on factors including the scale of works required, co-operation of third parties in granting access to the building and finalising a works contract, and risk-based prioritisation by the developer of assessments and remedial works across the portfolio of buildings for which the developer is responsible.

The Government publishes monthly data on progress that developers have made towards assessing and remediating buildings for which they are responsible under the contract.

As at end of November 2023, fire risks assessments had been undertaken on 97.6% of all buildings reported 11m+ in height which are the responsibility of social housing providers, with a further 1.5% planned in the next nine months. As at end January 2024, developers had yet to obtain an assessment for 1,607 of the 4,614 11m+ buildings for which developers had accepted responsibility under the developer remediation contract.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
15th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what was their rationale for the short duration of the call for evidence in relation to jointly owned leasehold properties, from Thursday 21 March to Friday 5 April.

The Government has discretion about the length of calls for evidence.

In this instance, the call ran from Thursday 21 March to Friday 5 April 2024 and as a result this was a short duration.

Baroness Swinburne
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Local Government Association's report Local service delivery and place-shaping: A framework to support parish and town councils, published on 11 August 2021; and what plans they have to raise awareness of the report in central and local government.

The Government recognise that parish and town councils play an important role in improving the quality of life and well-being of their communities. Parish and town councils often have a close understanding of what their communities want and that is why we fully encourage schemes that support their achievements and frameworks that help improve local service delivery.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to celebrate parish and town councils that have received an award through the Local Council Award Scheme.

The Government recognise that parish and town councils play an important role in improving the quality of life and well-being of their communities. Parish and town councils often have a close understanding of what their communities want and that is why we fully encourage schemes that support their achievements and frameworks that help improve local service delivery.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to raise public awareness of parish and town council elections taking place on 4 May.

As has been the case under successive administrations, Principal Councils have the responsibility to post notices and deliver elections locally. The Electoral Commission also provides information and guidance to voters.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to increase the diversity of councillors by encouraging and supporting more people to stand for election.

The Government believes that no one should feel deterred or excluded from standing or serving as a councillor.

The Local Authority Government Sector Support Programme 2022-23 funds the Local Government Association's delivery of an expanded 'Be a Councillor' campaign to promote a greater diversity of candidates. We also provide funding to support disabled councillors including those hoping to stand for election.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
20th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government why they made provision for an 18-month relaxation period in relation to non-combustible cavity barriers in external walls of buildings when making the Building etc. (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2022 (SI 2022/603) and publishing the Approved Document B 2019 edition incorporating 2020 and 2022 amendments, given that at the date of laying the regulations there were suitable non-combustible products readily available.

On 1 June 2022, the Government published a response to a consultation following the review of the ban of combustible materials in and on the external walls of buildings. The consultation proposed a temporary 18-month relaxation of the ban as it relates to cavity trays. This followed from issues highlighted to officials on the excessive cost, supply (including of trained professional able to install these products) and installation of products on the market at the time. At the time we brought in the changes we considered it appropriate, on balance, to allow for a short-term exemption for combustible cavity trays as the risk they pose remains relatively low while providing temporary flexibility.

The consultation response is available here.

We will continue to review the impact of the ban including this short-term exemption and to work with industry to understand new products available on the market.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
20th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what is the impact of defining 'defect' in the Developer Remediation Contract, published on 17 February, differently from 'relevant defect', in the Building Safety Act 2022; and what effect this will have on ensuring buildings are adequately remediated.

The definition of 'Defect' in the developer remediation contract and the definition of 'Relevant Defect' in the Building Safety Act were drafted for different purposes.

The definition of 'Relevant Defect' in the Building Safety Act 2022 is used in relation to a wider range of actors, defect types and circumstances.

The definition of 'Defect' in the developer remediation contract was drafted to match the wording of a public pledge signed by 49 developers. Under the developer pledge and the contract which codifies the pledge commitments, developers commit to addressing life-critical fire safety defects arising from the original design, construction or refurbishment of the building, and to do so in line with relevant standards.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
28th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have commissioned research on (1) significant fire safety defects, and (2) other significant structural defects, in residential buildings in England below 18 meters in height; and if so, whether they will publish the findings.

The department has carried out a 11 meters-18 meters data collection looking at fire safety defects in external wall systems. The findings will be published once the analysis has been completed.

15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Viscount Younger of Leckie on 30 October 2019 (HL178), whether (1) their interim review, and (2) the Valuation Office Agency's customer evaluation, of the Check, Challenge, Appeal system has concluded; and when they intend to publish the results of each.

The Government intends to communicate the outcomes of the interim review of the Check, Challenge, Appeal system shortly. The Valuation Office Agency is currently conducting the customer evaluation of the delivery of the new system and intends to publish this in autumn 2020.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)