John Penrose Portrait

John Penrose

Conservative - Weston-super-Mare

Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
16th Nov 2018 - 26th Jul 2019
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
8th Feb 2014 - 17th Jul 2016
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
8th May 2015 - 17th Jul 2016
Committee of Selection
17th Jul 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
7th Oct 2013 - 8th Feb 2014
Administration Committee
3rd Dec 2012 - 28th Oct 2013
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
17th May 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Regulatory Reform
29th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Minister (Business, Innovation and Skills)
19th Jan 2009 - 27th Jul 2009
Work and Pensions Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 29th Jun 2009


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Wednesday 20th July 2022
Oral Answers to Questions
T1. If he will make a statement on his departmental responsibilities.
Written Answers
Wednesday 20th July 2022
Greenhouse Gas Emissions
To ask the President of COP26, whether he has had discussions with Cabinet colleagues on the potential effect on domestic …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 13th September 2021
Planning (Street Plans) Bill 2021-22
A Bill to make provision about the creation and operation of street-level plans for local development; and for connected purposes.
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 31st January 2022
1. Employment and earnings
18 January 2022, received £200 from the Daily Telegraph, 111 Buckingham Palace Rd, London SW1W 0DT, for an article published …
EDM signed
Thursday 28th June 2018
REFERRAL OF BURMA TO THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT
That this House expresses concern that Min Aung Hlaing, Commander in Chief of the Burmese military, has paid no real …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 26th April 2022
Whistleblowing Bill 2021-22
A Bill to establish an independent Office of the Whistleblower to protect whistleblowers and whistleblowing in accordance with the public …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, John Penrose has voted in 516 divisions, and 3 times against the majority of their Party.

17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
John Penrose voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
John Penrose voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
30 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
John Penrose voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 72 Conservative Aye votes vs 175 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 188
View All John Penrose Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Paul Scully (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
(10 debate interactions)
Michael Ellis (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
(9 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(34 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(14 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Subsidy Control Act 2022
(5,107 words contributed)
Parliamentary Constituencies Act 2020
(1,947 words contributed)
Finance Act 2020
(1,860 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all John Penrose's debates

Weston-super-Mare Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

John Penrose has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by John Penrose

1st May 2018
John Penrose signed this EDM on Thursday 28th June 2018

REFERRAL OF BURMA TO THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT

Tabled by: Rushanara Ali (Labour - Bethnal Green and Bow)
That this House expresses concern that Min Aung Hlaing, Commander in Chief of the Burmese military, has paid no real price for the military offensive against the Rohingya which began in August 2017; notes that around 700,000 Rohingya have been forced to flee to Bangladesh, joining the more than 300,000 …
88 signatures
(Most recent: 4 Sep 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 45
Scottish National Party: 18
Liberal Democrat: 7
Independent: 7
Conservative: 6
Plaid Cymru: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 1
Green Party: 1
8th November 2016
John Penrose signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 8th November 2016

TRIGGERING OF ARTICLE 50

Tabled by: John Penrose (Conservative - Weston-super-Mare)
That this House supports the triggering of Article 50 of the Treaty on the European Union according to the Government's timetable.
40 signatures
(Most recent: 6 Dec 2016)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 35
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Independent: 1
View All John Penrose's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by John Penrose, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


John Penrose has not been granted any Urgent Questions

John Penrose has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by John Penrose


A Bill to make provision about the creation and operation of street-level plans for local development; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 6th May 2022

104 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
20th Jul 2022
To ask the President of COP26, whether he has had discussions with Cabinet colleagues on the potential effect on domestic manufacturing of including carbon that is embedded in imports in calculations of the UK's carbon footprint.

The UK follows the agreed international approach for reporting greenhouse gas emissions, whereby countries report emissions produced within their territories.

We will continue to drive international co-operation to counter the risk of emissions offshoring and the Government will consult later this year on Carbon Leakage Mitigation options.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the President of COP26, when he plans to respond to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 28 September and 4 November 2021 on behalf of his constituent, Mr Michael Crane.

I apologise for the delay in responding to the points raised by the hon. Member on behalf of his constituent.

I responded to the hon. Member’s letters on 11 January.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
8th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of reporting external meetings of (a) special advisers and (b) senior officials below Permanent Secretary level, on a similar basis to that which applies to Ministers and Permanent Secretaries.

The Government publishes a comprehensive set of transparency publications and we keep this under review.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether calls to the Census support phone helpline are cut off by the helpline if not answered within a certain time.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what information his Department holds on the average waiting times for calls to the Census support phone helpline; and what proportion of the calls to that helpline have been dropped or terminated.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the current response time is for the Parliamentary Ombudsman to respond to correspondence and questions from hon. Members; what assessment he has made of recent trends in those response times; and what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the current performance of the Ombudsman is replying to those inquiries.

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) is independent of Government and is accountable to Parliament through the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee for its performance. The PHSO will therefore reply separately to this question by letter.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the National Audit Office report on Government procurement during the covid-19 pandemic, published 18 November 2020, whether all qualifying Government contracts will be published on Contracts Finder within the recommended 90 day time limit; and what estimate he has made of the length of time it will take to clear the backlog of those contracts waiting to be published.

Being able to procure at speed has been critical in providing the Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

We welcome the NAO report which recognises that the government ‘needed to procure with extreme urgency’ and ‘secured unprecedented volumes of essential supplies necessary to protect front-line workers’.

All contracts, including those designed to tackle coronavirus issues, must continue to achieve value for money for taxpayers, use good commercial judgement and the details of any awards made should be published as soon as possible in line with Government transparency guidelines.

Robust processes are in place for the award of government contracts. PPE offers were assessed using the same eight step process, including quality checks, price controls and other due diligence, no matter where the original referral came from. This eight step process has been published in the NAO’s report. For further details please see the statement on gov.uk.

We are committed to transparency in public procurement. Details of central government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder. We regret that some details have not been uploaded in a timely fashion. All will be published as soon as possible and significant information is already available online.

The forthcoming Green Paper on transforming the UK’s public procurement regulations will strengthen our longstanding and essential policies that are fundamental to public procurement including transparency, ensuring value for money and fair treatment of suppliers. As part of this, we will propose legislating to reinforce that contracting authorities would need to publish basic disclosure information, including the basis of award decisions.

We have always accepted that there are lessons to be learned from how we responded to this unprecedented global pandemic and the government is fully committed to doing so. We will address the NAO report’s recommendations in due course. As I stated in my answer on 12 November, we are engaged in both internal and external audit to review how our procurements during this period have been conducted.


The service to offer coronavirus (COVID-19) support has closed. Information for businesses seeking to offer coronavirus support is available at https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus-support-from-business

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the November 2020 NAO report on Government procurement during the covid-19 outbreak, if he will open the fast track approval process to all potential contracts and suppliers to ensure equal treatment for all.

Being able to procure at speed has been critical in providing the Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

We welcome the NAO report which recognises that the government ‘needed to procure with extreme urgency’ and ‘secured unprecedented volumes of essential supplies necessary to protect front-line workers’.

All contracts, including those designed to tackle coronavirus issues, must continue to achieve value for money for taxpayers, use good commercial judgement and the details of any awards made should be published as soon as possible in line with Government transparency guidelines.

Robust processes are in place for the award of government contracts. PPE offers were assessed using the same eight step process, including quality checks, price controls and other due diligence, no matter where the original referral came from. This eight step process has been published in the NAO’s report. For further details please see the statement on gov.uk.

We are committed to transparency in public procurement. Details of central government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder. We regret that some details have not been uploaded in a timely fashion. All will be published as soon as possible and significant information is already available online.

The forthcoming Green Paper on transforming the UK’s public procurement regulations will strengthen our longstanding and essential policies that are fundamental to public procurement including transparency, ensuring value for money and fair treatment of suppliers. As part of this, we will propose legislating to reinforce that contracting authorities would need to publish basic disclosure information, including the basis of award decisions.

We have always accepted that there are lessons to be learned from how we responded to this unprecedented global pandemic and the government is fully committed to doing so. We will address the NAO report’s recommendations in due course. As I stated in my answer on 12 November, we are engaged in both internal and external audit to review how our procurements during this period have been conducted.


The service to offer coronavirus (COVID-19) support has closed. Information for businesses seeking to offer coronavirus support is available at https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus-support-from-business

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the NAO report into Government procurement during the covid-19 pandemic, if the Government will publish data for all future direct award contracts on how the risks of procuring suppliers without competition have been mitigated; and when the Government plans to publish that information for all existing direct award contracts.

Being able to procure at speed has been critical in providing the Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

We welcome the NAO report which recognises that the government ‘needed to procure with extreme urgency’ and ‘secured unprecedented volumes of essential supplies necessary to protect front-line workers’.

All contracts, including those designed to tackle coronavirus issues, must continue to achieve value for money for taxpayers, use good commercial judgement and the details of any awards made should be published as soon as possible in line with Government transparency guidelines.

Robust processes are in place for the award of government contracts. PPE offers were assessed using the same eight step process, including quality checks, price controls and other due diligence, no matter where the original referral came from. This eight step process has been published in the NAO’s report. For further details please see the statement on gov.uk.

We are committed to transparency in public procurement. Details of central government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder. We regret that some details have not been uploaded in a timely fashion. All will be published as soon as possible and significant information is already available online.

The forthcoming Green Paper on transforming the UK’s public procurement regulations will strengthen our longstanding and essential policies that are fundamental to public procurement including transparency, ensuring value for money and fair treatment of suppliers. As part of this, we will propose legislating to reinforce that contracting authorities would need to publish basic disclosure information, including the basis of award decisions.

We have always accepted that there are lessons to be learned from how we responded to this unprecedented global pandemic and the government is fully committed to doing so. We will address the NAO report’s recommendations in due course. As I stated in my answer on 12 November, we are engaged in both internal and external audit to review how our procurements during this period have been conducted.


The service to offer coronavirus (COVID-19) support has closed. Information for businesses seeking to offer coronavirus support is available at https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus-support-from-business

22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of reforming the (a) energy price cap, (b) wholesale energy markets and (c) electricity grid to deliver lower and stable energy costs.

We are considering how our policies should evolve and will continue to be guided by our commitment to meeting carbon budgets, maintaining energy security, and ensuring cost effectiveness.  We will also continue to adopt a system-wide approach in assessing the case for any changes.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the Government will publish its official response to the Penrose Review that it commissioned into the UK’s competition and consumer regime, published in February 2021.

I would like to thank the Hon. Member for conducting his review and continued advocacy for reforming our competition and consumer policy. The Government consulted from July to October 2021 on a wide range of reforms to competition and consumer policy, and the consultations respond to proposals made by the Hon. Member in his report. The Government is now analysing the feedback received and will respond to the consultations in due course. We do not intend to issue a formal response to the Penrose review beyond our plans for response to consultation.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the quantitative calculations and evidence supporting the statement in the Subsidy Control Bill's Impact Assessment, section 290, that lowering transparency thresholds for publication from £500,000 to either £175,000 or £0 would have a net additional benefit of 0.00001 per cent a year.

The Bill’s Impact Assessment can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/subsidy-control-bill-2021-bill-documents.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the total value of reported Government subsidies to businesses as at 14 September 2021.

According to the most recent available State Aid Scoreboard, the total reported subsidies between 2010 and 2019 in the United Kingdom was €80.1bn for non-agricultural subsidies. Data covering 2020 will be included in the next annual report of the State Aid Scoreboard.

Data for the period from 01 January 2021 is held on the UK’s publicly-accessible subsidy Transparency Database.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to (a) assess and (b) monitor the effectiveness of subsidies made by public authorities falling below the transparency thresholds proposed in the Subsidy Control Bill; and whether those subsidies will be required to be reported to his Department by public authorities.

The new subsidy transparency rules will make the UK a world leader in subsidy transparency and will provide subsidy data for improving subsidy design across the UK.

Any financial support below £315,000 over three years does not require a public authority to check the subsidy against the principles, because it is exempt as Minimal Financial Assistance (MFA). This financial support does not need to be reported to the Government or uploaded to the transparency database. The Government does not intend to assess and monitor the effectiveness of financial support which is exempt from the subsidy control rules.

The subsidy transparency rules have been designed to balance the administrative burden of recording subsidies with the benefits of subsidy transparency for those subsidies most likely to distort competition. This is why the MFA threshold is set at £315,000 over three years.

Regardless of the transparency rules, public authorities have a responsibility to ensure that any public money they provide is spent appropriately. Nonetheless, the assessment of financial support which is exempt from the rules would reduce the effectiveness of the dataset generated by the subsidy control database. Any subsidy data analysis should focus on those subsidies subject to the rules of the regime.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total (a) number and (b) value of subsidies awarded by public bodies that were below the General Block Exemption Regulation (GBER) transparency threshold was in each calendar year between 2015 and 2020.

Information on subsidies which were below the EU State aid transparency threshold was not required to be declared on the EU State Aid Transparency Public Search tool.

The information is also not held centrally by the Government and could therefore only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
10th Feb 2022
With reference to the Penrose review, published in February 2021, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the recommendation in that review that Ofcom should promote competition and reduce regulatory burdens in the communications sector.

Our Future Telecoms Infrastructure Review recognised that promoting competition and stable, long-term regulation were critical to our connectivity ambitions. We embedded these goals into Ofcom’s Statement of Strategic Priorities.

Moreover, work continues across government on the UK’s regulatory frameworks: the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has consulted on reforms to competition and consumer policy; and, the government has set out its vision for modernising the economic regulation of the utilities sectors, including telecommunications.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to reply to the letters of 16 July 2020 and 17 August 2020 and telephone call of 10 November 2020 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on Weston Choral Society, raised on behalf of his constituent Howard Sayer.

A response to the 16 July letter was sent to the Hon Member on 13 August.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of including assessments of financial education in Ofsted inspections.

Education on financial matters helps to ensure that young people are prepared to manage their money well, make sound financial decisions and know where to seek further information when needed. Pupils receive financial education through the national curriculum for mathematics and citizenship. For secondary school-aged pupils, this includes compulsory content covering the functions and uses of money, financial products and services, and the need to understand financial risk, including any emerging financial trends. Schools have flexibility over how they design their curriculum and can tailor it to the needs of their pupils.

The Money and Pensions Service (MAPS) published financial education guidance for primary and secondary schools in England during Talk Money Week (8-12 November 2021). The guidance includes links to quality assured resources for schools, including content and activities on cryptocurrencies and buy now, pay later schemes. It also sets out the knowledge and skills pupils need to protect their personal data, critically evaluate online content, and identify scams. The guidance is available to view here: https://maps.org.uk/2021/11/11/financial-education-guidance-for-primary-and-secondary-schools-in-england/.

There are other opportunities across the national curriculum to teach pupils about cryptocurrencies. For example, the computing curriculum teaches the fundamental knowledge and skills that support pupils to make well-informed choices about technology. It covers the principles of e-safety at all key stages, with progression in the content to reflect the different and escalating risks that young people face. The computing curriculum is available to view here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-computing-programmes-of-study.

The department will continue to work closely with the MAPS and other relevant parties such as Her Majesty’s Treasury, to support the teaching of financial education to children and young people, including novel financial products.

Ofsted’s Education Inspection Framework has a strong emphasis on schools providing a broad, balanced, and ambitious curriculum for all pupils, as exemplified by the national curriculum. Inspectors undertake deep dives into several specific subjects during inspection and this will include mathematics and citizenship for some schools.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to educate young people on emerging financial trends, including crypto currencies and buy now, pay later schemes.

Education on financial matters helps to ensure that young people are prepared to manage their money well, make sound financial decisions and know where to seek further information when needed. Pupils receive financial education through the national curriculum for mathematics and citizenship. For secondary school-aged pupils, this includes compulsory content covering the functions and uses of money, financial products and services, and the need to understand financial risk, including any emerging financial trends. Schools have flexibility over how they design their curriculum and can tailor it to the needs of their pupils.

The Money and Pensions Service (MAPS) published financial education guidance for primary and secondary schools in England during Talk Money Week (8-12 November 2021). The guidance includes links to quality assured resources for schools, including content and activities on cryptocurrencies and buy now, pay later schemes. It also sets out the knowledge and skills pupils need to protect their personal data, critically evaluate online content, and identify scams. The guidance is available to view here: https://maps.org.uk/2021/11/11/financial-education-guidance-for-primary-and-secondary-schools-in-england/.

There are other opportunities across the national curriculum to teach pupils about cryptocurrencies. For example, the computing curriculum teaches the fundamental knowledge and skills that support pupils to make well-informed choices about technology. It covers the principles of e-safety at all key stages, with progression in the content to reflect the different and escalating risks that young people face. The computing curriculum is available to view here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-computing-programmes-of-study.

The department will continue to work closely with the MAPS and other relevant parties such as Her Majesty’s Treasury, to support the teaching of financial education to children and young people, including novel financial products.

Ofsted’s Education Inspection Framework has a strong emphasis on schools providing a broad, balanced, and ambitious curriculum for all pupils, as exemplified by the national curriculum. Inspectors undertake deep dives into several specific subjects during inspection and this will include mathematics and citizenship for some schools.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to improve the financial literacy of school children in Weston-super-Mare.

All schools are required to provide a broad and balanced curriculum. Education on financial matters helps to ensure that young people are prepared to manage their money well, make sound financial decisions and know where to seek further information when needed.

The mathematics programmes of study provide young people with the knowledge and financial skills to make important financial decisions. In the primary mathematics curriculum, there is a strong emphasis on the essential arithmetic knowledge that pupils should be taught. This knowledge is vital, as a strong grasp of numeracy and numbers will underpin pupils’ ability to manage budgets and money, including, for example, using percentages. There is also some specific content about financial education, such as calculations with money.

In 2014 financial literacy was made statutory within the national curriculum as part of the citizenship curriculum for 11 to 16-year-olds. The department also published a non-statutory citizenship curriculum for 5 to 11-year-olds, which is clear that, by the end of primary education, pupils should be taught how to look after their money and realise that future wants and needs may be met through saving.

Primary schools are free to include additional content on financial management in their curricula, including working with external experts to ensure they develop the right teaching approach for their particular context.

The Money and Pensions Service (MAPS) published financial education guidance for primary and secondary schools in England on 11 November 2021, during Talk Money week. The guidance is designed to support school leaders to enhance the financial education currently delivered in their schools to make it memorable and impactful. The department supported MAPS with their communications activities during Talk Money week and is looking for future appropriate opportunities to promote the guidance. The guidance is available here: https://maps.org.uk/2021/11/11/financial-education-guidance-for-primary-and-secondary-schools-in-england/.

In the COVID-19 School Snapshot survey from June-September 2021, all leaders were asked if their school teaches pupils about managing money, such as how to make good decisions about spending and saving. The summary of findings showed that most did so but that it was more common amongst secondary schools (86%) than primary schools (60%). Schools with the lowest proportion of pupils eligible for free school meals were more likely than those on the highest proportion to teach pupils about managing money (70% vs. 59%).

MAPS are planning to carry out a UK wide children and young people financial capability survey later this year. The Delivery Plans for each nation are being published shortly and will detail plans to increase the provision of financial education for more children and young people across the UK.

The department will continue to work closely with MAPS and other stakeholders such as Her Majesty's Treasury, to consider learning from other sector initiatives and whether there is scope to provide further support for the teaching of financial education in schools.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will estimate how many UK schools are currently delivering financial education programmes.

All schools are required to provide a broad and balanced curriculum. Education on financial matters helps to ensure that young people are prepared to manage their money well, make sound financial decisions and know where to seek further information when needed.

The mathematics programmes of study provide young people with the knowledge and financial skills to make important financial decisions. In the primary mathematics curriculum, there is a strong emphasis on the essential arithmetic knowledge that pupils should be taught. This knowledge is vital, as a strong grasp of numeracy and numbers will underpin pupils’ ability to manage budgets and money, including, for example, using percentages. There is also some specific content about financial education, such as calculations with money.

In 2014 financial literacy was made statutory within the national curriculum as part of the citizenship curriculum for 11 to 16-year-olds. The department also published a non-statutory citizenship curriculum for 5 to 11-year-olds, which is clear that, by the end of primary education, pupils should be taught how to look after their money and realise that future wants and needs may be met through saving.

Primary schools are free to include additional content on financial management in their curricula, including working with external experts to ensure they develop the right teaching approach for their particular context.

The Money and Pensions Service (MAPS) published financial education guidance for primary and secondary schools in England on 11 November 2021, during Talk Money week. The guidance is designed to support school leaders to enhance the financial education currently delivered in their schools to make it memorable and impactful. The department supported MAPS with their communications activities during Talk Money week and is looking for future appropriate opportunities to promote the guidance. The guidance is available here: https://maps.org.uk/2021/11/11/financial-education-guidance-for-primary-and-secondary-schools-in-england/.

In the COVID-19 School Snapshot survey from June-September 2021, all leaders were asked if their school teaches pupils about managing money, such as how to make good decisions about spending and saving. The summary of findings showed that most did so but that it was more common amongst secondary schools (86%) than primary schools (60%). Schools with the lowest proportion of pupils eligible for free school meals were more likely than those on the highest proportion to teach pupils about managing money (70% vs. 59%).

MAPS are planning to carry out a UK wide children and young people financial capability survey later this year. The Delivery Plans for each nation are being published shortly and will detail plans to increase the provision of financial education for more children and young people across the UK.

The department will continue to work closely with MAPS and other stakeholders such as Her Majesty's Treasury, to consider learning from other sector initiatives and whether there is scope to provide further support for the teaching of financial education in schools.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to increase the provision of financial education in primary schools.

All schools are required to provide a broad and balanced curriculum. Education on financial matters helps to ensure that young people are prepared to manage their money well, make sound financial decisions and know where to seek further information when needed.

The mathematics programmes of study provide young people with the knowledge and financial skills to make important financial decisions. In the primary mathematics curriculum, there is a strong emphasis on the essential arithmetic knowledge that pupils should be taught. This knowledge is vital, as a strong grasp of numeracy and numbers will underpin pupils’ ability to manage budgets and money, including, for example, using percentages. There is also some specific content about financial education, such as calculations with money.

In 2014 financial literacy was made statutory within the national curriculum as part of the citizenship curriculum for 11 to 16-year-olds. The department also published a non-statutory citizenship curriculum for 5 to 11-year-olds, which is clear that, by the end of primary education, pupils should be taught how to look after their money and realise that future wants and needs may be met through saving.

Primary schools are free to include additional content on financial management in their curricula, including working with external experts to ensure they develop the right teaching approach for their particular context.

The Money and Pensions Service (MAPS) published financial education guidance for primary and secondary schools in England on 11 November 2021, during Talk Money week. The guidance is designed to support school leaders to enhance the financial education currently delivered in their schools to make it memorable and impactful. The department supported MAPS with their communications activities during Talk Money week and is looking for future appropriate opportunities to promote the guidance. The guidance is available here: https://maps.org.uk/2021/11/11/financial-education-guidance-for-primary-and-secondary-schools-in-england/.

In the COVID-19 School Snapshot survey from June-September 2021, all leaders were asked if their school teaches pupils about managing money, such as how to make good decisions about spending and saving. The summary of findings showed that most did so but that it was more common amongst secondary schools (86%) than primary schools (60%). Schools with the lowest proportion of pupils eligible for free school meals were more likely than those on the highest proportion to teach pupils about managing money (70% vs. 59%).

MAPS are planning to carry out a UK wide children and young people financial capability survey later this year. The Delivery Plans for each nation are being published shortly and will detail plans to increase the provision of financial education for more children and young people across the UK.

The department will continue to work closely with MAPS and other stakeholders such as Her Majesty's Treasury, to consider learning from other sector initiatives and whether there is scope to provide further support for the teaching of financial education in schools.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will conduct a UK-wide assessment of the financial capability of young people.

All schools are required to provide a broad and balanced curriculum. Education on financial matters helps to ensure that young people are prepared to manage their money well, make sound financial decisions and know where to seek further information when needed.

The mathematics programmes of study provide young people with the knowledge and financial skills to make important financial decisions. In the primary mathematics curriculum, there is a strong emphasis on the essential arithmetic knowledge that pupils should be taught. This knowledge is vital, as a strong grasp of numeracy and numbers will underpin pupils’ ability to manage budgets and money, including, for example, using percentages. There is also some specific content about financial education, such as calculations with money.

In 2014 financial literacy was made statutory within the national curriculum as part of the citizenship curriculum for 11 to 16-year-olds. The department also published a non-statutory citizenship curriculum for 5 to 11-year-olds, which is clear that, by the end of primary education, pupils should be taught how to look after their money and realise that future wants and needs may be met through saving.

Primary schools are free to include additional content on financial management in their curricula, including working with external experts to ensure they develop the right teaching approach for their particular context.

The Money and Pensions Service (MAPS) published financial education guidance for primary and secondary schools in England on 11 November 2021, during Talk Money week. The guidance is designed to support school leaders to enhance the financial education currently delivered in their schools to make it memorable and impactful. The department supported MAPS with their communications activities during Talk Money week and is looking for future appropriate opportunities to promote the guidance. The guidance is available here: https://maps.org.uk/2021/11/11/financial-education-guidance-for-primary-and-secondary-schools-in-england/.

In the COVID-19 School Snapshot survey from June-September 2021, all leaders were asked if their school teaches pupils about managing money, such as how to make good decisions about spending and saving. The summary of findings showed that most did so but that it was more common amongst secondary schools (86%) than primary schools (60%). Schools with the lowest proportion of pupils eligible for free school meals were more likely than those on the highest proportion to teach pupils about managing money (70% vs. 59%).

MAPS are planning to carry out a UK wide children and young people financial capability survey later this year. The Delivery Plans for each nation are being published shortly and will detail plans to increase the provision of financial education for more children and young people across the UK.

The department will continue to work closely with MAPS and other stakeholders such as Her Majesty's Treasury, to consider learning from other sector initiatives and whether there is scope to provide further support for the teaching of financial education in schools.

6th Sep 2021
What plans his Department has to help secondary school pupils choose tertiary education courses informed by the (a) salaries and (b) employment rates of people completing those courses.

The National Careers Service website provides robust national labour market information (LMI), including average earnings and typical work hours, for individual occupations. In the Skills for Jobs white paper we set out the ambition that the National Careers Service website will be updated to become a single source of government-assured careers information for young people and adults. The revamped website will include improved and updated labour market information. We will bring together all the learning and careers routes available to people, along with improved content on work experience, the job market, and applying for roles.

We published updated statutory guidance for schools and colleges in July 2021. This includes a reminder to schools of their obligation to inform students when courses they are considering lead to poor career outcomes.

We are working closely with our partners to develop the best approach to making localised LMI available to schools and colleges. The Careers & Enterprise Company is working with local partners, including Skills Advisory Panels, Local Enterprise Partnerships, and Mayoral Combined Authorities to develop a greater understanding of local skills needs and disseminate LMI to schools and colleges. This includes promoting the use of the National Careers Service website and encouraging Careers Leaders to interpret labour market data for their students.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to respond to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 11 January 2021 and 8 February 2021 on behalf of his constituent, Michael Saunders, on funding for a university course.

I can confirm that a response has been sent to the letters dated 11 January and 8 February 2021, from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to reply to the correspondence of 10 December 2020 and of 15 January 2021 from the right hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent about covid-19 in special schools with medically vulnerable children.

I can confirm that a response has been sent to the letters dated 10 December, reference JP56880 and 15 January, reference JP5688010, from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to reply to the letters of 9 November and 8 December 2020 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent Chris Hildrew, headteacher of Churchill Academy & Sixth Form, on the effect of covid-19 on schools.

I can confirm that a response has been sent ref JP56663, to the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress is being made on the roll-out of the National Retraining Scheme; how many people (a) that scheme has been rolled out to and (b) have taken up that scheme; and which locations that scheme has been rolled out to.

We have taken a user centred, test and learn approach to developing the National Retraining Scheme, starting small and developing products iteratively. Through this approach we have introduced the first part of the scheme, Get Help to Retrain, alongside developing other areas such as online training and in-work technical training.

Get Help to Retrain helps users to understand their current skills, explore alternative occupations that they could do and find and sign up to the training they need to access opportunities for a broad range of good jobs.

We started testing the digital service in the Liverpool City Region in July 2019, and have since improved the service and rolled out to eligible users in five further areas: West Midlands, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, North East, Leeds, and Heart of the South West. To date, over 2,700 users have accessed Get Help to Retrain.

Due to the current circumstances, including the COVID-19 outbreak, we are reviewing what the implications could be in terms of the development and roll out of Get Help to Retrain. We are developing our approach for the National Retraining Scheme in the context of the new National Skills Fund and other reforms to adult skills funding and provision and we will provide a further update in due course.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to extend the National Retraining Scheme.

We have taken a user centred, test and learn approach to developing the National Retraining Scheme, starting small and developing products iteratively. Through this approach we have introduced the first part of the scheme, Get Help to Retrain, alongside developing other areas such as online training and in-work technical training.

Get Help to Retrain helps users to understand their current skills, explore alternative occupations that they could do and find and sign up to the training they need to access opportunities for a broad range of good jobs.

We started testing the digital service in the Liverpool City Region in July 2019, and have since improved the service and rolled out to eligible users in five further areas: West Midlands, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, North East, Leeds, and Heart of the South West. To date, over 2,700 users have accessed Get Help to Retrain.

Due to the current circumstances, including the COVID-19 outbreak, we are reviewing what the implications could be in terms of the development and roll out of Get Help to Retrain. We are developing our approach for the National Retraining Scheme in the context of the new National Skills Fund and other reforms to adult skills funding and provision and we will provide a further update in due course.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to reply to the letters of 4 May 2020, 19 May 2020 and 10 of June 2020 and telephone calls of 1 August 2020 and 7 November 2020 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on pet theft, raised on behalf of his constituent Gail Kalinowski.

The Rt Hon the Lord Goldsmith replied to the letter of 4 May from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Gail Kalinowski, by email on 2 July. Defra reference MC2020/12686/ES.

I replied to the letter of 16 March from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Mary V Mead, by email on 24 November. Defra reference MC2020/24831/GW

The Secretary of State replied to the letter of 8 August from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Geoffrey Pudney, by email on 6 October. Defra reference MC2020/20475/MK.

I have arranged for copies of the replies to be sent to the hon. Member and have also asked Defra officials to investigate the cause of the replies not being received by the hon. Member when originally sent.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to reply to the letters of 16 March 2020, 2 May 2020 and 10 June 2020 and telephone calls of 13 August 2020 and 7 November 2020 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on the removal of payments to farmers in advance of the Environmental Land Management scheme being introduced, raised on behalf of his constituent Mrs Mary V Mead.

The Rt Hon the Lord Goldsmith replied to the letter of 4 May from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Gail Kalinowski, by email on 2 July. Defra reference MC2020/12686/ES.

I replied to the letter of 16 March from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Mary V Mead, by email on 24 November. Defra reference MC2020/24831/GW

The Secretary of State replied to the letter of 8 August from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Geoffrey Pudney, by email on 6 October. Defra reference MC2020/20475/MK.

I have arranged for copies of the replies to be sent to the hon. Member and have also asked Defra officials to investigate the cause of the replies not being received by the hon. Member when originally sent.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to reply to the letters of 8 August 2020 and 28 October 2020 and telephone calls of 1 December 2020 and 10 December 2020 on the illegal killing of hen harriers and other birds of prey, raised on behalf of his constituent Geoffrey Pudney.

The Rt Hon the Lord Goldsmith replied to the letter of 4 May from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Gail Kalinowski, by email on 2 July. Defra reference MC2020/12686/ES.

I replied to the letter of 16 March from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Mary V Mead, by email on 24 November. Defra reference MC2020/24831/GW

The Secretary of State replied to the letter of 8 August from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Geoffrey Pudney, by email on 6 October. Defra reference MC2020/20475/MK.

I have arranged for copies of the replies to be sent to the hon. Member and have also asked Defra officials to investigate the cause of the replies not being received by the hon. Member when originally sent.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the oral contribution of the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare during the Ministerial Statement on Steel Safeguards on 29 June 2022, what advice she has received on whether the new steel safeguards decision is compliant with the Ministerial Code.

I have been asked to reply on behalf of Her Majesty’s Government.

From time to time, there will be challenging public policy decisions to be made, where there are issues in tension with another. It for Ministers to then decide what is in the public interest. Our democracy works on the basis that elected representatives make those tough decisions in the national interest, and are then accountable to Parliament and the British people. The Ministerial Code includes the (Nolan) Principles on Standards in Public Life, which are a guide to how Ministers should act.

After careful consideration, the Government has collectively concluded this approach is in the public interest, and meets all these Principles – in particular, objectivity, accountability, openness and leadership. The Government has set out its approach openly to Parliament, the press and the public. We also note the cross-party support for the Government’s actions.

Michael Ellis
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of whether the number of commissioned service contracts in place under the Williams-Shapps Plan for Rail be the same as the number of rail franchises operated under the previous system.

It will be for Great British Railways to determine the number of Passenger Service Contracts let. The geographic and financial size of Passenger Service Contracts will reflect local markets and needs. Great British Railways will need to take account of the full range of operational, commercial and economic factors in making these decisions.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 21 January and 6 May 2021 on behalf of constituent, Paul Walton, on the impact of the pandemic on the aviation industry.

A response to these letters was sent on 7 June.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what comparative assessment he has made of the (a) cost, (b) efficacy and (b) value of the (i) Operator of Last Resort and (ii) private sector operators.

The Operator of Last Resort (OLR) function exists to discharge the Secretary of State’s Duties under Section 30 of the Railways Act 1993. In deciding whether to transfer an operator to the OLR, the Secretary of State has regard to the Statement of policy on the exercise of the Secretary of State's power under section 26(1) of the Railways Act 1993.

If an operator is transferred into the OLR, that operator is managed under contract by the Department for Transport in much the same way as private sector operators are. These contracts deal with issues of cost, efficacy and value on an operator by operator basis.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when she will reply to the letters from the Member for Weston-super-Mare of 14 January and 24 February 2022 on behalf of my constituent David Walsh on the state pension.

A full response was sent to the hon member on the 11 April 2022.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2021 to Question 10306 and with reference to the response to part A of that Question, if she will publish the statistical information requested in response to a Parliamentary Question or via a Ministerial Statement; with reference to the response to part B of Question 10306, what costs are involved in publishing the statistical information held by her Department and not yet in the public domain as referenced in response to part A; and if she will respond to part D of Question 10306.

The number of claimants whose award has ended and were waiting for their new claim to be processed is not in the public domain.

New statistical information cannot be released via a Ministerial Statement. Under the Code of Practice for Statistics, statistics must be published so that they are equally available to all, not given to some people before others.

The statistics cannot be provided in response to a parliamentary question because the information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost. For PQs, there is a requirement to produce information to the same quality standard as Official Statistics. To assess the completeness of recording and quality assure the figures requested to this standard would take in excess of the time permitted to respond to a PQ and therefore incurs disproportionate cost.

In response to part (d) of question 10306, we always aim to make an award decision as quickly as possible and are treating as a priority advance claims, where a person’s previous fixed term award has ended. We are working with Assessment Providers to arrange assessment appointments as soon as possible. Where a person is found to still be eligible for PIP their award is backdated to the point they claimed, so no one loses out financially.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, further to the reply of 14 May 2021 to the letter from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of North Somerset Citizens' Advice Bureau, (a) for what reason his Department was unable to provide figures of the number of claimants whose award has ended and were waiting for their new claim to be processed, (b) when he will provide them, (c) what estimate he has made of the number of claimants in this position; and (d) what steps he is taking to resolve the issue.

We always aim to make an award decision as quickly as possible and are treating as a priority advance claims, where a person’s previous fixed term award has ended. Where a person is found to still be eligible for Personal Independence Payment their award is backdated to the point they claimed or when their previous award ended, so no one loses out financially.

In relation to part (a) of your question, the information requested in respect of the numbers of claimants whose award has ended and were waiting for their new claim to be processed is not in the public domain; new statistical information is not released via Ministerial Correspondence.

In relation to parts (b) and (c) the information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters of 28 April and 30 May 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Mr Gareth Avery, regarding care home fees.

We replied to the hon. Member on 30 June 2022.

24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 15 March and 18 May 2022 on behalf of my constituent, Rachael Craggs on covid isolation rules.

We replied to the hon. Member on 28 June 2022.

23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters of 17 March and 19 April 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Kevin Day-McDonnell, regarding agency workers.

We replied to the hon. Member on 7 June 2022.

23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will resend his reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Mr Vernon Stevens, which has not yet arrived.

We replied to the hon. Member on 24 May.


23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters of 22 March and 19 April 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Clarissa Payne, regarding the review into single-sex wards.

We replied to the hon. Member on 31 May 2022.

10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he will respond to the correspondence of 3 March and 7 April 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of constituent Tracey Henderson on the matter of covid-19 vaccinations.

We replied to the hon. Member on 12 May 2022.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to letters of 11 February and 14 March 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Joan Davis, about travel since the outbreak of covid-19.

We replied to the hon. Member on 20 April 2022.

28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters of 25 October 2021 and 5 January 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent Ms Finnegan, relating to social care badges.

We replied to the hon. Member on 30 March 2022.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he will respond to the letters dated 16 December 2021 and 15 February 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Mr Clive Oldridge on acquired brain injuries.

We replied to the hon. Member on 30 March 2022.

15th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters of 14 January and 14 February 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-Super-Mare on behalf of his constituents regarding vaccinations against covid-19.

We replied to the hon. Member on 16 March 2022.

15th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters of 18 January and 14 February 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent regarding puff bars.

We replied to the hon. Member on 16 March 2022.

15th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters of 11 January and 7 February 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent regarding covid-19 vaccination certification.

We replied to the hon. Member on 16 March 2022.

10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he will reply to the letters of 20 December 2021 and 8 February 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of my constituent Rachael Craggs.

We replied to the hon. Member on 15 March 2022.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond the letters dated 27 September and 16 December 2021 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on social care costs.

We replied to the hon. Member on 22 February 2022.

4th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 12 November 2021 and 6 January 2022 on behalf of his constituent, Joan Davis.

I replied to the hon. Member on 7 February 2022.

24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 12 November and 16 December on behalf of his constituent, Christina Hadjistephani.

We replied to the hon. Member on 26 January 2022.

19th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 15 November and 20 December 2021 on behalf of his constituent, Paul Maksimczyk, about retired dentists.

We replied to the hon. Member on 26 January 2022.

10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters dated 1 October and 9 November 2021 from the hon. Member for Weston-super- Mare, regarding a constituent.

We replied to the hon. Member on 14 January 2022.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 4 October and 3 November 2021 on behalf of his constituent, Dr Cara Knight.

We replied to the hon. Member on 21 December 2021.

8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters dated 4 October 2021 and 3 November 2021 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare in relation to my constituent, Caroline Lenihan.

We replied to the hon. Member on 10 January 2022.

5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 6 September and 4 October 2021 on behalf of constituent, Paul Maksimczyk, on re-accrediting retired dentists.

I replied to the hon. Member on 10 November 2021.

5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 16 July and 20 September 2021 on behalf of constituent Mr Stevens.

I replied to the hon. Member on 13 October 2021.

19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 12 August and 14 September 2021 on behalf of Avon LMC about the Health and Social Care Bill.

We replied to the hon. Member on 21 October 2021.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 22 March and 28 May 2021 on NHS pensions on behalf of constituent Ms Stacey.

I replied to the hon. Member on 23 August 2021.

9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters of 19 March 2021 and 6 May 2021 from the hon Member for Weston-super-Mare, on behalf of a constituent Charles Athcley on DIY abortions.

We replied to the hon. Member on 2 August 2021.

7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 11 February and 6 May 2021 on behalf of constituent, David McFarlane, on the covid-19 vaccination programme.

We replied to the hon. Member on 9 June 2021.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 7 March and 5 May 2021 on pay for NHS staff on behalf of his constituent John Weeks.

We replied to the hon. Member on 17 June 2021.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 1 April and 5 May 2021 on covid tests for migrants on behalf of his constituent Michael Joyce.

We replied to the hon. Member on 8 June 2021.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 11 February and 17 March 2021 on behalf of constituent, Mrs Andrea Miller, on care home visiting.

We replied to the hon. Member on 23 April 2021.

13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Weston-super- Mare of 10 February and 15 March 2021 on behalf of constituent Stephen Watters on the impact of covid-19 on people affected by dementia.

We replied to the hon. Member on 21 April 2021.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 8 December 2020 and 15 January 2021 on behalf of constituent, Ian Flather, on the effect of covid-19 on disabled people.

We are working to provide all Members and external correspondents with accurate answers to their correspondence, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s letter will be answered as soon as possible.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 16 December 2020 and 15 January 2021 on behalf of constituent, Jean Chamberlain, on private medical patients.

We are working to provide all Members and external correspondents with accurate answers to their correspondence, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s letter will be answered as soon as possible.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 6 November 2020 and 15 January 2021 on behalf of constituent, Timothy Hawes, on revision of the social care system.

We are working to provide all Members and external correspondents with accurate answers to their correspondence, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s letter will be answered as soon as possible.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2021 to Question 140762, whether retired dentists who cannot re-register are unable to take a patient's medical history, draw up the covid-19 vaccine from vial to syringe and undertake other basic tasks; and what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the speed of the vaccination programme of retired dentists being able to undertake those tasks.

Giving immunisations is usually a registered activity undertaken by registered healthcare professionals. However, due to the unprecedented scale of the vaccination programme, some tasks can be delegated to suitably trained, unregistered staff working under a National Protocol. An unregistered, retired dentist can apply to be an unregistered vaccinator and be appropriately trained and recertified as being competent to draw up and vaccinate within the COVID-19 vaccination programme.

Nadhim Zahawi
Chancellor of the Exchequer
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of NHS reusable rehabilitation equipment that was supplied to patients for home use and then never returned in each of the last five years.

No estimate has been made of these costs, on the grounds that the costs of buying this equipment are below the costs of collecting equipment and making it safe for re-use. Rehabilitation and support equipment supplied to patients requires decontamination and stress testing before being used again by another patient. This is to maintain an appropriate level of infection control and to ensure that equipment for frail patients is safe to use.

Given the relatively low cost of this equipment, the expense of setting up a system to collect, assess, clean and recycle equipment would be greater than the cost of purchasing new equipment. Trusts are able to set their own policies on the reuse and recycling of equipment and NHS England and NHS Improvement support initiatives to increase reuse and recycling.

20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to update the General Dental Council's legal powers to allow temporary re-registration of retired dentists to administer covid-19 vaccines in line with the General Medical Council.

Retired dentists do not need to be registered with the General Dental Council to be able to administer COVID-19 vaccines.

In October 2020 changes were made to the Human Medicines Regulations to expand the workforce capable of legally administering the flu and potential COVID-19 vaccines. The changes enable more healthcare professionals to participate in giving vaccinations and include the possibility that individuals who are not registered healthcare professionals will also be able to vaccinate with appropriate training and supervision.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 23 September and 20 November 2020 on behalf of his constituent, James Sleigh on dementia research.

We are working to provide all Members and external correspondents with accurate answers to their correspondence, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s letter will be answered as soon as possible.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 12 October and 12 November 2020 on behalf of constituent Ms Andrea Miller.

We are working to provide all Members and external correspondents with accurate answers to their correspondence, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s letter will be answered as soon as possible.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letters of 16 March 2020, 30 April  2020 and 12 June 2020 and telephone calls of 13 August 2020 and 7 November 2020 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on covid-19 and the science of indoor air quality, raised on behalf of his constituent Philip Louden.

The Department replied to the hon. Member’s query on 20 April 2020.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he will plans reply to the letters of 15 July 2020 and 13 August 2020 and telephone call of 7 November 2020 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on dentists, raised on behalf of his constituent John Pays.

We replied to the hon. Member’s letter on 10 August 2020.

25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential ​role that parliamentary representation for UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies could have in strengthening their status within the UK.

This Government is working to build a modern and productive partnership with the Overseas Territories. I have been working with the leaders of each Overseas Territory to identify areas where we can increase cooperation and support from the United Kingdom. In my dealings with the Overseas Territory, none have raised the idea of formal representation in the UK Parliament. We believe the fundamental basis of the relationship with each Overseas Territory is right, striking a balance which allows each to maintain strong links with the UK, but to also build their own democratic systems with local accountability, which reflect their own constitutional traditions. We also value the constitutional relationship with the Crown Dependencies which are also self-governing in relation to their own domestic affairs.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the (a) number, (b) ethnicity and (c) religious beliefs of the victims of recent massacres in Tigray; and what assessment he has made of the part that elements of the Ethiopian regime played in those massacres.

We are shocked and saddened by further reports from Tigray of massacres of civilians, sexual violence, and attacks on humanitarian facilities and places of worship. An ongoing lack of access to the Tigray region for human rights organisations means that it remains difficult to confirm these reports. We will continue to work with partners to seek further information and to raise the need for humanitarian access.

We have made clear with Ethiopian Ministers the need to protect civilians and adhere to international law and international human rights law. We continue to call for independent, international, investigations into allegations of human right abuses and violations, and that the perpetrators of those incidents that are proven are held to account, whoever they may be. We will continue to make this point in upcoming conversations with the Government of Ethiopia.

James Duddridge
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for which (a) Nigerian Government officials and (b) civil society groups the UK Government will work with as a result of the declaration of July 2018 by the Nigerian House of Representatives that the killing of Christian farmers in Nigeria amounts to genocide.

We are aware of the statement made by the Nigerian House of Representatives in July 2018 on killings in Plateau State.

The UK Government condemns all incidents of intercommunal violence in Nigeria. We have made clear to the Nigerian authorities at the highest levels the importance of protecting civilians, including ethnic and religious minorities, and human rights for all.

The UK Government's assessment remains that religion is not the principal driver of most incidents of intercommunal violence in Nigeria. The underlying drivers of conflict are complex, and include competition over land, water and resources, as well as rapid population growth. We hosted a joint conference on 'Fostering Social Cohesion in Nigeria' in February. Attendees included representatives from civil society, faith and political leaders, representatives from the Nigerian Government and UK parliamentarians. The discussion focused on the complex causes of conflict and explored solutions: a full report from the conference has been published: https://www.wiltonpark.org.uk/event/wp1752/

It is UK Government policy not to unilaterally determine whether genocide has occurred, in line with the Genocide Convention. This is a matter for competent courts and tribunals, including the International Criminal Court, after consideration of all the evidence, rather than governments or non-judicial bodies.

James Duddridge
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of applying sanctions to those responsible for committing or allowing incidences of persecution and human rights abuses against Christians in Nigeria.

In North East Nigeria, terrorist groups including Boko Haram and Islamic State West Africa have targeted both Christian and Muslim communities. Despite appalling attacks on Christians, the majority of those killed have been Muslim. Additionally, in many states across Nigeria incidents of intercommunal violence have affected Christian and Muslim communities. While religion is a factor in some incidents of intercommunal violence in Nigeria, the root causes are more complex and frequently relate to competition over resources and criminality.

We continue to call on the Nigerian Government to take urgent action to protect all communities affected by violence in Nigeria and carry out full investigations to bring perpetrators to justice.

On 6 July, the UK Government established the Global Human Rights sanctions regime by laying regulations in Parliament under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018. This sanctions regime gives the Government a powerful new tool to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses, including those who target individuals on the grounds of their religion or belief. It is longstanding practice not to speculate on future sanctions designations as to do so could reduce the impact of the designations.

James Duddridge
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment has he made of the (a) extent of and (b) trends in the level of incidences of persecution and human rights abuses against Christians in Nigeria.

We are concerned by increasing insecurity in Nigeria. While communities of different religions live together peacefully across much of Nigeria, incidents of intercommunal violence occur across many states in the country. These continue to negatively impact on the human rights of communities of all faiths, including Christians. Religious identity is a factor in many incidents of intercommunal violence but the root causes are more complex and frequently relate to competition over resources and criminality.

In North East Nigeria, attacks by terrorist groups including Boko Haram and Islamic State West Africa over the past decade have had a devastating effect on communities of all faiths. These groups attack indiscriminately those who do not subscribe to their extremist views, abusing both international human rights and international humanitarian law including the rights to life, freedom of religion or belief, freedom from slavery and right for children not to be used in armed conflict. Although 2014 saw the greatest number of attacks on civilians, terrorist attacks continue to occur on a regular basis in the North East. While Christians have been targeted by the terrorist groups, the majority of people killed have been Muslim. We condemn all terrorist attacks and are providing a comprehensive package of security, humanitarian and stabilisation support to Nigeria to help tackle the terrorist threat.

In January, the Prime Minister discussed insecurity in Nigeria and UK support with President Buhari. Most recently, I raised concerns over intercommunal violence in Nigeria with President Buhari's Chief of Staff in June. We encourage the Government of Nigeria to implement long-term solutions that address the root causes of conflict, and for those responsible for human rights violations or abuses to be held to account. We will continue to make clear to the Nigerian authorities at the highest levels the importance of protecting civilians, including all ethnic and religious groups, and human rights for all Nigerians.

James Duddridge
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the extent to which Nigerian national or state Government officials have been involved in either preventing or allowing incidences of persecution and human rights abuses to take place against Christians in Nigeria.

The UK Government is firmly committed to promoting and protecting human rights around the world. We have made clear to the Nigerian authorities at the highest levels the importance of protecting civilians, including all ethnic and religious groups, and human rights for all Nigerians.

We are aware of allegations of Nigerian military or government complicity in attacks on communities of all faiths in Nigeria. However, we do not assess that there is systemic complicity by the Nigerian authorities in the persecution of any peoples in Nigeria. The Nigerian Armed Forces are deployed in North East Nigeria to tackle the threat from terrorist groups including Boko Haram and Islamic State West Africa, who continue to cause immense suffering on communities of all faiths. Through our engagement and programmatic activity in Nigeria, the UK Government is supporting efforts to bring about the long-term changes needed to improve human rights compliance. For example, UK capacity building training for the Nigerian Armed Forces specifically includes topics on human rights compliance and rules of engagement.

In January, the Prime Minister discussed insecurity in Nigeria with President Buhari. In June, I raised security concerns in Nigeria with President Buhari's Chief of Staff. We will continue to monitor levels of violence in Nigeria, and to push for allegations of human rights abuses to be investigated and for those responsible to be held to account.

James Duddridge
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
10th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he will respond to the correspondence of 8 March and 6 April 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of constituent Matthew Thompson on the matter of new HMRC tax guidance.

A response was sent to the hon. Member on 11 May 2022.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to reply to the letters of 11 April 2020, 22 May 2020 and 23 June 2020 and telephone calls of 13 August 2020 and 7 November 2020 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on the self employed grant, raised on behalf of his constituent Sarah Aston-Davies.

A response was sent to the Member on 5 July 2020 and a further copy has been sent by email.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to reply to the letters of 29 July 2020 and 24 August 2020 and telephone call of 7 November 2020 on the Small Breweries' Relief scheme, raised on behalf of his constituent Mr Dave Turner.

A response was sent to the Member on 15 September 2020 and a further copy has been sent by email.

27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when UK Visas and Immigration plans to reply to correspondence from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 3 and 30 May on behalf of constituent Charles Idowu.

The Home Office responded to the correspondence on 28 June 2022.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 18 May and 30 May on behalf of his constituent, Ms Fiona Wilson, on passport applications.

The Home Office responded to the correspondence on 21 June 2022.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the online verification service for the EU Settlement Scheme has been out of service since it was launched; and for how long it was out of service on each of those occasions.

The online’ View and Prove your immigration status’ service has been operational since the EU Settlement Scheme was launched. Between October 2019 and March 2021 the service has seen over 3.9m profile views by individuals, and over 330,000 views by organisations checking immigration status.

Our digital services are designed to be highly resilient, and undergo rigorous testing and quality assurance. Service outages are rare, and where they do occur, teams work to resolve these as quickly as possible. Data on service outages is not routinely collated or published.

Our dedicated Resolution Centre is able to assist users who may experience technical issues, and where necessary, enable individuals’ immigration status to be verified through alternative means.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to reply to letters of 14 February and 15 March 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Chris Allen, about medals.

My Noble friend, the Right Hon. Baroness Goldie, responded to the hon. Member on 21 April 2022. I apologise for the delay in responding. This was due to an administrative error.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, when he plans to respond to the letters of 4 April and 3 May 2022 from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare on behalf of his constituent, Louis Stuart-Kelso.

A response to my Hon Friend has been issued.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
16th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what steps his Department is taking to increase housing in urban areas using local authority-approved building codes that pre-approve buildings.

My Honourable Friend has been a strong advocate for delivering more housing in urban areas and protecting our precious green spaces.

The Levelling Up and Regeneration Bill includes new powers for “Street Votes”, allowing residents on a street to bring forward proposals to extend or redevelop their properties in line with their design preferences, and hold a vote on whether they should be given planning permission.

This measure will incentivise communities to consider the potential for development, particularly in the urban areas where new homes are most needed.

Stuart Andrew
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
2nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, when he plans to respond to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare dated 4 January and 1 February 2022 relating to online Parish Council meetings.

A response to the Hon Member will be issued shortly.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, when he plans to answer the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 17 December and 18 January on LEP reviews.

A response has gone to the Hon Member today.

22nd Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, when he plans to respond to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-Super-Mare dated 11 August 2021 and 22 September on behalf of a constituent on parking charges.

The response to this letter was sent on 29 October.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 25 October and 23 November 2021 on behalf of his constituent, Holly Saunders.

The Government recognises the great importance of the effective and timely handling of correspondence.

The delay in responding to your letters of the 25 October and 23 November 2021 was the result of an administrative error. We have now responded to both letters.

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to reply to the letters from the hon. Member for Weston-super-Mare of 16 December 2020 and 8 February 2021 on behalf of a constituent, Mrs Frances Littlewood on shared parenting.

The Hon. Member’s letters were transferred to us on 22 February from the Department for Education. I can confirm that a response has been sent to the Hon. Member today, 16 March 2021.