Graham Stringer

Labour - Blackley and Broughton

Science and Technology Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Transport Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Panel of Chairs
22nd Jun 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Science and Technology Committee
13th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
European Scrutiny Committee
16th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
13th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Transport Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Panel of Chairs
25th Jun 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Science and Technology Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Energy and Climate Change Committee
4th Nov 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Transport Committee
18th Jul 2011 - 30th Mar 2015
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Justice Committee
21st Jan 2013 - 24th Feb 2014
Transport Committee
22nd Jul 2002 - 6th May 2010
Commons Science and Technology
1st Oct 2009 - 6th May 2010
Innovation, Universities, Science and Skills Committee
10th Mar 2008 - 30th Sep 2009
Innovation, Universities and Skills
9th Nov 2007 - 10th Mar 2008
Science and Technology Committee
27th Nov 2006 - 30th Oct 2007
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
27th Nov 2006 - 30th Oct 2007
Modernisation of the House of Commons
16th Jan 2006 - 7th Dec 2006
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
12th Jun 2001 - 29th May 2002
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
9th Nov 1999 - 7th Jun 2001
Transport Sub-committee
15th Jul 1997 - 13th Dec 1999
Environment, Transport & Regional Affairs
14th Jul 1997 - 13th Dec 1999


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 1st December 2021
09:20
Division Votes
Tuesday 23rd November 2021
Health and Care Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 176 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 191 Noes - 307
Speeches
Wednesday 24th November 2021
Transport for the North

However much the Minister blusters, he cannot get away from the fact that this is an £18 billion cut to …

Written Answers
Wednesday 2nd June 2021
Electricity: Storage
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 27th March 2018
ROSSENDALE TRANSPORT LIMITED (ROSSO)
That this House is deeply concerned at the failure of the Chief Executive of Rossendale Borough Council to supply any …
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
Tuesday 26th May 2020
8. Miscellaneous
From 1 April 2020, Member (unpaid) of the Political Advisory Board of the Foundation for Independence, a pro-Brexit group. (Registered …
EDM signed
Friday 26th November 2021
Conduct of councillors towards town and parish council clerks
That this House notes with deep concern convincing evidence collected by the Association of Local Council Clerks showing that, far …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 4th March 2020
June Bank Holiday (Creation) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to make provision for an annual national public holiday on the Friday nearest to 23 June; and for …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Graham Stringer has voted in 222 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

25 Mar 2021 - Coronavirus - View Vote Context
Graham Stringer voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 21 Labour No votes vs 176 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 484 Noes - 76
View All Graham Stringer Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all Graham Stringer's debates

Blackley and Broughton Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We, the people, demand that health and social care workers are given the right to exercise free will in relation to any medical procedure and so to be able to refuse to take the covid 19 vaccination without fear of facing discrimination at work or in wider society.

The individual must remain sovereign over their own body, discrimination against those who cannot or will not be vaccinated against COVID is incompatible with a free democracy. The Government must take firm action to prevent 'vaccination passports' and discriminatory 'no jab, no job' policies.

We ask Parliament to repeal the High Speed Rail Bills, 2016 and 2019, as MPs voted on misleading environmental, financial and timetable information provided by the Dept of Transport and HS2 Ltd. It fails to address the conditions of the Paris Accord and costs have risen from £56bn to over £100bn.

The Government must make a public statement on the #kissanprotests & press freedoms.

India is the worlds largest democracy & democratic engagement and freedom of the press are fundamental rights and a positive step towards creating a India that works for all.

Being the first to close and still no clue as to when we can open, this seasonal industry is losing its summer profits that allows them to get through the first quarter of next year.

Even if we are allowed to open in December, 1 months profit won't be enough to keep us open in 2021. We need help

The UK hospitality industry. Responsible for around 3m jobs, generating £130bn in activity, resulting in £38bn in taxation. Yet, unlike the Arts or Sports, we do not have a dedicated Minister.

We are asking that a Minister for Hospitality be created for the current, and successive governments.

During the pandemic government workers have delivered vital public services and kept our country safe and secure. After ten years in which the real value of civil service pay has fallen, many face hardship. The Government must start to restore the real value of their pay with a 10% increase in 2020.

The government is helping private firms to protect jobs by paying up to 80% of staff wages through this crisis. If it can do this why can it not help key workers who will be putting themselves/their families at risk and working extra hard under extremely challenging and unprecedented circumstances.

Matthew was taken to, ‘a place of safety’, and died 7 days later.
24 others died by the same means, dating back to the year 2000. An indicator that little was done to address the growing problems.
Something went terribly wrong with the NHS Mental Health Services provided to my son.

As the Coronavirus escalates, there are concerns that a trade deal between the UK Government and the US deal might not exempt our NHS, leaving it vulnerable to privatisation and in direct contradiction to promises this would not happen.

Football is a powerful tool of which allows a range of benefits such as employment, and other important aspects of life. Football can be associated with passion, emotion, excitement and dedication across the community. With Fans attending football games a range of economic benefits are there too.

A significant number of students will sit their final 2021 examinations. The outcome of which undoubtedly will be their passport, for many of their future life chances and successes. In order for this to be done fairly, it is imperative that the amount of content they are tested on is reduced.

We want the Education Secretary and the Government to step in and review the exam board’s decision on how GCSE and A-Level grades will be calculated and awarded due to the current coronavirus crisis. We want a better solution than just using our previous data to be the basis of our grade.

The government should consider delaying negotiations so they can concentrate on the coronavirus situation and reduce travel of both EU and UK negotiators. This would necessitate extending the transition period; as there can only be a one off extension, this should be for two years.


Latest EDMs signed by Graham Stringer

25th November 2021
Graham Stringer signed this EDM as a sponsor on Friday 26th November 2021

Conduct of councillors towards town and parish council clerks

Tabled by: Julian Lewis (Conservative - New Forest East)
That this House notes with deep concern convincing evidence collected by the Association of Local Council Clerks showing that, far from being untypical, the toxic behaviour by Parish Councillors in Cheshire exposed online in December 2020, is endemic in a significant minority of Town and Parish Councils; deplores the departure …
3 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Nov 2021)
Signatures by party:
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Conservative: 1
Labour: 1
28th October 2021
Graham Stringer signed this EDM on Friday 29th October 2021

Ministerial responses to hon. Members' correspondence on Afghanistan

Tabled by: Helen Hayes (Labour - Dulwich and West Norwood)
That this House is extremely concerned by the extensive delays in hon. Members receiving responses on the resettlement of Afghan nationals to the UK; notes the Minister for Safeguarding and Afghan Resettlement’s statement of 13 September 2021 on the Government's progress in providing specific updates on people within Afghanistan and …
49 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Nov 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 26
Liberal Democrat: 7
Scottish National Party: 7
Plaid Cymru: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Independent: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
View All Graham Stringer's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Graham Stringer, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Graham Stringer has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Graham Stringer has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Graham Stringer has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


19 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the seasonal electricity storage capacity that will be required to deliver the net zero target.

Longer duration storage, including seasonal electricity storage, can help manage variation in generation and demand over long periods of time by storing excess generation until times when generation sources are less available or demand is greater. Analysis[1] suggests that longer-duration storage could reduce system costs by replacing gas-fired generation and reducing the requirement for other low-carbon generation.

The analysis demonstrates that there are a number of scenarios for generation and storage that could deliver net zero. The electricity market should determine the best solutions for very low emissions and reliable supply of electricity, at a low cost to consumers.

[1] Modelling 2050: electricity system analysis, https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/modelling-2050-electricity-system-analysis

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the capital cost of seasonal electricity storage capacity.

There are a range of technologies that could provide longer duration storage, including seasonal electricity storage. BEIS has published technical data and cost projections for electricity storage technologies that could be commercially deployed in the future, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/storage-cost-and-technical-assumptions-for-electricity-storage-technologies. This report shows that the capital costs of the different technologies vary widely.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether top-up payments to be made to third parties are permissible, under the Contracts for Difference regime.

The Low Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC) pays electricity generators that have signed a Contract for Difference (CfD) a flat, indexed, rate for the electricity that they produce over a 15-year period. The amount paid is the difference between the ‘strike price’ (a price for electricity, typically determined during a competitive auction process) and the ‘reference price’ (a measure of the average market price for electricity in the GB electricity market).

The CfD standard terms and conditions set out that payments to the generator will be made to the UK based account that the generator notifies the CfD Counterparty they want the payment to be made to.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether it is permissible under the Contracts for Difference regime for top-up payments to be made to third parties outside the UK.

The Low Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC) pays electricity generators that have signed a Contract for Difference (CfD) a flat, indexed, rate for the electricity that they produce over a 15-year period. The amount paid is the difference between the ‘strike price’ (a price for electricity, typically determined during a competitive auction process) and the ‘reference price’ (a measure of the average market price for electricity in the GB electricity market).

The CfD standard terms and conditions set out that payments to the generator will be made to the UK based account to which the generator notifies the CfD Counterparty they want the payment to be made.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to prevent tax avoidance by participants in the Contracts for Difference scheme.

The Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme is the Government’s main mechanism for supporting low carbon electricity generation. The Low Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC) works with CfD generators to ensure that they deliver on their contractual commitments to build and operate low-carbon electricity generating stations. The LCCC pays CfD generators for the low-carbon electricity that they produce. As with any other commercial undertaking operating within the UK, it is for each electricity generator supported by the CfD scheme to pay its taxes in accordance with UK tax rules.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his Department's BEIS Electricity Generation Costs (2020) published on 24 August 2020, if he will publish the empirical evidence, other than bid prices, underlying the estimate of (a) falling capital and (b) operational costs in the wind sector, (i) offshore and (ii) onshore in that report.

The estimates of (a) falling capital and (b) operational costs for (i) onshore and (ii) offshore wind generation are informed by a variety of internal and external evidence sources. These include published estimates from Arup (2016)[1] and DNV GL (2019)[2] as well as internal estimates informed by stakeholders and external commentators, such as Bloomberg[3], Baringa[4], Aurora[5], and others. These assumptions have also undergone an independent peer-review by Professor Derek Bunn (2020)[6], and more detail on specific assumptions can be found in this publication.

_______

[1] ‘Arup (2016): Review of Renewable Electricity Generation Cost and Technical Assumptions’ https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/arup-2016-review-of-renewable-electricity-generation-cost-and-technical-assumptions

[2] ‘Potential to improve load factor of offshore wind farms in the UK to 2035’ https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/potential-to-improve-load-factor-of-offshore-wind-farms-in-the-uk-to-2035

[3] https://about.bnef.com/new-energy-outlook/

[4] “An analysis of the potential outcome of a further ‘Pot 1’ CfD auction in GB”, https://www.baringa.com/getmedia/99d7aa0f-5333-47ef-b7a8-1ca3b3c10644/Baringa Scottish-Renewables UK-Pot-1-CfD-scenario April-2017 Report FINA/

[5] www.auroraer.com

[6] ‘Peer review of 2019 electricity generation cost updates’ https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/peer-review-of-2019-electricity-generation-cost-updates

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his Department's BEIS Electricity Generation Costs (2020) published on 24 August 2020, if he will publish the empirical, numerical evidence underlying its estimate of (a) stagnant capital and (b) operational cost for (i) Combined Cycle Gas Turbines and (ii) other conventional generation technologies in that report.

The evidence behind the (a) capital and (b) operational cost assumptions for (i) Combined Cycle Gas Turbines and (ii) other conventional generation technologies has been published in a report prepared by Leigh Fisher and Jacobs (2016)[1]. Minor updates to Combined Cycle Gas Turbine efficiency have been made since, as a result of a published benchmarking exercise by Wood (2018)[2], which affects operational costs.

[1] ‘Leigh Fisher and Jacobs’ (2016): Electricity Generation Cost Update’ https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/leigh-fisher-and-jacobs-2016-electricity-generation-cost-update

[2] ‘Call for CCUS Innovation: literature review, benchmarking report and calculator’ https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/call-for-ccus-innovation-literature-review-benchmarking-report-and-calculator

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of agricultural land in each Agricultural Land Classification (ACL) category 1 to 5 which has been granted planning consent for development as solar photovoltaic generation in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland.

We have not made any estimate of agricultural land in Agricultural Land Classification categories, which is in the planning system or has been granted consent for development as solar photovoltaic generation, and we do not hold this information.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of agricultural land in each Agricultural Land Classification (ACL) category 1 to 5 which is in scoping or pre-application or is awaiting decision on an application for development as solar photovoltaic generation in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland.

We have not made any estimate of agricultural land in Agricultural Land Classification categories, which is in the planning system or has been granted consent for development as solar photovoltaic generation, and we do not hold this information.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he is taking steps to ensure (a) market transparency and (b) protection of consumer interest by requiring National Grid ESO to publish the assumed load factors used to rank bids in the new Optional Downward Flexibility Mechanism made necessary by the low demand resulting from the public health measures adopted to tackle covid-19.

The Government believes that transparency is essential for a stable, secure energy market in which industry and consumers can participate with confidence.

The Optional Downward Flexibility Mechanism (ODFM) service has been established by National Grid Electricity System Operator (ESO) to be used in exceptional circumstances and under certain conditions. ODFM was critical during recent periods of exceptionally low demand as it created ‘space’ on the system, thereby allowing the ESO to balance the system without having to resort to implementing emergency disconnection of embedded generation. As lockdown restrictions relax and demand increases, there is likely to be less of a requirement to use this service.

Ofgem, as the independent energy regulator, has a statutory duty to protect the interests of GB’s energy consumers and is responsible for ensuring that the ESO procures services to balance electricity demand and supply (including ODFM) in an open, transparent, economic and efficient manner.

The ESO is committed to transparency and provides a comprehensive suite of data relating to its activities via their data portal [https://data.nationalgrideso.com/ancillary-services/optional-downward-flexibility-management-odfm-market-information?from=0#resources]; this includes extensive information about the ODFM service. The ESO is continuing to publish further information about activities undertaken as a result of the pandemic. We have asked them to publish further information in relation to load factors for ODFM as part of this.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 8 December 2020 to Question 125212 on Gambling: Coronavirus, what plans the Government has to review restrictions on adult gaming centres in covid-19 tier three areas; and if he will make a statement.

The government, with advice from SAGE, reviewed the impact of the previous tiering arrangements and decided that unfortunately stricter rules on tier 3 closures would be necessary to have an impact on the rate of transmission in very high alert areas. This led to the decision that all hospitality and indoor entertainment venues in tier 3 areas would have to close, including casinos, bingo halls and adult gaming centres. SAGE advice is independent and published on a regular basis on: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies

The government has continued to engage with the land-based gambling sector throughout the pandemic, including with its trade associations the Betting and Gaming Council, Bacta and the Bingo Association. The Minister for Sports, Heritage and Tourism has had a series of roundtable discussions with the industry to discuss the impact of Covid-19, including representatives from two of Britain’s largest AGC operators. DCMS officials have been in regular contact with the representative trade associations and fed their views into the government decision-making process, and they are continuing to do so.

Government has set out an analysis of the health, economic and social impacts of the tiered approach, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-health-economic-and-social-effects-of-covid-19-and-the-tiered-approach. As on previous occasions, local data packs have also been published.

Epidemiological data and projection models on local restriction tiers, including commentary on individual tier allocation decisions, can also be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938964/Coronavirus_England_briefing_26_November.pdf.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 8 December 2020 to Question 125212 on Gambling: Coronavirus, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of allowing adult gaming centres to open under covid-19 tier three restrictions.

The government, with advice from SAGE, reviewed the impact of the previous tiering arrangements and decided that unfortunately stricter rules on tier 3 closures would be necessary to have an impact on the rate of transmission in very high alert areas. This led to the decision that all hospitality and indoor entertainment venues in tier 3 areas would have to close, including casinos, bingo halls and adult gaming centres. SAGE advice is independent and published on a regular basis on: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies

The government has continued to engage with the land-based gambling sector throughout the pandemic, including with its trade associations the Betting and Gaming Council, Bacta and the Bingo Association. The Minister for Sports, Heritage and Tourism has had a series of roundtable discussions with the industry to discuss the impact of Covid-19, including representatives from two of Britain’s largest AGC operators. DCMS officials have been in regular contact with the representative trade associations and fed their views into the government decision-making process, and they are continuing to do so.

Government has set out an analysis of the health, economic and social impacts of the tiered approach, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-health-economic-and-social-effects-of-covid-19-and-the-tiered-approach. As on previous occasions, local data packs have also been published.

Epidemiological data and projection models on local restriction tiers, including commentary on individual tier allocation decisions, can also be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938964/Coronavirus_England_briefing_26_November.pdf.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether adult gaming centres can adopt similar measures to bookmakers in order to re-open in areas with tier 3 covid-19 restrictions.

The government, with advice from SAGE, reviewed the impact of the previous tiering arrangements and decided that unfortunately stricter rules on tier 3 closures would be necessary to have an impact on the rate of transmission in very high alert areas. This led to the decision that all hospitality and indoor entertainment venues in tier 3 areas would have to close, including casinos, bingo halls and adult gaming centres. SAGE advice is independent and published on a regular basis on: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies

The government has continued to engage with the land-based gambling sector throughout the pandemic, including with its trade associations the Betting and Gaming Council, Bacta and the Bingo Association. The Minister for Sports, Heritage and Tourism has had a series of roundtable discussions with the industry to discuss the impact of Covid-19, including representatives from two of Britain’s largest AGC operators. DCMS officials have been in regular contact with the representative trade associations and fed their views into the government decision-making process, and they are continuing to do so.

Government has set out an analysis of the health, economic and social impacts of the tiered approach, which can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-health-economic-and-social-effects-of-covid-19-and-the-tiered-approach. As on previous occasions, local data packs have also been published.

Epidemiological data and projection models on local restriction tiers, including commentary on individual tier allocation decisions, can also be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938964/Coronavirus_England_briefing_26_November.pdf.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what evidence his Department received on the rate of covid-19 transmission in adult gaming centres to justify keeping such centres closed in areas with tier 3 restrictions in December 2020.

The government, with advice from SAGE, reviewed the impact of the previous tiering arrangements and decided that unfortunately stricter rules on tier 3 closures would be necessary to have an impact on the rate of transmission in very high alert areas. This led to the decision that all hospitality and indoor entertainment venues in tier 3 areas would have to close, including casinos, bingo halls and adult gaming centres. SAGE advice is independent and published on a regular basis on: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies

The government has continued to engage with the land-based gambling sector throughout the pandemic, including with its trade associations the Betting and Gaming Council, Bacta and the Bingo Association. The Minister for Sports, Heritage and Tourism has had a series of roundtable discussions with the industry to discuss the impact of Covid-19, including representatives from two of Britain’s largest AGC operators. DCMS officials have been in regular contact with the representative trade associations and fed their views into the government decision-making process, and they are continuing to do so.

Government has set out an analysis of the health, economic and social impacts of the tiered approach, which can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-health-economic-and-social-effects-of-covid-19-and-the-tiered-approach. As on previous occasions, local data packs have also been published.

Epidemiological data and projection models on local restriction tiers, including commentary on individual tier allocation decisions, can also be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938964/Coronavirus_England_briefing_26_November.pdf.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Feb 2021
How many meetings she has had with the Mayor of Greater Manchester since the recent publication of Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services' report, An inspection of the service provided to victims of crime by Greater Manchester Police.

It is the Mayor’s responsibility to ensure Greater Manchester Police act immediately and effectively to provide victims of crime, especially the vulnerable, with the high-quality service they deserve.

The Policing Minister met the Deputy Mayor and acting Chief Constable on 15 December to discuss the appalling findings and the force’s improvement plan. We are closely monitoring progress ahead of the Inspectorate’s reinspection.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
9th Nov 2020
What recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of Greater Manchester Police's Integrated Operational Policing System.

We are concerned about the issue in Manchester and are keen for Greater Manchester Police to resume publishing and sharing crime data in full as soon as possible.

It is the responsibility of the Labour Mayor, Andy Burnham to hold the Chief Constable and force to account and he is democratically accountable to the public for this.

An initial HMICFRS report made recommendations which the force responded to. We await the findings of the latest HMICFRS inspections to assess GMP’s progress.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she last received crime performance figures from Greater Manchester Police.

Greater Manchester Police’s most recent crime data submission to the Home Office was received in August 2019. This covered police recorded crime up the end of June 2019. There has been a disruption to the regular supply of crime data since the force implemented a new Integrated Operational IT system in July 2019.

The Home Office carries out regular quality assurance of data received from all police forces in England and Wales before data are published as official statistics.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to verify the most recent crime performance figures from Greater Manchester Police.

Greater Manchester Police’s most recent crime data submission to the Home Office was received in August 2019. This covered police recorded crime up the end of June 2019. There has been a disruption to the regular supply of crime data since the force implemented a new Integrated Operational IT system in July 2019.

The Home Office carries out regular quality assurance of data received from all police forces in England and Wales before data are published as official statistics.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)