Barbara Keeley Portrait

Barbara Keeley

Labour - Worsley and Eccles South

Shadow Minister (Mental Health and Social Care)
9th Jan 2018 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Minister (Mental Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2016 - 9th Jan 2018
Shadow Minister (Health)
18th Sep 2015 - 28th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Treasury)
8th May 2015 - 18th Sep 2015
Health and Social Care Committee
24th Oct 2011 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Shadow Minister (Health)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Shadow Deputy Leader of the House of Commons
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Parliamentary Secretary and Deputy Leader of the House of Commons
9th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Finance and Services Committee
23rd Jan 2006 - 6th May 2010
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
5th Oct 2008 - 9th Jun 2009
Constitutional Affairs
12th Jul 2005 - 17th Jul 2006


Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 17th June 2021
10:00
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 22nd June 2021
09:00
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Investing in Children and Young People
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 193 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 224 Noes - 0
Speeches
Monday 14th June 2021
Covid-19 Update

I wish to return to the question of surge vaccinations. Case rates in Salford are higher than they have been …

Written Answers
Thursday 10th June 2021
Respite Care: Coronavirus
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the potential …
Early Day Motions
Monday 2nd November 2020
Future Social Care Coalition and support for care staff
That this House welcomes the launch of the cross party and cross sector Future Social Care Coalition and believes now …
Bills
Tuesday 14th October 2014
Carers Bedroom Entitlement (Social Housing Sector) Bill 2014-15
A Bill to provide that people in receipt of Universal Credit and Housing Benefit and accommodated in the social housing …
MP Financial Interests
Tuesday 1st June 2021
1. Employment and earnings
29 January 2021, fee of £75 donated to my local party. Hours: 45 mins. (Registered 19 May 2021)
EDM signed
Wednesday 27th January 2021
Holocaust Memorial Day 2021
That this House notes that on 27 January 2021 the UK will observe Holocaust Memorial Day marking the anniversary of …
Supported Legislation
House of Lords (Exclusion of Hereditary Peers) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Barbara Keeley has voted in 252 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Barbara Keeley Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
(48 debate interactions)
Nadine Dorries (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
(21 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(76 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(7 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Barbara Keeley's debates

Worsley and Eccles South Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The Government's manifesto stated “we will make intentional trespass a criminal offence”: an extreme, illiberal & unnecessary attack on ancient freedoms that would threaten walkers, campers, and the wider public. It would further tilt the law in favour of the landowning 1% who own half the country.

Matthew was taken to, ‘a place of safety’, and died 7 days later.
24 others died by the same means, dating back to the year 2000. An indicator that little was done to address the growing problems.
Something went terribly wrong with the NHS Mental Health Services provided to my son.


Latest EDMs signed by Barbara Keeley

30th December 2020
Barbara Keeley signed this EDM on Wednesday 27th January 2021

Holocaust Memorial Day 2021

Tabled by: Bob Blackman (Conservative - Harrow East)
That this House notes that on 27 January 2021 the UK will observe Holocaust Memorial Day marking the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, where an estimated 1.1 million people were murdered; commemorates the six million victims of the Holocaust; further notes that the theme for Holocaust Memorial Day 2021 …
97 signatures
(Most recent: 11 May 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 45
Scottish National Party: 31
Conservative: 7
Liberal Democrat: 4
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
14th January 2021
Barbara Keeley signed this EDM on Friday 15th January 2021

Godfrey Colin Cameron

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary security staff and member of the PCS trade union who passed away aged just 55 after contracting covid-19; extends our sincere condolences to his devoted wife Hyacinth, children Leon and …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 117
Scottish National Party: 15
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Barbara Keeley's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Barbara Keeley, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Barbara Keeley has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Barbara Keeley has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Barbara Keeley


A Bill to provide that people in receipt of Universal Credit and Housing Benefit and accommodated in the social housing sector be entitled to an additional bedroom related to caring responsibilities or overnight care; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 14th October 2014

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 20th June 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require health bodies and general medical practitioners, and certain other organisations, to identify patients who are carers or who have a carer; to require identified carers to be referred to sources of help and support and to make further provision in relation to such arrangements; to make provision in relation to the responsibilities of local authorities and schools for the needs of young carers and their families; and for connected purposes;


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 14th July 2010

232 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, when he plans to respond to the the letter dated 3 September 2020 entitled Overdue Social Care Reform Must Start With Parity of Respect for the Workforce, from signatories including former Ministers at the then Department of Health; and if he will make a statement.

My Office has no record of receiving this letter. I have asked my Office to contact the signatories to see if they can re-send the correspondence.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on reducing waiting times for NHS gender identity services.

As with many issues, the Government Equalities Office and Department for Health and Social Care continue to engage on this matter.

We are aware that waiting times for Gender Identity Services are currently very long and we are working with NHS England to help address this. In 2019, NHS England began work on changing services to establish a more modern, flexible care model to support adult transgender people. Procurement is underway and clinics meeting new service specifications will be in place in this year, subject to changes caused by the COVID-19 response. The intention is to move routine gender identity service away from specialist centres, to more local provision.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to answers to Written Parliamentary Questions that are written or drafted by external contractors, what steps his Department is taking to verify that the information in those answers is (a) complete and (b) accurate.

Written Parliamentary Questions receive final sign off from Ministers.

The Cabinet Office has produced guidance for civil servants on drafting answers to parliamentary questions. This can be found on the gov.uk website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/drafting-answers-to-parliamentary-questions-guidance


Civil servants and Ministers conduct these duties in line with their respective Codes of Conduct.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that answers to Written Parliamentary Questions that are written or drafted by external contractors are drafted in accordance with the Civil Service Code.

Written Parliamentary Questions receive final sign off from Ministers.

The Cabinet Office has produced guidance for civil servants on drafting answers to parliamentary questions. This can be found on the gov.uk website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/drafting-answers-to-parliamentary-questions-guidance


Civil servants and Ministers conduct these duties in line with their respective Codes of Conduct.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 September 2020 to Question 85069, what the timeframe is for establishing a framework of compensation for the (a) victims and (b) families of the contaminated blood scandal.

Work is currently underway and I will update Parliament as soon as possible on this.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will take steps to produce comprehensive covid-19 guidance in (a) easy read, (b) BSL videos and (c) other accessible formats.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ 107140 on 21 October 2020.

It is vital public health information in this pandemic is accessible to all. Covid-19 guidance is provided in alternative formats including Easy Read, British Sign Language and Audio. Covid-19 press briefings with BSL are published on the 10 Downing Street and UK Government social media channels. The BBC News Channel has live signing for the briefings and has been made available across the UK via Freeview, cable, satellite and online.

We have also used publicly held contact details to communicate with those who may need support, and our on the ground teams have directly spoken to local residents. The Government Digital Service has published detailed accessibility standards and guidelines to help departmental channel owners improve content. We will continue to review this and all Covid-19 communication through regular feedback sessions with disability charities.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the compliance of covid-19 guidance with accessible information standards.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ 107140 on 21 October 2020.

It is vital public health information in this pandemic is accessible to all. Covid-19 guidance is provided in alternative formats including Easy Read, British Sign Language and Audio. Covid-19 press briefings with BSL are published on the 10 Downing Street and UK Government social media channels. The BBC News Channel has live signing for the briefings and has been made available across the UK via Freeview, cable, satellite and online.

We have also used publicly held contact details to communicate with those who may need support, and our on the ground teams have directly spoken to local residents. The Government Digital Service has published detailed accessibility standards and guidelines to help departmental channel owners improve content. We will continue to review this and all Covid-19 communication through regular feedback sessions with disability charities.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the effect of the state aid provisions of the UK-Japan Free Trade Agreement on UK compliance with EU state aid laws.

The Government has a clear ambition for the UK to be a global science superpower and this is reaffirmed in the UK Research and Development Roadmap. The UK is open to participation in certain EU programmes provided we can reach a fair and balanced deal, and negotiations are ongoing.

The UK reached a substantive agreement on the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership on 11 September 2020. This contains subsidy commitments which are appropriate for an FTA and have a bearing on UK subsidies only insofar as they may have an effect on trade with Japan.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the UK and EU not agreeing a deal on their future relationship by the end of the transition period on scientific collaboration between institutions and researchers in the UK and EU.

The Government has a clear ambition for the UK to be a global science superpower and this is reaffirmed in the UK Research and Development Roadmap. The UK is open to participation in certain EU programmes provided we can reach a fair and balanced deal, and negotiations are ongoing.

The UK reached a substantive agreement on the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership on 11 September 2020. This contains subsidy commitments which are appropriate for an FTA and have a bearing on UK subsidies only insofar as they may have an effect on trade with Japan.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the value of free trade with the EU to the UK fishing industry.

The Government remains committed to working to reach an agreement with the EU.

Whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement, the UK will be an independent coastal state outside of the Common Fisheries Policy from 31 December 2020. The UK will no longer be bound by the EU’s outdated and unfair method of sharing fishing opportunities. I refer the hon. Member to the press statement released on 13 October 2020 by the Fisheries Minister on this issue.

I also refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ59762 on 23 June 2020.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the UK and the EU failing to agree an agreement on their future relationship by the end of the transition period on the UK fishing industry.

The Government remains committed to working to reach an agreement with the EU.

Whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement, the UK will be an independent coastal state outside of the Common Fisheries Policy from 31 December 2020. The UK will no longer be bound by the EU’s outdated and unfair method of sharing fishing opportunities. I refer the hon. Member to the press statement released on 13 October 2020 by the Fisheries Minister on this issue.

I also refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ59762 on 23 June 2020.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the UK and EU failing to agree a deal on their future relationship on employment in (a) Greater Manchester and (b) Salford.

The Government remains committed to working to reach an agreement with the EU.

Whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement, the UK will be an independent coastal state outside of the Common Fisheries Policy from 31 December 2020. The UK will no longer be bound by the EU’s outdated and unfair method of sharing fishing opportunities. I refer the hon. Member to the press statement released on 13 October 2020 by the Fisheries Minister on this issue.

I also refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ59762 on 23 June 2020.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
22nd May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the Government's timeframe is for weddings of different sizes to be able to resume.

Our Plan To Rebuild, the Government's COVID-19 Recovery Strategy, is published on gov.uk and includes details on plans for weddings. We understand the frustration couples planning a wedding must be feeling at this time. We are keeping these restrictions under review and will ease them as soon as it is safe to do so. We will continue to work closely with faith leaders and local government over the coming weeks to go through the practicalities of doing so.

Marriages and civil partnerships under the special procedure for those who are seriously ill and not expected to recover, are taking place in some cases where it is safe to do so in line with PHE guidance.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
18th May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 19 March 2020 to Questions 30105 and 37838, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that all television broadcasts by the Government on covid-19 are accompanied by British Sign Language interpretation.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to PQs 39766 and 41529 on 4 May 2020.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what plans the Government has to put forward a candidate for the elections to the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women in 2020.

This Government is fully committed to fulfilling its obligations under this important Convention and recognises the important role the CEDAW Committee plays in holding States Parties to account in implementing the treaty.

A range of factors are considered before making a decision on whether to nominate a candidate for a UN body such as CEDAW. It is also important to highlight that CEDAW Committee members serve in their personal capacity and do not represent the Member State that nominated them. This Government has full faith in the independence of the Committee and applaud the high quality of its work.

After careful consideration, the Government will not be nominating a candidate for the 2020 CEDAW Committee election. However, as with all UN bodies, the Government will carefully consider whether to nominate a UK representative for future vacancies which will arise to the Committee.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Supreme Court judgement in the case of Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake and Shannon v Rampersad and another dated 19 March 2021, whether he has plans to bring forward legislative proposals to amend National Minimum Wage regulations to clarify that sleep-in shifts for care staff should be counted for the purposes of calculating the minimum wage.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal judgment of July 2018 and provided legal clarity following years of evolving court judgments and legal uncertainty.

The Government welcomes the legal clarity and is considering the implications of the judgment, also with care commissioners and providers, to consider what action, if any, is needed.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 3 November 2020 to Question 110766 on Business: Coronavirus, if his Department will take steps to monitor the number of office-based businesses who are still requiring staff to work from the office during the covid-19 outbreak.

When employers consider whether workers should come into the office, this will need to be reflected in the COVID-19 workplace risk assessment and actions taken to manage the risks of transmission in line with this guidance.

The decision to return to the workplace must be made in meaningful consultation with workers (including through trade unions or employee representative groups where they exist). It is vital employers engage with workers to ensure they feel safe returning to work, and they should not force anyone into an unsafe workplace.

Safer working guidance for offices and contact centres can be found at www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/offices-and-contact-centres. This guide clarifies for employees how they, should they need to, can escalate a concern regarding a return to work.

Anyone who feels they are incorrectly being asked to go into their place of work should contact their employee representative or trade union if they have one, or contact the Health and Safety Executive on 0300 790 6787 or using the online working safely enquiry form.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to monitor compliance with covid-19 guidance among office-based businesses.

Across all industries, 97% of UK businesses say they are aware of the government safer workplace guidance. Source: ‘Business Impact of Covid-19 Survey’, ONS, October 2020.

Across all industries, only 2% of UK businesses said that they have not implemented any safety measures in the workplace. Source: ‘Business Impact of Covid-19 Survey’, ONS, October 2020.

A survey of the public found that almost two thirds of employees (63%) in Great Britain had been consulted on safer working practices by their employer, whilst a similar proportion (62%) said that their employer is displaying a covid-secure poster in their workplace. Source: ‘Coronavirus and the social impacts on Great Britain’, ONS, October 2020.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of employers contravening Government guidance by prohibiting staff from working from home during the covid-19 outbreak.

Compliance by employers across the nation with the BEIS guidance is high. Across all industries, 97% of UK businesses say they are aware of the government safer workplace guidance (Business Impact of Covid-19 Survey’, ONS, October 2020).

Further, the BEIS guidance make it clear that by law, from 28 September employers must not knowingly require or encourage someone who is being required to self-isolate to come to work.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that employers support staff to work from home where possible during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government’s safer working guidance is clear that in order to keep the virus under control, it is important that people work safely. In order to help contain the virus, everyone who can work effectively from home must do so. Where people cannot do so (for instance people who work in critical national infrastructure, construction, or manufacturing) they should continue to attend their workplace. This is essential to keeping the country operating and supporting vital sectors and employers. The full guidance is available on gov.uk.

In order to help employers support staff to work from home where possible, ACAS has produced comprehensive guidance on the key employment issues for when people are working at home during the pandemic. This covers practical issues such as pay and insurance, as well as offering training on managing people who work remotely – the link to the relevant section of the ACAS site can be found here https://www.acas.org.uk/working-from-home.

There is also a legal framework in place that grants all employees with 26 weeks’ continuous service with their employer the statutory Right to Request Flexible Working, where employees can request a change to their hours, working patterns or to work from home. There is supporting guidance currently available online which explains eligibility, as well as the process for both making and receiving requests to work flexibly on GOV.UK – this can be found here https://www.gov.uk/flexible-working.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's Covid-19 recovery strategy published on 11 May 2020, what funding the Government will provide to small businesses to enable them to comply with the Covid-19 secure guidelines.

The Government has put in place a package of support for businesses of all sizes, including small businesses. This includes guidance developed with industry experts, unions, business organisations, local Government, and other stakeholders to get people back to work safely. It helps organisations meet their obligations under health and safety law and employers are responsible for taking all reasonably practical steps to address health and safety risks.

The small business grant fund has been created, specifically for hereditaments in England that were eligible for relief on 11 March under the small business rates relief (SBRR) fund. The funding is to support small and rural businesses which are ratepayers on a property, as these businesses are more likely to have ongoing fixed costs during this period. Unfortunately, businesses that were not eligible for percentage SBRR relief on 11 March are excluded.

Nevertheless, there are other new measures to provide support to those businesses, including Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme; deferral of the next quarter of back-payments for firms until the end of June, representing a £30 billion injection into the economy; and a new fast-track finance scheme providing loans with a 100% government guarantee. In addition, there is also the bounce-back loan scheme, which will ensure that the smallest businesses can access loans in a matter of days. We are working currently with local authorities to try to make sure that this support is delivered as fast as possible.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including people working in live music and the performing arts on the list of jobs that qualify for exemption from covid-19 quarantine regulations on arrival in the UK, in line with the exemptions for elite sportspersons and those working on film and television productions.

We continue to work tirelessly with the cultural and creative sectors to explore all options to support them through this challenging period, including on proposals for exemptions from quarantine. All decisions about exemptions and other measures will need to be considered in light of the wider public health context, and will be taken with the Secretary of State for Transport and other Ministerial colleagues.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with Arts Council England on the payment of open access National Lottery Project Grants during the covid-19 outbeak.

Myself and my officials have worked closely with its arm’s-length bodies throughout the COVID-19 crisis to deliver tailored support packages at speed, including the £160m Emergency Funding Package announced by Arts Council England (ACE) in March.

DCMS will continue to support ACE in its hugely important role in supporting and developing England’s arts and culture, including in its upcoming role in the delivery of the £1.57 billion of new funding announced on 5 July, to provide support for key organisations across the cultural, heritage and creative sectors.

On 22 July ACE’s National Lottery Project Grants re-open and further guidance, updated so more individuals and creative practitioners can be supported during COVID-19, can be found on the ACE website.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to reduce the incidence of sexual abuse of minors by sports coaches; and if he will make a statement.

Ensuring that sport is a safe environment for all young people is of paramount importance, and my department works closely with Sport England and the Child Protection in Sport Unit to strengthen provision wherever possible.

All organisations in receipt of public funding from Sport England and UK Sport have been required to meet the standards set out in the Code for Sports Governance since April 2017. The Code contains specific obligations around safeguarding, including a requirement for national governing bodies to adhere to the Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport, which are issued by the Child Protection in Sport Unit.

We have also taken steps to promote best practice in non-publicly funded sports. A Code of Safeguarding in Martial Arts was launched in March 2018 which sets consistent standards and provides parents with the knowledge they need to make informed decisions about where to send their children for instruction.

We welcome the Ministry of Justice’s commitment, at a recent hearing of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, to change the law around ‘positions of trust’ in the Sexual Offences Act 2003. We look forward to working closely with the Ministry of Justice to ensure that sports coaches are included as part of these legislative changes.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when charities providing support for people during the covid-19 outbreak will be able to submit bids for funding to National Lottery Community Fund; and what the planned timetable is for distributing that funding.

On 8 April, Government announced a £750m civil society support package. Of this, £360m is being distributed by central Government Departments and £370m is available for charities providing vital services for those affected by the pandemic.

Of the £310m available in England, £200m is being distributed by the National Lottery Community Fund through the Coronavirus Community Support Fund. Charities and social enterprises can bid into the Coronavirus Community Support Fund from 22 May.

This funding will support organisations working with people and communities experiencing disproportionate challenges during the crisis, and those that provide services and support for vulnerable people which have seen an increase in demand or have lost income. Supporting guidance is provided on the National Lottery Community Fund website.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to support community radio during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government is strongly supportive of the community radio sector and recognises the great value that it offers to communities across the United Kingdom, in terms of providing quality local news, information and entertainment. The Government is also grateful for the interest that community radio stations have shown in broadcasting vitally important public health information during the current Covid-19 outbreak. I understand that the Community Media Association is liaising with the Cabinet Office and the government's external partners in this regard.

The Government also recognises the unique difficulties these stations face, which is why we are releasing emergency funding to help them to continue to provide programming and services for the communities they serve. This will provide a lifeline for community radio stations hit hardest by the coronavirus. Relevant stations were invited to bid for emergency grants to help meet their core costs through an Ofcom sponsored process. The window for applications opened on 4 May 2020 and closed on 11 May 2020. The awarding panel will meet in May 2020 to consider the applications.

As well as this, DCMS continues to have discussions with those in the community radio sector, including the CMA, in order to further understand the wider implications of the coronavirus outbreak on community stations and further support for recovery.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to provide financial support to charities in the orchestral and musical sector in receipt of charitable rate relief affected by the covid-19 outbreak.

On 8th April, the Treasury announced a funding package for charities providing vital services and helping vulnerable people through the current crisis. Unfortunately, not all charitable organisations will be able to benefit from this package. I would encourage organisations to assess whether other schemes provided by the Government will be better suited to their circumstances such as the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and deferring VAT payments.

DCMS has also been working closely with Arts Council England (ACE) to monitor and respond to the challenges being faced by the arts and cultural sectors. On 24 March, Arts Council England announced a £160m emergency response package, made possible by Government funding, to complement the financial measures already announced by Government and ensure immediate resilience of this vital sector. DCMS and Arts Council England will continue to work closely to consider the additional measures that are needed to ensure the long-term recovery and growth of the cultural sector.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the report of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Technology use and the mental health of children and young people, published in January 2020, what plans he has for a consultation on a voluntary harm reporting scheme for online platforms, similar to the MHRA’s Yellow Card scheme for monitoring the harms of medical products.

The government is developing world-leading plans to make the UK the safest place to be online. The Online Harms White Paper set out proposals to establish a statutory duty of care on online companies, overseen by an independent regulator with tough enforcement powers, to hold them to account. The regulator will have the power to require transparency reports from companies outlining what they are doing to protect people online, such as the processes to report content. These reports will be published so parents and children can make informed decisions about their internet use.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress his Department has made towards establishing a Takaful-based funding structure for financial support for students in higher and further education.

The government is considering the Alternative Student Finance (ASF) product carefully and will provide a further update with the full and final conclusion of the Post-18 Review of Education and Funding. The interim report of the review was published on 21 January 2021, and the review is scheduled to conclude alongside the next multi-year Spending Review. An update on the ASF product will be provided at that time.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will update the Restricting attendance during the national lockdown: schools guidance to include guidance for special schools.

We published guidance on the 7 January 2021 setting out how we want all schools, including special schools and specialist post 16 provision, to operate during this new lockdown. This is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak.

We will continue to update guidance and support in due course.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what support he is giving to special schools to ensure that children with Education, Health and Care Plans are able to attend school safely.

During national lockdown restrictions, special schools and special post-16 settings should continue to welcome and encourage pupils to attend full-time (or as per their usual timetable) where parents and carers wishes for their child to be able to attend (or for post-16s, where the young person wishes to attend). This is because we know that children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities, and their families, can be disproportionately impacted by being out of education. The Department for Education (DfE) has published new guidance on the period during the national lockdown, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak#history.

It is important that staff in these schools continue to be supported. The rapid asymptomatic testing programme will include testing staff, vulnerable pupils and students, and children of key workers, including those within special schools and special post-16 settings. Further announcements on the roll out of testing to staff in primary schools will follow in due course, to help support the reopening of education settings.

As outlined in the department’s published guidance, additional use of personal protective equipment (PPE) for COVID-19 related purposes is only needed in a small number of cases, such as if a pupil or student becomes ill with COVID-19 symptoms and a distance of 2 metres cannot be maintained, or when undertaking aerosol generating procedures. If a pupil or student already has routine intimate care needs that involve the use of PPE, the same PPE should continue to be used. Public Health England have advised that the current guidance on the system of controls, including the use of PPE and face coverings, should continue to be followed.

The PPE portal can be used by residential special settings to access COVID-19 PPE. These providers will have received an email invitation to register with the portal. Depending on local arrangements, special schools and special post-16 settings may be able to access PPE for their COVID-19 needs via their local authority or local resilience forum.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) are independent experts advising the government on which vaccine(s) the UK should use and provide advice on who should be offered them. JCVI advises that the first priorities for the COVID-19 vaccination should be the prevention of mortality and the maintenance of the health and social care systems, and as the risk of mortality from COVID-19 increases with age, prioritisation is primarily based on age. This prioritisation captures almost all preventable deaths from COVID-19. In the next phase of the vaccine rollout, JCVI have asked that the Department of Health and Social Care consider occupational vaccination in collaboration with other government departments. The DfE will input into this cross-governmental exercise.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance he has issued to special schools on the provision of in-person education for children with education, health and care plans during the covid-19 outbreak.

The department published ‘Guidance for full opening: special schools and other specialist settings’ in July 2020, and this has been regularly updated. This guidance supports special schools and other specialist provision to provide in-person education for children and young people with Education, Health and Care Plans. Further information on this guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-for-full-opening-special-schools-and-other-specialist-settings/guidance-for-full-opening-special-schools-and-other-specialist-settings.

Due to the national restrictions introduced on 7 January 2021, we published new guidance setting out how we want all schools, including special schools and specialist post 16 provision to operate during this new lockdown. This is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak.

We will continue to update guidance and support in due course, providing more detailed advice and support for special schools.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent discussions he has had with the Office for Students on (a) the level of in-person teaching provided by universities and (b) the value for money for student of university teaching during the covid-19 outbreak.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State of Education, and I hold regular meetings with the Office for Students (OfS) leadership. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, these meetings have also involved regularly reviewing and monitoring the impact of COVID-19 on teaching and assessment, including the level of in-person teaching provided by universities and the value for money that students are receiving. I have consistently made it clear to the OfS that quality and standards must be maintained.

As I set out in a letter to MPs on 9 October and in a letter to Vice-Chancellors on 2 November, the government’s clear and stated expectation is that, whether higher education providers are delivering face-to-face, online or blended provision, they must continue delivering a high quality academic experience that helps all students achieve qualifications that they and employers value. If there are concerns, the OfS has the powers to act. The OfS has made it clear that HE providers must continue to comply with registration conditions relating to quality and standards, which set out requirements to ensure that courses are high-quality, that students are supported and achieve good outcomes and that standards are protected.

HE providers must continue to comply with their legal obligations under the Equality Act (2010), ensuring that education and learning is accessible to all students. When making changes to the delivery of their courses, HE providers need to consider how they support all students, particularly the most vulnerable, to achieve successful academic and professional outcomes.

The OfS has published information for HE providers, providing practical guidance on how best to ensure students continue to receive a high quality academic experience. The OfS will keep this guidance under review to ensure it remains relevant to the developing circumstances of the COVID-19 outbreak. The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education has also published a series of guides to support providers to secure academic standards and to support student achievement during the COVID-19 outbreak.

The OfS is taking very seriously the potential impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak on teaching and learning and is regularly engaging with all registered HE providers. It is actively monitoring those providers which have moved provision predominantly online due to COVID-19 restrictions to ensure that they maintain the quality of their provision, that it is accessible for all and that they have been clear in their communications with students about how arrangements for teaching and learning may change throughout the year.

The OfS is also following up directly with HE providers where they receive notifications from students, parents or others raising concerns about the quality of teaching on offer. The OfS is also requiring HE providers to report to them when they are not able to deliver a course or award a qualification. If the OfS has concerns, it will investigate further.

Students have rights under consumer law that they can rely on if they are dissatisfied with their HE provider’s response to COVID-19. In the first instance, students should speak to their provider to see if they can resolve their issue. We expect student complaints and appeals processes to be operated flexibly, accessibly and sympathetically by providers to resolve any concerns. If a student at a provider in England or Wales is not satisfied with their provider’s final response, they should go to the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education, which has published guidance on this issue.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the additional funding from the Arts Premium that will be allocated to primary schools.

Arts education is an important part of a broad and balanced curriculum and should not be the preserve of the elite but the entitlement of every single child. Between 2016-20 the Department is providing almost £500 million of funding for a range of creative and performance arts education programmes including Music Education Hubs, the Music and Dance Scheme, the Dance and Drama Awards, and a set of diverse cultural education programmes. As set out in the manifesto and in early January, we also announced funding of £85 million for music and arts in 2020-21; £80 million for music hubs coupled with further investment in film, dance, theatre and design.

The Department believes that the arts help young people to learn creative skills and widen their horizons, so we will also offer an ‘arts premium’ to secondary schools to fund enriching activities for all pupils. We will share further details on the premium in due course.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what role music will play in the introduction of the Arts Premium for secondary schools.

Arts education is an important part of a broad and balanced curriculum and should not be the preserve of the elite but the entitlement of every single child. Between 2016-20 the Department is providing almost £500 million of funding for a range of creative and performance arts education programmes including Music Education Hubs, the Music and Dance Scheme, the Dance and Drama Awards, and a set of diverse cultural education programmes. As set out in the manifesto and in early January, we also announced funding of £85 million for music and arts in 2020-21; £80 million for music hubs coupled with further investment in film, dance, theatre and design.

The Department believes that the arts help young people to learn creative skills and widen their horizons, so we will also offer an ‘arts premium’ to secondary schools to fund enriching activities for all pupils. We will share further details on the premium in due course.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to his comments at the Wild Live event on 18 May 2021, how much funding previously allocated to the Basic Payment Scheme has been allocated to projects to improve public access to the countryside; and if he will publish the names of those projects.

The Agricultural Transition Plan outlined the Government's plans for farming for the length of this parliament. We have a manifesto commitment to maintain the farming budget for the duration of this parliament. Over this period, as we phase out Direct Payments, we will redirect this money into our new environmental land management schemes. Public access is one of the public goods for which Ministers will be able to provide financial assistance through our new schemes, using powers in the Agriculture Act 2020.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of changes in the level of air pollution during lockdown restrictions due to the covid-19 outbreak; and what steps he is taking to reduce air pollution.

The Government is taking a proactive approach to understand the possible links between air quality and COVID-19. That is why, with our Air Quality Expert Group (AQEG), we ran a rapid Call for Evidence to ensure we can more fully understand the impact that COVID-19 is having on air pollutant emissions, concentrations and human exposure. A report was published on 1 July (the report can be found here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/reports.php?report_id=1005) which outlines the findings from this Call for Evidence. The report provides an early snapshot of evidence (pre-April 30th 2020) and is an important component of Defra’s response to COVID-19 and strategic leadership to improving air quality in the UK. A detailed follow-up by AQEG in the form of a more traditional review of the peer reviewed evidence will follow when more is known about the impact of the pandemic on air quality.

The National Air Quality Monitoring Network continuously monitors air quality across the UK for a range of pollutants including for key pollutants like nitrogen dioxide and particulates. These networks have provided valuable insights into the impacts COVID -19 has had on air quality throughout this pandemic and continue to provide valuable information to assess air pollution trends.

Our assessment of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and PM2.5 concentrations during the pandemic has shown that:

  • Between 23 March and 31 May, NO2 concentrations were on average 46% lower compared to the 3-year average for the same period in 2017-2019, although there was substantial local level variability - with NO2 reductions at individual locations ranging from 5 to 68%. Concentrations of other air pollutants, such as particulate matter, have not shown similar trends.
  • Since the start of June, we have seen NO2 concentrations increase slightly as lockdown measures were lifted and traffic activity increased, although on average roadside NO2 concentrations remain lower than levels observed in the previous 3 years. From 1 June to 16 September 2020, roadside NO2 concentrations were on average 26% lower compared to the 2017-2019 average for this period, although there continues to be considerable local level variability.
  • There has been an impact on PM2.5 concentrations. Between 23 March and 16 September 2020 concentrations of PM2.5 measured by our monitoring network decreased by 15% at urban sites compared to the same period averaged over years 2017-2019. There is substantial local variability, however, with several sites reported increasing concentrations over the period.

Improving air quality remains a top priority for the Government and, especially during these unprecedented times, we will continue to take robust and comprehensive action to improve air quality in the UK and minimise public health impacts. This includes action that Government is taking to deliver our Clean Air Strategy, including through the Environment Bill. We will apply our understanding of the longer-term implications from these unprecedented changes in living and working patterns to delivering our environmental commitments.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to encourage private hire vehicles to switch to lower emission or electric vehicles.

The Government has provided over £20m to install dedicated chargepoints for ultra-low emission taxis and private hire vehicles across the UK to give drivers the confidence to make the transition to electric. This includes over 200 fast chargers and over 550 rapid chargers. Private hire operators are also able to take advantage of the Plug-in Car and Van Grant schemes, as well as the Electric Homecharge and Work Place Charging Schemes. The Plug-in Car Grant offers up to £3000 off an electric or fuel cell cars and the Electric Homecharge Scheme provides a grant of up to £350 towards the installation of domestic chargepoints.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to encourage lower levels of car use; and if he will make a statement.

The Department is creating a Transport Decarbonisation Plan for publication later this year setting out a bold and ambitious pathway to decarbonisation. This holistic and cross-modal approach to decarbonising the entire transport system will set out the measures needed to accelerate modal shift to public and active transport.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking in response to the covid-19 outbreak and the reduction in services provided by the Driving and Vehicle Licencing Agency to allow people aged over 70 to renew their driving licence by post.

The quickest and easiest way to renew a driving licence at the age 70 and over is to use the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)’s online service at www.gov.uk/renew-driving-licence-at-70 .

We are aware that some drivers may face difficulties using this service and those customers should submit a paper application in the normal way. However, paper applications will take longer to process in the current circumstances. Some drivers may be able to continue to drive while their application is being processed, provided they have a valid licence and they have not been told by a doctor or optician not to drive. Further information on this provision can be found online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/inf1886-can-i-drive-while-my-application-is-with-dvla.

The department is considering what can be done to help drivers who are unable to use the DVLA’s online service. More information will be made available at the appropriate time.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the application of Section 88 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 to people aged over 70 who may not be able to verify their fitness to drive with their GP and continue driving.

It is a driver’s responsibility to ensure that they meet the criteria for driving under the provisions of Section 88 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 while their application is being considered. More information on the criteria can be found online at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/inf1886-can-i-drive-while-my-application-is-with-dvla

While there is no specific requirement to visit a doctor for these purposes, if a driver has been told not to drive by a doctor or optician, they should not do so.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people aged over 70 have applied to renew their driving licence by using the DVLA’s (a) online and (b) postal service in each of the last five years, by age of applicant.

The table below shows the number of applications received from those renewing their driving licence at the age of 70 and over either online or by post in the last five financial years. It has not been possible in the time available to break this down by age of applicant.

Online applications age 70 and over

Postal applications age 70 and over

2015-2016

720,152

1,068,060

2016-2017

843,947

1,079,017

2017-2018

897,577

990,243

2018-2019

907,005

1,117,544

2019-2020

1,128,344

1,012,176

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of bus provision in Worsley and Eccles South.

The bus market outside London is deregulated and decisions regarding service provision is primarily a commercial matter for bus operators. Decisions on subsidised bus services are a matter for individual English local authorities, in the light of their other spending priorities.

The Bus Services Act 2017 provides the tools local authorities need, such as Franchising and Enhanced Partnerships to improve local bus services and increase passenger numbers. We are working with interested local authorities to determine which of the powers provided are best able to support bus networks in their areas.

We are committed to implementing the UK’s first-ever long-term bus strategy, accompanied by a long-term funding settlement. The strategy will focus on the needs of passengers so that more people want to use the bus and set out how national and local government and the private sector will come together to achieve this.

7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to increase access to rail services in Walkden.

Northern is introducing refurbished trains that meet modern accessibility standards in the coming months, and these will serve Walkden. They will provide audio visual passenger information systems and wheelchair spaces among other accessibility features for disabled passengers.

In addition, Northern is required to spend at least £250,000 on station accessibility improvements in each year of its franchise and in addition deliver 10 accessible hub stations.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of new funding for road maintenance will be allocated to (a) Greater Manchester and (b) Salford City Council.

The Government is committed to improving local infrastructure and expects to announce details of the available funding shortly. Individual allocations of this funding will be subject to Ministerial decisions.

6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what criteria his Department used to decide not to award Walkden Station funding from the 2018 Access for All programme.

Stations were selected for this funding against a range of criteria including annual footfall, the incidence of disability in the area, and the availability of third party funding for the project. The Department also took into account local factors such as proximity to a hospital. Stations were also chosen to ensure a fair geographical spread of projects across the country.

The programme was heavily subscribed, meaning that many strong nominations were not successful, including Walkden.

26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on the potential merits of removing the time limit on claims of new jobseeker's allowance for the duration of the covid-19 outbreak.

There have been no discussions with Cabinet Office colleagues on extending eligibility for contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance during the covid-19 outbreak.

A person’s entitlement to contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance is limited to a maximum of 182 days in any period for which entitlement is established by reference to the person’s National Insurance record in the same two income tax years relevant to the claim or claims. The time limit strikes a balance in providing support whilst keeping to the cost of this and other contributory benefits affordable based on the overall income to the National Insurance Fund each year.

People who are entitled to contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, or whose entitlement ends before they find employment, may have access to income-related support through Universal Credit. Entitlement will depend on individual circumstances.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of families on universal credit in 2018-19 in (a) Salford and (b) Worsley and Eccles South constituency; and what her policy is on foodbank referrals for those people.

It is not Department for Work and Pensions policy to refer claimants to food banks. However, flexibility and innovation in local Jobcentre arrangements allow for signposting to foodbanks.

In November 2019 the total number of households on Universal Credit in Salford was 12,395 and in Worsley and Eccles South constituency was 5,151.

Source: Stat-Xplore, Department for Work and Pensions

Notes:

  1. Statistical disclosure control has been applied to avoid the release of confidential data.
  2. A count date of the second Thursday of the month is used when calculating the statistics for the households on Universal Credit.
  3. Further information on the background and methodology can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-credit-statistics-background-information-and-methodology/universal-credit-statistics-background-information-and-methodology
  4. These figures are provisional. These figures will be subject to revision in subsequent releases. It is expected that overall provisional figures will be within two per cent of their revised figure in future releases.
  5. This data is published and available at: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk
  6. Guidance on how to extract information can be found at: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many children in Worsley and Eccles South constituency were categorised under section 4 (a) (1)(a), (b) (1)(b), (c) (1)(c) and (d) (1)(d) of the Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016 in each of the last four calendar years.

National Statistics on the percentage of children in low income households (relating to Section 4(a) 1(a) and 1(c) of the Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016) are published annually in the “Households Below Average Income” publication. Statistics for the percentage of children in low income households is not available at constituency level in this publication because the survey sample sizes are too small to support the production of robust estimates at this geography. Statistics for the North West region can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/households-below-average-income-199495-to-201718, “children-hbai-timeseries-1994-95-2017-18-tables” in tables 4.16ts (for relative low income, before and after housing costs) and 4.22ts (for absolute low income, before and after housing costs)

Data for the percentage of children in low income and material deprivation (relating to Section 4(a) 1(b) of the Act) is not available at constituency level in the “Households Below Average Income” publication. Statistics for the United Kingdom are available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/households-below-average-income-199495-to-201718, “children-trends-hbai-1994-95-2017-18-tables” in table 4.5tr.

Experimental Statistics on the percentage of children in persistent low income (relating to Section 4(a) 1(d) of the Act) are published annually in the “Income Dynamics” publication. Statistics for the percentage of children in persistent low income households is not available at constituency level in this publication because the survey sample sizes are too small to support the production of robust estimates at this geography. Statistics for the North West region can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/income-dynamics-2016-to-2017 in table 3.2p (on a before housing costs basis) and table 3.8p (on an after housing costs basis).

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of food parcels distributed by food banks in (a) Salford and (b) Worsley and Eccles South in 2018-19.

The Government does not collect data on the number of food parcels distributed by food banks and there is no official data on food bank use in the UK.

In order to develop a better understanding of the drivers of food insecurity and identify which groups are most at risk we have introduced a new set of food security questions in the Family Resources Survey questionnaire from April 2019 onwards.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to help ensure that unpaid carers have been able to take a break from their caring role during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises that access to breaks provides important support for people with care needs and their carers during the COVID-19 pandemic. We have provided approximately £1.8 billion in specific funding for adult social care. This includes the £1.35 billion Infection Control Fund, which has been used towards supporting day centres to re-open safely.

In addition, we have also supported the provision of respite within caring ‘bubbles’ ensuring that the COVID-19 restrictions allowed household mixing when providing care and respite for other carers. We have also provided over £2 billion this year to the Better Care Fund which local authorities can access to fund social care services in their areas including respite services.

No assessment has been made of providing an extra £50 is personal budgets to help carers access breaks from their caring. Local authorities are responsible for assessing individual’s eligibility for support as set out in the Care Act 2014. Carers have legal rights to an assessment of, and support for, their needs where eligible. Following the assessment, the local authority will decide if the carer is eligible for support. Support could be provided by the local authority, or in the form of a direct payment or personal budget.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing an additional £50 per week to personal budgets for unpaid carers to help those carers access breaks from their caring responsibilities.

The Government recognises that access to breaks provides important support for people with care needs and their carers during the COVID-19 pandemic. We have provided approximately £1.8 billion in specific funding for adult social care. This includes the £1.35 billion Infection Control Fund, which has been used towards supporting day centres to re-open safely.

In addition, we have also supported the provision of respite within caring ‘bubbles’ ensuring that the COVID-19 restrictions allowed household mixing when providing care and respite for other carers. We have also provided over £2 billion this year to the Better Care Fund which local authorities can access to fund social care services in their areas including respite services.

No assessment has been made of providing an extra £50 is personal budgets to help carers access breaks from their caring. Local authorities are responsible for assessing individual’s eligibility for support as set out in the Care Act 2014. Carers have legal rights to an assessment of, and support for, their needs where eligible. Following the assessment, the local authority will decide if the carer is eligible for support. Support could be provided by the local authority, or in the form of a direct payment or personal budget.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to create parity of esteem between health and social care with regard to (a) pay and (b) career development opportunities.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of the effect of the level of charges for social care on levels of deprivation among (a) working age adults using social care and (b) adults over 65 using social care.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what resources he has made available to local authorities to enable the provision of respite breaks for carers.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the High Court Judgement in the case of SH v Norfolk Council, what steps he is taking to ensure that local authority social care charging policies are compliant with equality law.

Local authorities have discretion to implement charging policies which best meet the needs of the local populations they serve, whilst adhering to legislation and statutory guidance. Responsibility for ensuring that charging policies are compliant with equality laws rests with local authorities, who take their own legal advice on such matters. Following engagement with local authority representative groups, the Government is confident that local authorities understand their obligations.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that (a) suitable housing, (b) suitable social care providers and (c) robust community teams are being provided to support people with learning disabilities and prevent admission to inpatient units.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to remove financial incentives which can lead(a) to long lengths of stay and (b) delays to discharge for people with a learning disability and/or autism detained in inpatient units.

In July 2020, we announced the three-year £62 million Community Discharge Grant in England to accelerate discharges into the community by addressing ‘double-running’ costs which can act as disincentive for discharge. We paid £20 million in total of the Community Discharge Grant to nominated lead local authorities during the summer of 2020. Allocations for 2021/2022 will be announced in due course.

The Building the Right Support Delivery Board has been established to drive further progress in reducing the number of people with a learning disability and autistic people in specialist inpatient settings through the development of community-based support. A priority for the Board is examining issues with funding flows, including assessing any financial disincentives preventing progress.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to make adequate funding available to ensure there are (a) suitable social care providers and (b) robust community teams in every local area for people with learning disabilities to prevent admission to inpatient units.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on funding for independent hospices.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the value to the public purse of palliative care services provided by independent hospices.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure local health, care and education services are able to share records to identify autistic children at risk of being admitted to inpatient mental health services.

In England, the Care, Education and Treatment Review policy sets out an expectation that local commissioners hold a database to identify people with a learning disability, autism or both with a particular requirement to identify those who are at risk of an admission to mental health inpatient care. This may be known as a dynamic support register or dynamic risk register. Commissioners are tasked with holding the local database and keeping this information with support from those in the education, care and health partners and community teams to identify those who are at risk of admission.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many autistic people are receiving treatment for an eating disorder in the most recent period for which figures are available.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of support for autistic people with mental health problems.

As part of implementation of the NHS Long Term Plan we are increasing investment in intensive, crisis and forensic community mental health support to enable more autistic children and young adults to receive personalised care in the community and prevent avoidable admissions to inpatient services. In March 2021, we published the COVID-19 Mental Health and Wellbeing Recovery Action Plan, which includes £31 million to improve autism and learning disability services.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to reduce the risk of suicide for autistic people, as set out in the fourth progress report of the cross-government outcomes strategy to save lives.

In March, we published ‘Preventing suicide in England: fifth progress report of the cross-government outcomes strategy to save lives’. It includes an update on work across the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement to reduce suicide rates amongst groups with specific needs and characteristics that may expose them to more risk factors for suicide, including autism.

This work includes NHS England and NHS Improvement’s refreshed approach to the Learning Disability Mortality Review (LeDeR) programme, ‘Learning from lives and deaths - people with a learning disability and autistic people’. The LeDeR aims to improve care, reduce heath inequalities and prevent premature mortality of people with a learning disability and autistic people by reviewing information about the health and social care support that people received.

We also published the Mental Health and Wellbeing Recovery Plan, setting out our response to the mental health impacts of the pandemic. Many of the actions in the Plan will support people at risk of self-harm or suicide, including autistic people. The Plan is backed by an additional £500 million, including £5 million to support suicide prevention organisations in 2021/22.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Answer of 22 April 2021 to Question 181225 on Mental Health Services: Social Services, what the cost to the public purse has been of providing mental health support to the social care workforce during the covid-19 outbreak to date.

The information requested is not held centrally. Several Government funds can be used for mental health support for social care workers which are non-ringfenced, to give flexibility to providers, local authorities and partners such as Skills for Care on how they choose to meet COVID-19 priorities.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish any impact assessments undertaken on mental health support provided to the social care workforce during the covid-19 outbreak.

We have not undertaken any such impact assessments to date.

We have worked alongside the National Health Service and other organisations to provide a package of emotional, psychological and practical resources for the social care workforce. We are engaging with social care stakeholders to understand the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of staff and that the right support is available.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding his Department has provided to support the mental health of the social care workforce during the covid-19 outbreak.

To support the wellbeing of social care workers, we have worked alongside the National Health Service and other organisations to provide a package of emotional, psychological and practical resources for the workforce. This includes support helplines, guidance, bereavement resources and a bespoke package of support for registered managers.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the social care workforce is provided with mental health training.

The Workforce Development Fund enables employers to access funding to support the development of their workforce’s knowledge and skills, including mental health training. We have also commissioned Skills for Care to create a package of support for registered managers which includes support for mental wellbeing.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what additional mental health support his Department is providing to the frontline social care workforce during the covid-19 outbreak.

We have worked alongside the National Health Service and other organisations to provide a package of emotional, psychological and practical resources for all care workers. This package includes support helplines, guidance, bereavement resources and a bespoke package of support for registered managers. We have also worked with the sector to ensure that wellbeing resources and best practice advice are streamlined and easier to navigate.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to take steps to increase the proportion of statutory funding that is allocated to palliative care services provided by independent hospices.

The Government recognises the importance of palliative and end of life care services, including hospices. The hospice sector has played a vital role in the national response to the COVID-19 pandemic which is reflected by the provision of up to £280 million of additional funding from March 2020 to March 2021.

The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement proactively engage with the whole sector on an ongoing basis to understand the issues they face and their views of upcoming needs and challenges. Most hospices are independent, charitable organisations that receive some statutory funding, mainly from clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) for providing local services. CCGs are responsible for the planning and commissioning of high-quality, cost-effective services that meet the needs of their local population.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have developed Palliative and End of Life Care Strategic Clinical Networks, working closely with local commissioners, to develop and implement sustainable commissioning models for palliative and end of life care including hospice services that respond to the needs of their local population. This work includes the development of service specifications and an investment framework.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the level of statutory funding that is required for palliative care services provided by independent hospices to continue to provide care in the medium term.

The Government recognises the importance of palliative and end of life care services, including hospices. The hospice sector has played a vital role in the national response to the COVID-19 pandemic which is reflected by the provision of up to £280 million of additional funding from March 2020 to March 2021.

The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement proactively engage with the whole sector on an ongoing basis to understand the issues they face and their views of upcoming needs and challenges. Most hospices are independent, charitable organisations that receive some statutory funding, mainly from clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) for providing local services. CCGs are responsible for the planning and commissioning of high-quality, cost-effective services that meet the needs of their local population.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have developed Palliative and End of Life Care Strategic Clinical Networks, working closely with local commissioners, to develop and implement sustainable commissioning models for palliative and end of life care including hospice services that respond to the needs of their local population. This work includes the development of service specifications and an investment framework.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the value to the public purse of palliative care services provided by independent hospices.

The Government recognises the importance of palliative and end of life care services, including hospices. The hospice sector has played a vital role in the national response to the COVID-19 pandemic which is reflected by the provision of up to £280 million of additional funding from March 2020 to March 2021.

The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement proactively engage with the whole sector on an ongoing basis to understand the issues they face and their views of upcoming needs and challenges. Most hospices are independent, charitable organisations that receive some statutory funding, mainly from clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) for providing local services. CCGs are responsible for the planning and commissioning of high-quality, cost-effective services that meet the needs of their local population.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have developed Palliative and End of Life Care Strategic Clinical Networks, working closely with local commissioners, to develop and implement sustainable commissioning models for palliative and end of life care including hospice services that respond to the needs of their local population. This work includes the development of service specifications and an investment framework.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of statutory funding for palliative care services provided by independent hospices.

The Government recognises the importance of palliative and end of life care services, including hospices. The hospice sector has played a vital role in the national response to the COVID-19 pandemic which is reflected by the provision of up to £280 million of additional funding from March 2020 to March 2021.

The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement proactively engage with the whole sector on an ongoing basis to understand the issues they face and their views of upcoming needs and challenges. Most hospices are independent, charitable organisations that receive some statutory funding, mainly from clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) for providing local services. CCGs are responsible for the planning and commissioning of high-quality, cost-effective services that meet the needs of their local population.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have developed Palliative and End of Life Care Strategic Clinical Networks, working closely with local commissioners, to develop and implement sustainable commissioning models for palliative and end of life care including hospice services that respond to the needs of their local population. This work includes the development of service specifications and an investment framework.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Written Parliamentary Questions to his Department have received a response drafted by external contractors since March 2020.

As part of their work in helping respond to the pandemic, external contractors may provide support in answering Written Questions if required. However, Senior Civil Servants review each reply to ensure it is accurate and provide final sign-off.

Information on how many responses to Written Questions have included contributions by external contractors and an estimate of costs to the Department is not available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the cost to his Department of responses to Written Parliamentary Questions drafted by external contractors since March 2020.

As part of their work in helping respond to the pandemic, external contractors may provide support in answering Written Questions if required. However, Senior Civil Servants review each reply to ensure it is accurate and provide final sign-off.

Information on how many responses to Written Questions have included contributions by external contractors and an estimate of costs to the Department is not available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the cost to his Department of responding to Written Parliamentary Questions since March 2020.

We have made no such estimate.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Supreme Court judgement in the case of Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake, whether he will take steps to prevent care staff working on sleep in shifts from having their wages reduced.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal judgment. Workers on ‘sleep-in’ shifts are entitled to the minimum wage for the time they are awake for the purpose of working. The Government is working closely with local authorities and providers in order to consider whether this judgment might have implications with respect to the provision of social care more generally and to consider what action if any is needed.

Local authorities and providers should continue to ensure that that care workers are supported and remunerated in accordance with both minimum wage law and local authorities’ market shaping duties.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of current trends in the levels of demand for housing-with-care provision.

Housing-with-care has a vital role in enabling older people to live independently, with the necessary care and support available if required. Both the Department of Health and Social Care and the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government provide capital funding subsidy to incentivise their supply. In the context of an ageing population, both Departments are committed to working closely together, and across government, to refine our understanding of the evidence base around specialist housing, adult social care and health. Both Departments are also committed to further improve the diversity of housing options available to older people, including housing-with-care, and are engaging closely both with the sector and a range of other stakeholders on this issue.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on increasing housing-with-care provision.

Housing-with-care has a vital role in enabling older people to live independently, with the necessary care and support available if required. Both the Department of Health and Social Care and the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government provide capital funding subsidy to incentivise their supply. In the context of an ageing population, both Departments are committed to working closely together, and across government, to refine our understanding of the evidence base around specialist housing, adult social care and health. Both Departments are also committed to further improve the diversity of housing options available to older people, including housing-with-care, and are engaging closely both with the sector and a range of other stakeholders on this issue.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to Questions 146837, 146838 and 146836, tabled on 1 February 2021 by the hon. Member for Worsley and Eccles South.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that hon. Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold the Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s questions will be answered as soon as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to identify people with (a) learning disabilities and (b) severe mental illness who are in each of the current priority groups for covid-19 vaccines.

On 24 February the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) published a clarification of their advice on vaccinating people with a learning disability. They confirmed their view that priority should be given to those with a severe and profound learning disability, but recognised concerns about coding of Learning Disability on general practitioner (GP) systems and supported a practical approach of inviting everyone who is on the GP Learning Disability Register for vaccination in cohort 6.

The JCVI also supports an approach for the National Health Service to work with local authorities to identify adults with learning disability in residential and nursing care, and those who require support, for example as part of assisted living in the community, and those in shared accommodation with multiple occupancy.

The NHS can identify adults who have severe mental illnesses, including individuals with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or any mental illness that causes severe functional impairment, who are eligible for vaccination in cohort 6 through GP records.

Local systems are best placed to reach out to our diverse communities and avoid inequalities in access, and every system should have a plan for full coverage for health inclusion groups. Regional teams working with local systems have identified local health inclusion groups that will require access to the vaccine, within eligible patient cohorts. Locally commissioned arrangements to reach these groups may include local NHS Community & Mental Health Trust providers, primary care networks, or partnership activity with statutory and voluntary services.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that people in priority groups 1 to 4 with (a) learning disabilities and (b) severe mental illness are able to access covid-19 vaccines.

On 24 February the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) published a clarification of their advice on vaccinating people with a learning disability. They confirmed their view that priority should be given to those with a severe and profound learning disability, but recognised concerns about coding of Learning Disability on general practitioner (GP) systems and supported a practical approach of inviting everyone who is on the GP Learning Disability Register for vaccination in cohort 6.

The JCVI also supports an approach for the National Health Service to work with local authorities to identify adults with learning disability in residential and nursing care, and those who require support, for example as part of assisted living in the community, and those in shared accommodation with multiple occupancy.

The NHS can identify adults who have severe mental illnesses, including individuals with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or any mental illness that causes severe functional impairment, who are eligible for vaccination in cohort 6 through GP records.

Local systems are best placed to reach out to our diverse communities and avoid inequalities in access, and every system should have a plan for full coverage for health inclusion groups. Regional teams working with local systems have identified local health inclusion groups that will require access to the vaccine, within eligible patient cohorts. Locally commissioned arrangements to reach these groups may include local NHS Community & Mental Health Trust providers, primary care networks, or partnership activity with statutory and voluntary services.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of covid-19 vaccine uptake rates among people in priority groups 1 to 4 with (a) learning disabilities and (b) severe mental illness.

The data is not held centrally in the format requested.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation's advice on priority groups for covid-19 vaccination, whether the UK covid-19 vaccines delivery plan will be updated to confirm that unpaid carers will be offered a vaccine in priority group six.

Unpaid carers are included in the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation’s priority group six. This also includes those who are eligible for a carer’s allowance, or those who are the sole or primary carer of an elderly or disabled person who is at increased risk of COVID-19 mortality and therefore clinically vulnerable.

The Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for unpaid carers has now been published. The SOP draws on national and local sources for known carers, to help identify and enable them to be invited quickly for a vaccination, as well as making provision for those unpaid carers who may not already be known to the health and social care system to come forward. The SOP is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2021/03/C1182-sop-covid-19-vaccine-deployment-programme-unpaid-carers-jcvi-priority-cohort-6.pdf

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation's advice on priority groups for covid-19 vaccination and the UK covid-19 vaccines delivery plan, what steps he is taking to identify unpaid carers in order to ensure they are offered the covid-19 vaccine at the appropriate point.

Unpaid carers are included in the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation’s priority group six. This also includes those who are eligible for a carer’s allowance, or those who are the sole or primary carer of an elderly or disabled person who is at increased risk of COVID-19 mortality and therefore clinically vulnerable.

The Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for unpaid carers has now been published. The SOP draws on national and local sources for known carers, to help identify and enable them to be invited quickly for a vaccination, as well as making provision for those unpaid carers who may not already be known to the health and social care system to come forward. The SOP is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2021/03/C1182-sop-covid-19-vaccine-deployment-programme-unpaid-carers-jcvi-priority-cohort-6.pdf

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation's (JCVI) advice on priority groups for covid-19 vaccination and the UK covid-19 vaccines delivery plan, what estimate he has made of the number of unpaid carers who may be eligible for a vaccine in priority group six.

NHS England’s Standard Operating Procedure sets out how unpaid carers are being identified. NHS England estimates that there are approximately two million unpaid carers in England. This is based on the number of people either eligible for a carer’s allowance, identified through general pracitioner records, receiving support following a carer’s assessment by their local council or from a local carer’s organisation, or who are the sole or primary carer of an elderly or disabled person who is clinically vulnerable to COVID-19.

A bespoke process is being developed for any eligible but unknown unpaid carers so they can self-declare and still apply for priority vaccination.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make front line airport staff a priority group in phase 2 of the covid-19 vaccine roll-out.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) are the independent experts who advise the Government on which vaccines the United Kingdom should use and provide advice on prioritisation at a population level.  For the first phase, the JCVI has advised that the vaccine be given to care home residents and staff, as well as frontline health and social care workers, then to the rest of the population in order of age and clinical risk factors.

Prioritisation decisions for the next phase of delivery are subject to of the surveillance and monitoring of data and information from phase one, as well as further input from independent scientific experts such as the JCVI. Phase two of the roll-out may include further reduction in hospitalisation and targeted vaccination of those at high risk of exposure and/or those delivering key public services.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that lateral flow tests are administered by trained professionals.

Evidence suggests that those with no clinical background or training should be completely able to secure an effective sample. International peer-reviewed evidence suggests that self-swabbing is just as effective at securing a valid sample as clinician-administered testing. Each kit comes with comprehensive instructions on how to administer the swab.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what evidence he has received on the potential effect on the transmission of covid-19 of lateral flow tests being incorrectly administered by members of the public.

Evidence suggests that those with no clinical background or training should be able to secure an effective sample. International peer-reviewed evidence suggests that self-swabbing is just as effective at securing a valid sample as clinician-administered testing. Each kit comes with comprehensive instructions on how to administer the swab.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (All Tiers) (England) Regulations 2020 Schedule 3, Part 2(12)(5), whether there are restrictions on who can stay in (a) hotels and (b) other overnight accommodation in tier 3 areas during the Christmas period.

Between 23 and 27 December, people may travel between tiers and other nations of the United Kingdom, if necessary to meet with other households in their Christmas ‘bubble’ or return home. Once at their destination, they should follow the rules in that tier.

Individuals can stay in a hotel during the Christmas period, including accommodation in tier 3 areas, or with other members of your household. People can only meet their Christmas bubble in a hotel if it is the primary residence of one of the members of their bubble. This is also the case for other types of non-private residence, for example an educational establishment or bed and breakfast. Those in a Christmas bubble must not mix in any shared facilities or spaces, like a restaurant. However, households or bubbles can stay in private rented accommodation.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the imposition of local covid-19 restrictions on 29 June 2020, what (a) discussions he had and (b) representations he received on the merits of implementing restrictions at a district level.

Discussions about implementing tier restrictions take place at the COVID Operations Committee. These decisions are based on public health recommendations from senior clinical and scientific advisors, guided by five key indicators - the case detection rate in all age groups; case detection rates among the over 60 year olds; the rate at which case rates are rising or falling; the positivity rate; and pressures on the National Health Service.

A search of the Department’s Ministerial Correspondence database for any such representations could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the imposition of local covid-19 restrictions on 29 June 2020, if he will publish the evidence which informed the Government’s decision not to implement district-level restrictions in areas with high infection rates such as Ashford in Kent.

Restrictions are not placed on district level but at county and regional levels. Decisions on tiers are made by Ministers based on public health recommendations from senior clinical and scientific advisors, guided by five key indicators; the case detection rate in all age groups; case detection rates among the over 60 year olds; the rate at which case rates are rising or falling; the positivity rate; and pressures on the National Health Service. Final decisions on tiering are made by the COVID-19 Operations Committee.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the launch of the Future Social Care Coalition, if he will take steps to (a) improve the (i) career structure and (ii) employment conditions and (b) increase (i) funding for skills training and (ii) pay of social care workers.

The Government recognises the importance of training and development for social workers and commissions a range of programmes to support the skills and knowledge of the workforce and opportunities for career progression. This includes over £11 million of funding in 2020/21 for the Workforce Development Fund which supports vocational learning for the care sector.

The Government does not determine care workers’ pay or employment conditions. We have given councils access to an additional £1 billion of funding for adult social care. The funding is intended to help councils to meet rising costs of social care, including rising pay. In any event, all care workers over 18 years old should be paid at least the National Living Wage or if over 25 years old, the National Minimum Wage.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) (No. 4) Regulations 2020, if he will publish the scientific advice on the effect of closing (a) nail and beauty salons, (b) hair salons and (c) barbers on the transmission of covid-19.

Throughout the pandemic, the Government has listened carefully to the views of the scientific community, in particular the information from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) and its sub-groups when taking decisions on the best way to tackle the pandemic.

The evidence that is considered by SAGE and used to support the Government’s response to COVID-19 is shared on GOV.UK at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/scientific-evidence-supporting-the-government-response-to-coronavirus-covid-19

Close contact services including hairdressing and beauty services are associated with an increased risk of transmission of the virus. Scientists have made it clear that the more you break the chains of transmission the more you reduce spread of the virus. Therefore, the current restrictions are in place to limit the number of interactions that people have and therefore reduce the risk spread.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the information collected in the General Practice Extraction Service data for pandemic planning and research indicates whether the frequency of use of antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs in people with learning disabilities has changed in (a) England and (b) local areas during the covid-19 outbreak .

The information is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that covid-19 contact tracing services capture information on contacts that occur after a person has taken a routine covid-19 test in the event that that person has tested positive for covid-19.

Where a person tests positive for COVID-19, NHS Test and Trace will ask them to provide information about their close contacts throughout the period that begins 48 hours before symptom onset or 48 hours before the date of their test if they did not have symptoms and ends seven days after symptom onset or date of test, when they are most likely to be infectious. They are also asked to provide information about all other members of their household.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether clause 11, Exception 5: support groups of The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) (No. 4) Regulations 2020 applies to baby sensory classes.

Under the national restrictions, all non-essential businesses must close. These restrictions are designed to reduce the number of face-to-face contact and limit the rate of infection. This includes baby sensory classes. Under the restrictions, no person may participate in a gathering which consists of two or more people, and takes place indoors, including within a private dwelling, gyms or specialist child service centres.

However, the use of online classes and virtual support classes are a potential means to support families of young children with social contact online and serve as a basis for support for parents to provide sensory experiences at home.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his contribution of 19 October 2020, Official report, column 790, for what reasons directors of public health in Tier (a) 1 and (b) 2 covid-19 restriction areas do not have discretion to allow routine visits to care homes.

For visits to happen, a provider needs to assess and balance the risk of local prevalence and the ability of the care home to manage the visit safely. This dynamic risk assessment must formally take into account the advice of the local Director of Public Health.

On 5 November we published guidance to enable COVID-19-secure visits for care home residents while national restrictions are in place. The guidance will enable care home providers, families and local professionals to work together to find the right balance between the benefits of visiting on wellbeing and quality of life, and the risk of transmission of COVID-19 to social care staff and vulnerable residents.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his contribution of 19 October 2020, Official report, column 790, what discussions he has had with directors of public health in Tier (a) 2 and (a) 3 covid-19 restriction areas on ensuring that visits to care homes are allowed during periods of increased covid-19 restrictions.

New visiting arrangements started on 8 March. Every care home should ensure that each resident can nominate one named person who can have regular, indoor visits. Visiting arrangements that have been available throughout the period of national lockdown should continue i.e. using substantial screens, visiting pods, behind windows or outdoors. Visits in exceptional circumstances including end of life should always be supported and enabled.

At Step 2 of the roadmap, we will assess the data and take a decision on opening up further opportunities for visiting - setting out a plan for the next phase of visits for people in residential care.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his contribution of 19 October 2020, Official report, column 790, what steps he is taking to ensure that visits to care homes are not suspended in Tier (a) 2 and (b) 3 covid-19 restriction areas.

We recognise how important it is to allow care home residents to safely meet their loved ones. On 5 November we published guidance to enable COVID-19 secure visits to take place for care home residents while national restrictions were in place. This guidance was intended to enable providers, supported by local professionals, families and the wider community, to provide appropriate visiting opportunities, that balance these important benefits against the continued priority of preventing infections to protect staff and residents.

On 1 December we published new guidance for care home visiting following the November period of national restrictions, enabling indoor visits to take place provided a visitor had a negative COVID-19 test combined with infection prevention and control precautions.

On 19 December tier 4 was introduced which restricted visiting to the same basis as the November national restrictions, given the increased prevalence of the virus in tier 4 areas.

On 6 January the current national lockdown began. We updated our guidance on 12 January. For this period, visiting is restricted to outdoor visiting and screened visits. Visits in exceptional circumstances including end of life should always be enabled.

Recognising the importance of visiting for the wellbeing of residents and those who visit them, we will work to enable more visits as soon as it is safe to do so.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to enact Section 4 of the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Act 2019 relating to Codes of Practice.

The Government aims for full implementation of the Liberty Protection Safeguards (LPS), as set out in the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Act 2019, for April 2022.

The Department is drafting a Code of Practice and secondary legislation for the implementation of LPS. Both will be subject to public consultation in spring 2021. Subject to the outcome of the consultation, the Government plans to lay the Code and regulations before Parliament in the autumn of that year.

The Department is also working with stakeholders from across the local government, health and social care sectors to develop workforce plans to ensure that implementation is a success.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to enact the changes contained in the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Act 2019.

The Government aims for full implementation of the Liberty Protection Safeguards (LPS), as set out in the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Act 2019, for April 2022.

The Department is drafting a Code of Practice and secondary legislation for the implementation of LPS. Both will be subject to public consultation in spring 2021. Subject to the outcome of the consultation, the Government plans to lay the Code and regulations before Parliament in the autumn of that year.

The Department is also working with stakeholders from across the local government, health and social care sectors to develop workforce plans to ensure that implementation is a success.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish draft guidance on the operation of the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Act 2019.

The Government aims for full implementation of the Liberty Protection Safeguards (LPS), as set out in the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Act 2019, for April 2022.

The Department is drafting a Code of Practice and secondary legislation for the implementation of LPS. Both will be subject to public consultation in spring 2021. Subject to the outcome of the consultation, the Government plans to lay the Code and regulations before Parliament in the autumn of that year.

The Department is also working with stakeholders from across the local government, health and social care sectors to develop workforce plans to ensure that implementation is a success.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to lay regulations under Section 6(3)(b) of the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Act 2019.

The Government aims for full implementation of the Liberty Protection Safeguards (LPS), as set out in the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Act 2019, for April 2022.

The Department is drafting a Code of Practice and secondary legislation for the implementation of LPS. Both will be subject to public consultation in spring 2021. Subject to the outcome of the consultation, the Government plans to lay the Code and regulations before Parliament in the autumn of that year.

The Department is also working with stakeholders from across the local government, health and social care sectors to develop workforce plans to ensure that implementation is a success.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether children and adults with cystic fibrosis will continue to receive priority access to influenza vaccinations in 2020.

General practitioners and other National Health Service providers have been asked to prioritise flu vaccination for all those who are in the clinically vulnerable groups, documented in the national guidance, this includes children and adults with cystic fibrosis.

Vaccination of those who are in at risk groups has started and will continue in all areas in England through the winter months.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to help reduce the time taken for close contacts' details to be obtained by email from people who have tested positive for covid-19 through the test and trace system.

Once entered into the contact tracing system, positive cases are asked to provide details of their close recent contacts via an online form. Between 14 to 20 January, 42.9% of positive cases responded in this way.

If this process is not completed within eight hours, the case is handed over to a clinical case worker who will attempt to make contact by telephone and will call up to ten times over the next 24-hour period. After 24 hours have elapsed, the case will then be passed on to the relevant local authority for follow up, where a local tracing partnership is in place.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of people who tested positive for covid-19 and were asked to provide details of close contacts by telephone were contacts obtained for within 24 hours of the case details being loaded onto the contract tracing system in each week from 3 August to 13 September 2020.

The information is not available in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of people who tested positive for covid-19 cases were asked to provide details of close contacts via (a) telephone and (b) email in each week from 3 August to 13 September 2020.

Currently the information is not available in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of people who tested positive for covid-19 and were asked to provide details of close contacts by email were contacts obtained for within 24 hours of the case details being loaded onto the contract tracing system in each week from 3 August to 13 September 2020.

The information requested is not available in the format requested. We publish the number of non-complex contacts who were reached and advised to self-isolate within 24 hours of the case being transferred to the contact tracing system on GOV.UK.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 tests were carried out via (a) home-testing kits and (b) walk-in or drive-through testing centres in each week from 3 August to 13 September 2020.

The weekly data for COVID-19 testing in the United Kingdom with the numbers of home testing kits sent out and tests undertaken at regional, local, mobile and satellite test centres is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/nhs-test-and-trace-statistics-england-weekly-reports

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of covid-19 testing kits completed at walk-in or drive-through testing centres in each week from 3 August to 13 September 2020 were returned in a compromised or otherwise unusable state.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of covid-19 home testing kits distributed to the public in each week from 3 August to 13 September 2020 were (a) not returned and (b) returned in a compromised or otherwise unusable state.

We do not hold data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will estimate the number of employed people who were formerly on the Government's Shielded Patient List who are aged (a) 50 to 59, (b) 60 to 69 and (c) more than 70 years.

The information requested is not available, as data on a person's employment status is not collected centrally for the shielded patients list.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to his oral statement of 20 July 2020, Official Report, column 1850, on Coronavirus Response, what assessment he has made of the effect on local covid-19 transmission rates of not sharing enhanced levels of data with local authorities prior to 20 July 2020.

Public Health England has shared daily and weekly local, regional and national surveillance and epidemiology reports with local authorities since May 2020. The information contained in these reports is used to inform local risk assessments and situational awareness.

The provision of a daily list of cases and their contacts to local authorities from 20 July was an extension to these ongoing activities.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to his oral statement of 20 July 2020, Official Report, column 1850, on Coronavirus Response, for what reason enhanced levels of data were not shared with local authorities prior to 20 July 2020.

Public Health England (PHE) regional and health protection teams work very closely with local authorities to provide the necessary local intelligence and data that is needed for local risk assessments and action.

Prior to 20 July, PHE worked with local authorities to meet their expressed data and intelligence needs. Based on these discussions with local authorities, the Association of Directors of Public Health, Solace and Local Government Association colleagues, PHE agreed to provide a daily list of identifiable data on cases and their contacts. The Government drew up a Data Sharing Agreement with local authorities and on that basis have been providing all local authorities with access to postcode level testing data.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to answer Question 60709, tabled on 17 June 2020 by the hon. Member for Worsley and Eccles South.

I replied to the hon. Member’s question on 14 July.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department regularly monitors the number of CARE badges that are distributed.

Since the Secretary of State’s announcement, around 15,000 badges have been distributed at no cost to social care providers or members of the workforce.

To increase supply, additional badges of recognition have been procured by the Government and we expect to be able to start distribution of these badges shortly. Details of how they will be distributed to people working in social care will be available in due course.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to reports of variable mortality rates from covid-19 between NHS Trusts and regions, what the age-standardised mortality rate from covid-19 is in (a) Salford Royal Foundation Trust, (b) Greater Manchester, (c) the North West and (d) England.

The Office of National Statistics (ONS) has published age-standardised mortality rates by country, region, local authority and Middle Layer Super Output Areas. The report published on 12 June 2020 can be accessed at the following link:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsinvolvingcovid19bylocalareasanddeprivation/deathsoccurringbetween1marchand31may2020/

Between 1 March and 31 May 2020, the age-standardised mortality rate (ASMR) published by the ONS was 81.9 per 100,000 persons in England, 98.9 per 100,000 persons in the North West, and 135.5 in Manchester Local Authority. ASMR by National Health Service trusts are not published by the ONS.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance he has issued to NHS trusts on when to resume charging NHS staff for car parking as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my Rt. hon. Friend the Prime Minister on 8 July, Official Report, column 966.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his timescale is for the end of free car parking at hospitals for NHS staff during the covid-19 outbreak.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my Rt. hon. Friend the Prime Minister on 8 July, Official Report, column 966.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to increase the supply of CARE badges to social care staff.

Since the Secretary of State’s announcement around 15,000 badges have been distributed at no cost to social care providers or members of the workforce.


To increase supply, additional badges of recognition have been procured by government and we expect to be able to start distribution of these badges shortly. Details of how they will be distributed to people working in social care will be available in due course.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to data published by the Care Quality Commission on 2 June 2020 on deaths of people with a learning disability, what steps he is taking to reduce the number of people with a learning disability that (a) contract and (b) die from covid-19.

On 15 April, we set out our comprehensive action plan to support the adult social care sector in England throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, including ramping up testing, overhauling the way personal protective equipment is being delivered to care homes and helping to minimise the spread of the virus to keep people safe.

Since the start of this outbreak we have been working closely with the sector and public health experts to put in place guidance and support for adult social care and we will continue to ensure they have everything they need to respond.

The Government has published a range of general COVID-19 guidance documents. We have worked with the Social Care Institute for Excellence on more detailed guidance on supporting people with learning disability and autistic people during the COVID-19 pandemic which is available at the following link:

https://www.scie.org.uk/care-providers/coronavirus-covid-19/learning-disabilities-autism

We are commissioning Public Health England to undertake a thorough analysis of the numbers of deaths of people with a learning disability. This will draw on data published by NHS England and the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to give as complete a picture of the impact of COVID-19 on this group of people as possible.

The following table shows the breakdown of deaths of people with a learning disability in adult social care.

Primary inspection category

Confirmed

Suspected

Total

Community based adult social care services

78

20

98

Residential social care

72

33

105

Data collection is between 10 April and 15 May 2020. Details correct at 15 May 2020.

It should be noted that the number of deaths included above may be higher than officially reported figures released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). This is because ONS deaths data is based on clinically verified death certificates whereas the CQC’s data is derived from notifications made by providers. In some cases, deaths may be reported to the CQC as COVID-19 related when the true cause of death is not due to COVID-19.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to data published by the Care Quality Commission on 2 June 2020 on deaths of people with a learning disability, what changes he plans to make to the covid-19 testing regime to ensure that people with a learning disability are able to access covid-19 testing.

From 7 June 2020 all remaining adult care homes will be able to access whole care home testing for all residents and asymptomatic staff through the digital portal at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/apply-coronavirus-test-care-home

These will include specialist adult care homes catering for adults with learning disabilities or mental health issues, physical disabilities, acquired brain injuries and other categories for younger adults under 65 years.

We are continuing to explore how we can support other parts of the care sector such as supported living settings, extra care settings and domiciliary care. Anyone with suspected COVID-19 symptoms in these settings can access testing at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/apply-coronavirus-test-essential-workers

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to data published by the Care Quality Commission on 2 June 2020 on deaths of people with a learning disability, how many people that died from (a) confirmed and (b) suspected covid-19 lived in (i) community and (ii) residential care settings.

On 15 April, we set out our comprehensive action plan to support the adult social care sector in England throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, including ramping up testing, overhauling the way personal protective equipment is being delivered to care homes and helping to minimise the spread of the virus to keep people safe.

Since the start of this outbreak we have been working closely with the sector and public health experts to put in place guidance and support for adult social care and we will continue to ensure they have everything they need to respond.

The Government has published a range of general COVID-19 guidance documents. We have worked with the Social Care Institute for Excellence on more detailed guidance on supporting people with learning disability and autistic people during the COVID-19 pandemic which is available at the following link:

https://www.scie.org.uk/care-providers/coronavirus-covid-19/learning-disabilities-autism

We are commissioning Public Health England to undertake a thorough analysis of the numbers of deaths of people with a learning disability. This will draw on data published by NHS England and the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to give as complete a picture of the impact of COVID-19 on this group of people as possible.

The following table shows the breakdown of deaths of people with a learning disability in adult social care.

Primary inspection category

Confirmed

Suspected

Total

Community based adult social care services

78

20

98

Residential social care

72

33

105

Data collection is between 10 April and 15 May 2020. Details correct at 15 May 2020.

It should be noted that the number of deaths included above may be higher than officially reported figures released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). This is because ONS deaths data is based on clinically verified death certificates whereas the CQC’s data is derived from notifications made by providers. In some cases, deaths may be reported to the CQC as COVID-19 related when the true cause of death is not due to COVID-19.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to data published by the Care Quality Commission on 2 June 2020 on deaths of people with a learning disability, what assessment he has made of the reasons for excess deaths of people with a learning disability during the covid-19 outbreak.

On 15 April, we set out our comprehensive action plan to support the adult social care sector in England throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, including ramping up testing, overhauling the way personal protective equipment is being delivered to care homes and helping to minimise the spread of the virus to keep people safe.

Since the start of this outbreak we have been working closely with the sector and public health experts to put in place guidance and support for adult social care and we will continue to ensure they have everything they need to respond.

The Government has published a range of general COVID-19 guidance documents. We have worked with the Social Care Institute for Excellence on more detailed guidance on supporting people with learning disability and autistic people during the COVID-19 pandemic which is available at the following link:

https://www.scie.org.uk/care-providers/coronavirus-covid-19/learning-disabilities-autism

We are commissioning Public Health England to undertake a thorough analysis of the numbers of deaths of people with a learning disability. This will draw on data published by NHS England and the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to give as complete a picture of the impact of COVID-19 on this group of people as possible.

The following table shows the breakdown of deaths of people with a learning disability in adult social care.

Primary inspection category

Confirmed

Suspected

Total

Community based adult social care services

78

20

98

Residential social care

72

33

105

Data collection is between 10 April and 15 May 2020. Details correct at 15 May 2020.

It should be noted that the number of deaths included above may be higher than officially reported figures released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). This is because ONS deaths data is based on clinically verified death certificates whereas the CQC’s data is derived from notifications made by providers. In some cases, deaths may be reported to the CQC as COVID-19 related when the true cause of death is not due to COVID-19.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Our plan to rebuild: The UK Government’s COVID-19 recovery strategy, what recent estimate his Department has made of the reproduction rate of covid-19 in (a) Greater Manchester and (b) the North West of England.

We do not currently publish the reproduction (R) rate in each region. The Government Office for Science published the latest R number range for the United Kingdom on 29 May. The current R number range can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-r-number-in-the-uk

The Government is committed to publishing the scientific evidence that has informed the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergency’s (SAGE) advice. These papers are being published in batches. The latest batches were released on 20 May and 22 May and the next batch will published in the coming weeks. The full list of papers released to date is available at the following the link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

This list will be updated to reflect papers considered at recent and future meetings.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Government's covid-19 recovery strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of advising people to wear face coverings on the supply of personal protective equipment for key workers.

We are working around the clock to give the social care sector and wider National Health Service the equipment and support they need to tackle this outbreak.

We published a personal protective equipment (PPE) Plan on 10 April, setting out clear guidance on who needs PPE and in what circumstances they need to use it; and how sufficient supplies will be secured and distributed to the front line. The ‘Coronavirus (COVID-19): personal protective equipment (PPE) plan’ can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-personal-protective-equipment-ppe-plan

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy that NHS England publishes its data on deaths from covid-19 notified to it under the LeDeR programme on a weekly basis, and if he will make a statement.

Information on COVID-19 deaths of people with a learning disability notified to the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review programme is available on the NHS England website at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/covid-19-deaths-of-patients-with-a-learning-disability-notified-to-leder/

NHS England publishes COVID-19 daily deaths of people who have died in hospitals in England and had tested positive for COVID-19 or where COVID-19 was mentioned on the death certificate at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-daily-deaths/

These daily reports include a breakdown by such criteria as reporting trust, region, age, ethnicity, gender and specific pre-existing conditions, including learning disability and/or autism.

Public Health England is leading a rapid review to better understand how different factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, sex (male and female) and obesity can impact on how people are affected by COVID-19. The report is being finalised and will be published shortly.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 5 May 2020 to Question 37551 on Coronavirus: Learning Disability, what data (a) his Department, (b) NHS England and (c) the Office for National Statistics is collecting on the (i) demographic and (ii) protected characteristics of people that have (A) been diagnosed with and (B) died from covid-19.

Information on COVID-19 deaths of people with a learning disability notified to the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review programme is available on the NHS England website at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/covid-19-deaths-of-patients-with-a-learning-disability-notified-to-leder/

NHS England publishes COVID-19 daily deaths of people who have died in hospitals in England and had tested positive for COVID-19 or where COVID-19 was mentioned on the death certificate at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-daily-deaths/

These daily reports include a breakdown by such criteria as reporting trust, region, age, ethnicity, gender and specific pre-existing conditions, including learning disability and/or autism.

Public Health England is leading a rapid review to better understand how different factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, sex (male and female) and obesity can impact on how people are affected by COVID-19. The report is being finalised and will be published shortly.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 5 May 2020 to Question 37551 on Coronavirus: Learning Disability, for what reason his Department does not collect data on the number of disabled people that have died from covid-19.

Information on COVID-19 deaths of people with a learning disability notified to the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review programme is available on the NHS England website at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/covid-19-deaths-of-patients-with-a-learning-disability-notified-to-leder/

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many deaths have been notified due to covid-19 where the place of death is a mental health unit or ward.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) publishes an annual report ‘Monitoring the Mental Health Act’ which includes annual data for notifications to the CQC of deaths of people detained under the Mental Health Act.

The CQC has reported that, from 1 March to 1 May 2020, it had been notified of 54 deaths that mental health providers had indicated were suspected or confirmed to be COVID-19-related. This includes people who were detained in hospital and people subject to the Mental Health Act who were in the community.


Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to Questions 37548 and 37552, tabled by the hon. Member for Worsley and Eccles South on 20 April 2020.

The hon. Members’ questions were answered on 15 May and 7 May respectively.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many deaths of people with learning disabilities from covid-19 have been notified to NHS England by the Learning Disability Mortality Review in each week since 1 March 2020.

Information on COVID-19 deaths of people with a learning disability notified to the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review programme is available on the NHS England website at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/covid-19-deaths-of-patients-with-a-learning-disability-notified-to-leder/

NHS England publishes COVID-19 daily deaths of people who have died in hospitals in England and had tested positive for COVID-19 or where COVID-19 was mentioned on the death certificate at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-daily-deaths/

These daily reports include a breakdown by such criteria as reporting trust, region, age, ethnicity, gender and specific pre-existing conditions, including learning disability and/or autism.

Public Health England is leading a rapid review to better understand how different factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, sex (male and female) and obesity can impact on how people are affected by COVID-19. The report is being finalised and will be published shortly.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the (a) Health and Care Professions Council and (b) Nursing and Midwifery Council on reducing the fees paid by medical professionals for registration and replacing those fees with Government funding.

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) is the independent regulator of nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom, and nursing associates in England. The NMC’s regulatory activities are primarily funded by annual registration fees, currently set at £120 per year.

The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) is the independent regulator of 15 professions in the UK, including paramedics, practitioner psychologists and occupational therapists. The HCPC’s regulatory activities are primarily funded by annual registration fees, currently set at £90 per year.

There are no registration fees for any healthcare professionals joining the NMC or HCPC temporary register.

While we currently have no plans to subsidise the annual registration fees of existing NMC and HCPC registrants, we are considering how to recognise the incredible work that healthcare staff are doing to support the collective effort to tackle the COVID-19 outbreak. As part of this, we will be engaging with staff and employers.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Answer of 27 April 2020 to Question 39524, for what reasons his Department is unable to provide a full response at this time.

A regularly updated list of which local authorities have informed the Department that they have taken the decision to operate under the Care Act Easements introduced by the Coronavirus Act 2020 is publicly available at the following link:

www.cqc.org.uk/CareActEasements

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Answer of 27 April 2020 to Question 34934 on Coronavirus: Disease and Control, and the SAGE paper entitled Potential impact of behavioural and social interventions on an epidemic of Covid-19 in the UK, for what reason at its 10 March 2020 meeting SAGE agreed a change in the age at which people would be asked to socially distance from 65 to 70.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) is an advisory group. At its 10 March 2020 meeting, SAGE provided advice on enhanced distancing measures for vulnerable groups, based on consideration of the likely effectiveness of different options. This advice draws upon a range of inputs including modelling, clinical expertise and behavioural science, amongst others.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether casual workers in the independent healthcare sector are eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme in the event that their employers have entered into a retention agreement with the NHS.

It is a decision for any employer, including those in the independent healthcare provider under contract to provide services to the National Health Service, to choose to apply to access funds from the Government’s COVID-19 Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) to furlough some or all of their workers. Staff must agree to being furloughed.

CJRS allows employers to claim for ‘employees’ on any type of employment contract, including full-time, part-time, agency or flexible. The scheme covers casual and zero-hour workers where they are paid via the PAYE system.

All applications to furlough staff must be made to HM Revenue and Customs. HM Revenue and Customs is ultimately responsible for deciding which applications can receive financial support to furlough staff or not.

Organisations who are receiving public funding specifically to provide services necessary to respond to COVID-19 are not expected to furlough staff, casual or otherwise. This would include independent health care providers under contract to provide services to the NHS in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. As such, it is not expected these providers would furlough substantive staff or “casual” workers i.e. zero-hours contract workers on staff Banks paid via PAYE where those staff are needed to deliver services within scope of the contract and the contract includes funding for staff costs.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government is supporting clinical trials of convalescent plasma therapy in treating covid-19; and what evidence he has received on the effectiveness of those treatments.

On 25 April, the Department announced that the clinical trial REMAP-CAP has been given approval to determine if plasma donated by patients who have recovered from COVID-19 can help those with the virus. NHS Blood and Transplant has started to collect convalescent plasma to supply to REMAP-CAP, with the first transfusion expected this week.

In parallel with the trial, NHS Blood and Transplant is scaling up a national programme for collecting plasma so the treatment can be widely rolled out if it is shown to be effective. The collection of plasma will be ramped up by mid-May to deliver up to 10,000 units of plasma to the National Health Service every week, enough to treat 5,000 COVID-19 patients per week.

Convalescent plasma has been used as an effective treatment for emerging infections in the past, and this step forward underpins the Department’s science-backed approach to fighting this virus.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which local authorities have informed his Department that they have taken the decision to operate the Care Act easements provided for under the Coronavirus Act 2020.

As of 28 April, six local authorities have notified the Department that they have taken the decision to operate under the Care Act easements. These are Sunderland City Council, Warwickshire County Council, Staffordshire County Council, Birmingham City Council, Solihull Council and Derbyshire County Council. Middlesbrough also notified the Department of a decision to operate under the Care Act easements but has since notified the Department that they have resumed duties under the Care Act 2014.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of people who have (a) been diagnosed with and (b) died from covid-19 (i) had learning disabilities and/or autism, (ii) were in detention under the Mental Health Act 1983 and (iii) were otherwise classed as disabled under the Equality Act 2010.

Data on the number and proportion of people who have been diagnosed with and died from COVID-19 are not available in the format requested.

The latest data on the number of COVID-19 cases and deaths in hospitals can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-information-for-the-public

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what evidence the Government has used to reach its decision to recommend the use of aprons rather than gowns on lower risk inpatient wards with patients who have tested positive for covid-19; and for what reasons guidance for the NHS is different from that of the World Health Organisation.

The United Kingdom Government and devolved administrations published clear guidance on COVID-19 personal protective equipment for health and social care workers. This has been written and reviewed by all four UK public health bodies and informed by National Health Service infection prevention control experts. The guidance can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/wuhan-novel-coronavirus-infection-prevention-and-control/covid-19-personal-protective-equipment-ppe

The guidance is consistent with World Health Organization (WHO) guidance for protecting health and social care workers from COVID-19. The use of aprons rather than gowns for non-aerosol generating procedures, including advice on thoroughly washing forearms if there is a risk of exposure to droplets is consistent with the UK policy of bare below the elbows and evidence reviews on the risks of healthcare acquired infections. This is a longstanding policy difference between the WHO and the United Kingdom.

More information can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-personal-protective-equipment-ppe-guidance-for-nhs-teams

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to provide a performance-related pay increase to (a) nurses and (b) others working in the health and social care sectors for their work during the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will make a statement.

We are incredibly proud of all our health and care staff who work in both National Health Service and social care settings. We are working hard to ensure that staff feel supported and safe to continue the fight against COVID-19.

We recognise their extraordinary commitment, working day and night putting our care and safety at the centre of everything they do.

Annual pay awards for NHS staff are determined by an independent transparent pay review body process.

Pay for Agenda for Change staff is already set for 2020/21 as part of the multi-year (2018/19 – 20/21) pay and contract reform deal and for junior doctors following a multi-year pay and contract reform deal agreed in June 2019 (2019/20 – 22/23).

The pay review bodies will make pay recommendations for 2020/21 for consultants and speciality doctors.

We want to ensure that the NHS employment offer continues to attract, retain and reward staff and this offer continues to be kept under review.

Social care providers determine the level of pay for their employees on an individual basis.

It is vital that we continue to attract, retain and reward NHS and care staff and we are determined to do everything we can to show that they are truly valued.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance he has received on the risks posed by covid-19 to people aged 65 to 70; and for what reason the Government's policy on the shielding of people from covid-19 applies to people aged over 70.

The United Kingdom Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been guided by the advice of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) with the sole purpose of minimising loss of life. The Government has published the scientific advice given by SAGE which can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/scientific-advisory-group-for-emergencies-sage-coronavirus-covid-19-response

It is important for everyone to follow the Government’s stay at home guidance to minimise the spread of COVID-19. In addition to social distancing measures for everyone it is important for those in the extremely vulnerable category to follow the guidance on shielding. People in this category will be contacted by the National Health Service by no later than 29 March to ensure they are aware. Shielding guidance has also been published online and can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to (a) measure and (b) improve the quality of life for people diagnosed with one of the less survivable cancers, such as (i) brain, (ii) liver, (iii) oesophageal, (iv) stomach, (v) lung and (vi) pancreatic cancer.

A pilot project to introduce a national Quality of Life metric has been underway since 2017. This pilot project has tested approaches to collecting quality of life information through a survey. NHS England and NHS Improvement are carrying out more survey testing of other cancer types and in more hospital, trusts using a refined method based on feedback from the pilot. Information from these tests will be used to decide on a final roll out model.

The national Cancer Quality of Life metric will formally launch later this year.

By 2021, every person diagnosed with cancer will have access, where appropriate, to personalised care, including a needs assessment, a care plan and health and wellbeing information and support. The needs assessment guides a conversation about the person’s holistic needs (physical, psychosocial, financial and social) in order to identify any concerns, including psychological and emotional.

Over the next three years every patient with cancer will receive a Personalised Care and Support Plan based on holistic needs assessment, end of treatment summaries and health and wellbeing information and support.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to manage the potential effect of the spread of covid-19 on the social care workforce; and if he will make a statement.

On 13 March 2020 [updated on 6 April 2020], the government published guidance for social or community care and residential settings which was cascaded across the United Kingdom by Public Health England and devolved authorities which can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-residential-care-supported-living-and-home-care-guidance

The guidance is tailored for providers of residential care, supported living and home care, in the event of a COVID-19 outbreak. The guidance sets out:

- How to maintain delivery of care in the event of an outbreak or widespread transmission of COVID-19; and

- What to do if care workers or individuals being cared for have symptoms of COVID-19.

On 15 April 2020 the government published ‘Coronavirus (COVID-19): adult social care action plan’ which can be read here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-adult-social-care-action-plan

The government also announced £2.9 billion funding to strengthen care for the vulnerable. This funding is part of the government’s commitment to ensure the National Health Service, social care system and other public services, have all the resources they need during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to support social care providers in managing the effect of covid-19 on people who need social care; and if he will make a statement.

On 13 March 2020 [updated on 6 April 2020], the government published guidance for social or community care and residential settings which was cascaded across the United Kingdom by Public Health England and devolved authorities which can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-residential-care-supported-living-and-home-care-guidance

The guidance is tailored for providers of residential care, supported living and home care, in the event of a COVID-19 outbreak. The guidance sets out:

- How to maintain delivery of care in the event of an outbreak or widespread transmission of COVID-19; and

- What to do if care workers or individuals being cared for have symptoms of COVID-19.

On 15 April 2020 the government published ‘Coronavirus (COVID-19): adult social care action plan’ which can be read here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-adult-social-care-action-plan

The government also announced £2.9 billion funding to strengthen care for the vulnerable. This funding is part of the government’s commitment to ensure the National Health Service, social care system and other public services, have all the resources they need during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to publish the fifth progress report of the preventing suicide in England: cross-Government outcomes strategy to save lives.

We will publish the fifth progress report and updated cross-Government suicide prevention workplan in 2020.


Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the answer of 30 January 2020 to Question 7600 on Mental Health Services and the Network Contract Direct Enhanced Service Specifications published in December 2019, what mechanisms his Department plans to use to ensure that (a) Primary Care Networks, (b) mental health services and (c) other community services work in partnership.

The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement are committed to dissolving the boundaries between primary medical care, mental health services and community health services so that they work together better for the benefits of patients. To deliver the requirements of the Network Contract Direct Enhanced Service, Primary Care Networks will be required to work with their community services providers, community mental health providers and community pharmacies, and to record in their network agreement how they will deliver services in an integrated way.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the implementation by clinical commissioning groups of the requirements under section 140 of the Mental Health Act 1983.

The final report providing advice to clinical commissioning groups and local authorities on the use of Section 140 of the Mental Health Act 1983 will be published in the next few months.

The report has been prepared by the independent review of the Mental Health Act and published in December 2018, which recommended that guidance should be issued to support National Health Service commissioners to discharge their statutory duties under Section 40 more effectively and consistently.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to reports in the Health Service journal, published 6 February 2020, when his Department plans to publish its report on the use of Section 140 of the Mental Health Act 1983 by the NHS.

The final report providing advice to clinical commissioning groups and local authorities on the use of Section 140 of the Mental Health Act 1983 will be published in the next few months.

The report has been prepared by the independent review of the Mental Health Act and published in December 2018, which recommended that guidance should be issued to support National Health Service commissioners to discharge their statutory duties under Section 40 more effectively and consistently.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people died by suicide within two months of attending A&E for a mental health problem in (a) 2018 and (b) 2019.

The following table shows the number of people who died by intentional self-poisoning or intentional self-harm within 60 days of attending accident and emergency (A&E) and, through the Accident and Emergency Clinical Coding Structure1, received diagnosis of a ‘psychiatric condition’.

Financial year

Number of people who died by suicide within 60 days of attending A&E and being diagnosed with a psychiatric condition

2017/18

139

2018/19

79

Source: NHS Digital

Note:

1Accident and Emergency Clinical Coding Structure: https://www.datadictionary.nhs.uk/version2/web_site_content/pages/codes/administrative_codes/a_amp_e_diagnosis_tables.asp?shownav=1

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of people who died by suicide within two months of presenting at A&E with a mental health condition.

The following table shows the number of people who died by intentional self-poisoning or intentional self-harm within 60 days of attending accident and emergency (A&E) and, through the Accident and Emergency Clinical Coding Structure1, received diagnosis of a ‘psychiatric condition’.

Financial year

Number of people who died by suicide within 60 days of attending A&E and being diagnosed with a psychiatric condition

2017/18

139

2018/19

79

Source: NHS Digital

Note:

1Accident and Emergency Clinical Coding Structure: https://www.datadictionary.nhs.uk/version2/web_site_content/pages/codes/administrative_codes/a_amp_e_diagnosis_tables.asp?shownav=1

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with local authorities’ social care providers on protecting older and vulnerable people from the coronavirus.

We have put in place proportionate, precautionary measures in response to the outbreak of coronavirus in China, guided by the clinical advice of the Chief Medical Officer and national experts in the treatment of infectious diseases.

On 3 February 2020 we issued advice to healthcare professionals in primary care and community settings including pharmacy. This advice was sent to all social care providers that are registered with the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency Central Alerting System. This advice highlighted what to do if a someone has concerns that they may have been exposed to or become infected with the novel coronavirus. It also directed healthcare professionals to further online guidance produced by Public Health England.

In addition, through a National Steering Group, the department is working closely with national partners including the Care Provider Alliance, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, the Local Government Association and the Care Quality Commission to help co-ordinate advice and support to the adult social care sector.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the National Quality Improvement Taskforce for children and young people’s mental health inpatient services' has to include the transition to adult services in its remit; and what steps the Taskforce will take to ensure service improvements are carried over to adult services.

The taskforce has been set up to ensure inpatient services deliver timely, safe and high quality care for children and young people, including a focus on well-planned discharge to home or other appropriate services.


Transition from inpatient child and young people’s services to adult services will be considered as part of this work with the aim of ensuring decisions are based on the individual needs and circumstances of the young person. This should ensure appropriate preparation for transition of the children and young people and cross-organisational preparation for appropriate receipt into adult services.



Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his oral contribution, of 28 January 2020, Official Report, Column 665, if he will publish the number of people held under the Transforming Care programme in units rated as (a) Requires Improvement and (b) Inadequate by clinical commissioning group in (i) March 2015, (ii) March 2017 and (iii) December 2019.

The attached tables outline the number of people with a learning disability or autism who were inpatients in March 2015, March 2017 and December 2019 according to the Assuring Transformation dataset.

The data regarding the number of people held under the Transforming Care programme in units rated as requires improvement or inadequate by clinical commissioning group is not currently available in the format requested.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 23 January 2020 to Question 5379 on Learning Disabilities Mortality Review Programme, whether he plans to publish the last annual report from the Learning Disability Mortality Review.

The third annual report is the latest report from Learning Disabilities Mortality Review (LeDeR) programme and was published on 21 May 2019. A further annual report will be published by the University of Bristol later this year. NHS England and NHS Improvement will also publish an action from learning report, setting out the work underway nationally in response to common themes raised through LeDeR reviews across the country.

We are taking action to address the recommendations set out in the third annual LeDeR report and will publish our formal response shortly.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his oral contribution, of 28 January 2020, Official Report, column 665, if he will publish the number of people held under the Transforming Care programme by clinical commissioning group in (a) March 2015, (b) March 2017 and (c) December 2019.

The attached tables outline the number of people with a learning disability or autism who were inpatients in March 2015, March 2017 and December 2019 according to the Assuring Transformation dataset.

The data regarding the number of people held under the Transforming Care programme in units rated as requires improvement or inadequate by clinical commissioning group is not currently available in the format requested.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment her Department has made of the potential of effect the draft service specifications for Primary Care Networks, published on 23 December 2019, on people with mental health problems.

The Network Contract Direct Enhanced Service Specifications published in December 2019 have placed a clear emphasis on other providers of community services, including mental health services, being able to work alongside Primary Care Networks (PCNs) to ensure delivery of the multidisciplinary elements of the proposed new service model.

The 2019/20 General Practitioner contract that came into force in April 2019 is the most ambitious in a generation, creating a five-year framework for general practitioners. It supports the NHS Long Term Plan by increasing primary care funding and establishing new PCNs across the country. The PCN service specifications form part of annual GP contract negotiations between NHS England and the General Practitioners Committee of the British Medical Association. Feedback received during engagement on the draft service specifications published in December 2019 has informed ongoing negotiations on the 2020/21 GP contract. NHS England will take a deal to Government for sign-off shortly. The detail within the service specifications are still subject to negotiation and therefore not yet finalised. A statement on the engagement and negotiations can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/2020/01/primary-care-network-service-specifications-and-the-network-des-close-of-engagement/

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that mental health is prioritised within the Primary Care Network Contract Direct Enhanced Service Specifications 2020-21.

The Network Contract Direct Enhanced Service Specifications published in December 2019 have placed a clear emphasis on other providers of community services, including mental health services, being able to work alongside Primary Care Networks (PCNs) to ensure delivery of the multidisciplinary elements of the proposed new service model.

The 2019/20 General Practitioner contract that came into force in April 2019 is the most ambitious in a generation, creating a five-year framework for general practitioners. It supports the NHS Long Term Plan by increasing primary care funding and establishing new PCNs across the country. The PCN service specifications form part of annual GP contract negotiations between NHS England and the General Practitioners Committee of the British Medical Association. Feedback received during engagement on the draft service specifications published in December 2019 has informed ongoing negotiations on the 2020/21 GP contract. NHS England will take a deal to Government for sign-off shortly. The detail within the service specifications are still subject to negotiation and therefore not yet finalised. A statement on the engagement and negotiations can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/2020/01/primary-care-network-service-specifications-and-the-network-des-close-of-engagement/

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much NHS England has spent on commissioning mental health services to treat patients in (a) youth offender institutes, (b) secure children’s homes and (c) prisons in each year for which information is available.

The information is not available in the requested format.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to Answer of 16 January 2020 to Question 2462 on Psychiatric Hospitals: Standards, how many mental health hospitals rated as (a) good and (b) outstanding by the CQC are (i) independent mental health hospitals and (ii) NHS hospitals.

The following table shows the number of independent mental health hospitals and National Health Service mental health hospitals that are rated as good and outstanding by the Care Quality Commission (CQC), as at 22 January 2020.

-

Locations and providers currently rated Good and Outstanding, by Primary Inspection Category

Total number of locations and providers currently rated Good and Outstanding

Location/Provider Primary Inspection Category

Outstanding

Good

-

Mental health - community and hospital - independent

23

159

182

Mental health - community and residential - NHS

6

41

47

Total

29

200

229

Source: CQC database as at 22 January 2020

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people who were detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 died in each year since 2010.

Information on the number of people detained under the Mental Health Act and who died subsequent to detention is not held centrally. Information on the number of deaths in detention is attached.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether EU nationals living in the UK will be eligible to receive social care services after the UK leaves the EU.

European Union nationals living in the United Kingdom at the point of the UK leaving the EU, will be able to access social care services, as they do now. Where they do not already have citizenship they will be able to access adult social care services either by applying to the EU Settlement Scheme or where they have not already done so applying for citizenship.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how cases currently being reviewed under the Learning Disability Mortality Review Programme will be handled after the University of Bristol’s contract to administer that programme ends in May 2020.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are committed to the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review Programme, as set out in the NHS Long Term Plan, and will continue to use the existing methodology and an internet based platform going forward.

Additional resources and support have been given to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), which includes entering into a contract with a Commissioning Support Unit, to complete historic reviews on behalf of CCGs.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to tackle the backlog of cases for review under the LeDeR programme.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are committed to the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review Programme, as set out in the NHS Long Term Plan, and will continue to use the existing methodology and an internet based platform going forward.

Additional resources and support have been given to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), which includes entering into a contract with a Commissioning Support Unit, to complete historic reviews on behalf of CCGs.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his policy is on the future of the Learning Disability Mortality Review programme LeDeR.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are committed to the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review Programme, as set out in the NHS Long Term Plan, and will continue to use the existing methodology and an internet based platform going forward.

Additional resources and support have been given to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), which includes entering into a contract with a Commissioning Support Unit, to complete historic reviews on behalf of CCGs.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the level of revenue local authorities will raise through the social care precept in 2020-21.

The provisional Local Government Finance Settlement, published on 20 December 2019, proposed that local authorities will be able to increase council tax by an additional 2% exclusively for adult social care without holding a local referendum. This will allow councils to raise a further £500 million for adult social care in 2020-21.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people with learning disabilities covered by the transforming care programme are receiving care in inpatient units or hospitals rated (a) inadequate and (b) requires improvement by the Care Quality Commission.

Cross-referencing Assuring Transformation data and Care Quality Commission (CQC) data on service ratings indicates that of the 2,190 inpatients as at the end of November 2019, 225 (10%) were in services rated as requiring improvement and 125 (6%) were in services rated as inadequate by the CQC.

Inpatient counts have been rounded to the nearest five to minimise disclosure risks associated with small numbers.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many care homes have permanently closed in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not centrally held.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many care home operators have permanently ceased trading in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not centrally held.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many mental health hospitals are rated by the Care Quality Commission as (a) inadequate and (b) requires improvement for safety.

The data in the following tables provide figures for independent and National Health Service mental health hospitals that have been rated by the Care Quality Commission as requires improvement or inadequate and mental health hospitals that have been rated as requires improvement or inadequate for safety. These figures are up to date as of 15 January 2020.

-

Locations and providers rated overall Requires Improvement or Inadequate, by Primary Inspection Category

Total number of locations and providers rated overall Requires Improvement or Inadequate

Location/Provider Primary Inspection Category

Requires improvement

Inadequate

Mental health - community and hospital – independent

40

18

58

Mental health - community and residential - NHS

16

0

16

Total

56

18

74

-

Locations and providers rated Requires Improvement or Inadequate in the safe domain, by Primary Inspection Category

Total number of locations and providers rated Requires Improvement or Inadequate in Safe domain

Location/Provider Primary Inspection Category

Requires improvement

Inadequate

Mental health - community and hospital - independent

81

20

101

Mental health - community and residential - NHS

35

0

35

Total

116

20

136

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children aged 17 years old and under received inpatient care in NHS hospitals for mental health reasons in each of the last five years.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many of the mental health hospitals currently rated as (a) inadequate and (b) requires improvement are (i) independent mental health hospitals and (ii) NHS hospitals.

The data in the following tables provide figures for independent and National Health Service mental health hospitals that have been rated by the Care Quality Commission as requires improvement or inadequate and mental health hospitals that have been rated as requires improvement or inadequate for safety. These figures are up to date as of 15 January 2020.

-

Locations and providers rated overall Requires Improvement or Inadequate, by Primary Inspection Category

Total number of locations and providers rated overall Requires Improvement or Inadequate

Location/Provider Primary Inspection Category

Requires improvement

Inadequate

Mental health - community and hospital – independent

40

18

58

Mental health - community and residential - NHS

16

0

16

Total

56

18

74

-

Locations and providers rated Requires Improvement or Inadequate in the safe domain, by Primary Inspection Category

Total number of locations and providers rated Requires Improvement or Inadequate in Safe domain

Location/Provider Primary Inspection Category

Requires improvement

Inadequate

Mental health - community and hospital - independent

81

20

101

Mental health - community and residential - NHS

35

0

35

Total

116

20

136

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the increasing backlog of LeDer cases to be reviewed, what assessment the Government has made of the effectiveness of the LeDer process.

Our assessment is that over the past 12 months, the Learning Disability Mortality Review (LeDeR) programme has made good progress in completing reviews, providing the largest body of evidence of deaths of people with a learning disability at an individual level anywhere in the world and using that evidence to turn learning into action to drive improvements in healthcare.

By December 2019, the latest date for which information is available, 3,195 reviews had been completed. There are also a further 1,923 reviews currently in progress. The total number of deaths notified to the Programme at December 2019 was 7,145 of which 3,060 had been notified in the last 12 months.

Unallocated reviews do not necessarily equate to a backlog as not all will have exceeded the standard for completion, which is within six months of a death being notified to the Programme. As a proportion of the total number of notifications to the Programme, unallocated reviews have reduced from 39% in November 2018 to 28% in December 2019. NHS England expect that, by the end of 2020, every clinical commissioning group (CCG) will be in a position to conclude all reviews within six months where it is appropriate to do so.

In May 2019, NHS England announced an additional £5 million investment in 2019/20 to address the backlog of unreviewed cases and increase the pace in which cases are allocated and reviewed in timely way. Monies have been allocated to CCGs and to the Commissioning Support Unit and is being invested in developing a dedicated workforce to carry out reviews and to develop systems and processes to embed quality improvement activity across the health and social care system. More than 2,000 experts have now been trained to undertake reviews.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the backlog of unreviewed cases in the LeDer process.

Our assessment is that over the past 12 months, the Learning Disability Mortality Review (LeDeR) programme has made good progress in completing reviews, providing the largest body of evidence of deaths of people with a learning disability at an individual level anywhere in the world and using that evidence to turn learning into action to drive improvements in healthcare.

By December 2019, the latest date for which information is available, 3,195 reviews had been completed. There are also a further 1,923 reviews currently in progress. The total number of deaths notified to the Programme at December 2019 was 7,145 of which 3,060 had been notified in the last 12 months.

Unallocated reviews do not necessarily equate to a backlog as not all will have exceeded the standard for completion, which is within six months of a death being notified to the Programme. As a proportion of the total number of notifications to the Programme, unallocated reviews have reduced from 39% in November 2018 to 28% in December 2019. NHS England expect that, by the end of 2020, every clinical commissioning group (CCG) will be in a position to conclude all reviews within six months where it is appropriate to do so.

In May 2019, NHS England announced an additional £5 million investment in 2019/20 to address the backlog of unreviewed cases and increase the pace in which cases are allocated and reviewed in timely way. Monies have been allocated to CCGs and to the Commissioning Support Unit and is being invested in developing a dedicated workforce to carry out reviews and to develop systems and processes to embed quality improvement activity across the health and social care system. More than 2,000 experts have now been trained to undertake reviews.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients at A&E at Salford Royal Hospital have had to wait over four hours to be seen in each of the last four financial years.

The information is not available in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of changes in waiting times at A&E at (a) Salford Royal Hospital and (b) Royal Bolton Hospital since 2010.

The information is not available in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Queen’s Speech 2019 background briefing notes, what proportion of the 6,000 new staff in primary care settings will be providing mental health support.

Many primary care professionals provide some form of mental health support for their patients. However, it is not possible to estimate what proportion of new staff being recruited to work in primary care settings will be providing such support, as this is dependent on patient demand, local decision making and ensuring patients and clinicians have a navigable system.

The Government is committed to growing the primary care workforce by 6,000 more doctors in general practice and 6,000 other professionals, such as physiotherapists and pharmacists. This is on top of the additional 20,000 primary care professionals NHS England is already providing funding towards recruiting.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Queen’s Speech on 19 December 2019, what steps the Government plans to take to ensure that no one will have to sell their home to pay for social care.

We are determined to find a long-term solution to the challenges in social care to ensure every person is treated with dignity and offered the security they deserve. We will seek to build cross-party consensus and will outline next steps shortly.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the background briefing notes on the Queen's Speech on 19 December 2019, what steps the Government plans to take to deliver the commitment to improve how autistic people and people with learning disabilities are treated in law.

Improving the care and treatment of autistic people and people with learning disabilities is a priority for this Government.

The Independent Review of the Mental Health Act 1983 made a number of recommendations to improve the treatment of autistic people and people with learning disabilities under the Act.

During 2019, we also received two petitions to change how the Act applied to autistic people and people with learning disabilities.

We will be responding to the Review’s recommendations and to proposals to change the scope of the Act in a white paper early in 2020. We will then consult publicly on our proposals and bring forward a new Mental Health Bill to amend the Act.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to announcement of reform of the Mental Health Act 1983, what plans the Government has to reduce the number inpatient mental health beds in dormitory-style wards; and if he will make it his policy to end the use of dormitory style wards in all mental health units.

The Independent Review of the Mental Health Act 1983 recommended that all existing dormitory accommodation should be updated to allow patients the privacy of their own room. The NHS Long Term Plan also recognised that capital investment is needed to upgrade the physical environment for inpatient psychiatric care but that this would be subject to the next capital review.

We will publish a white paper in early 2020 that will set out the Government’s response to the Review’s recommendations and we will bring forward a Mental Health Bill to amend the Act when parliamentary time allows.

In addition, the NHS Long Term Plan will deliver improvements to crisis and community mental health services as an alternative to inpatient care through increased investment of at least a further £2.3 billion a year by 2023/24.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Conservative Party manifesto 2019 and the background briefing to the Queen's Speech, how many of the 50,000 more nurses will be (a) mental health nurses, (b) learning disability nurses and (c) nurses from other disciplines.

The announcement made on the 18 December 2019 is to increase the nursing workforce by 50,000 by 2025 in total across all nursing disciplines which includes mental health and learning disability nursing.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Israeli Government on the eviction of Palestinian families from their homes in East Jerusalem; and if he will make a statement.

The UK is concerned by the continued demolition of Palestinian property by Israeli authorities. In all but the most exceptional of circumstances demolitions by an occupying power are contrary to International Humanitarian Law. The practice causes unnecessary suffering to ordinary Palestinians and is harmful to the peace process. We instead urge Israel to provide a clear, transparent route to construction for Palestinians in Area C.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the letter dated 29 October 2020, entitled Time for a Fair Deal, and signed by former Ministers at the then Department of Health; and if he will make a statement.

The Chief Secretary to the Treasury issued a response to this letter on 26 February 2021. No further statement will be made.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to extend orchestra tax relief to performances with no in-person audience during the covid-19 outbreak.

HMRC publish official statistics for the creative industries tax reliefs annually. Statistics for the amount of Orchestra Tax Relief (OTR) claimed in the 2020-21 tax year will be published in summer 2021. In 2019-20, the Government provided £18 million of support to 565 productions through OTR.

The Government keeps all tax reliefs under review, and regularly receives proposals for changes to tax reliefs. When considering proposed changes, HM Treasury must ensure they provide support to businesses across the economy in a fair way and that taxpayer money is targeted effectively.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of covid-19 social distancing restrictions on the level of orchestra tax relief claimed since April 2020.

HMRC publish official statistics for the creative industries tax reliefs annually. Statistics for the amount of Orchestra Tax Relief (OTR) claimed in the 2020-21 tax year will be published in summer 2021. In 2019-20, the Government provided £18 million of support to 565 productions through OTR.

The Government keeps all tax reliefs under review, and regularly receives proposals for changes to tax reliefs. When considering proposed changes, HM Treasury must ensure they provide support to businesses across the economy in a fair way and that taxpayer money is targeted effectively.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of NHS staff who (a) are subject to and (b) have settled their debt in relation to the Loan Charge.

HMRC do not hold the requested estimates and do not routinely collect data on profession.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the Loan Charge on levels of bankruptcy.

No estimate of the number of individual bankruptcies has been made.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what support is available to owners of small businesses which are legally permitted to remain open during the January 2021 covid-19 lockdown but are closed due to staff health concerns.

Throughout this crisis, the government has sought to protect people’s jobs and livelihoods while also supporting businesses and public services across the UK. To do this, the government has put in place an economic package of support which will provide businesses and individuals with certainty over the coming months, even as measures to prevent further spread of the virus change. The government has spent over £280 billion this year to provide this support.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) was introduced to help employers whose operations have been affected by COVID-19 retain their employees and protect the UK economy. All businesses across the UK can access the scheme, which will run until the end of April 2021, with employees receiving 80% of their usual salary for hours not worked, up to £2,500 per month. The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) will also run until the end of April.

Local authorities will receive an additional £500 million, to a total of £1.6 billion, of discretionary funding through the Additional Restrictions Grant to allow them to support their local businesses, including businesses that are adversely impacted but not forced to close by COVID-19 restrictions.

Businesses have also received billions in loans, tax deferrals, Business Rates relief, and general and sector-specific grants. Individuals and families have benefited from increased welfare payments, enhanced Statutory Sick Pay, a stay on repossession proceedings and mortgage holidays.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to expand the coronavirus job retention scheme to allow (a) schools and (b) other publicly funded organisations to access that scheme for staff who are clinically extremely vulnerable and who cannot attend work during the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown and are unable to work from home.

Those working for fully funded public sector organisations, including those that are clinically extremely vulnerable, should be paid as normal out of existing budgets.

Arrangements should be made to facilitate working from home wherever possible, and reprioritisation and redeployment should be considered to minimise issues with service delivery.

Where a clinically extremely vulnerable individual works for a public sector organisation that is not fully funded by public grants, and working from home is not possible, furloughing may be appropriate. This remains at the employer’s discretion and Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme claims should remain proportionate to the impact on revenue disruption.

Schools have continued to receive their core funding in full throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. Guidance on financial support for education, early years and children’s social care can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care#sector-specific-guidance

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans his Department has to support employed people from (a) 1 August 2020, (b) 1 September 2020 and (c) 1 October 2020 who (i) are over the age of 60 years and (ii) were formerly on the Government's Shielded Patient List to maintain their employment relationship with their employer until it is safe to return to work as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

From 1 August the Government has relaxed national advice to those shielding, bringing it in line with the advice to those who are clinically vulnerable. The advice is still to stay at home as much as possible. However, if they are unable to work from home they will be able to return, provided their workplace is COVID-safe.

It is important that this group continue to take careful precautions, and employers should do all they can to enable them to work from home where this is possible, including moving them to another role if required. Where this is not possible, the Clinically Extremely Vulnerable (CEV) should be provided with the safest onsite roles that enable them to maintain social distancing from others.

If employers cannot provide a safe working environment, the CEV will continue to have access to the unprecedented package of financial support. This is not limited to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, but also includes the introduction of the Self Employed Income Support Scheme and an increase in the generosity of welfare payments worth a further £9.3bn according to Office for Budget Responsibility estimates. Individuals over the State Pension age may be eligible for the State Pension.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans his Department has to support employers from (a) 1 August 2020, (b) 1 September 2020 and (c) 1 October 2020 who have employees who (i) are over the age of 60 years and (ii) were formerly on the Government's Shielded Patient List to maintain their employment relationship with their employees until it is safe for those employees to return to work as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

From 1 August the Government has relaxed national advice to those shielding, bringing it in line with the advice to those who are clinically vulnerable. The advice is still to stay at home as much as possible. However, if they are unable to work from home they will be able to return, provided their workplace is COVID-safe.

It is important that this group continue to take careful precautions, and employers should do all they can to enable them to work from home where this is possible, including moving them to another role if required. Where this is not possible, the Clinically Extremely Vulnerable (CEV) should be provided with the safest onsite roles that enable them to maintain social distancing from others.

If employers cannot provide a safe working environment, the CEV will continue to have access to the unprecedented package of financial support. This is not limited to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, but also includes the introduction of the Self Employed Income Support Scheme and an increase in the generosity of welfare payments worth a further £9.3bn according to Office for Budget Responsibility estimates. Individuals over the State Pension age may be eligible for the State Pension.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans his Department has to ensure that people who (a) are over the age of 60 years and (b) were formerly on the Government's Shielded Patient List maintain their incomes and do not find themselves in avoidable personal debt or living in poverty as a result of it not being safe for them to return to work from 1 August 2020 as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

From 1 August the Government has relaxed national advice to those shielding, bringing it in line with the advice to those who are clinically vulnerable. The advice is still to stay at home as much as possible. However, if they are unable to work from home they will be able to return, provided their workplace is COVID-safe.

It is important that this group continue to take careful precautions, and employers should do all they can to enable them to work from home where this is possible, including moving them to another role if required. Where this is not possible, the Clinically Extremely Vulnerable (CEV) should be provided with the safest onsite roles that enable them to maintain social distancing from others.

If employers cannot provide a safe working environment, the CEV will continue to have access to the unprecedented package of financial support. This is not limited to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, but also includes the introduction of the Self Employed Income Support Scheme and an increase in the generosity of welfare payments worth a further £9.3bn according to Office for Budget Responsibility estimates. Individuals over the State Pension age may be eligible for the State Pension.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what guidance the Government has published on whether pregnant women can remain on furlough once their workplace has reopened; and if he will make a statement.

Pregnant women have always been eligible for furlough and the return to the workplace does not affect this. To enable the introduction of flexible furloughing and support those already on furlough back to work, the scheme will close to new entrants on 30 June. The last three-week furloughs before that deadline will begin on 10 June.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on providing dedicated grant support to charities during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has announced a £750 million support package for charities. £360m of this will be allocated as grants directly to charities providing essential services and supporting vulnerable people. £310m will support smaller, local charities, including through grants distributed by the National Lottery Community Fund. £60m will be allocated to the Devolved Administrations through the Barnett formula. The Government pledged to match whatever the public donated to the BBC Big Night In fundraiser on 23 April, with a minimum of £20m going to the National Emergencies Trust.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when the £160 million announced for charities due to the financial effect of the covid-19 outbreak will be received by charities.

The Government has announced a £750m support package for charities. £360m of this will be allocated directly to charities providing essential services and supporting vulnerable people, including up to £200m for hospices across the next quarter. St John Ambulance has been allocated £6.8m, which has already supported an increased operational response. Charities can now apply on gov.uk for £10m to support victims of domestic abuse and £6m to support members of the armed forces and veterans. A further £310m will support smaller, local charities, including through grants distributed by the National Lottery Community Fund. £60m will be allocated to the Devolved Administrations through the Barnett formula. The Government pledged to match whatever the public donated to the BBC Big Night In fundraiser on 23 April, with a minimum of £20m going to the National Emergencies Trust.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on extending the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to allow charity employees who would otherwise have been made redundant to continue working.

Any employer using a PAYE scheme can access the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

To mitigate the risk of fraudulent claims and to protect individuals, the Government made it clear that individuals cannot work or volunteer for their organisation. If workers were allowed to volunteer for their employer, the employer could ask them to work in an effectively full time way while only paying 80% of the wages


The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is working with other Government departments and the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector to identify areas where volunteers can contribute to the COVID-19 response.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on extending the Small Business Grant and Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant to organisations receiving charity rates relief.

Charities which occupy properties used for retail, hospitality or leisure purposes, such as charity shops, may be eligible for a grant from the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund. The RHLGF provides businesses with a £25,000 cash grant per property, for each property used for retail, hospitality or leisure purposes with a rateable value between £15,000 and £51,000; and a £10,000 cash grant per property, for each property used for these purposes with a rateable value of £15,000 or below which is not in receipt of Small Business Rates Relief or Rural Rates Relief. Businesses and organisations may receive a maximum of €800,000 from the RHLGF under State Aid rules.

The Government is aware that some small businesses and organisations have found themselves excluded from the existing business grants schemes because of the way they interact with the business rates system. That is why the Government has allocated up to an additional £617 million to Local Authorities to enable them to give discretionary grants to businesses in this situation. The Government’s intention is for Local Authorities to prioritise the following types of organisations when making discretionary grants:

  • Small businesses in shared offices or other flexible work spaces for example, industrial parks, science parks, incubators etc, which do not have their own business rates assessment;
  • Regular market traders who do not have their own business rates assessment;
  • B&Bs which pay Council Tax instead of business rates; and
  • Charity properties in receipt of charitable business rates relief which would otherwise have been eligible for Small Business Rates Relief or Rural Rate Relief

Local Authorities may choose to focus payments on those priority groups which are most relevant to their local areas. Local Authorities may also choose to pay grants to businesses outside of these priority groups, according to local economic need, so long as the business was trading on 11th March, and has not received any other cash grant funded by central Government.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to enable salaried company directors to undertake essential work to maintain their businesses while furloughed; and if he will make a statement.

In March, the Government announced the unprecedented Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help firms keep millions of people in employment. Where furloughed directors need to carry out particular duties to fulfil the statutory obligations they owe to their company, they may do so provided they do no more than would reasonably be judged necessary for that purpose, and they should not do work of a kind they would carry out in normal circumstances to generate commercial revenue or provide services to or on behalf of their company. Full guidance for employers and employees can be found at www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-for-wage-costs-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme and www.gov.uk/guidance/check-if-you-could-be-covered-by-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of extending Orchestra Tax Relief to cover claims for costs incurred on cancelled concerts due to the covid-19 outbreak up to the point at which the concert would have taken place.

The orchestra tax relief legislation allows for the ‘abandonment’ of a concert due to circumstances outside of the company’s control. Cancellations of concerts because of COVID-19 would fall within ‘abandonment’. Claims may be made for qualifying expenditure incurred up to the abandonment of a concert or concert series and where an orchestra company has a legal obligation, such as a contractual one, to make the payments for a cancelled concert. HM Treasury keeps all tax reliefs under review.

The Government has also announced an unprecedented package of support for businesses and individuals affected by COVID-19. This includes the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and Self-Employed Income Support Scheme delivered by HMRC. Further information about HMRC’s dedicated COVID-19 support can be found by visiting the GOV.UK website.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to expand furlough payments to cover a proportion of (a) performance-related pay and (b) sales commission up to a cap.

The objective of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is to enable employers to continue to keep people in employment. To achieve this, the grants compensate employers for the payments that they are contractually obliged to make, in order to avoid the need for redundancies. Covering discretionary payments would go beyond the objectives of the scheme. Full guidance on how to calculate 80% of wages can be found at: www.gov.uk/guidance/work-out-80-of-your-employees-wages-to-claim-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme

For some employees, the pay in scope for the grant will be less than the overall sum they usually receive. The Government is also supporting those on low incomes who need to rely on the welfare system through a significant package of temporary welfare measures. This includes a £20 per week increase to the Universal Credit standard allowance and Working Tax Credit basic element, and a nearly £1 billion increase in support for renters through increases to the Local Housing Allowance rates for Universal Credit and Housing Benefit claimants. These changes will benefit all new and existing claimants. Anyone can check their eligibility and apply for Universal Credit by visiting www.gov.uk/universal-credit.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to ensure equitable access for people with past or present mental health problems for travel to travel insurance after the EU transition period.

From 1 January 2021, it will be particularly important to get travel insurance with the right cover if you have a pre-existing medical condition. This is because the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) will only be valid up to 31 December 2020.

On 5 February, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) published new rules and guidance to improve access to travel insurance for all consumers with medical conditions, including those with mental health conditions.

Included within the FCA’s rules is a requirement for firms to signpost consumers to specialist providers if they are declined cover, offered cover with an exclusion, or charged a significantly higher premium based on their medical condition.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that ECAA entry clearance applications received prior to 31 December 2020 are processed in accordance with the rules in force prior to 31 December 2020.

The Government remains committed to ensuring people are not unfairly impacted in terms of their immigration status as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Further guidance for European Communities Association Agreement (ECAA) applicants who have been unable to return to the UK or renew their leave because of illness or travel restrictions due to Covid-19 will be published shortly.

Under the EU Withdrawal Agreement, the UK’s commitments to Turkish nationals exercising rights under the ECAA will continue throughout the transition period. Turkish workers, business persons and their family members will be able to apply for entry clearance or extension of their stay in the UK until the end of 2020 under existing arrangements.

All applications, provided they were submitted before 11pm GMT on 31 December 2020, will be decided in accordance with the existing rules and guidance.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2020 to Question 73764 on Visas: Turkey, when she plans to publish guidance for ECAA applicants who have been unable to return to the UK or renew their leave because of illness or travel restrictions due to covid-19.

The Government remains committed to ensuring people are not unfairly impacted in terms of their immigration status as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Further guidance for European Communities Association Agreement (ECAA) applicants who have been unable to return to the UK or renew their leave because of illness or travel restrictions due to Covid-19 will be published shortly.

Under the EU Withdrawal Agreement, the UK’s commitments to Turkish nationals exercising rights under the ECAA will continue throughout the transition period. Turkish workers, business persons and their family members will be able to apply for entry clearance or extension of their stay in the UK until the end of 2020 under existing arrangements.

All applications, provided they were submitted before 11pm GMT on 31 December 2020, will be decided in accordance with the existing rules and guidance.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Sep 2020
What recent assessment she has made of trends in the time taken by UK Visas and Immigration to process one-year visa extensions for healthcare workers.

Mr Speaker, I would like, with your permission to group questions 30 and 31.

Up till close on Friday, provisional management information shows we have concluded 5,954 free extensions for eligible healthcare workers and dependents.

On average, straightforward cases have been concluded within four weeks of receiving necessary information from employers to enable the extension to be undertaken.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will take steps to allow asylum seekers to work after they have been waiting six months for a decision on their case.

Asylum seekers can work in the UK if their claim has been outstanding for 12 months, through no fault of their own. Those allowed to work are restricted to jobs on the Shortage Occupation List, which is published by the Home Office and based on expert advice from the Migration Advisory Committee.

It is important to distinguish between those who need protection and those seeking to work here, who can apply for a work visa under the Immigration Rules. Our wider policy could be undermined if migrants bypassed work visa Rules by lodging unfounded asylum claims here.

Asylum seeker right to work is a complex issue. A review of the policy is ongoing, and we are considering the evidence put forward on the issue.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will take steps to allow asylum seekers to work in roles in addition to those on the Shortage Occupation List.

Asylum seekers can work in the UK if their claim has been outstanding for 12 months, through no fault of their own. Those allowed to work are restricted to jobs on the Shortage Occupation List, which is published by the Home Office and based on expert advice from the Migration Advisory Committee.

It is important to distinguish between those who need protection and those seeking to work here, who can apply for a work visa under the Immigration Rules. Our wider policy could be undermined if migrants bypassed work visa Rules by lodging unfounded asylum claims here.

Asylum seeker right to work is a complex issue. A review of the policy is ongoing, and we are considering the evidence put forward on the issue.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will take steps to enable people with European Community Association Agreement visas to (a) renew and (b) extend those visas whist outside the UK in the event that they cannot travel back to the UK during the covid-19 outbreak prior to their visa expiring; and if she will make a statement.

The Government is committed to ensuring that people are not unfairly impacted in terms of their immigration status as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Those who are outside the UK when their European Community Association Agreement (ECAA) visa expires can apply, free of charge, for entry clearance as an ECAA business person so that they can return to the UK. On their return, they can seek to extend their leave where they are eligible for this.

Further guidance for ECAA applicants who have been unable to return to the UK or renew their leave because of illness or travel restrictions due to Covid-19 will be published shortly

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for (a) visas and (b) asylum took (i) three to six months, (ii) six to 12 months, (iii) 12 to 24 months and (iv) over 24 months to be completed in each of the last four financial years.

The Home Office does not publish data on how many applications for (a) visas and (b) asylum took (i) three to six months, (ii) six to 12 months, (iii) 12 to 24 months and (iv) over 24 months in each of the last four financial years.

However, the Home Office does publish data on:

The Home Office does not publish data on how many applications for (a) visas and (b) asylum from individuals resident in Worsley and Eccles South constituency took (i) three to six months, (ii) six to 12 months, (iii) 12 to 24 months and (iv) over 24 months in each of the last four financial years as this information is not held centrally and to obtain it would exceed the disproportionate cost threshold.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for (a) visas and (b) asylum from individuals resident in Worsley and Eccles South constituency took (i) three to six months, (ii) six to 12 months, (iii) 12 to 24 months and (iv) over 24 months to be completed in each of the last four financial years.

The Home Office does not publish data on how many applications for (a) visas and (b) asylum took (i) three to six months, (ii) six to 12 months, (iii) 12 to 24 months and (iv) over 24 months in each of the last four financial years.

However, the Home Office does publish data on:

The Home Office does not publish data on how many applications for (a) visas and (b) asylum from individuals resident in Worsley and Eccles South constituency took (i) three to six months, (ii) six to 12 months, (iii) 12 to 24 months and (iv) over 24 months in each of the last four financial years as this information is not held centrally and to obtain it would exceed the disproportionate cost threshold.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people spent time in a police station as a place of safety due to a mental health condition in each of the past five years.

The Home Office collects and publishes information on the number of persons detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983, broken down by place of safety taken to.

These data were collected by the Home Office on a mandatory basis for the first time in 2016/17, and were published as part of the ‘Police powers and procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019

Figures for 2015/16 were collected and published by the National Police Chiefs’ Council and can be accessed using the following links:

http://www.npcc.police.uk/documents/S136%20Data%202015%2016.pdf.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking taking to increase the supply of housing-with-care for older people.

The growth of this sector is important for meeting the needs of the ageing population and supporting our housing supply objectives. We are investing over £12 billion in affordable housing over 5 years, the largest investment in affordable housing in a decade. This includes the new £11.5 billion Affordable Homes Programme, where 10 per cent of delivery over the course of the programme will be used to increase the supply of much needed specialist or supported housing, including retirement housing. DHSC are also continuing to subsidise new supply of specialist housing for older and disabled people through the Care and Support Specialised Housing (CASSH) Fund.

We are continuing to work closely with the sector and across Government to look at how we can further support its growth. This includes considering the merits of different engagement and delivery models including the proposals for a taskforce.

Ministerial meetings with external organisations are published on Gov.uk.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
15th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what consultation his Department carried out with (a) Salford city council, (b) Greater Manchester resilience forum and (c) other bodies referenced in Schedule 1(1) to the Town and Country Planning (Border Facilities and Infrastructure) (EU Exit) (England) Special Development Order 2020 Order.

The Special Development Order requires a border department to engage with local authorities and a range of other parties ahead of any submission to my department to seek to use a site for border facilities and associated infrastructure.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
15th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to ensure that permissions under article 3 of the Town and Country Planning (Border Facilities and Infrastructure) (EU Exit) (England) Special Development Order 2020 are subject to consultation with local residents and businesses.

The Special Development Order does not approve the use of specific sites, and the border departments defined in the Order are required to seek approval from the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government to use and develop a specific site.

The Order requires a border department to engage with local authorities and a range of other parties ahead of a formal request for approval to use a site. The Order sets out that a request for approval must include a report setting out the engagement activities that have been undertaken, and the outcomes of those activities. The report should include a statement of the period given to engagement parties to make representation being no less than 14 calendar days.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the Government plans to increase the provision of allotments (a) during and (b) after the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has no plans to increase the provision of allotments during or after the covid-19 outbreak.

Local authorities have responsibility for allotments in their area. The decision to increase local provision is one taken at a local level based on individual circumstances.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect of changes in the level of funding allocated to local government on the ability of local authorities to maintain street cleaning services.

Street cleaning is delivered through the Local Governance Finance Settlement, however responsibility for the policy is owned by DEFRA. Funding is delivered on a non-ringfenced basis through the Settlement, which gives local authorities maximum flexibility to deliver services as they see fit according to local needs. We recognise the vital role Local Government plays and this is why they will receive an additional £2.9 billion next year, the largest increase in spending power in almost a decade.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to help ensure that people who have been mis-sold leasehold properties will be compensated.

The Government is taking forward a comprehensive programme of reform to end unfair practices in the leasehold market. This includes working with the Law Commission to make buying a freehold or extending a lease easier, quicker and more cost effective to help both future and existing leaseholders. Their report on Valuation was published on 9 January, and we are considering the recommendations. We are moving forward with legislation to ban new leasehold houses and reduce ground rents on future leases to zero. We will publish a draft bill as soon as possible.

The Government recognises that there are those who feel strongly that they were mis-sold their properties. The Government welcomed the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) announcement on 11 June 2019 that it was launching an investigation in this area. The CMA is considering the extent of any mis-selling and onerous term in the leasehold sector, including whether they might constitute ‘unfair terms’. The Government looks forward to hearing progress on the CMA’s work.

6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to tackle the mis-selling of leasehold properties.

The Government is taking forward a comprehensive programme of reform to end unfair practices in the leasehold market. This includes working with the Law Commission to make buying a freehold or extending a lease easier, quicker and more cost effective to help both future and existing leaseholders. Their report on Valuation was published on 9 January, and we are considering the recommendations. We are moving forward with legislation to ban new leasehold houses and reduce ground rents on future leases to zero. We will publish a draft bill as soon as possible.

The Government recognises that there are those who feel strongly that they were mis-sold their properties. The Government welcomed the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) announcement on 11 June 2019 that it was launching an investigation in this area. The CMA is considering the extent of any mis-selling and onerous term in the leasehold sector, including whether they might constitute ‘unfair terms’. The Government looks forward to hearing progress on the CMA’s work.

6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent steps he has taken to end the use of escalating ground rents on leasehold properties.

The Government has set out a package of measures to tackle unfair practices in the leasehold market, this includes a ban on the unjustified use of leasehold for new houses and restricting ground rents for both houses and flats to a peppercorn.

The Government is committed to providing support to existing leaseholders. We are putting pressure on developers who have sold leases with onerous ground rents, including those that double more frequently than every 20 years, to provide support for current leaseholders. Some developers have introduced schemes to assist individuals with onerous leases which is welcome, but these must go further and faster.

To facilitate this process, the Government announced a ‘Public Pledge for Leaseholders’ on 28 March 2019. This contains a commitment for freeholders to identify any existing leases within their portfolio which contain ground rents that double more frequently than every 20 years. They have also committed to contact the relevant leaseholders and offer to vary their leases. We are pleased that over 60 institutional freeholders and developers have signed the pledge, which also provides safeguards for future leaseholders.

9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to reduce the transmission of covid-19 on the prison estate.

The safety of our staff and those in our care remains our top priority and when responding to Covid-19 we have worked closely with Public Health England and been guided by their advice. Closed settings such as prisons pose particular challenges in managing outbreaks, but we have well-developed policies and procedures in place to manage outbreaks and infectious diseases, including COVID-19. This means prisons are well prepared to take immediate action whenever cases or suspected cases are identified.

One of the range of measures HMPPS is taking to limit the spread of the virus in prisons and save lives is to compartmentalise prisoners. This requires establishments to introduce isolation units for the symptomatic, shielding units for the vulnerable, and reverse cohorting to quarantine new arrivals. Social distancing and basic hygiene are also effective controls to reduce transmission and we continue to provide access to the right cleaning and hygiene products in prisons. Other measures have included adapting prison regimes to support social distancing and PPE usage, and expanding the estate with new temporary units.

We have started to rollout regular testing for frontline staff which means we can identify positive cases earlier and will be able to minimise the spread of outbreaks. HMMPS is also rolling out testing for prisoners on reception and transfer.

We continue to work closely with PHE to develop and refine our response to the pandemic.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure that prison staff have adequate PPE during the covid-19 outbreak.

We have well-developed policies and procedures in place to manage outbreaks and infectious diseases, including COVID-19. This means prisons are well prepared to take immediate action whenever cases or suspected cases are identified. Our measures so far have included restricting regimes, minimising inter-prison transfers and compartmentalising our prisons into different units to isolate the sick, shield the vulnerable and quarantine new arrivals.

We are, however, prepared for continued staffing challenges and are driving forward with recruitment campaigns and using many of the tried and tested staffing interventions that worked effectively before, which will allow us to supply establishments with staff at short notice. These measures include enabling operationally qualified staff in HQ and non-operational roles to return to prisons and inviting retired and resigned former staff to return to work on temporary contracts.

There is currently adequate stock and forward supply of all PPE items in accordance with public health advice. We are making preparations and keeping demand for PPE under regular review as we move through each phase of managing the outbreak. We have issued a face mask strategy for staff which, in line with public health advice, sets out when face masks must be worn in HMPPS settings.

We have also begun introducing a testing regime for staff and prisoners across all prisons in England and Wales to help identify and isolate cases early and control the spread of coronavirus. Routine staff testing will also be rolled out from November for both directly employed and non-directly employed staff who work with prisoners on a weekly basis. Reception and transfer testing for prisoners is now in place in seven prisons in England and two in Wales. Further sites are expected to begin testing over the coming weeks with a focus on reception prisons first.

All of these measures collectively contribute to preventing the spread of coronavirus and protect staff, residents and the public and it is important to continue to follow all of the guidelines in place.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to support prisons in the event of a covid-19 outbreak among staff.

We have well-developed policies and procedures in place to manage outbreaks and infectious diseases, including COVID-19. This means prisons are well prepared to take immediate action whenever cases or suspected cases are identified. Our measures so far have included restricting regimes, minimising inter-prison transfers and compartmentalising our prisons into different units to isolate the sick, shield the vulnerable and quarantine new arrivals.

We are, however, prepared for continued staffing challenges and are driving forward with recruitment campaigns and using many of the tried and tested staffing interventions that worked effectively before, which will allow us to supply establishments with staff at short notice. These measures include enabling operationally qualified staff in HQ and non-operational roles to return to prisons and inviting retired and resigned former staff to return to work on temporary contracts.

There is currently adequate stock and forward supply of all PPE items in accordance with public health advice. We are making preparations and keeping demand for PPE under regular review as we move through each phase of managing the outbreak. We have issued a face mask strategy for staff which, in line with public health advice, sets out when face masks must be worn in HMPPS settings.

We have also begun introducing a testing regime for staff and prisoners across all prisons in England and Wales to help identify and isolate cases early and control the spread of coronavirus. Routine staff testing will also be rolled out from November for both directly employed and non-directly employed staff who work with prisoners on a weekly basis. Reception and transfer testing for prisoners is now in place in seven prisons in England and two in Wales. Further sites are expected to begin testing over the coming weeks with a focus on reception prisons first.

All of these measures collectively contribute to preventing the spread of coronavirus and protect staff, residents and the public and it is important to continue to follow all of the guidelines in place.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)