Alun Cairns Portrait

Alun Cairns

Conservative - Vale of Glamorgan

Secretary of State for Wales
19th Mar 2016 - 16th Dec 2019
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
15th Jul 2014 - 19th Mar 2016
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Wales Office)
15th Jul 2014 - 19th Mar 2016
Public Administration Committee
9th May 2011 - 12th May 2014
Welsh Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 27th Jun 2011


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 20th October 2021
Environment Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 300 Conservative Aye votes vs 1 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 307 Noes - 185
Speeches
Tuesday 21st September 2021
Oral Answers to Questions

6. What recent progress he has made on the Government’s proposals to support automotive battery manufacturers. (903534)

Written Answers
Monday 20th September 2021
Party Wall etc Act 1996
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans he has to bring forward proposals …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Tuesday 8th December 2020
BBC (Transparency) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to require the BBC to publish specified information including all invoices over £500, expenditure by region, details of …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 20th September 2021
6. Land and property portfolio: (i) value over £100,000 and/or (ii) giving rental income of over £10,000 a year
On 26 August 2021, my family home in the Vale of Glamorgan, which I co-own with my wife, was used …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Alun Cairns has voted in 291 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Alun Cairns Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(12 debate interactions)
Simon Hart (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Wales
(9 debate interactions)
Brandon Lewis (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(40 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(9 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(7 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Alun Cairns's debates

Vale of Glamorgan Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Bring in a law which enforces professional football clubs to have at least 51% fan ownership similar to how the Bundesliga operates this rule.

The Government should use the recently established fan led review of football to introduce an Independent Football Regulator in England to put fans back at the heart of our national game. This should happen by December 2021.


Latest EDMs signed by Alun Cairns

Alun Cairns has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Alun Cairns, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Alun Cairns has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Alun Cairns has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Alun Cairns

Introduced: 7th June 2016

A Bill to amend the Government of Wales Act 2006 and the Wales Act 2014 and to make provision about the functions of the Welsh Ministers and about Welsh tribunals; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Tuesday 31st January 2017 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to require the BBC to publish specified information including all invoices over £500, expenditure by region, details of staff remuneration and exit payments, payments to personal service companies and other contractors, and the outside earnings of staff; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Tuesday 8th December 2020
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require disclosure of caller line identification by non-domestic callers; to require Ofcom to consider applications for exemption from such disclosure; to provide that telephone providers may not make a charge for providing caller line identification; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 6th November 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. Require the British Broadcasting Corporation to publish all invoices for amounts in excess of £500 each quarter; to allow unrestricted access to the Corporation’s accounts by the National Audit Office; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 21st November 2012

Alun Cairns has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


39 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the resilience of the National Grid as part of the UK's transition to net zero.

The UK has one of the most robust energy systems in the world. Maintaining a safe and secure energy supply is a key priority for this Government.

We work closely with the National Grid Electricity System Operator (ESO), electricity operators, and Ofgem, to ensure our electricity and gas systems are able to respond to new challenges, including the transition to net zero, whilst continuing to ensure resilience.

In April 2019, the ESO published its plan to fully operate Great Britain’s electricity system with zero carbon by 2025 and is undertaking a number of projects to explore how this can be achieved.

The Government will continue to work with the ESO to ensure that this is delivered in a manner that ensures the stability and security of the electricity system.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of UK households have smart meters fitted.

Smart meters are replacing traditional gas and electricity meters in Great Britain as part of an essential infrastructure upgrade to make the energy system more efficient, flexible and ensure cost effective delivery of net zero.

Thirty-nine percent of meters in homes across Great Britain were smart meters as of 30 June 2020. The latest data on the rollout of smart meters is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/smart-meters-in-great-britain-quarterly-update-june-2020. The next quarterly publication covering the period from July to end of September 2020 is due for release on 26 November.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the regulated asset-based financing model for funding new nuclear power stations.

The Government is looking at options for the financing of new nuclear projects. A Regulated Asset Base (RAB) model has the potential to reduce the cost of raising private finance for new nuclear projects, thereby reducing consumer bills and maximising value for money for consumers and taxpayers. In 2019, we consulted on our proposals for a nuclear RAB model and we will publish our response in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much Government support has been provided in subsidies to the (a) marine, (b) wind, (c) biomass and (d) solar energy sectors in each of the last 10 years.

Support for the generation of renewable electricity is paid under three schemes: The Renewables Obligation (RO), the Feed-in Tariffs (FIT), and Contracts for Difference (CfD) schemes.

The Renewables Obligation does not pay a direct subsidy but instead support is provided through tradeable certificates.

Support for renewable heat is provided through the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) which is funded through general taxation.

The table below gives a breakdown of support for electricity generation and renewable heat from marine, wind, biomass and solar technologies in Great Britain. The CfD, FITs & GB RHI schemes are not available in Northern Ireland.

Year

Scheme+

Support for electricity generation and renewable heat (in £m)

Marine

Offshore wind

Onshore wind

Biomass

Solar Thermal

Solar PV

2010/11

RO

0.01

258.0

360.1

248.1

-

0.03

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

-

-

-

2011/12

RO

0.02

371.3

450.9

255.2

-

0.1

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

1

-

-

2012/13

RO

0.03

696.3

494.7

385.4

-

0.8

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

15

-

2013/14

RO

0.2

1,022.6

731.5

484.3

-

36.3

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

49

-

2014/15

RO

0.2

1,107.7

704.9

737.5

-

134.9

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

138

1

-

2015/16

RO

-

1,496.8

805.5

932.0

-

304.0

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

239

2

-

2016/17

RO

0.1

1,533.7

892.8

953.6

-

416.4

CfD

-

-

-

91.8

-

0.4

RHI

-

-

-

289

2

-

2017/18

RO

1.8

2,008.6

1,256.2

864.7

-

471.1

CfD

-

295.8

-

247.3

-

0.8

RHI

-

-

-

368

3

-

2018/19

RO

2.6

2,220.5

1,334.9

1,079.9

-

548.5

CfD

-

587.6

11.3

380.2

-

0.8

RHI

-

-

-

394

3

-

2019/20

RO*

3.4

2,212.2

1,270.9

981.1

-

459.9

CfD

1,276.1

88.7

442.0

-

1.4

RHI

-

-

-

428

3

-

Notes

*The RO figures are based on Ofgem’s certificate report as of 4 August 2020 from their Renewables and CHP Register.

* The RO figures for 2019/20 are provisional as not all the certificates have been issued yet and the full notional value of each certificate is not yet known.

* The figures for FITs are not available as they cannot be broken down by technology.

*RHI payments are made to scheme participants using eligible renewable heating technologies. The RHI figures above relate to both the Domestic and Non-Domestic RHI schemes.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the proportion of the UK's energy that will be supplied from (a) nuclear, (b) wind, (c) biomass, (d) solar, and (e) tidal sources over the next (i) five, (ii) 10 and (iii) 20 years.

The Department has published projections of electricity generation by source for the UK which can be used to derive the proportion of total UK electricity supply supplied by nuclear and renewable sources, respectively. These are shown in the table below.

For commercial reasons we do not release any breakdown of renewables projections. Officials need to work in a private space to determine auction parameters for each CfD round to ensure competitive tension. Providing a more granular/annual deployment trajectory for specific technologies could distort auction outcomes.

Proportion of UK electricity supply (gross) excluding net imports[1]

Year

Nuclear

Renewables[2]

2021

21%

44%

2022

21%

47%

2023

19%

51%

2024

13%

54%

2025

15%

57%

2026

19%

58%

2027

20%

58%

2028

19%

57%

2029

17%

57%

2030

18%

58%

2031

20%

59%

2032

20%

59%

2033

20%

58%

2034

19%

58%

2035

20%

58%

2036

24%

57%

2037

27%

55%

2038

26%

55%

2039

26%

56%

2040

26%

56%

The figures are based on central estimates of economic growth and fossil fuel prices and contains all agreed policies where decisions on policy design are sufficiently advanced to allow robust estimates of impact as at August 2019. Further details can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/energy-and-emissions-projections. Figures provided are derived from BEIS Energy and Emissions Projections (EEP) 2019 Annex J, Total electricity generation by source.

[1] For this calculation total UK electricity supply is defined as including generation from storage but excluding net imports of electricity.

[2] Includes a small amount of generation from non-renewable wastes.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to update the electronic communications code; and what plans he has to amend that code to support the rollout and development of the 5G network.

We recently consulted on whether changes to the Electronic Communications Code were necessary in order to support the deployment of digital infrastructure, including 5G. The responses to that consultation are currently being considered and a consultation response will be published in due course. We have confirmed our intention to legislate in this Parliamentary session and will bring forward legislative proposals as soon as parliamentary time allows.

15th Jul 2021
What assessment she has made of the potential merits of the UK-Australia free trade deal for food producers.

This deal will support jobs and drive growth by cutting tariffs on key UK exports like food (up to around 20% on cheese) bringing huge benefits to the UK’s agri-food sector.

Wales’ food and drink sector exported £10m to Australia last year in goods and could benefit from the removal of tariffs and non-tariff barriers.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jan 2021
What steps her Department has taken to promote the export of British manufactured small modular nuclear reactors.

DIT recognises the export potential of UK manufactured small modular reactors and we are providing support to industry in several countries to facilitate market entry and position them for success ahead of first production. We are also in discussions with industry about developing a more strategic “Whole of Government” approach to support overseas sales.

23rd Jan 2020
What assessment she has made of the potential economic opportunities for the UK of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) is an ambitious regional trade agreement covering 11 countries across four continents.

Joining would provide us with the opportunity to deepen our trading links with some of the world’s most diverse, growing economies, and will allow us to expand our influence in the world and strengthen the rules-based international system.

No doubt CPTPP countries will be a valuable market for Aston Martin’s new DBX SUVs, which will be exported from the factory in my Rt Hon Friend for Vale of Glamorgan's constituency.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the UK's trade relationship was with each African country in the last five years.

Over the last five years the UK has consolidated stronger trade and investment partnerships with African countries, supporting businesses to enter and expand across African markets, and deepening our bilateral engagement to open new trade and investment opportunities.

Over this time the UK has offered almost all African countries preferential access to its markets as beneficiaries of the European Union’s unilateral trade preferences scheme or as parties to trade agreements with the EU. There are 44 African countries that receive duty-free quota-free access to the UK under EU arrangements that also offer preferential access to a further eight African countries.

As we leave the EU, we have sought to replicate the effects of EU trade arrangements and have secured trade continuity with 46 African countries.

The UK’s trade flows with each African country are published by the Office for National Statistics.

14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) accidents and (b) breakdowns on each stretch of smart motorway in each of the last 5 years.

The number of accidents has been taken to mean the number of injury casualties. The tables in Annexes B, C and D of the Smart Motorways Evidence Stocktake and Action Plan show the number of reported casualties by road class on England's Strategic Road Network (SRN) for slight, serious and fatal casualties. These tables show the casualty split on different types of motorway. These tables are attached for ease of reference. Highways England is currently analysing the 2019 data and, when available, will analyse the 2020 data, which is expected to be in Autumn 2021.

The last full year of data available is for 2019, the statistic for which are set out in the table 1, note that ‘motorway’ refers to ‘conventional motorways’ excluding all other types set out in the table.

As outlined in the published STATS19 data, the number of incidents increased across the network in 2019, and the amount of All Lane Running (ALR) sections of the network also increased over this period. In the time available, it has not been possible to provide data on accidents and breakdowns for each stretch of motorway.

Highways England does not hold data for the attendance of incidents by vehicle recovery companies or the emergency services.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the (a) longest and (b) shortest amount of time taken for rescue vehicles to reach vehicles that have broken down on smart motorways in each of the last 5 years.

The number of accidents has been taken to mean the number of injury casualties. The tables in Annexes B, C and D of the Smart Motorways Evidence Stocktake and Action Plan show the number of reported casualties by road class on England's Strategic Road Network (SRN) for slight, serious and fatal casualties. These tables show the casualty split on different types of motorway. These tables are attached for ease of reference. Highways England is currently analysing the 2019 data and, when available, will analyse the 2020 data, which is expected to be in Autumn 2021.

The last full year of data available is for 2019, the statistic for which are set out in the table 1, note that ‘motorway’ refers to ‘conventional motorways’ excluding all other types set out in the table.

As outlined in the published STATS19 data, the number of incidents increased across the network in 2019, and the amount of All Lane Running (ALR) sections of the network also increased over this period. In the time available, it has not been possible to provide data on accidents and breakdowns for each stretch of motorway.

Highways England does not hold data for the attendance of incidents by vehicle recovery companies or the emergency services.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made on the potential for synthetic fuel to drive motor vehicles to help meet the 2035 ban on diesel and petrol cars.

The Government is consulting on ending the sale of new petrol, diesel and hybrid cars and vans from 2040 to 2035, or earlier if feasible. This is in line with advice from the independent Committee on Climate Change on what is required to achieve net zero emissions in 2050. Existing vehicles will be unaffected by this.

Renewable fuels, including renewable synthetic fuels, are incentivised through the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation and are an important measure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as we transition to zero emission vehicles.

Vehicles fuelled by renewable synthetic equivalents of petrol and diesel have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions but are unlikely to offer the air quality benefits of battery electric or hydrogen fuelled vehicles.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to provide exemptions to specialist automotive sectors from the proposed ban on the sale of petrol and diesel vehicles in 2035.

The Prime Minister announced last week that we are consulting on bringing forward the end to the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans to 2035, or earlier if a faster transition appears feasible, as well as including hybrids for the first time. We are consulting on the Committee on Climate Change recommendation that any new vehicles sold after the phase out date must be zero emission at the tailpipe. We understand the concerns of low volume manufacturers and we will be engaging with stakeholders on a package of support allowing us to seize the opportunities and lead the world in the shift to zero emission vehicles.

As part of this consultation, we are asking what the accompanying package of support will need to be to enable the transition and minimise the impacts on businesses and consumers across the UK, building on the significant demand and supply side measures already in place. The Government will continue to work with all sectors of industry to accelerate the rollout of zero emission vehicles - helping to deliver new green jobs in the UK.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many driving licences were (a) revoked and (b) suspended for medical reasons in each of the last five years.

The table below provides a breakdown of revocations or applications refused on medical grounds, for drivers with car and motorcycle entitlement (group one) and for drivers with lorry and bus entitlement (group two) for the last five calendar years.

Year

Group1 (car/motorcycle)

Group 2 (lorry/bus)

2015

47,658

8,095

2016

61,354

10,665

2017

59,163

11,213

2018

61,482

12,242

2019

62,613

10,371

Some individuals may be recorded in both groups as their licences to drive all vehicles have been revoked or refused. Others may not meet the higher medical standards required for driving lorries or buses but may have been allowed to retain their entitlement to drive cars and motorcycles.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency does not temporarily suspend driving licences for medical reasons.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
8th Mar 2021
What assessment she has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the level of welfare support required by disabled people.

This Government is committed to supporting disabled people affected by the Covid-19 outbreak and has delivered an unprecedented package of support, putting £7 billion into the welfare system.

We continue to monitor the impact on disabled people using existing and new data sources, whilst ensuring that they are able to access the support they need.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reasons the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence postponed the publication of the guidelines on (a) myalgia encephalomyelitis, (b) chronic fatigue syndrome and (c) post viral fatigue syndrome.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) issued a statement on their decision to pause the publication of the guideline on myalgia encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome which is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/news/article/nice-pauses-publication-of-updated-guideline-on-diagnosis-and-management-of-me-cfs

NICE is not currently developing a guideline on post viral fatigue syndrome.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many doctors have been recruited by the NHS from overseas in each last five years.

The following tables show people with a non-United Kingdom nationality joining the National Health Service, not people who have been recruited directly from abroad.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), but not staff working in primary care or in general practitioner surgeries, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the number of doctors with a nationality other than British joining NHS trusts and CCGs as at September 2019 and at each year since 2014 (headcount).

September 2014-15

September 2015-16

September 2016-17

September 2017-18

September 2018-19

European Union

2,259

2,262

2,087

2,117

2,088

European Economic Area (EEA)

43

36

44

46

38

Rest of World

3,161

3,374

3,872

4,675

6,670

Unknown

791

807

1,143

931

713

The following table shows the number of nurses with a nationality other than British joining the NHS trusts and CCGs as at September 2019 and at each year since 2014 (headcount).

September 2014-15

September 2015-16

September 2016-17

September 2017-18

September 2018-19

EU

5,817

5,941

2,779

2,313

2,328

EEA

21

17

12

17

18

Rest of World

2,161

2,782

2,993

4,325

7,068

Unknown

1,417

1,817

1,167

1,078

733

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many nurses have been recruited from overseas in each last five years.

The following tables show people with a non-United Kingdom nationality joining the National Health Service, not people who have been recruited directly from abroad.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), but not staff working in primary care or in general practitioner surgeries, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the number of doctors with a nationality other than British joining NHS trusts and CCGs as at September 2019 and at each year since 2014 (headcount).

September 2014-15

September 2015-16

September 2016-17

September 2017-18

September 2018-19

European Union

2,259

2,262

2,087

2,117

2,088

European Economic Area (EEA)

43

36

44

46

38

Rest of World

3,161

3,374

3,872

4,675

6,670

Unknown

791

807

1,143

931

713

The following table shows the number of nurses with a nationality other than British joining the NHS trusts and CCGs as at September 2019 and at each year since 2014 (headcount).

September 2014-15

September 2015-16

September 2016-17

September 2017-18

September 2018-19

EU

5,817

5,941

2,779

2,313

2,328

EEA

21

17

12

17

18

Rest of World

2,161

2,782

2,993

4,325

7,068

Unknown

1,417

1,817

1,167

1,078

733

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of overseas (a) doctors and (b) nurses have indefinite leave to remain.

The Department does not hold the information requested.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his Department's policy is on the availability of medicinal cannabis; and if he will list the medical conditions that the NHS treats with medicinal cannabis.

On 1 November 2018, the law was changed to allow clinicians on the General Medical Council’s (GMC) Specialist Register to prescribe cannabis-based products for medicinal use, where clinically appropriate and in the best interests of patients. The law does not restrict the medical conditions for which these products may be used, and the decision of whether to prescribe is ultimately one for clinicians to make on a case by case basis.

Two reviews have taken place since this change in the law:

- On 8 August 2019, NHS England and NHS Improvement published its review into barriers to accessing cannabis-based products for medicinal use on NHS prescription which is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/barriers-to-accessing-cannabis-based-products-for-medicinal-use-on-nhs-prescription/

- On 11 November 2019, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), following a review of the available evidence, published guidance on the prescribing of cannabis-based medicinal products which is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng144

This demonstrates a clear need for more evidence to support prescribing and funding decisions of cannabis-based medicines for intractable nausea and vomiting; chronic pain; spasticity; and severe treatment-resistant epilepsy.

We continue to work hard with the health system, industry and researchers to improve the evidence base for cannabis-based medicines and to implement the recommendations of NHS England and NHS Improvement’s review.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he has taken to establish a partnership with Rotary International on the joint goal of eradicating polio.

Thanks to the joint efforts of Rotary International and the UK Government, we have made major strides in defeating the polio virus. The UK Government appreciates the tireless campaigning and generous fundraising achieved by Rotarians on behalf of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI), which has vaccinated millions against polio in the world's poorest countries.

Alongside Rotary, the UK Government has also supported GPEI since 1995 as the second largest sovereign donor. Through our joint commitment and strong advocacy, more than 18 million people are able to walk today who would have otherwise been paralysed by the virus. This decades-long partnership between Rotary International and the UK Government has eliminated the wild polio virus from Africa. We will continue our advocacy together, from the global to the grassroots level, until the wild polio virus is eliminated worldwide.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what funding is available for Rotary Great Britain and Ireland and other UK-based voluntary groups to support their work in eradicating polio.

Rotary in Great Britain and Ireland is supported by contributions from the public. These contributions are transformed into service projects and grants that support polio eradication. The UK Government does not fund Rotary directly, though we work closely together as joint donors and partners in ridding the world of the polio virus through the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

The Foreign, Commonwealth, and Development Office provides support to UK charities making a difference through grants, and our flagship volunteer scheme. The Small Charities Challenge Fund provides grants to UK charities addressing Global Goals. The Volunteering for Development programme, delivered in partnership with Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO), supports volunteers to make an impact in the world's poorest communities.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to facilitate the safe return of UK Nationals on the Coral Princess during the covid-19 outbreak.

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, we have worked hard to support British nationals aboard cruise ships. Over 350 British passengers and crew members aboard the Coral Princess returned to the UK on three separate charter flights - two flights on 6 April and one on the 9 April - organised by the cruise company, and British Airways. The FCO worked closely with the cruise company and partners across Whitehall, including the Department for Transport, Public Health England, the Department for Health and Social Care and Border Force to ensure British nationals were safely repatriated to the UK.

Upon their return, the cruise company organised private transport for those who did not have family members to collect them, and they were also advised to self-isolate for 14 days in line with advice from the Department of Health and Social Care and Public Health England.

Of the four remaining British passengers who were not fit to travel on the repatriation flights, one has was discharged from hospital on 15 April and will shortly be repatriated to the UK. Three remain in hospital in Miami and are receiving consular support from the British Consulate General.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many British nationals aged between 13 and 25 died in (a) Spain and (b) the rest of the world in each of the last five years.

The FCO does not hold a complete record of information requested as it is not obligatory for states to inform us of the deaths of British Nationals in their territory, nor do we record the details of British nationals overseas who do not require assistance.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
12th Jul 2021
What plans she has to support police forces in coastal communities.

The Government is supporting all forces, including those in costal communities, by providing 20,000 extra police officers; with 8,771 already in place.

We are also providing targeted investment to help high-crime areas. The Safer Streets Fund funds crime prevention activity in a range of areas, including coastal ones.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications have been submitted to the EU Settlement Scheme to date; and how many of those application have been granted.

The latest figures can be found on the Home Office’s ‘EU Settlement Scheme statistics’ web page available at:

EU Settlement Scheme statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many immigration health surcharges have been paid by overseas (a) doctors and (b) nurses.

The Home Office does not collate or publish the information requested.

Non-EEA nationals moving to the UK for more than six months have been required to pay the Immigration Health Surcharge since April 2015.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many immigration health surcharges have been paid by overseas (a) doctors and (b) nurses.

The Home Office does not collate or publish the information requested.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of representation from the nations and regions of the UK in the armed forces; and if he will make a statement.

The UK's Armed Forces are drawn from all the regions and nations that make up the UK and they play an essential role in our Defence and security. All regular recruitment is carried out online and through a network of Armed Forces Careers Offices. Although recruits provide a postcode, this is not always an accurate reflection of their nationality or origin.

Each of the three Services benefit from historic military connections and recruiting links with specific regions and nations and recruit predominantly from those to ensure those links, culture and identities are strongly represented in the UK's Armed Forces.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) reserve and (b) regular service personnel have been based in each of the (i) nations and (ii) regions of the UK in each of the last five years.

The requested information for UK Reserve Service personnel is provided in the attached tables; figures are estimates.

Official statistics on the stationed locations of UK Regular Service personnel are published annually. The latest edition of the Ministry of Defence's (MOD) Annual Location Statistics, including data as at 1 April 2019 and going back to April 2012, can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/location-of-uk-regular-service-and-civilian-personnel-annual-statistics-2019

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans he has to bring forward proposals to amend the Party Wall Act 1996.

To ensure safe and high-quality buildings, it is important that anyone involved in a project throughout a building's lifecycle is competent to do their job properly and in compliance with the Building Regulations. The Government is working with industry to develop the professional standards of competence of those working across the built environment and enforcing a stringent new regulatory regime for high-rise residential and other in scope buildings for the Building Safety Regulator.

The Party Wall Act provides a framework for preventing and resolving disputes in relation to party walls, boundary walls and excavations near buildings. The Act is separate from obtaining planning permission or building regulations approval. At present, there are no plans to amend the Act.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Jun 2021
What recent assessment he has made of the opportunities to bid for levelling up funding.

Levelling up all four nations of our United Kingdom remains at the centre of this Government’s mission – and in particular my Department as MHCLG becomes a UK-wide Department again. Our £4.8 billion Levelling Up Fund will invest in infrastructure that improves everyday life across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales. And only a fortnight ago I was delighted to visit Wales and hear from local leaders about their exciting ambitions for their local areas, and take in the sites including Treorchy High Street – the current reigning Great British High Streets Champion.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how long it takes on average to process a probate application.

The most recently published information regarding combined waiting times for a grant of probate, on paper and digital cases, covers January 2021 to March 2021 and is published on gov.uk via Family Court Statistics Quarterly (Table 25):

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/family-court-statistics-quarterly-january-to-march-2021

Average time to grant issue for grants of Probate, England and Wales, quarterly Q3 2019 – Q1 20211,2,3,6

Probate - All

Application submission to grant issue

Document receipt to grant issue4

Year

Quarter

Grants issued

Mean weeks

Median weeks

Mean weeks

Median weeks

2019

Q3

53,403

9.5

8.0

9.5

8.0

2019

Q4

54,388

7.8

5.6

7.6

5.4

2020

Q1

49,706

6.7

4.3

6.5

4.1

2020

Q2

45,493

6.6

4.6

6.3

4.4

2020

Q3

60,221

6.7

4.9

6.0

4.4

2020

Q4

54,469

7.2

5.3

6.2

4.9

2021

Q1

57,620

7.7

4.4

5.3

0.9

Probate - Digital

Application submission to grant issue

Document receipt to grant issue4

Year

Quarter

Grants issued

Mean weeks

Median weeks

Mean weeks

Median weeks

2019

Q3

7,166

9.4

7.6

9.0

7.1

2019

Q4

11,060

10.2

9.0

9.2

8.3

2020

Q1

10,784

7.1

4.9

6.0

3.7

2020

Q2

10,955

6.1

3.7

4.7

2.1

2020

Q3

21,592

6.4

4.4

4.3

2.6

2020

Q4

21,879

6.6

3.1

4.2

0.3

2021

Q1

35,996

6.6

4.1

2.9

0.0

Probate - Paper

Application submission to grant issue

Document receipt to grant issue4

Year

Quarter

Grants issued

Mean weeks

Median weeks

Mean weeks

Median weeks

2019

Q3

46,237

9.6

8.1

9.6

8.1

2019

Q4

43,328

7.2

4.7

7.2

4.7

2020

Q1

38,922

6.6

4.1

6.6

4.1

2020

Q2

34,538

6.8

4.7

6.8

4.7

2020

Q3

38,629

6.9

5.1

6.9

5.1

2020

Q4

32,590

7.6

6.3

7.6

6.3

2021

Q1

21,624

9.4

7.7

9.4

7.7

Source: HMCTS Core Case Data

Notes:

1) HMCTS Core Case Data came into effect at the end of March 2019, following a transition between data systems recording information regarding The Probate Service

2) The average timeliness figures are produced by calculating the time from application/document receipt (which may be from an earlier period) to the grant issued made in that period. Currently grants being issued on the same day as the application submission/document receipt are being calculated as 0 days. This is being reviewed as to whether it is an accurate reflection of workload and may be adjusted in future

3) Some averages presented here may be based on a small number of grants. Where this occurs, any conclusion drawn from these will be limited

4) Document receipt occurs after payment has been made and all accompanying paperwork has been received by HMCTS. As such, it does not reflect the entire case journey from when an application is submitted by the user to when a grant is received. Instead these figures reflect the timeliness from when HMCTS staff are able to start working on the case. The aspects not included in these timeliness measures include (but are not limited to); time taken to scan and upload documents to the management system (for paper items), and check that these items are of good enough quality to proceed. For the timeliness figures for stopped cases, the figures will further exclude time taken to resolve those issues mentioned in footnote 6 below

6) A probate application can be stopped for several reasons: a caveat can be entered when there’s a dispute about either who can apply for probate or issues with a will or proposed will, or if an error is identified and a request for further information is made

Despite the unprecedented challenges faced by the probate service during the Covid 19 pandemic the average waiting for a grant of probate following receipt of the documents required has been maintained at between four to six weeks.

More recent management information published by HMCTS (which does not go through the same level of quality assurance and analysis as the Family Court Statistics Quarterly) provides waiting time information up to June 2021 for grants of probate as well as letters of administration with/without a Will annexed and reseals. This shows that the waiting time on digital grant of probate applications, which are not stopped due to errors or missing documentation, is between two and three weeks for June 2021 where paper cases, not stopped, took around five weeks in June 2021.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/hmcts-management-information-june-2021

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the (a) shortest and (b) longest wait for an appointment to be heard at a Special Education Needs Tribunal was in each of the last three years.

The table below shows the (a) shortest wait and (b) longest wait.

Year

(a) shortest wait

(b) longest wait ¹

2018/19

29 days

552 days

2017/18

21 days

771 days

2016/17 ²

24 days

1,014 days³

¹ The Tribunal lists all cases at approximately 12 - 14 weeks from the date of registration of the appeal into the Tribunal.

² Years are broken down into school years from 1 September to 31 August the following year.

³ This figure is the result of a Permission to Appeal being lodged. When this happens, timescales continue to tick and this until the appeal is resolved and this is reflected in the higher than usual waiting time.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2021
What assessment he has made of the effectiveness of economic support for Scottish businesses during the covid-19 outbreak.

The UK Government is providing continued UK-wide support and security to manage the ongoing impacts of Covid-19.

One in three jobs in Scotland has been supported by the UK Government’s unprecedented employment support package.

Scottish businesses have benefited from more than £3.4 billion of loans and support driven by UK Government schemes.

We have also provided a much needed boost to Scottish tourism and hospitality with our UK-wide VAT reduction.

Alister Jack
Secretary of State for Scotland