Lord Shinkwin

Conservative - Life peer

Financial Exclusion Committee
25th May 2016 - 25th Mar 2017


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Monday 17th January 2022
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 145 Conservative No votes vs 5 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 236 Noes - 158
Speeches
Thursday 20th January 2022
E-scooters
My Lords, I, too, thank my noble friend Lady Neville-Rolfe for giving us the opportunity to debate such an important …
Written Answers
Tuesday 4th January 2022
Environment Protection: Technology
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to share UK expertise in green technology with partners …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 3rd February 2020
Workforce Information Bill [HL] 2019-21
A bill to make provision for certain employers to be required to publish information about differences in pay relative to …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Shinkwin has voted in 200 divisions, and 15 times against the majority of their Party.

8 Mar 2021 - Domestic Abuse Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 213 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 234
23 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 33 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 214
2 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 215 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 304 Noes - 260
2 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 40 Conservative Aye votes vs 165 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 359 Noes - 188
7 Dec 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 297 Noes - 221
7 Dec 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 16 Conservative Aye votes vs 143 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 287 Noes - 161
1 Dec 2020 - Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (All Tiers) (England) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 27 Conservative Aye votes vs 178 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 64 Noes - 246
6 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 196 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 312 Noes - 211
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Conservative Aye votes vs 125 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 112 Noes - 388
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 127 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 355 Noes - 77
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 156 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 93 Noes - 418
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative Aye votes vs 151 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 401
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 144 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 409
26 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Conservative Aye votes vs 59 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 60
15 Dec 2021 - Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (Entry to Venues and Events) (England) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Shinkwin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative Aye votes vs 105 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 38 Noes - 205
View All Lord Shinkwin Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Stedman-Scott (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
(4 debate interactions)
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(4 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(8 debate contributions)
Home Office
(7 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(6 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Shinkwin's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Shinkwin, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Shinkwin has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Shinkwin has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Lord Shinkwin


A Bill to make provision for disability equality in respect of abortions.


Last Event - Report Stage : House Of Lords
Friday 24th February 2017
(Read Debate)

A bill to make provision for certain employers to be required to publish information about differences in pay relative to protected characteristics


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Monday 3rd February 2020
(Read Debate)

Lord Shinkwin has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


74 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4 Other Department Questions
22nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park on 18 November (HL3652), who assessed all permanent and temporary venues at COP26 as fully accessible; and whether they will put into the Library of the House a record of the input of the Disability Inclusive Working Group into COP26.

Inclusivity and accessibility were key priorities for the COP26 summit and the venue was designed to facilitate that. The SEC venue has been awarded the Gold Charter of Best Practice by the charity Attitude is Everything.

The COP26 permanent structures were fully wheelchair accessible, and the venue holds gold level accessibility status. A complete accessibility audit for the temporary structures was completed by the production company, Identity. The structures were all fully compliant.

The COP26 Unit Civil Society Engagement Team established an officials-led Disability Inclusive Working Group, composed of disability Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and disabled people’s organisations. This group provided helpful guidance to the unit in the run up to COP26, which was incorporated into our planning.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which minister was responsible for ensuring equal disability access to the COP26 summit; what discussions they had regarding disability access to the summit with (1) the Scottish Government, and (2) event organisers, prior to the opening of the summit; and whether they will publish their communications with (a) the Scottish Government, (b) the office of Karin Elharar, the Israeli Energy Minister, and (c) event organisers, concerning disability access to the summit.

We remain committed to an inclusive COP26, accessible to all, and the venue was designed to facilitate that. When officials were made aware of the issue in question, which was a genuine mistake, they worked urgently with the Israeli delegation to resolve this and the UK Government apologised to Minister Elharrar.

The COP26 permanent structures were fully wheelchair accessible and the venue holds gold level accessibility status. For the temporary structures a complete accessibility audit was completed and they were fully compliant.

The COP26 Unit Civil Society Engagement Team established an official-led Disability Inclusive Working Group, composed of disability Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs), who provided helpful guidance to the unit in the run up to COP26.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish a cross-Government equality action plan; and what role (1) the Equality Hub, and (2) the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, will have in any of those plans.

The Equality Hub is part of the Cabinet Office, and therefore its work is covered by the Cabinet Office’s wider Outcome Delivery Plan. All departments’ Outcome Delivery Plans for the current year were published on 15 July 2021. The Equality Hub’s work includes development and delivery of specific strategies across government, for example the National Disability Strategy.

Each department is responsible for the equality work relating to their portfolio. This will be reflected in their Outcome Delivery Plan, Equality Objectives, and other relevant strategies, and equality considerations will be factored into their wider work in line with the public sector equality duty.

The creation of the new Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities reflects the Government’s commitment to levelling up and will be instrumental in driving forward the agenda across government, ensuring we are geared up to deliver on our ambitions. This is a transformative agenda and the Department’s priority is to produce a White Paper which matches our ambition and which will drive change for years to come. The links between levelling up and equality work will be even stronger given the Minister of State for Equalities is now based in that Department.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what evaluation has been made of the decision to implement mandatory gender pay gap reporting.

We have had two successful years of gender pay gap reporting so far, with over 10,000 employers publishing their data both years. Reporting provides an unprecedented level of transparency whilst driving board level discussions and pushing employers to take real action to close the gap.

We are keeping a close eye on progress to ensure that the legislation delivers on its aims, but it is important that we give the new regulations sufficient time to embed, to see how employers are responding and what actions they are taking, before considering any changes.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the average cost of literature reviews commissioned by the Cabinet Office.

This information is not held centrally.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what measures are in place to monitor the public sector’s compliance with the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018; and what have been the findings of any compliance monitoring exercises so far.

The Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) Accessibility Regulations, came into force in September 2018. They aim to ensure public sector websites and mobile apps are accessible to all users.

In May 2020, Government Digital Service (GDS) began monitoring a sample of public sector websites using a combination of automated and manual audits. GDS also monitors websites where complaints have been sent to the Equality Advisory and Support Service and the Equalities Commission for Northern Ireland.

More information on how GDS monitors the accessibility of public sector organisations websites can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/public-sector-website-and-mobile-application-accessibility-monitoring

GDS is creating an independent group of stakeholders consisting of organisations who represent the interests of users with a wide range of access needs to help aid GDS’s accessibility monitoring duty as well as ensuring that website users and the wider accessibility community’s views are heard.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of public sector bodies’ compliance with the Public Sector (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018, now that the 23 September 2020 deadline has passed.

The Government Digital Service (GDS) is testing websites in accordance with the Accessibility Regulations.

GDS will periodically publish information about their monitoring. GDS will also, on behalf of the Minister for the Cabinet Office, publish a list of websites with non-compliant accessibility statements.

GDS encourages organisations to engage with them to increase the accessibility of their websites for users.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
16th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to publish their response to the consultation Social Value in Government Procurement, which ended on 10 June 2019.

The Government's response was unfortunately delayed due to Covid-19. We will announce further details of our revised timings in the usual way.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment, if any, they have made of the number of (1) disabled people, and (2) elderly people, who will be unable to heat their homes this winter.

The Priority Service Register (PSR) records domestic customers who, due to their personal characteristics or otherwise being in a vulnerable situation, may require Priority Services. In Ofgem’s Consumer Protection Report: Autumn 2021 the Priority Service Register (PSR) had recorded 7,032,854 consumers for electricity and 5,935,528 consumers for gas in 2020.

Elderly and disabled consumers are protected. As per Ofgem’s rules, in winter, energy suppliers must not disconnect domestic premises where the customer is of pensionable age. Additionally, suppliers must take all reasonable steps to avoid disconnecting a premise if the occupants include a person who is of pensionable age, disabled, or chronically sick. Vulnerable customers who feel they are struggling to pay their energy bills should contact their energy supplier as soon as possible to agree on a payment plan.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish their response to the Ethnicity Pay Gap Reporting Consultation, first published on 18 October 2018.

The Government ran a consultation from October 2018 to January 2019 on Ethnicity Pay Reporting. The Government met with businesses and representative organisations to understand the barriers towards reporting. A response will be published in due course.

3rd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which sectors and roles were identified in the most recent Employers’ Skills Survey as being hard to fill; what assessment they have made of the extent to which those gaps could be filled by those coming to the UK from Hong Kong under (1) the British National (Overseas) visa, and (2) any other schemes; and what plans they have (a) to identify, and (b) to recruit, suitably qualified people from Hong Kong for such roles.

On 31 January, the UK launched the new Hong Kong British National (Overseas) (BN(O)) route for those with BN(O) status and their eligible family members to come to the UK to live, study and work in virtually any capacity, on a pathway to citizenship.

There is no cap on numbers on the BN(O) route, nor are there any requirements for BN(O) status holders to have a job offer in order to apply. As such, those on the BN(O) route will be able to work in virtually any capacity (with the exception of working as a professional sportsperson or sports coach) whilst in the UK, including in the sectors and occupations highlighted in the most recent Employer Skills Survey.

The Employer Skills Survey collects data on how many vacancies are proving hard to fill due to a lack of applicants with the right skills, experience, or qualifications – these are called skill-shortage vacancies (SSVs). The most recent survey conducted in 2019 found that 24% of all vacancies were SSVs. By sector, the rates of SSVs were highest in the Construction and Manufacturing industries, with both sectors reporting that 36% of their vacancies were SSVs. By occupation group, the Skilled Trades had the highest rates of SSVs (48% of vacancies were classed as SSVs). The three specific occupations with the highest rates of SSVs were Carpenters and Joiners, Welding trades, and Metal machining setters.

These findings from the Employer Skills Survey can be found at the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/936489/ESS_2019_Skills_Needs_Report_Nov20.pdf.

Departments across Government are working together closely to ensure that necessary support and guidance is provided for BN(O) status holders who take advantage of the new visa route.

We want the UK to be the first choice for the highly skilled both from Hong Kong and around the world. This can be seen in the focus on high skilled migration in the Budget, including plans to modernise the immigration system and make it easier to use, as well as new routes for high skilled talent. We also want to ensure the UK is seen as open and welcoming to talent by those who are thinking of moving. At this stage we are considering those coming to the UK from Hong Kong as part of the wider picture of high skilled migration.

21st Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they assess the quality assurance of providers of supported internships in relation to (1) the programme structure, (2) the programme content, and (3)  the cohort outcomes. [T]

Supported Internships are an educational study programme and, as such, are inspected by Ofsted.

This is a matter for Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the noble Lord and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

22nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the STATS19 data published on 19 October on road casualties; and particularly any casualties involving e-scooters.

The STATS19 data on road casualties published on 19 October is summarised in the Department’s Reported Road Casualties Statistics Great Britain 2020 annual report published on 30 September 2021.

E-scooter casualties during 2020 based on data reported to the police are summarised in a separate factsheet published alongside the annual report, which shows that in 2020 there were 460 reported accidents involving e-scooters resulting in 484 casualties, of which 384 were e-scooters users. The majority of casualties involved minor injuries.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the outcome of the consultation on the Review of The Highway Code to improve road safety for cyclists, pedestrians and horse riders, when they plan to introduce legislation to confirm the changes to the Highway Code; and whether rules for e-scooters will be included in the upcoming changes to the Highway Code.

The consultation on the proposed changes to The Highway Code closed in October 2020, with nearly 21,000 replies received, and the Government response to the consultation was published in July 2021. Given the feedback received, we will be seeking to introduce all the proposed changes and will lay the revised version of The Highway Code in Parliament shortly.

E-scooters were not part of the consultation on the proposed changes. E-scooter trials are live in 31 areas. The evidence gathered during the trials will inform whether e-scooters should be legalised in the future, and how we can ensure their use is as safe as possible. Until we have that evidence we cannot commit to a legislative timetable.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) penalties, and (2) suspension of drivers' licences, have been given to e-scooter riders for misuse in (a) designated trial zones, and (b) all other areas.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of motoring offences in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. However, information on the type of vehicle issued with a motoring offence is not collected.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions have been had with (1) Local Authorities, (2) disability charities, and (3) Disabled People’s Organisations, to ensure (a) the effective monitoring of e-scooter pilots, (b) the enforcement of the law regarding e-scooter pilots, and (c) the effective protection of disabled and visually impaired pedestrians.

The Department has in place a national monitoring and evaluation programme for the e-scooter trials. We will be publishing reports in Autumn 2021 and Spring 2022, with a summary of the evidence collected and reviewed so far by our evaluation contractor, Arup.

This will include high level information on the number of trips; average distance and duration; scooter availability; and demographic information about users, from across the trials.

The evaluation is collecting data on accidents and injuries through surveys with e-scooter users and residents living within trial areas, along with an estimation of e-scooter casualties using free text in the STATS19 database. STATS19 is a collection of all road traffic accidents that resulted in a personal injury and were reported to the police within 30 days of the accident.

Outside the trial areas e-scooters are not currently one of the designated vehicle types collected in STATS19, and as such they would be classed as ‘other’ and can only be identified using a free text field in the STATS19 database.

Data for 2020 are currently being collated and validated. Subject to the data recorded in the free text field being of sufficient quality, the Department intends to publish data on e-scooters and other vehicle types, which can be reliably identified from the free text field alongside the publication of the annual publication of the Reported Road Casualties Great Britain in September 2021.

The Department is not collecting data on the number of e-scooters sold.

It is not illegal to sell an e-scooter, however under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 there is a general obligation for traders to give consumers sufficient information about goods and services at the point of sale, so consumers are not misled. The regulations ban commercial practices through which omissions and actions cause, or are likely to cause, the average consumer to make a decision they would otherwise not make, for example, to purchase goods or a service that they would otherwise not have purchased. The CPRs carry criminal penalties and are enforced by local authority trading standards officers.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) leads on ensuring responsible business practices. However, in December 2018 Ministers from this Department wrote to micromobility retailers to remind them of the law regarding the sale of e-scooters and we are planning to do so again shortly. It is in everyone’s interest that consumers can make properly informed decisions when buying these products.

The vehicle special orders (VSOs) issued to allow the trials to take place, contain the maximum number of e-scooters that are allowed in a trial area. This number is set by the local authority and the e-scooter operator, taking into account local circumstances, and is authorised by the Department. We collect monthly sit-rep reports from the local authorities in the trial areas and these include the size of the current fleet. We do not hold, nor are we collecting, any data on the number of e-scooters in use outside trial areas.

Since July 2020 we have held four e-scooter roundtable meetings with groups representing the interests of disabled people, including those with sight loss. The most recent roundtable was held on 7 June 2021, where three local areas involved in the trials, gave presentations on what they are doing to address the concerns of disabled people in trial areas.

We have instructed all local authorities participating in trials to engage throughout the trial period with these groups in their local areas to ensure their concerns are being heard and, where possible, mitigated. Following our consultation last year, and feedback from subsequent stakeholder activities, we have required all e-scooters used in trials to have a horn or bell so that users can make others aware of their presence. The Department’s guidance for trial areas is also clear that there needs to be sufficient parking provision in trial areas; where a dockless operating model is being used, local authorities should ensure that e-scooters do not become obstructive to other road users and pedestrians, particularly those with disabilities.

The Department has in place a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation programme and we have also made additional commitments such as allowing vulnerable road user groups to take part in the evaluation process.

There are offences and penalties for using an e-scooter illegally. Users can be fined up to £300, have 6 points put on their driving licence, and the e-scooter can be impounded. We are speaking with the police about enforcement during trials, and local authorities are speaking to police forces in their areas.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what data they (1) hold, and (2) are collecting, on the number of e-scooters that are in use in (a) designated pilot areas, and (b) other areas.

The Department has in place a national monitoring and evaluation programme for the e-scooter trials. We will be publishing reports in Autumn 2021 and Spring 2022, with a summary of the evidence collected and reviewed so far by our evaluation contractor, Arup.

This will include high level information on the number of trips; average distance and duration; scooter availability; and demographic information about users, from across the trials.

The evaluation is collecting data on accidents and injuries through surveys with e-scooter users and residents living within trial areas, along with an estimation of e-scooter casualties using free text in the STATS19 database. STATS19 is a collection of all road traffic accidents that resulted in a personal injury and were reported to the police within 30 days of the accident.

Outside the trial areas e-scooters are not currently one of the designated vehicle types collected in STATS19, and as such they would be classed as ‘other’ and can only be identified using a free text field in the STATS19 database.

Data for 2020 are currently being collated and validated. Subject to the data recorded in the free text field being of sufficient quality, the Department intends to publish data on e-scooters and other vehicle types, which can be reliably identified from the free text field alongside the publication of the annual publication of the Reported Road Casualties Great Britain in September 2021.

The Department is not collecting data on the number of e-scooters sold.

It is not illegal to sell an e-scooter, however under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 there is a general obligation for traders to give consumers sufficient information about goods and services at the point of sale, so consumers are not misled. The regulations ban commercial practices through which omissions and actions cause, or are likely to cause, the average consumer to make a decision they would otherwise not make, for example, to purchase goods or a service that they would otherwise not have purchased. The CPRs carry criminal penalties and are enforced by local authority trading standards officers.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) leads on ensuring responsible business practices. However, in December 2018 Ministers from this Department wrote to micromobility retailers to remind them of the law regarding the sale of e-scooters and we are planning to do so again shortly. It is in everyone’s interest that consumers can make properly informed decisions when buying these products.

The vehicle special orders (VSOs) issued to allow the trials to take place, contain the maximum number of e-scooters that are allowed in a trial area. This number is set by the local authority and the e-scooter operator, taking into account local circumstances, and is authorised by the Department. We collect monthly sit-rep reports from the local authorities in the trial areas and these include the size of the current fleet. We do not hold, nor are we collecting, any data on the number of e-scooters in use outside trial areas.

Since July 2020 we have held four e-scooter roundtable meetings with groups representing the interests of disabled people, including those with sight loss. The most recent roundtable was held on 7 June 2021, where three local areas involved in the trials, gave presentations on what they are doing to address the concerns of disabled people in trial areas.

We have instructed all local authorities participating in trials to engage throughout the trial period with these groups in their local areas to ensure their concerns are being heard and, where possible, mitigated. Following our consultation last year, and feedback from subsequent stakeholder activities, we have required all e-scooters used in trials to have a horn or bell so that users can make others aware of their presence. The Department’s guidance for trial areas is also clear that there needs to be sufficient parking provision in trial areas; where a dockless operating model is being used, local authorities should ensure that e-scooters do not become obstructive to other road users and pedestrians, particularly those with disabilities.

The Department has in place a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation programme and we have also made additional commitments such as allowing vulnerable road user groups to take part in the evaluation process.

There are offences and penalties for using an e-scooter illegally. Users can be fined up to £300, have 6 points put on their driving licence, and the e-scooter can be impounded. We are speaking with the police about enforcement during trials, and local authorities are speaking to police forces in their areas.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what data they (1) hold, and (2) are collecting, on the number of pedestrian injuries as a result of e-scooter use in (a) designated trial zones, and (b) other areas.

The Department has in place a national monitoring and evaluation programme for the e-scooter trials. We will be publishing reports in Autumn 2021 and Spring 2022, with a summary of the evidence collected and reviewed so far by our evaluation contractor, Arup.

This will include high level information on the number of trips; average distance and duration; scooter availability; and demographic information about users, from across the trials.

The evaluation is collecting data on accidents and injuries through surveys with e-scooter users and residents living within trial areas, along with an estimation of e-scooter casualties using free text in the STATS19 database. STATS19 is a collection of all road traffic accidents that resulted in a personal injury and were reported to the police within 30 days of the accident.

Outside the trial areas e-scooters are not currently one of the designated vehicle types collected in STATS19, and as such they would be classed as ‘other’ and can only be identified using a free text field in the STATS19 database.

Data for 2020 are currently being collated and validated. Subject to the data recorded in the free text field being of sufficient quality, the Department intends to publish data on e-scooters and other vehicle types, which can be reliably identified from the free text field alongside the publication of the annual publication of the Reported Road Casualties Great Britain in September 2021.

The Department is not collecting data on the number of e-scooters sold.

It is not illegal to sell an e-scooter, however under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 there is a general obligation for traders to give consumers sufficient information about goods and services at the point of sale, so consumers are not misled. The regulations ban commercial practices through which omissions and actions cause, or are likely to cause, the average consumer to make a decision they would otherwise not make, for example, to purchase goods or a service that they would otherwise not have purchased. The CPRs carry criminal penalties and are enforced by local authority trading standards officers.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) leads on ensuring responsible business practices. However, in December 2018 Ministers from this Department wrote to micromobility retailers to remind them of the law regarding the sale of e-scooters and we are planning to do so again shortly. It is in everyone’s interest that consumers can make properly informed decisions when buying these products.

The vehicle special orders (VSOs) issued to allow the trials to take place, contain the maximum number of e-scooters that are allowed in a trial area. This number is set by the local authority and the e-scooter operator, taking into account local circumstances, and is authorised by the Department. We collect monthly sit-rep reports from the local authorities in the trial areas and these include the size of the current fleet. We do not hold, nor are we collecting, any data on the number of e-scooters in use outside trial areas.

Since July 2020 we have held four e-scooter roundtable meetings with groups representing the interests of disabled people, including those with sight loss. The most recent roundtable was held on 7 June 2021, where three local areas involved in the trials, gave presentations on what they are doing to address the concerns of disabled people in trial areas.

We have instructed all local authorities participating in trials to engage throughout the trial period with these groups in their local areas to ensure their concerns are being heard and, where possible, mitigated. Following our consultation last year, and feedback from subsequent stakeholder activities, we have required all e-scooters used in trials to have a horn or bell so that users can make others aware of their presence. The Department’s guidance for trial areas is also clear that there needs to be sufficient parking provision in trial areas; where a dockless operating model is being used, local authorities should ensure that e-scooters do not become obstructive to other road users and pedestrians, particularly those with disabilities.

The Department has in place a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation programme and we have also made additional commitments such as allowing vulnerable road user groups to take part in the evaluation process.

There are offences and penalties for using an e-scooter illegally. Users can be fined up to £300, have 6 points put on their driving licence, and the e-scooter can be impounded. We are speaking with the police about enforcement during trials, and local authorities are speaking to police forces in their areas.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what data they (1) hold, and (2) are collecting, on the number of (a) accidents, and (b) injuries, resulting from the use of e-scooters in (i) designated trial zones, and (ii) other areas.

The Department has in place a national monitoring and evaluation programme for the e-scooter trials. We will be publishing reports in Autumn 2021 and Spring 2022, with a summary of the evidence collected and reviewed so far by our evaluation contractor, Arup.

This will include high level information on the number of trips; average distance and duration; scooter availability; and demographic information about users, from across the trials.

The evaluation is collecting data on accidents and injuries through surveys with e-scooter users and residents living within trial areas, along with an estimation of e-scooter casualties using free text in the STATS19 database. STATS19 is a collection of all road traffic accidents that resulted in a personal injury and were reported to the police within 30 days of the accident.

Outside the trial areas e-scooters are not currently one of the designated vehicle types collected in STATS19, and as such they would be classed as ‘other’ and can only be identified using a free text field in the STATS19 database.

Data for 2020 are currently being collated and validated. Subject to the data recorded in the free text field being of sufficient quality, the Department intends to publish data on e-scooters and other vehicle types, which can be reliably identified from the free text field alongside the publication of the annual publication of the Reported Road Casualties Great Britain in September 2021.

The Department is not collecting data on the number of e-scooters sold.

It is not illegal to sell an e-scooter, however under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 there is a general obligation for traders to give consumers sufficient information about goods and services at the point of sale, so consumers are not misled. The regulations ban commercial practices through which omissions and actions cause, or are likely to cause, the average consumer to make a decision they would otherwise not make, for example, to purchase goods or a service that they would otherwise not have purchased. The CPRs carry criminal penalties and are enforced by local authority trading standards officers.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) leads on ensuring responsible business practices. However, in December 2018 Ministers from this Department wrote to micromobility retailers to remind them of the law regarding the sale of e-scooters and we are planning to do so again shortly. It is in everyone’s interest that consumers can make properly informed decisions when buying these products.

The vehicle special orders (VSOs) issued to allow the trials to take place, contain the maximum number of e-scooters that are allowed in a trial area. This number is set by the local authority and the e-scooter operator, taking into account local circumstances, and is authorised by the Department. We collect monthly sit-rep reports from the local authorities in the trial areas and these include the size of the current fleet. We do not hold, nor are we collecting, any data on the number of e-scooters in use outside trial areas.

Since July 2020 we have held four e-scooter roundtable meetings with groups representing the interests of disabled people, including those with sight loss. The most recent roundtable was held on 7 June 2021, where three local areas involved in the trials, gave presentations on what they are doing to address the concerns of disabled people in trial areas.

We have instructed all local authorities participating in trials to engage throughout the trial period with these groups in their local areas to ensure their concerns are being heard and, where possible, mitigated. Following our consultation last year, and feedback from subsequent stakeholder activities, we have required all e-scooters used in trials to have a horn or bell so that users can make others aware of their presence. The Department’s guidance for trial areas is also clear that there needs to be sufficient parking provision in trial areas; where a dockless operating model is being used, local authorities should ensure that e-scooters do not become obstructive to other road users and pedestrians, particularly those with disabilities.

The Department has in place a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation programme and we have also made additional commitments such as allowing vulnerable road user groups to take part in the evaluation process.

There are offences and penalties for using an e-scooter illegally. Users can be fined up to £300, have 6 points put on their driving licence, and the e-scooter can be impounded. We are speaking with the police about enforcement during trials, and local authorities are speaking to police forces in their areas.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether social value requirements were (1) considered, and (2) taken into account, when awarding contracts for the Access for All programme; and if so, (a) what weighting was given to social value in each stage of the procurement process, and (b) what are the details of the social value that successful bidding organisations reported that they could add.

The Access for All Programme prioritised the busiest stations first and took into account factors such as the incidence of disability in the area, proximity to a hospital, and stations that have high numbers of interchange passengers. A proportion of the funding was also set aside for smaller projects such as customer information systems which promote confidence to travel. This is how we recognise that improved accessibility has benefits that are hard to quantify and are therefore not explicitly reported in terms of social value.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, since the additional £300 million funding for Access for All was provided in April 2019, what progress has there been in each of the 73 stations ear-marked to benefit from the fund.

Network Rail have continued to successfully deliver the Access for All programme which is due to deliver a total of 110 accessible routes at stations between April 2019 and 2024. 11 of these projects have been completed and the remainder are at various stages of development and design. The Department and the Office of Rail and Roads are working closely with Network Rail to ensure the continued successful delivery of the programme and all projects remain on track to be completed by on schedule.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Stedman-Scott on 11 November (HL3461), whether in their view the removal of the Universal Credit uplift meets the public sector equality duty tests set out in section 149(1) of the Equality Act 2010 for any of the nine protected characteristics; what evidence informs their view that the public sector equality duty does not apply to ‘temporary’ measures; and what legal advice they have sought to confirm this view.

The Government recognises that the Public Sector Equality Duty set out in Section 149 of the Equality Act 2010 is ongoing. As such, a full equality impact assessment was completed prior to the introduction of the uplift to Universal Credit and that equality impact assessment was reviewed and updated prior to implementation of the temporary six-month extension announced by the Chancellor at the Budget on 3 March 2021.

Consideration of the impact of the end of the uplift was implicit in those equality impact assessments, because the uplift was always intended as a temporary measure only. No separate assessment was therefore needed when the uplift came to an end.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Stedman-Scott on 11 November (HL3461), what assessment they have made of the number of disabled households living in poverty following the end of the Universal Credit uplift; what assessment they have made of the impact of increasing inflation and cost of living on disabled households; and what plans they have to support disabled people who are unable to work.

No assessment has been made. Official poverty statistics for individuals living in disabled families, covering the period 2020/21, will be published in March 2022, as part of the Department’s Households Below Average Income publication, subject to the usual checks on data quality. This is an annual publication.

As well as receiving support through ESA or UC Health, disabled people may be eligible for Personal Independence Payment, which helps towards some of the extra costs arising from having a long-term health condition or disability. Spending on benefits for disabled people and people with long-term ill health has never been higher and is set to increase further. In 2021/22 we are forecast to spend £59 billion.

Vulnerable households in most need of support will also benefit from the £421m Household Support Fund (HSF), a new grant made by DWP to upper tier Local Authorities across England. The Devolved Administrations will receive £80m through the Barnett Formula.

We are reviewing responses to the Health and Disability Green Paper and intend to publish a White Paper next year, setting out changes to the benefits system that will better meet the needs of claimants now and in the future by improving claimant experience of our services, enabling independent living and improving employment outcomes.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of any long-term, disproportionate effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the employment of (1) disabled people, and (2) young Black people; and what steps they are taking to address those effects.

Since 2013 (the earliest comparable year using the current definition of disability) up to the start of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic the general trend in disability employment had been positive. There had been strong growth in the number and rate of disabled people in employment and a narrowing of the gap, between the rate of disabled and non-disabled people in employment.

While quarterly statistics published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that the pandemic initially reversed these trends, there are now signs of the trends improving, with the disability employment rate returning to its pre-pandemic level in Q2 2021. The disability employment gap has also started to narrow again during Q1 and Q2 of 2021. This suggests that, in the long term, disability employment rates have not been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic.

We continue to monitor the data and annual statistics, published by the Department on 4 November 2021, provided a more detailed view of disabled people in the labour market. These included breakdowns by a number of individual and work-related characteristics and covered the first 12 months of the pandemic. The number of disabled people in employment continued to increase (year-on-year) throughout the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic but at a slower rate than seen in previous years. The number of disabled people in employment is now above pre-pandemic levels.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have provided specialist employment support remotely and made programmes easier to access. A range of DWP initiatives are supporting disabled people to start and stay in work. These include the Work and Health Programme, the Intensive Personalised Employment Support programme, Access to Work, Disability Confident and support in partnership with the health system, including Employment Advice in NHS Improving Access to Psychological Therapy services.

Data from the Annual Population Survey shows the impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on young Black people in relation to employment. Before the Covid-19 pandemic (July 2018 - June 2019) the employment rate for 16-24 year-old black people was 36.3%. This fell during the pandemic to 27.4% between July 2020 - June 2021.This is the latest available published data and therefore we cannot yet see how the employment rate of young black people has changed as the economy recovers from the pandemic.

Throughout these unprecedented times, the Government has provided crucial support to record numbers of claimants. . This includes the Youth Offer, which has been developed to ensure that 18-24 year olds claiming Universal Credit have the skills they need to look for, find and keep employment. We also have a national programme of mentoring circles, involving employers offering specialised support to young jobseekers from ethnic minority backgrounds, including young black people.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether an equality impact assessment was completed prior to the removal of the £20 Universal Credit uplift; and if so, what reference this had to disabled people.

The Department has not completed an equality impact assessment of the removal of the Universal Credit temporary uplift as it was introduced as a temporary measure.

The Chancellor announced a temporary six-month extension to the £20 per week uplift at the Budget on 3 March to support households affected by the economic shock of Covid-19. Universal Credit has provided a vital safety net for six million people during the pandemic, and the temporary uplift was part of a COVID support package worth a total of £407 billion in 2020-21 and 2021-22.

There have been significant positive developments in the public health situation since the uplift was first introduced. With the success of the vaccine rollout and record job vacancies, it is right that our focus is on helping people back into work.

Through our existing programmes such as Work and Health Programme and the Intensive Employment Support Programme we are keen to see disabled people progress in work. Over the last 8 years the number of disabled people in employment has increased by 1.5m.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what evaluation they have made of their supported employment schemes and employment support programmes for (1) disabled people, and (2) young people, since February 2020.

The Department for Work and Pensions’ two main employment support programmes for disabled people are the Work and Health Programme (WHP) and Intensive Personalised Employment Support (IPES). Both programmes are subject to ongoing evaluation to capture a full range of employment, health and wellbeing outcomes for programme participants.

Alongside these employment schemes, DWP continues to evaluate labour market interventions targeted at disabled people and those with health conditions, including:

  • Group Work: A trial of JOBS II, a 20-hour specialised job-search skills training course. An evaluation of the trial was published in July 2021: An evaluation of the Group Work (JOBS II) trial - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)
  • Employment Advisors (EAs) in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT): this initiative provides combined psychological support and employment advice to enable IAPT clients to stay in or take up work. An initial process evaluation was published in 2019: Employment Advisers in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies: process evaluation report (publishing.service.gov.uk)
  • The Health-led trials: testing whether the provision of Individual Placement Support (IPS) to people with physical and/or mild to moderate mental health conditions in Sheffield City Region (SCR) and West Midlands Combined Authority (WMCA) makes a difference to health and employment outcomes. Individual Placement and Support is a specific version of supported employment and evaluation is ongoing.

The Plan for Jobs includes specific support for young people, including Kickstart, which funds the direct creation of jobs for young people at risk of long-term unemployment. The Department for Work and Pensions will be monitoring and evaluating the Kickstart scheme, alongside the wider DWP Youth Offer, throughout and after implementation.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) whether their National Strategy for Disabled People will be published after the Cabinet Office’s systematic review of the lived experience of disabled people (CCZZ21A07) is completed, and (2) how it will take into account the findings of that review.

The systematic review of the evidence on the lived experience of disabled people in the UK is expected to conclude in autumn 2021. It is one strand of the Disability Unit's analytical work. It is part of a long-term programme of analytical work to improve and systematise the evidence base and ensure that government departments make decisions that are driven by robust evidence. It will inform the Disability Unit’s post-strategy work, including evaluation.

Any publication of the review would not be before Autumn 2021 at the earliest, due to the time it takes to conduct and write-up the review. Ministers will decide whether the final output of the review - or a condensed version of it - will be published, nearer the time.

The UK Disability Survey and the systematic review of the evidence on the lived experience of disabled people are two distinct but complementary strands of our evidence and insight and engagement work

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the Cabinet Office’s systematic review of the lived experience of disabled people (CCZZ12A07) will be made publicly available.

The systematic review is part of Disability Unit’s ongoing work to improve and systematise the evidence base on the lived experience of disabled people in the UK.

The tendering process has been overseen by Disability Unit (DU) staff as well as procurement specialists from Crown Commercial Service (CCS). We do not know about those from the CCS side, but some DU staff involved do have lived experience of disability.

The scope and criteria were drawn up by Disability Unit, informed by knowledge of the existing evidence base and its gaps, and also incorporating the focus areas of the National Strategy for Disabled People. Since the tender was conducted as an open competition, all of the criteria (e.g. the requirements and the evaluation criteria) for the tendering process were available on Contracts Finder.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will publish the criteria for the tendering process of the Cabinet Office’s systematic review of the lived experience of disabled people (CCZZ21A07).

The systematic review is part of Disability Unit’s ongoing work to improve and systematise the evidence base on the lived experience of disabled people in the UK.

The tendering process has been overseen by Disability Unit (DU) staff as well as procurement specialists from Crown Commercial Service (CCS). We do not know about those from the CCS side, but some DU staff involved do have lived experience of disability.

The scope and criteria were drawn up by Disability Unit, informed by knowledge of the existing evidence base and its gaps, and also incorporating the focus areas of the National Strategy for Disabled People. Since the tender was conducted as an open competition, all of the criteria (e.g. the requirements and the evaluation criteria) for the tendering process were available on Contracts Finder.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which disabled peoples' organisations were involved in (1) developing the criteria for the tendering process of the Cabinet Office’s systematic review of the lived experience of disabled people (CCZZ21A07), and (2) appointing the body responsible for the review.

The systematic review is part of Disability Unit’s ongoing work to improve and systematise the evidence base on the lived experience of disabled people in the UK.

The tendering process has been overseen by Disability Unit (DU) staff as well as procurement specialists from Crown Commercial Service (CCS). We do not know about those from the CCS side, but some DU staff involved do have lived experience of disability.

The scope and criteria were drawn up by Disability Unit, informed by knowledge of the existing evidence base and its gaps, and also incorporating the focus areas of the National Strategy for Disabled People. Since the tender was conducted as an open competition, all of the criteria (e.g. the requirements and the evaluation criteria) for the tendering process were available on Contracts Finder.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the panel overseeing the tendering process for the Cabinet Office’s systematic review of the lived experience of disabled people (CCZZ21A07) (1) includes, or (2) is chaired, by a disabled person.

The systematic review is part of Disability Unit’s ongoing work to improve and systematise the evidence base on the lived experience of disabled people in the UK.

The tendering process has been overseen by Disability Unit (DU) staff as well as procurement specialists from Crown Commercial Service (CCS). We do not know about those from the CCS side, but some DU staff involved do have lived experience of disability.

The scope and criteria were drawn up by Disability Unit, informed by knowledge of the existing evidence base and its gaps, and also incorporating the focus areas of the National Strategy for Disabled People. Since the tender was conducted as an open competition, all of the criteria (e.g. the requirements and the evaluation criteria) for the tendering process were available on Contracts Finder.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish in one document all the questions in the Cabinet Office’s National Strategy for Disabled People Citizen Space Survey.

The Government is committed to transforming the lives of disabled people, and will publish the National Strategy for Disabled People this year. It will be informed by insights from the lived experience of disabled people, and will focus on the issues that disabled people say are most important across all aspects of life.

On Friday 15th January, we launched the online UK Disability Survey, which complements the range of engagement already undertaken and ongoing, including lived experience research with disabled people, discussions with the Disabled Charities Consortium, the Regional Stakeholder Networks and others. Contributions to the survey will feed not only into the development of the strategy but also its delivery.

The survey questions were also included in the Easy Read document published online on the survey page (link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disability-in-the-uk-survey). The key findings and analysis of the survey will be published in due course.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what internal meetings they held between the Cabinet Office and other government departments to draft the National Strategy for Disabled People; and on what date each meeting took place.

The National Strategy will be subject to the usual processes for collective agreement by ministers which are outlined in the Cabinet Manual. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place through Cabinet and its Committees is not normally shared publicly.

We’re working hard to deliver the National Strategy for Disabled People to support our ambition to level up opportunity and inclusivity, and will publish the strategy this year. It will be informed by insights from the lived experience of disabled people, focusing on the issues that disabled people say affect them the most in all aspects and phases of life, including employment, housing, education and transport.

The Cabinet Office Disability Unit, established in November 2019, is leading and coordinating this work at official level within Government, and also with external stakeholders. The unit has engaged widely across government departments to support the development of the National Strategy. No meetings have taken place with other government departments specifically to draft the National Strategy, but regular meetings have taken place to develop the Strategy. We are also working closely with the 13 Ministerial Disability Champions on the development of the National Strategy.

The Disability Unit has also engaged with a diverse range of external stakeholders through our Disability Charities Consortium, Regional Stakeholder Networks and UK Disability online survey. By 4th March, the survey had generated more than 14,800 responses from disabled people, carers and the wider public. Other engagement has included businesses and business organisations, regulators, academia, professional bodies and the Devolved Administrations.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what reasonable adjustments they have made to ensure that the timeline for disabled people to respond to the Cabinet Office Disability Unit’s National Strategy for Disabled People survey takes into account the extra time that it will take some respondents to complete the survey on account of their disability.

The Government is committed to transforming the lives of disabled people, and will publish the National Strategy for Disabled People this year. It will be informed by insights from the lived experience of disabled people, and will focus on the issues that disabled people say are most important across all aspects of life.

On Friday 15th January, we launched the online UK Disability Survey, which complements the range of engagement already undertaken and ongoing, including lived experience research with disabled people, discussions with the Disabled Charities Consortium, the Regional Stakeholder Networks and others. Contributions to the survey will feed not only into the development of the strategy but also its delivery.

The survey questions were also included in the Easy Read document published online on the survey page (link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disability-in-the-uk-survey). The key findings and analysis of the survey will be published in due course.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish (1) the arrangements, and (2) the methodology, for analysing responses to the Cabinet Office Disability Unit’s National Strategy for Disabled People survey; and what assessment they have made of the time required for this analysis per thousand responses.

The Government is committed to transforming the lives of disabled people, and will publish the National Strategy for Disabled People this year. It will be informed by insights from the lived experience of disabled people, and will focus on the issues that disabled people say are most important across all aspects of life.

On Friday 15th January, we launched the online UK Disability Survey, which complements the range of engagement already undertaken and ongoing, including lived experience research with disabled people, discussions with the Disabled Charities Consortium, the Regional Stakeholder Networks and others. Contributions to the survey will feed not only into the development of the strategy but also its delivery.

The survey questions were also included in the Easy Read document published online on the survey page (link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disability-in-the-uk-survey). The key findings and analysis of the survey will be published in due course.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many responses to the Cabinet Office Disability Unit’s National Strategy for Disabled People survey they received within (1) the first, (2) the second, and (3) the third, week of the survey’s launch; and when they plan to publish the key findings of this survey.

The Government is committed to transforming the lives of disabled people, and will publish the National Strategy for Disabled People this year. It will be informed by insights from the lived experience of disabled people, and will focus on the issues that disabled people say are most important across all aspects of life.

On Friday 15th January, we launched the online UK Disability Survey, which complements the range of engagement already undertaken and ongoing, including lived experience research with disabled people, discussions with the Disabled Charities Consortium, the Regional Stakeholder Networks and others. Contributions to the survey will feed not only into the development of the strategy but also its delivery.

The survey questions were also included in the Easy Read document published online on the survey page (link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disability-in-the-uk-survey). The key findings and analysis of the survey will be published in due course.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish (1) the procedure, and (2) the timeline, for the sign-off of the draft National Strategy for Disabled People by (a) relevant lead officials in (i) the Cabinet Office, and (ii) the Department for Work and Pensions, (b) the relevant Cabinet Office Minister, (c) the Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work, (d) the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, (e) Secretaries of State whose departments are affected by the strategy, and (f) the Prime Minister.

The National Strategy will be subject to the usual processes for collective agreement by ministers which are outlined in the Cabinet Manual. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place through Cabinet and its Committees is not normally shared publicly.

We’re working hard to deliver the National Strategy for Disabled People to support our ambition to level up opportunity and inclusivity, and will publish the strategy this year. It will be informed by insights from the lived experience of disabled people, focusing on the issues that disabled people say affect them the most in all aspects and phases of life, including employment, housing, education and transport.

The Cabinet Office Disability Unit, established in November 2019, is leading and coordinating this work at official level within Government, and also with external stakeholders. The unit has engaged widely across government departments to support the development of the National Strategy. No meetings have taken place with other government departments specifically to draft the National Strategy, but regular meetings have taken place to develop the Strategy. We are also working closely with the 13 Ministerial Disability Champions on the development of the National Strategy.

The Disability Unit has also engaged with a diverse range of external stakeholders through our Disability Charities Consortium, Regional Stakeholder Networks and UK Disability online survey. By 4th March, the survey had generated more than 14,800 responses from disabled people, carers and the wider public. Other engagement has included businesses and business organisations, regulators, academia, professional bodies and the Devolved Administrations.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government on which dates the draft National Strategy for Disabled People was given (1) to the relevant Cabinet Office Minister, (2) to the Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work, and (3) to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions.

The National Strategy will be subject to the usual processes for collective agreement by ministers which are outlined in the Cabinet Manual. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place through Cabinet and its Committees is not normally shared publicly.

We’re working hard to deliver the National Strategy for Disabled People to support our ambition to level up opportunity and inclusivity, and will publish the strategy this year. It will be informed by insights from the lived experience of disabled people, focusing on the issues that disabled people say affect them the most in all aspects and phases of life, including employment, housing, education and transport.

The Cabinet Office Disability Unit, established in November 2019, is leading and coordinating this work at official level within Government, and also with external stakeholders. The unit has engaged widely across government departments to support the development of the National Strategy. No meetings have taken place with other government departments specifically to draft the National Strategy, but regular meetings have taken place to develop the Strategy. We are also working closely with the 13 Ministerial Disability Champions on the development of the National Strategy.

The Disability Unit has also engaged with a diverse range of external stakeholders through our Disability Charities Consortium, Regional Stakeholder Networks and UK Disability online survey. By 4th March, the survey had generated more than 14,800 responses from disabled people, carers and the wider public. Other engagement has included businesses and business organisations, regulators, academia, professional bodies and the Devolved Administrations.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what improvements have been made to measuring the outcomes since 2017 of nationally contracted programmes that support disabled people to work.

The new nationally contracted employment programmes for disabled people since 2017 are the Work and Health Programme (WHP), which began in November 2017, and Intensive Personalised Employment Support (IPES), which began in November 2019. Both of these programmes are being delivered as Randomised Control Trials to enable us to measure the average impacts they have on participants’ employment. Both include full evaluations which will also capture the impact on wider health and wellbeing outcomes.

Separately, both of these programmes also have defined job outcomes which are used for the provider payment models and for performance management purposes.

In the Work and Health Programme, a participant is classed as achieving a job outcome when they have reached a specified level of earnings once in employment, or reach six months of being in self-employment. The specified level of earnings varies across the different regions. The national WHP and the majority of Local Government Partners have an earning threshold as 16 hours per week for 26 weeks at the National living wage. However, for the West London Alliance this is at the London Living Wage and for Greater Manchester Combined Authority at the Real Living Wage. Job outcome rates are published in the Work and Health Programme statistical publication attached.

For IPES, there are two job outcome measures used; a lower threshold income measure, which is defined as earnings equivalent to eight hours per week for 26 weeks; and a higher threshold, which is the equivalent to 16 hours per week for 26 weeks. There is not currently a statistical publication for IPES as the programme has not been running for long enough.

WHP was the first programme to utilise HM Revenue & Customs Real Time Information data in its identification, payment and validation of employment programme outcomes. This use of earnings has ensured that only sustained outcomes are paid for with participants having to acquire a pre-defined level of earnings synonymous with six months in employment, rather than a durational outcome. This has had significant advantages in terms of speed and reducing the resource required by the Department for Work and Pensions and contracted providers in tracking and evidencing outcomes.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what measures have been put in place since the publication of the National Audit Office report, Supporting Disabled People to Work, to better measure the outcomes of their job centre offer, specifically around measuring (1) progress towards work; (2) time spent with customers; (3) customer satisfaction; and (4) data on satisfaction or quality of referrals to third party provision.

Since the National Audit Office’s report on Supporting was published in March 2019, we have been working to fulfil all of its recommendations. For example, as part of the evaluations of Work and Health Programme and Intensive Personalised Employment Support, we will measure the impact of the programmes on participant employment outcomes.

We have invested in 60 minutes additional work coach time per claimant per year to offer ‘supportive steps’. For some claimants, this extra support may include activities and tailored support around work options, journey towards work and work preparation activity.

In September 2019, the Department created a Customer Experience Directorate to further our commitment to improve customer service.

We have strong oversight of DWP contracted employment provision. Since the publication of the report we have reviewed and revised our commercial processes.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to review the Voluntary Reporting Framework on Disability, Mental Health and Wellbeing, published in November 2018; and how many (1) employers have reported data, and (2) employees have had their data reported, via that Framework.

There is no requirement for employers to notify the Government if they are using the Voluntary Reporting Framework on Disability, Mental Health and Wellbeing. As such, no data is held on the total number of businesses and related employees that are currently reporting on this. From November 2019 however those employers signing up to or renewing Disability Confident Level 3 Leader status have been required to use the Voluntary Reporting Framework, and other Disability Confident employers are being encouraged to use it.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of UK employers are currently signed up to Disability Confident; and what percentage of employers they estimate will be signed up by the end of 2020.

As at 31 March 2020, 17,869 employers had signed up to Disability Confident (DC). This represents 1 per cent of UK employers in 2019, of which there are estimated to be 1.329 million (Business population estimates 2019).

The information requested on private and public sector employers is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

In the current climate it is not possible to estimate the number of DC employers at the end of 2020.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of UK (1) private, and (2) public, sector employers are currently signed up to Disability Confident; and what percentage of (a) private, and (b) public, sector employers they estimate will be signed up by the end of 2020.

As at 31 March 2020, 17,869 employers had signed up to Disability Confident (DC). This represents 1 per cent of UK employers in 2019, of which there are estimated to be 1.329 million (Business population estimates 2019).

The information requested on private and public sector employers is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

In the current climate it is not possible to estimate the number of DC employers at the end of 2020.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the briefing by Kim Hoque and Nick Bacon Response to the UK Government's reforms of Disability Confident level 3, published in November 2019.

The analysis and recommendations in ‘A Response to the UK Government's reforms of Disability Confident level 3’ are a useful contribution to the debate about the future policy development of Disability Confident. On 6 January 2020, Department for Work and Pensions officials met with the authors, Kim Hoque and Nick Bacon, and Philip Connolly of the Leonard Cheshire organisation, to discuss the report.

In November 2018, we published the results of survey research commissioned from Ipsos MORI, which explored the effect that signing up to the Disability Confident scheme had on recruitment and retention attitudes towards disabled people. Half of all employers interviewed for the study said they had recruited at least one person with a disability, long-term health or mental health condition as a result of joining the scheme. Among larger employers, nearly two thirds reported the same. It was not technically possible to compare employers who are signed up to Disability Confident with other employers not signed up to the scheme but otherwise similar in every way.

As at 31 December 2019, over 15,000 employers had signed up to Disability Confident. We are not able to accurately estimate the total workforce currently working for Disability Confident organisations.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what evidence there is that organisations signed up to the Disability Confident Scheme (1) are more inclusive of disabled employees and jobseekers, and (2) employ disabled people in larger numbers, than employers who have not signed up to that scheme.

The analysis and recommendations in ‘A Response to the UK Government's reforms of Disability Confident level 3’ are a useful contribution to the debate about the future policy development of Disability Confident. On 6 January 2020, Department for Work and Pensions officials met with the authors, Kim Hoque and Nick Bacon, and Philip Connolly of the Leonard Cheshire organisation, to discuss the report.

In November 2018, we published the results of survey research commissioned from Ipsos MORI, which explored the effect that signing up to the Disability Confident scheme had on recruitment and retention attitudes towards disabled people. Half of all employers interviewed for the study said they had recruited at least one person with a disability, long-term health or mental health condition as a result of joining the scheme. Among larger employers, nearly two thirds reported the same. It was not technically possible to compare employers who are signed up to Disability Confident with other employers not signed up to the scheme but otherwise similar in every way.

As at 31 December 2019, over 15,000 employers had signed up to Disability Confident. We are not able to accurately estimate the total workforce currently working for Disability Confident organisations.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of (1) total employers, and (2) the total workforce, in the UK who fall within the Disability Confident Scheme.

The analysis and recommendations in ‘A Response to the UK Government's reforms of Disability Confident level 3’ are a useful contribution to the debate about the future policy development of Disability Confident. On 6 January 2020, Department for Work and Pensions officials met with the authors, Kim Hoque and Nick Bacon, and Philip Connolly of the Leonard Cheshire organisation, to discuss the report.

In November 2018, we published the results of survey research commissioned from Ipsos MORI, which explored the effect that signing up to the Disability Confident scheme had on recruitment and retention attitudes towards disabled people. Half of all employers interviewed for the study said they had recruited at least one person with a disability, long-term health or mental health condition as a result of joining the scheme. Among larger employers, nearly two thirds reported the same. It was not technically possible to compare employers who are signed up to Disability Confident with other employers not signed up to the scheme but otherwise similar in every way.

As at 31 December 2019, over 15,000 employers had signed up to Disability Confident. We are not able to accurately estimate the total workforce currently working for Disability Confident organisations.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of job outcomes for disabled people that can be definitively attributed to the Disability Confident Scheme; and what methodology they used to support that estimate.

The analysis and recommendations in ‘A Response to the UK Government's reforms of Disability Confident level 3’ are a useful contribution to the debate about the future policy development of Disability Confident. On 6 January 2020, Department for Work and Pensions officials met with the authors, Kim Hoque and Nick Bacon, and Philip Connolly of the Leonard Cheshire organisation, to discuss the report.

In November 2018, we published the results of survey research commissioned from Ipsos MORI, which explored the effect that signing up to the Disability Confident scheme had on recruitment and retention attitudes towards disabled people. Half of all employers interviewed for the study said they had recruited at least one person with a disability, long-term health or mental health condition as a result of joining the scheme. Among larger employers, nearly two thirds reported the same. It was not technically possible to compare employers who are signed up to Disability Confident with other employers not signed up to the scheme but otherwise similar in every way.

As at 31 December 2019, over 15,000 employers had signed up to Disability Confident. We are not able to accurately estimate the total workforce currently working for Disability Confident organisations.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what evaluation, if any, they are undertaking into the Disability Confident scheme, including how the scheme is viewed by disabled people.

The Department for Work and Pensions commissioned Ipsos MORI to conduct research with Disability Confident employers to understand the effect that signing up to the Disability Confident scheme has had on their attitudes and practices with regards to disabled people. We published the results of this research on 13 November 2018. The survey suggested the scheme has had a significant impact on disability employment practices, with half of those employers surveyed saying it had led to them taking on at least one disabled member of staff.

The Disability Confident Business Leaders Group is constantly reviewing the scheme to ensure it remains effective in helping employers recruit, retain and develop disabled people. We also receive regular representations from the Disability Charities Consortium and other disabled people’s organisations. These reviews and representations have led to recently announced improvements, including requiring Disability Confident Leader (Level 3) employers to use the Voluntary Reporting Framework to publicly report on their disability employment.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to introduce targets for closing the disability employment gap; and if so, what dates they plan to set to meet those targets.

We announced on 2 November that new Disability Confident (DC) Leaders (Level 3) and Disability Confident Leaders applying for re-accreditation will need to use the voluntary reporting framework (VRF) to publicly report on disability employment. A copy of which is attached. Although there is flexibility in how employers can use the VRF, we expect that most DC Leaders would choose to combine it with their annual report and accounts.

We developed the voluntary reporting framework with a group of employers and disability stakeholders. It is deliberately designed to be flexible, recognising that different employers start in different places. It does not require reporting on pay and we have no current plans to require pay reporting.

Disability Confident leaders are now required to publicly report using the voluntary reporting framework and one of the measures the framework encourages is the number of disabled people employed.

The definition of disability in the voluntary reporting framework is self-declared, asking employees if they ‘consider’ themselves to have a disability. The framework is both voluntary and flexible, designed based on feedback from employers and other stakeholders. If we choose to go further in future, we will look at the case for alignment with the definition of disability in the Equality Act 2010.

We are committed to reducing the disability employment gap, and will report on progress regularly. We will consider the case for a target as part of our work on the new National Disability Strategy which we have committed to publish by the end of 2020.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to amend the wording in the framework for voluntary reporting on disability, mental health and wellbeing so that it matches the definition of disability in the Equality Act 2010 and the Government Statistical Service's disability disclosure question.

We announced on 2 November that new Disability Confident (DC) Leaders (Level 3) and Disability Confident Leaders applying for re-accreditation will need to use the voluntary reporting framework (VRF) to publicly report on disability employment. A copy of which is attached. Although there is flexibility in how employers can use the VRF, we expect that most DC Leaders would choose to combine it with their annual report and accounts.

We developed the voluntary reporting framework with a group of employers and disability stakeholders. It is deliberately designed to be flexible, recognising that different employers start in different places. It does not require reporting on pay and we have no current plans to require pay reporting.

Disability Confident leaders are now required to publicly report using the voluntary reporting framework and one of the measures the framework encourages is the number of disabled people employed.

The definition of disability in the voluntary reporting framework is self-declared, asking employees if they ‘consider’ themselves to have a disability. The framework is both voluntary and flexible, designed based on feedback from employers and other stakeholders. If we choose to go further in future, we will look at the case for alignment with the definition of disability in the Equality Act 2010.

We are committed to reducing the disability employment gap, and will report on progress regularly. We will consider the case for a target as part of our work on the new National Disability Strategy which we have committed to publish by the end of 2020.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to require large employers to publish data on the (1) number, and (2) pay, of disabled employees.

We announced on 2 November that new Disability Confident (DC) Leaders (Level 3) and Disability Confident Leaders applying for re-accreditation will need to use the voluntary reporting framework (VRF) to publicly report on disability employment. A copy of which is attached. Although there is flexibility in how employers can use the VRF, we expect that most DC Leaders would choose to combine it with their annual report and accounts.

We developed the voluntary reporting framework with a group of employers and disability stakeholders. It is deliberately designed to be flexible, recognising that different employers start in different places. It does not require reporting on pay and we have no current plans to require pay reporting.

Disability Confident leaders are now required to publicly report using the voluntary reporting framework and one of the measures the framework encourages is the number of disabled people employed.

The definition of disability in the voluntary reporting framework is self-declared, asking employees if they ‘consider’ themselves to have a disability. The framework is both voluntary and flexible, designed based on feedback from employers and other stakeholders. If we choose to go further in future, we will look at the case for alignment with the definition of disability in the Equality Act 2010.

We are committed to reducing the disability employment gap, and will report on progress regularly. We will consider the case for a target as part of our work on the new National Disability Strategy which we have committed to publish by the end of 2020.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to extend the voluntary reporting on disability, mental health and wellbeing framework to include the number or proportion of disabled employees in each pay quartile.

We announced on 2 November that new Disability Confident (DC) Leaders (Level 3) and Disability Confident Leaders applying for re-accreditation will need to use the voluntary reporting framework (VRF) to publicly report on disability employment. A copy of which is attached. Although there is flexibility in how employers can use the VRF, we expect that most DC Leaders would choose to combine it with their annual report and accounts.

We developed the voluntary reporting framework with a group of employers and disability stakeholders. It is deliberately designed to be flexible, recognising that different employers start in different places. It does not require reporting on pay and we have no current plans to require pay reporting.

Disability Confident leaders are now required to publicly report using the voluntary reporting framework and one of the measures the framework encourages is the number of disabled people employed.

The definition of disability in the voluntary reporting framework is self-declared, asking employees if they ‘consider’ themselves to have a disability. The framework is both voluntary and flexible, designed based on feedback from employers and other stakeholders. If we choose to go further in future, we will look at the case for alignment with the definition of disability in the Equality Act 2010.

We are committed to reducing the disability employment gap, and will report on progress regularly. We will consider the case for a target as part of our work on the new National Disability Strategy which we have committed to publish by the end of 2020.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to make the framework for voluntary reporting on disability, mental health and wellbeing a mandatory requirement for Disability Confident Leaders.

We announced on 2 November that new Disability Confident (DC) Leaders (Level 3) and Disability Confident Leaders applying for re-accreditation will need to use the voluntary reporting framework (VRF) to publicly report on disability employment. A copy of which is attached. Although there is flexibility in how employers can use the VRF, we expect that most DC Leaders would choose to combine it with their annual report and accounts.

We developed the voluntary reporting framework with a group of employers and disability stakeholders. It is deliberately designed to be flexible, recognising that different employers start in different places. It does not require reporting on pay and we have no current plans to require pay reporting.

Disability Confident leaders are now required to publicly report using the voluntary reporting framework and one of the measures the framework encourages is the number of disabled people employed.

The definition of disability in the voluntary reporting framework is self-declared, asking employees if they ‘consider’ themselves to have a disability. The framework is both voluntary and flexible, designed based on feedback from employers and other stakeholders. If we choose to go further in future, we will look at the case for alignment with the definition of disability in the Equality Act 2010.

We are committed to reducing the disability employment gap, and will report on progress regularly. We will consider the case for a target as part of our work on the new National Disability Strategy which we have committed to publish by the end of 2020.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the extent to which NHS shortages of (1) nurses, (2) medical practitioners, and (3) other staff, could be filled by those coming to the UK from Hong Kong under (a) the British National (Overseas) visa, and (b) any other schemes; and what plans they have (i) to identify, and (ii) to recruit, suitably qualified people from Hong Kong for such roles.

Hong Kong is not on the World Health Organization’s Workforce Support and Safeguard List, 2020. Therefore, the Department considers Hong Kong a suitable country for supplying the National Health Service with qualified health workers. Agencies are working in Hong Kong and some nurses have already joined the NHS.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps, if any, they are taking to (1) measure, (2) monitor, and (3) reduce, the (a) gender, (b) ethnicity, (c) disability, and (d) LGBTQ+, pay gap.

Pay gaps are caused by a range of factors. To address them, we must ensure that everybody has equal access to opportunities.

In 2017, we introduced mandatory gender pay gap reporting for large employers, providing an unprecedented level of transparency. The gender pay gap is currently at a record low of 17.3%. However, the gap for full-time employees increased slightly to 8.9%. To address the drivers of the gap, we’ve set out a package of commitments aiming to empower women from school right through to retirement.

The Government ran a consultation from October 2018 to January 2019 on Ethnicity Pay Reporting and received over 300 detailed responses. The Government met with businesses and representative organisations to understand the barriers towards reporting and what information could be published to allow for meaningful action to be taken. We have also run voluntary methodology testing with a broad range of businesses to better understand the complexities outlined in the consultation using real payroll data and will share next steps in due course.

Calculation and monitoring of disability and LGBT pay gaps raises significant issues of self-reporting and data accuracy and this data is not widely collected by employers. Although we have no plans for data collection of pay for these characteristics, we want to achieve practical changes for disabled people, which remove barriers and increase opportunity. The Government will publish an ambitious ‘National Strategy for Disabled People’. We will ensure that the lived experience of disabled people is at the heart of the new National Strategy and focus on the issues that disabled people say affect them the most.

The 108,000 respondents to the National LGBT Survey told us that their priority in the workplace is to tackle discrimination. So the Government Equalities Office is exploring the creation of a package of measures to tackle LGBT workplace discrimination. LGBT people should be able to be themselves in the workplace, so that they can do their best work and achieve their full potential.

Diverse workforces make good business sense. For example, organisations in the top 25% for gender diversity on their executive teams are 21% more likely to have profits above their industry average, and organisations where over 20% of managers are women have been associated with higher performance than organisations with less than 15% representation of women.

16th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to share UK expertise in green technology with partners in (1) the Middle East, and (2) North Africa region, following the water-for-energy deal agreed by Israel and Jordan, and brokered by the United Arab Emirates.

The Middle East and North Africa region, particularly as one of the most water stressed regions in the world, will be profoundly affected by climate change. Regional co-operation to address shared challenges, such as the water for energy deal, is necessary. The UK is committed to supporting the region transition to low carbon economies and to adapt to future climate change. Through Build Back Better, HMG will be exploring ways to supplement existing efforts which include work on green finance instruments across North Africa using the expertise of the Bank of England and the recent £50m contribution to the High Impact Partnership for Climate Action trust fund delivered by London headquartered European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent discussions they have had with the government of France regarding steps to counter levels of antisemitism in the UK and France.

The UK and France stand together in opposing antisemitism. The UK works with France and other partners in the UN, OSCE, G7 and Council of Europe to promote and protect freedom of religion or belief for all.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to make a statement regarding the Durban IV event commemorating the 2001 World Conference Against Racism in Durban.

The United Kingdom is committed to combatting all forms of racism, including anti-Semitism, both at home and abroad. We believe that one of the most effective ways to tackle injustices and advocate respect among different religious and racial groups is to encourage all states to uphold their human rights obligations. Some of the anti-Semitic actions and speeches in and around the 2001 Durban conference and its various follow-up events gave rise to serious concerns. We will consider UK attendance in the light of developments between now and the commemoration event, including the likelihood of any recurrence of anti-Semitism.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports about the possibility of (1) antisemitism, and (2) anti-Israel sentiment, at events marking the anniversary of the 2001 World Conference Against Racism in Durban

The United Kingdom is committed to combatting all forms of racism, including anti-Semitism, both at home and abroad. We believe that one of the most effective ways to tackle injustices and advocate respect among different religious and racial groups is to encourage all states to uphold their human rights obligations. Some of the anti-Semitic actions and speeches in and around the 2001 Durban conference and its various follow-up events gave rise to serious concerns. We will consider UK attendance in the light of developments between now and the commemoration event, including the likelihood of any recurrence of anti-Semitism.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports that the Palestinian Authority contributed to the salaries of prisoners convicted of terrorists offences in 2020.

We are clear that the prisoner payments system should be reformed. The UK has raised the need for reform at the highest levels of the Palestinian Authority (PA), including when the Foreign Secretary visited the Occupied Palestinian Territories in August 2020.
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the President of the United States to support the resumption of direct talks between the government of Israel and the Palestinian Authority.

The UK works closely with the US on matters relating to the Middle East Peace Process and we will continue to work closely with the US Administration, as we would normally do, on a variety of issues.

Only the leaders of Israel and the Palestinian Authority can determine the needs and aspirations of their people. However, we have encouraged them to resume cooperation and work towards further dialogue. Peace will only come through negotiations between the parties, but international action has a role in facilitating progress. Meanwhile, the parties should do all they can to reverse the negative trends - including systematic settlement expansion and demolitions in the West Bank, violence and incitement, and the dire situation in Gaza.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the government of Pakistan about the ruling of Lahore High Court on the legality of the marriage and religious conversion of Maira Shahbaz, in the light of (1) reports that she was abducted at gunpoint by the man to whom she was subsequently married, and (2) the earlier ruling of the Faisalabad and District Sessions Court that she was underage at the time of the marriage.

We are closely monitoring Maira Shahbaz's case following her reported abduction in April. The UK Government strongly condemns the forced marriage and forced conversion of women and girls.

We are concerned about women's and girls' rights and ongoing reports of forced marriage and forced conversion in Pakistan of women and girls from religious minorities such as Hindus, Christians and Sikhs.

We regularly raise our concerns about Freedom of Religion or Belief, women and girl's rights and gender equality with the government of Pakistan at a senior level. Most recently, I raised our human rights concerns with Pakistan's Minister for Human Rights, Dr Shireen Mazari, on 15 July.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of Executive Order 13959 from the President of the United States on Addressing the Threat from Securities Investments that Finance Communist Chinese Military Companies; and whether they plan to enact a similar policy.

The Government has put in place a framework to ensure that the UK has clean, transparent and safe markets, overseen by high quality independent regulators. The UK is well known as a global financial centre with high standards.

The Government has powers in place to ensure it can tackle financial threats to UK national security, for example under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act, and the National Security and Investment Act.

It would not be appropriate for the Government to comment on financial services policy or regulation in other jurisdictions.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
18th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many disabled people have been furloughed as part of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, as (1) a number and, and (2) a proportion, of all employees furloughed under that Scheme. [T]

It is not possible to provide an answer to this question as HMRC do not require employers to inform HMRC if employees included in their RTI returns or a Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme claim are disabled.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure transparent and consistent workforce data reporting to support (1) women, (2) BAME, (3) disabled, and (4) LGBTQ+, graduates to realise their potential and, on merit, reach the top of their professions.

Pay gaps are caused by a range of factors. To address them, we must ensure that everybody has equal access to opportunities.

In 2017, we introduced mandatory gender pay gap reporting for large employers, providing an unprecedented level of transparency. The gender pay gap is currently at a record low of 17.3%. However, the gap for full-time employees increased slightly to 8.9%. To address the drivers of the gap, we’ve set out a package of commitments aiming to empower women from school right through to retirement.

The Government ran a consultation from October 2018 to January 2019 on Ethnicity Pay Reporting and received over 300 detailed responses. The Government met with businesses and representative organisations to understand the barriers towards reporting and what information could be published to allow for meaningful action to be taken. We have also run voluntary methodology testing with a broad range of businesses to better understand the complexities outlined in the consultation using real payroll data and will share next steps in due course.

Calculation and monitoring of disability and LGBT pay gaps raises significant issues of self-reporting and data accuracy and this data is not widely collected by employers. Although we have no plans for data collection of pay for these characteristics, we want to achieve practical changes for disabled people, which remove barriers and increase opportunity. The Government will publish an ambitious ‘National Strategy for Disabled People’. We will ensure that the lived experience of disabled people is at the heart of the new National Strategy and focus on the issues that disabled people say affect them the most.

The 108,000 respondents to the National LGBT Survey told us that their priority in the workplace is to tackle discrimination. So the Government Equalities Office is exploring the creation of a package of measures to tackle LGBT workplace discrimination. LGBT people should be able to be themselves in the workplace, so that they can do their best work and achieve their full potential.

Diverse workforces make good business sense. For example, organisations in the top 25% for gender diversity on their executive teams are 21% more likely to have profits above their industry average, and organisations where over 20% of managers are women have been associated with higher performance than organisations with less than 15% representation of women.

17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 April (HL15262), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, how many British National (Overseas) passports were issued in each of the last 12 months for which figures are available; and how many people have used the new British National (Overseas) visa scheme to come to the UK since it was introduced in January.

The table below provides data up to the end of March on BN(O) passports issued in the last 12 months.

Volume of BN(O)s

Apr-20

363

May-20

2,270

Jun-20

7,719

Jul-20

24,972

Aug-20

33,249

Sep-20

48,081

Oct-20

60,907

Nov-20

56,563

Dec-20

39,689

Jan-21

13,315

Feb-21

8,217

Mar-21

7,032


* These figures have been taken from a live operational database. As such, numbers may change as information on that system is updated.

Information on how many visas for the Hong Kong BN(O) route have been granted between 31 January and 31 March was published in the quarterly migration statistics release on 27 May and can be found at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-statistics

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many British National (Overseas) passports were issued in each of the last 12 months for which figures are available; and how many people have used the new British National (Overseas) visa scheme to come to the UK since it was introduced in January.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Dissolution. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what policy priority they place on (1) defence of the Realm, (2) defending UK citizens from terrorist rocket attacks, and (3) neutralising the threat of terrorist rocket attacks on UK citizens.

The Defence, security and resilience of the UK and its overseas territories is the primary task of the MOD. Defence works with partners across government to ensure that the UK continues to protect its citizens from terrorism within its borders and overseas.

The Home Office are the lead department for domestic terrorist threats. Should their assessment be that the risk from a particular terrorist methodology such as rockets has increased, consideration will be given to what additional policies, if any, are required to mitigate them. The UK has well-developed systems and capabilities to mitigate the threat from terrorism, including a range of response capabilities that can be deployed to mitigate the effects of the aftermath of any such attack and pursue those responsible.

The NATO ballistic missile defence system, of which the UK is a part, protects European NATO nations from ballistic missile threats from outside the Euro-Atlantic area.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to incentivise and reward those businesses that report on the (1) gender, (2) ethnicity, (3) disability, and (4) LGBTQ+, pay gap.

Pay gaps are caused by a range of factors. To address them, we must ensure that everybody has equal access to opportunities.

In 2017, we introduced mandatory gender pay gap reporting for large employers, providing an unprecedented level of transparency. The gender pay gap is currently at a record low of 17.3%. However, the gap for full-time employees increased slightly to 8.9%. To address the drivers of the gap, we’ve set out a package of commitments aiming to empower women from school right through to retirement.

The Government ran a consultation from October 2018 to January 2019 on Ethnicity Pay Reporting and received over 300 detailed responses. The Government met with businesses and representative organisations to understand the barriers towards reporting and what information could be published to allow for meaningful action to be taken. We have also run voluntary methodology testing with a broad range of businesses to better understand the complexities outlined in the consultation using real payroll data and will share next steps in due course.

Calculation and monitoring of disability and LGBT pay gaps raises significant issues of self-reporting and data accuracy and this data is not widely collected by employers. Although we have no plans for data collection of pay for these characteristics, we want to achieve practical changes for disabled people, which remove barriers and increase opportunity. The Government will publish an ambitious ‘National Strategy for Disabled People’. We will ensure that the lived experience of disabled people is at the heart of the new National Strategy and focus on the issues that disabled people say affect them the most.

The 108,000 respondents to the National LGBT Survey told us that their priority in the workplace is to tackle discrimination. So the Government Equalities Office is exploring the creation of a package of measures to tackle LGBT workplace discrimination. LGBT people should be able to be themselves in the workplace, so that they can do their best work and achieve their full potential.

Diverse workforces make good business sense. For example, organisations in the top 25% for gender diversity on their executive teams are 21% more likely to have profits above their industry average, and organisations where over 20% of managers are women have been associated with higher performance than organisations with less than 15% representation of women.

10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) how many, and (2) what proportion of, submissions to the consultation A new legal framework for abortion services in Northern Ireland, which closed on 19 December 2019, came from (a) individuals who identified themselves as a person with a disability, (b) disability charities, (c) organisations led and managed by disabled people, and (d) parents of disabled people. [T]

The public consultation, A new legal framework for abortion services in Northern Ireland, provided an opportunity for people and organisations in Northern Ireland to contribute their views on how the Government could best deliver on its statutory duty under section 9 of the Northern Ireland (Executive Formation etc.) Act 2019 in implementing the CEDAW Report recommendations.

The Government engaged with a wide range of stakeholders who reached out seeking further discussions during the consultation process. However, the consultation process did not collect personal data that would identify a respondent as a person with a disability. We carefully analysed all of the views expressed in the submissions received.

It is the Government’s firm view that the Regulations properly comply with the statutory duty under section 9 of the NIEF Act, and are also compliant with the UK’s obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
10th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many meetings (1) the Northern Ireland Office, or (2) any other Government body, had with representatives of (a) abortion providers, (b) disability charities and organisations, (c) organisations led and managed by disabled people, and (d) parents of disabled people, on the Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020.

The public consultation, A new legal framework for abortion services in Northern Ireland, provided an opportunity for people and organisations in Northern Ireland to contribute their views on how the Government could best deliver on its statutory duty under section 9 of the Northern Ireland (Executive Formation etc.) Act 2019 in implementing the CEDAW Report recommendations.

The Government engaged with a wide range of stakeholders who reached out seeking further discussions during the consultation process. However, the consultation process did not collect personal data that would identify a respondent as a person with a disability. We carefully analysed all of the views expressed in the submissions received.

It is the Government’s firm view that the Regulations properly comply with the statutory duty under section 9 of the NIEF Act, and are also compliant with the UK’s obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)