Lord Sharkey Portrait

Lord Sharkey

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

Became Member: 20th December 2010


Science and Technology Committee (Lords)
31st Jan 2023 - 31st Jan 2024
Industry and Regulators Committee
14th Apr 2021 - 31st Jan 2023
European Union Committee
15th Jul 2019 - 31st Mar 2021
EU Services Sub-Committee
23rd Apr 2020 - 31st Mar 2021
EU Financial Affairs Sub-Committee
2nd Jul 2019 - 23rd Apr 2020
EU Financial Affairs Sub-Committee
16th Jul 2019 - 23rd Apr 2020
Economic Affairs Committee
8th Jun 2015 - 1st Jul 2019
SLSC Sub-Committee A
4th Sep 2018 - 30th Apr 2019
Information Committee (Lords)
12th Jun 2014 - 31st Aug 2016
Draft Deregulation Bill (Joint Committee)
17th Jul 2013 - 11th Dec 2013


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Sharkey has voted in 495 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Sharkey Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Penn (Conservative)
Minister on Leave (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State)
(27 debate interactions)
Baroness Vere of Norbiton (Conservative)
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(56 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(40 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(29 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(20 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Financial Services and Markets Act 2023
(13,567 words contributed)
Pension Schemes Act 2021
(10,073 words contributed)
Financial Services Bill 2019-21
(9,962 words contributed)
Medicines and Medical Devices Act 2021
(8,558 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Sharkey's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Sharkey, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


3 Bills introduced by Lord Sharkey


A bill to require the Financial Conduct Authority to make rules for authorised persons to owe a duty of care to consumers in their regulated activities

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Thursday 9th January 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision for non-interest-bearing student finance facilities.

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Thursday 26th May 2016

To give a statutory pardon to Alan Mathison Turing for offences under section 11of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885 of which he was convicted on 31 March 1952.

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Wednesday 25th July 2012

Lord Sharkey has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 27 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body (1) what plans they have to publish all submissions to the review of the Restoration and Renewal Programme received from Members of both Houses of Parliament and those outside Parliament, (2) if they have such plans, when they will publish those submissions, and (3) if they have no such plans, why not.

The Strategic Review report, which is now available on the Restoration and Renewal Programme website, includes a detailed summary of the submissions made by Members of both Houses and by others.

18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the publication of the National Semiconductor Strategy on 19 May, when they expect to make a decision on the level of financial support that will be offered to underpin the competitiveness of the semiconductor manufacturing sector; and what discussions they have had to inform this decision and with whom.

The National Semiconductor Strategy sets out the government’s plan to build on the UK’s strengths to grow our sector, increase our resilience and protect our security.

We will announce plans in the autumn to further support the competitiveness of the semiconductor manufacturing sector that is critical to the UK tech ecosystem or our national security.

The Government’s new Semiconductor Advisory Panel met on 14 September and informed the Government’s approach. The panel is representative of the UK’s semiconductor industry, and the ecosystem that supports it. In an independent capacity, experts from British titans such as ARM, IQE and PragmatIC sit on the panel, as well as representation from venture capital, academia and the RaspberryPi Foundation.

Viscount Camrose
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
18th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of recent data by Enroly published on 27 March which showed that issuance of certificates of Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies has significantly reduced, with overall deposits down by more than a third on the same point in 2023.

The government seeks to ensure that there is a fair and robust migration policy, whilst maintaining the UK’s place as a top destination for the best and brightest students from around the world. The department remains committed to the ambitions set out in the government’s International Education Strategy to host 600,000 international students per year and to increase the value of our education exports to £35 billion per year, both by 2030.

The department expects the UK to remain a highly attractive study destination. The UK has four universities in the top 10, and 17 in the top 100. The UK has a highly sought after higher education (HE) experience, which is respected by students across the globe. The department is hugely proud to have met its international student recruitment ambition two years running.

However, the level of legal migration remains too high. As a result, on 4 December 2023, the government announced a new package of measures to reduce net migration and curb abuse and exploitation of the country’s immigration system. The department continues to work closely with the Home Office, Department for Business and Trade, and other governmental departments to assess the impact of these changes on HE providers.

HE providers are autonomous bodies, independent from government. As such, they are responsible for their own admissions decisions. The government takes a close interest in ensuring that the HE admissions system is fair and works closely with HE providers and sector bodies to make sure the system works well for students.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidelines the Department for Education (1) has, and (2) follows, for the time taken in responding to communications from members of the House of Lords.

In line with Cabinet Office guidance, ministers within the department aim to respond to hon. and right hon. Members of the House of Lords within 18 working days to a piece of written correspondence, written parliamentary questions within 14 days of receipt, and commitments in the House to write to hon. and right hon. Members within 10 working days or as soon as possible.

As you will understand, the department has been dealing with unprecedented volumes of correspondence due to the impact of COVID-19. The department ensures that urgent cases raised by hon. and right hon. Members are prioritised wherever possible and is taking steps to provide substantive responses in as short a time as possible.

6th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of (1) paediatric cystic fibrosis centres, and (2) adult cystic fibrosis centres, in England employed (a) a social worker, and (b) a clinical psychologist, as part of their multi-disciplinary team, for each year since 2015.

The information requested is not held centrally.

29th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Kamall on 17 March (HL7072), what the (1) mean, (2) median, and (3) maximum, waiting times were for patients who had been coded as having received a specialised service in (a) February 2020, and (b) the most recent period for which figures are available; and how many had waited longer than 18 weeks before receiving their treatment in each period.

The information requested on mean and maximum waiting times is not held. In February 2020, the estimated median waiting time for admitted treatment was 14.6 weeks, with 10,272 patients having waited more than 18 weeks for treatment. The estimated median waiting time for non-admitted treatment was 9.4 weeks, with 18,018 patients having waited more than 18 weeks for treatment.

In January 2022, the estimated median waiting time for admitted treatment was 13.7 weeks, with 7,705 patients having waited more than 18 weeks for treatment. The estimated median waiting time for non-admitted treatment was 10.7 weeks, with 21,868 patients having waited more than 18 weeks for treatment.

This data includes those patients referred to services directly commissioned by NHS England.

17th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many patients were waiting for elective treatment for which NHS England’s specialised services function was responsible in (1) February 2020, and (2) the latest month for which figures are available; how many of these patients had already waited over 18 weeks; and what was the (a) mean, and (n) median, waiting time for those patients in each time period.

The data is not available in the format requested. Patients are coded as receiving a specialised service after their treatment has taken place, therefore the number of patients waiting for specialised services is not available.

20th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Blackwood of North Oxford on 1 May 2019 (HL Deb, col 1020) that they intend to "ensure that the review takes into account the benefits offered by new treatments for severe life-threatening and rare diseases", what plans they have to provide assurances that NICE will not end the use of rarity as a decision modifier in its highly specialised technology appraisal process.

It is too soon to comment on the potential outcomes of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) methods review and any changes to that may be proposed, but issues around the use of modifiers are being explored.

NICE expects to consult on the case for change later this year, and there will be a second consultation in 2021 on the updated methods manual.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 12 May (HL4366), which aspects of the forthcoming EU Clinical Trial Regulation (Regulation (EU) (No 536/2014) they currently consider to be in the best interests of (1) UK patients, (2) industry, (3) non-commercial researchers, and (4) hospitals.

The Medicines and Medical Devices Bill 2020 will provide the mechanism to allow the United Kingdom to decide any aspects of the forthcoming European Union Clinical Trial Regulation (EU CTR) it would want to implement through national legislation.

The CTR is largely based on internationally recognised requirements to conduct a clinical trial and national UK legislation already implements many aspects of these international requirements.

Future changes made to the UK legislation will be done on the basis of what is in the best interests of the UK with the focus on remaining a leading global player, promoting patient safety; attracting more research to the UK; and enabling the UK to keep up with emerging technologies and maintain an internationally competitive clinical trials infrastructure.

12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure UK–EU clinical trials can continue after the end of the transition period, and once the EU?Clinical Trial Regulation?(Regulation (EU) No 536/2014) comes into effect.

The Government is committed to a world-leading regulatory system for clinical trials that allows us to collaborate effectively globally, ensuring the United Kingdom remains one of the best places in the world for science and innovation. At the end of the transition period, clinical trials will continue to be approved at a national level, working to international standards as they are now. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), along with partners across the UK healthcare ecosystem, has taken steps to ensure that all trials including multinational trials can continue seamlessly.

The MHRA, Health Research Authority, ethics services, National Institute for Health Research, National Health Service and devolved administrations have been preparing to implement the forthcoming European Union Clinical Trials Regulation since it was agreed in 2014. The UK will implement those aspects of the regulation which are in the best interests of UK patients, industry, non-commercial researchers and hospitals when it comes into force and this is currently expected during 2022.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential impact of COVID-19 on the work programme of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, in particular (1) the development and publication of technology appraisal guidance, and (2) the review of its methods and processes.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has adapted its priorities to support the National Health Service, local authorities and the wider health and social care sector to tackle COVID-19.

NICE’s immediate priorities include frontline staff being released from committee meetings and panels to minimise the disruption to critical care for those affected by COVID-19 and minimising the publication of outputs that might be a distraction during this critical time. NICE will only publish guidance, including technology appraisal guidance that is therapeutically critical or focused on COVID-19-related issues, and will continue with, but not publish other work, as staffing and other resources allow, including the review of its methods and processes. Information about the NICE methods review will be available shortly.

These priorities will be reviewed in six to eight weeks.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they estimate the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence will issue a consultation on changes to the routing criteria for the appraisal of medicines through its highly specialised technologies programme.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is continuing to work through the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on its work programmes. NICE anticipates that further information on the timing of the consultation on changes to the routing criteria for the appraisal of medicines through its highly specialised technologies programme should be available within the next few weeks.

25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure that the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has adequate levels of patient and patient group participation in its review of its methods and processes.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has had a specific workstream focussing on patient involvement aspects of both its methods and processes. NICE held a workshop with 22 patient groups, used the findings to develop an in-depth questionnaire and received responses from 52 patient groups. The findings and proposals of this are informing the other workstreams.

Further key aspects include having three patient group representatives on the Methods Review Working Group; having patient representatives on task and finish groups undertaking the detailed methods work; convening a Stakeholder Insight Group to inform process developments, which has numerous patient group representatives; and outreach talks at various key patient group meetings.

4th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions on the intervention by the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus in the construction of the road from Pile/Pyla to Yigitler/Arsos in Northern Cyprus they have had with (1) the United Nations, (2) the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus, (3) the government of the Republic of Cyprus, (4) the government of Türkiye, and (5) the Turkish Cypriot authorities in Northern Cyprus; and what assessment they have made of this intervention.

The UK has engaged with all parties referenced about recent events in the UN Buffer Zone to encourage de-escalation and support a diplomatic resolution. This included Ministerial-level engagement with counterparts in the Republic of Cyprus, Greece and Turkey. On 21 August, the UN Security Council issued a Press Statement that condemned the assaults on UN Peacekeepers, expressed concern at the unauthorised construction of the road and reiterated Council support for the United Nations' Peacekeeping mandate. The UK, US and French Embassies in Nicosia issued a similar statement. We have welcomed the subsequent de-escalation, but note that the injuries sustained by three British UN peacekeepers undermines the UN's ability to fulfil its peacekeeping mandate. It is also a reminder that our armed forces regularly put themselves in harm's way to support peace and stability across the globe.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
29th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the disparities between conventional and Sharia-compliant mortgage products in respect of the imposition of capital gains tax.

The government is aware of a difference in tax treatment when a commercial or residential property is refinanced using alternative rather than conventional finance methods. In these situations, a capital gains liability may arise for those using alternative financing, when this would not have been the case for those using conventional financing. The refinancing of main homes is unaffected as Private Residence Relief (PRR) applies.

On 16 January 2024, the government published the Tax Simplification for Alternative Finance consultation to seek views on reforms that would address the capital gains issue. The consultation closed on 9 April 2024 and all responses will be carefully considered and a summary of responses will be published in due course together with details of the next steps.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what, if any, statutory powers the Bank of England has to issue binding directions to (1) the Prudential Regulation Authority, (2) the Financial Conduct Authority, and (3) the Payment Systems Regulator; and on how many occasions in each year since 2007 they have been exercised.

The Treasury has statutory powers to issue directions to the Bank of England, which can only be used under specific conditions or circumstances. None of the powers outlined below have ever been used.

  • Under section 4 of the Bank of England Act 1946, the Treasury may direct the Bank, after consultation with the Governor, to action that is deemed to be necessary in the public interest. This power of direction applies to all of the Bank’s activities, with the exception of monetary policy and the exercise of the Bank’s functions as the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA).

  • Under section 19 of the Bank of England Act 1998, the Treasury may by order, after consultation with the Governor, direct the Bank with respect to monetary policy if it is deemed to be in the public interest and required by extreme economic circumstances.

  • Under section 410 of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000, the Treasury may direct the PRA and the Bank to not take an action that would be incompatible with the UK’s international obligations.

  • Under Section 61 of the Financial Services Act 2012, the Treasury may direct the Bank on specific measures relating to the assistance to or stabilisation of financial institutions.

The Bank of England also has powers to direct the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA), Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and Payment Systems Regulator (PSR).

  • Under section 9H of the Bank of England Act 1998, the Bank of England’s Financial Policy Committee (FPC) has powers of direction over the PRA and FCA (limited to the use of specific macroprudential tools). To date, the FPC has only ever used this power to implement the Leverage Ratio.

  • Under sections 9Y and 9Z of the Bank of England Act 1998, the Bank may direct the FCA to provide documents or information that the Bank reasonably requires for its financial stability functions. This power has never been used.

  • Under section 100 of the Financial Services (Banking Reform) Act 2013, the Bank has the power to direct the PSR not to exercise its powers, under specific circumstances. This power has never been used.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what, if any, statutory powers they have to issue binding directions to the Bank of England; and on how many occasions in each year since 2007 they have been exercised.

The Treasury has statutory powers to issue directions to the Bank of England, which can only be used under specific conditions or circumstances. None of the powers outlined below have ever been used.

  • Under section 4 of the Bank of England Act 1946, the Treasury may direct the Bank, after consultation with the Governor, to action that is deemed to be necessary in the public interest. This power of direction applies to all of the Bank’s activities, with the exception of monetary policy and the exercise of the Bank’s functions as the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA).

  • Under section 19 of the Bank of England Act 1998, the Treasury may by order, after consultation with the Governor, direct the Bank with respect to monetary policy if it is deemed to be in the public interest and required by extreme economic circumstances.

  • Under section 410 of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000, the Treasury may direct the PRA and the Bank to not take an action that would be incompatible with the UK’s international obligations.

  • Under Section 61 of the Financial Services Act 2012, the Treasury may direct the Bank on specific measures relating to the assistance to or stabilisation of financial institutions.

The Bank of England also has powers to direct the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA), Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and Payment Systems Regulator (PSR).

  • Under section 9H of the Bank of England Act 1998, the Bank of England’s Financial Policy Committee (FPC) has powers of direction over the PRA and FCA (limited to the use of specific macroprudential tools). To date, the FPC has only ever used this power to implement the Leverage Ratio.

  • Under sections 9Y and 9Z of the Bank of England Act 1998, the Bank may direct the FCA to provide documents or information that the Bank reasonably requires for its financial stability functions. This power has never been used.

  • Under section 100 of the Financial Services (Banking Reform) Act 2013, the Bank has the power to direct the PSR not to exercise its powers, under specific circumstances. This power has never been used.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what, if any, statutory powers they have to issue binding directions to (1) the Financial Conduct Authority, and (2) the Prudential Regulation Authority; and on how many occasions in each year since 2010 they have been exercised.

The Treasury has a limited number of powers to direct the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA).

It has a power to direct the regulators to take an action if doing so is necessary to fulfil international obligations, or to refrain from action which appears incompatible with international obligations.

The Treasury also has powers of direction which are designed to promote the accountability and transparency of the FCA and PRA. These include the power to direct the regulators to:

  • Review specified rules, where doing so is in the public interest;
  • Report on their performance, where necessary for scrutinising the discharge of their functions;
  • Carry out an investigation into a specified event of regulatory failure in certain circumstances, including, in the case of the PRA, where public funds have been expended.

These powers have not been used.

The Treasury has a power to direct the FCA and PRA to undertake an investigation of relevant events, where it is in the public interest, in certain circumstances. This power has been used twice: in 2018, to direct the PRA to review the events relating to the supervision of the Co-operative Bank, and in 2019, to direct the FCA to review the events relating to the failure of London Capital and Finance.

The Treasury does not have direction-making powers in relation to the FCA or the PRA regarding the content of their rules, or their approach to supervision and enforcement.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the announcement of the Mansion House Reforms on 10 July, what progress they have made in recruiting further UK based defined-contribution pension schemes to the Mansion House Compact, beyond the initial nine members.

The Mansion House Compact is a voluntary and industry-led agreement that has been led by the Lord Mayor and the City of London Corporation. Updates on the Compact and signatories are provided by The City of London Corporation on their website (https://www.theglobalcity.uk/insights/mansion-house-compact). There are currently 9 signatories to the Compact.

Baroness Penn
Minister on Leave (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State)
9th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the announcement on 4 April 2022 that the Royal Mint has been asked to create a Non-Fungible Token (NFT) in the summer of 2022, when this token is likely to be issued; and for what use this token is intended.

The Government announced in April 2022 that the Royal Mint intended to create and issue a non-fungible token. The Royal Mint operates as a commercial business and the cost of designing and offering an NFT would be met entirely out of its own revenues. An update on this work will be provided in due course.

Baroness Penn
Minister on Leave (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State)
12th Dec 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government which of the Chancellor’s proposed reforms to financial services regulation, announced in Edinburgh on 8 December, will (1) require primary legislation, (2) require secondary legislation, (3) be achievable using existing powers; and for each of the proposed reforms that can be made using existing powers, what power they intend to use in each case.

The Edinburgh Reforms, launched by the Chancellor on 9 December, take forward the government’s ambition for the UK to be the world’s most innovative and competitive global financial centre. We are committed to an open, sustainable, and technologically advanced financial services sector that is globally competitive and acts in the interests of communities and citizens across all four nations of the UK.

As part of the Edinburgh Reforms package, several consultations were either launched or trailed. It would not be appropriate to pre-judge the outcome of these consultations, nor how any measures may be implemented when final government policy has yet to be agreed. The outcomes of these consultations will be taken forward in the usual manner and peers will be able to engage in the normal ways depending on the precise form of implementation.

As set out in the Chancellor's written statement, a number of reforms will require secondary legislation. These are:

  • Secondary legislation in Q1 2023 to remove burdens for firms trading commodities derivatives as an ancillary activity. The powers to implement this can be found in: Article 3 of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (Regulated Activities) Order 2001, Article 3 of the Financial Service and Markets Act 2000 (Markets in Financial Instruments) Regulations 2017, and Article 4 of the Financial Regulators’ Powers (Technical Standards etc.) (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018.
  • Secondary legislation in 2023 to improve the functionality of the ring-fencing regime. The powers to implement these proposed reforms, which will be subject to consultation in mid-2023, can be found in Part 9B of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000.
  • Secondary legislation, when parliamentary time allows, to amend the Building Societies Act 1986. The powers to implement this can be found in Section 7 of the Building Societies Act 1986, and Section 104 (1) of the Building Societies Act 1986.

Additionally, the government will add transactions in certain cryptoassets to the Investment Management Exemption list for tax purposes. The existing list of investment transactions is set out in the Investment Manager (Investment Transactions) Regulations 2014. HMRC is able to make this change using existing powers contained in sections 827(2) and 835S(4) ITA07 and section 1150 CTA10.

Several of the Edinburgh Reforms are also being taken forward as primary legislation through the Financial Services and Markets Bill (FSM). These are the implementation of a Financial Market Infrastructure Sandbox in 2023, the establishment of a safe regulatory environment for stablecoins and the repeal of retained EU law in financial services. The FSM Bill contains provisions that will enable the government to commence the repeal of retained EU law in financial services and implement its replacement, a smarter regulatory framework specifically tailored to the UK, using secondary legislation following the passage of the Bill. The government will also legislate in the Finance Bill to amend the tax rules for Real Estate Investment Trusts.

Baroness Penn
Minister on Leave (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State)
1st Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Viscount Younger of Leckie on 25 November (HL Deb, cols 1002–03), what sanctions may be imposed, and by whom, on financial services organisations that breach Financial Conduct Authority Guidance on the treatment of UK Politically Exposed Persons, their families and known close associates.

Further to the answer of 25 November 2021 by Viscount Younger of Leckie, from April 2018, the Financial Ombudsman has had jurisdiction to consider complaints from Politically Exposed Persons about their treatment by banks, and since 2018, have received fewer than 10 complaints in this area.

Where the Financial Ombudsman find that a bank has not followed regulations, best practice or acted in a fair and reasonable manner, the Financial Ombudsman will tell the bank to put the consumer in the position they would have been in had the bank’s error or wrongdoing not occurred. The Financial Ombudsman also has the power to order banks to pay for financial loss, distress or inconvenience depending on the experience of the consumer.

However, the Financial Ombudsman does not apply sanctions or penalties on banks. The Financial Conduct Authority, as anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing supervisor for financial services firms in the UK, has the power to impose civil penalties (fines and censure statements) and prohibitions on management.

15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration, if any, they have given to creating a new category of tax advantaged share scheme, analogous to the existing employee share ownership schemes, for which people in the gig economy would be eligible.

The government is not considering creating a new tax-advantaged share scheme for self-employed contractors.

The purpose of all the existing schemes is to encourage employee share ownership and support employers' efforts to foster a more enterprising and productive relationship with their employees.

Where companies employ staff directly, they may offer tax-advantaged options to their employees through one of the existing schemes.

30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many written directions Ministers have been asked to give (1) to Permanent Secretaries, and (2) to other officials, in each of the last 10 years; and in each case, (a) which Ministers and officials were involved, and (b) to what the written directions referred.

There have been 41 Ministerial Direction published since April 2011. There was no general requirement to publish Ministerial Directions prior to this date.

Thirty -eight of these direction were requested by Permanent Secretaries or Acting Permanent Secretaries. One of those (from the Permanent Secretary at the Department of Health and Social Care) was jointly requested by the Chief Executive of the NHS. Of the remainder, two were requested by the Chief Executive of UK Export Finance and one by the Chief Executive of the NHS.

Details of all published Ministerial Directions can be found on the gov.uk website.[1].

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ministerial-directions

4th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what difficulties have been reported in honouring the pension entitlements of Turkish Cypriot former employees of the Sovereign Base Areas in Cyprus, or the widows of those employees, now living in Northern Cyprus.

There are currently no outstanding issues reported in honoring the occupational pension entitlements of Turkish Cypriot former employees of the Sovereign Base Areas in Cyprus, or the widows of those employees, now living in the north of Cyprus.