Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts Portrait

Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts

Conservative - Life peer

SLSC Sub-Committee B
4th Sep 2018 - 1st May 2019
Bribery Act 2010 Committee
17th May 2018 - 1st Mar 2019
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Committee
29th Jun 2017 - 28th Mar 2018
Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee
8th Jun 2015 - 19th Jul 2017
Draft Protection of Charities Bill (Joint Committee)
10th Nov 2014 - 3rd Feb 2015
Insurance Bill [HL] Special Public Bill Committee
19th Nov 2014 - 28th Nov 2014
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
12th Jun 2014 - 25th Jun 2014
Soft Power Committee
16th May 2013 - 11th Mar 2014
Trusts (Capital and Income) Bill [HL] Special Public Bill Committee
19th Jun 2012 - 24th Jul 2012
Consumer Insurance (Disclosure and Representations) Bill [HL]
5th Sep 2011 - 1st Dec 2011


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Thursday 30th June 2022
Environmental Principles Policy Statement
My Lords, as the noble Baroness, Lady Parminter, made clear, I am not a member of her committee, so I …
Written Answers
Friday 10th June 2022
Citizenship: Education
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to revise the inspection criteria for Citizenship Education with Ofsted; …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 14th June 2021
Office for Demographic Change Bill [HL] 2021-22
A Bill to establish the Office for Demographic Change with the duty of collecting evidence about and analysing the impact …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts has voted in 286 divisions, and 12 times against the majority of their Party.

13 Jan 2021 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 224 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 284
13 Jan 2021 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 13 Conservative Aye votes vs 208 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 339 Noes - 235
30 Nov 2020 - High Speed Rail (West Midlands–Crewe) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 198 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 57 Noes - 234
22 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 185 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 307 Noes - 212
15 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 194 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 130 Noes - 225
23 Jun 2020 - Corporate Insolvency and Governance Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 203 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 160 Noes - 241
23 Jun 2020 - Corporate Insolvency and Governance Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 191 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 155 Noes - 326
13 Apr 2021 - Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 209 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 223
16 Nov 2021 - Dormant Assets Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 179 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 216 Noes - 195
16 Nov 2021 - Dormant Assets Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 179 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 216 Noes - 195
14 Dec 2021 - Charities Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 80 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 18 Noes - 81
2 Mar 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 75 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 83 Noes - 76
View All Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord True (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
(9 debate interactions)
Lord Paddick (Liberal Democrat)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Home Affairs)
(8 debate interactions)
Lord Clement-Jones (Liberal Democrat)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Digital)
(6 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(43 debate contributions)
Home Office
(27 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts


A Bill to establish the Office for Demographic Change with the duty of collecting evidence about and analysing the impact of population change, and considering future changes in the population of the United Kingdom and their consequences; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 4th March 2022
(Read Debate)

Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


39 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
11th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will make a decision about the Charity Commission's request to refer the Royal Albert Hall to the charity tribunal.

The Charity Commission sought the previous Attorney General’s permission to refer a number of questions to the Tribunal concerning the Corporation of the Hall of Arts and Sciences – the Royal Albert Hall – which is a registered charity. While the Charity Commission has the power to refer questions to the Tribunal, it may only do so with the consent of the Attorney General, as set out in section 325 of the Charities Act 2011.

The issues concerned in this case are complex. The Attorney General’s Office (AGO) has engaged with the parties since the original request was made in order to explore the issues, which involve both modern charity law and its application to an organisation established over 150 years ago. This engagement has helped to refine the issues.

Before taking a decision on whether to consent to the latest iteration of the Commission’s request, the previous Attorney General asked the Commission and the Corporation to try to find a way forward without recourse to litigation. The AGO is awaiting an indication from the parties regarding the outcome of that process.

Lord Stewart of Dirleton
Advocate General for Scotland
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the Attorney General expects to give a definitive response to the request made three years ago by the Charity Commission in respect of the governance of the Albert Hall.

In December of last year, the Charity Commission wrote to the then Attorney General requesting consent to refer six questions to the First-Tier Tribunal concerning the Corporation of the Hall of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Albert Hall, which is a registered charity. This is the third such request by the Commission since 2017. The then Attorney General granted, then subsequently withdrew his consent in relation to the first request. The second request was withdrawn, with consent then sought for the reference of an amended set of questions last December. While the Charity Commission has the power to refer questions to the Tribunal, it may only do so with the consent of the Attorney General, as set out in section 325 of the Charities Act 2011.

The Corporation made further representations in relation to the Commission’s request earlier this year. The Attorney General is in the process of considering the request and representations with a view to issuing a decision in due course.

16th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans are in place to ensure that the UK is prepared for any impact resulting from a solar superstorm; and which department is responsible for those preparations.

This Government understands that good management of risk is essential for contingency planning, increasing the likelihood that the services we rely on day-to-day are available for citizens and ensuring that we can protect people’s health and safety.

The Department is the Lead Government Department for the risk of a severe space weather event. BEIS is therefore responsible for coordinating a Cross-Government work programme to ensure that appropriate preparedness and mitigation measures are in place so that impacts from severe space weather are minimised. BEIS working closely with the Met Office, Civil Contingencies Secretariat, other Government Departments, and academic partners has taken significant steps to increase the UK’s preparedness for major space weather events.

The Department will publish a new space weather strategy later this year, which will set out a five-year road map for how we intend to boost resilience and build on existing UK strength and capacity in this area, to continue to increase our preparedness for a severe space weather event.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to bring forward proposals for the regulation of Prepack Administrations; and if so when.

The Government will publish a report in due course of its review of the voluntary measures that were introduced in 2015 to enhance regulation of pre-pack administrations. The report will set out the Government’s plans for the future of pre-pack administrations.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reform the regulation of the accounting profession.

The Government is committed to acting on the findings of the three independent reviews of audit: the FRC review, the CMA review and the Brydon review, covering respectively the regulator, the market and the audit product itself. We will set out comprehensive proposals for audit reform in the Spring and will then bring forward legislation as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to respond to the letter sent by Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on 8 December 2020 about making public funds available to the Royal Albert Hall.

A response was sent on 25th February 2021. I apologise for the delay.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to respond to the letter sent by Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on 31 July about making public funds available to the Royal Albert Hall; and when they plan to respond to the follow-up letters sent on 19 August, 9 September and 1 October.

A response was sent to the Noble Lord on 26th October.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to revise the inspection criteria for Citizenship Education with Ofsted; and what plans they have to publish (1) any correspondence, or (2) the minutes of meetings, with Ofsted, including of any meeting that took place on 15 March.

I refer the noble Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts to the answer I gave on 25 April 2022 to question HL7809.

The government has now responded to the recommendations outlined within ‘The Ties that Bind: Citizenship and Civic Engagement in the 21st Century Follow-up report’, including the recommendations relating to the inspection of citizenship education.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to revise the inspection criteria for citizenship education with Ofsted; and what plans they have to publish (1) any correspondence, or (2) minutes of meetings (including the meeting on 15 March,) with Ofsted.

Ofsted, as a separate government department and independent inspectorate, is responsible for the criteria in its inspection framework and handbooks.

On 21 February, Ofsted wrote to the Chair of the House of Lords Liaison Committee, Lord Gardiner of Kimble, setting out its inspection approach regarding citizenship education. The letter is available at: https://committees.parliament.uk/publications/9100/documents/159384/default/.

The department has subsequently discussed this matter with Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. The Chief Inspector has confirmed that citizenship education forms a significant, but proportionate, part of school inspections. There are no plans to publish correspondence or minutes relating to discussions on this matter. The government will respond in due course to ‘The Ties that Bind: Citizenship and Civic Engagement in the 21st Century Follow-up report’, which includes recommendations relating to the inspection of citizenship education.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many teachers self-identified as citizenship education teachers in (1) 2016, (2) 2017, (3) 2018, (4) 2019, (5) 2020, and (6) 2021.

The number of teachers in state funded secondary schools in England, who are recorded as teaching one or more lessons of citizenship per week, are shown in the table below. The latest information gives the situation in November 2019. Information for November 2020 will be published in June 2021. Information for 2021 will be collected via the School Workforce Census later this year.

As at November 2019

2016

2017

2018

2019

Headcount of teachers teaching citizenship

4,826

4,451

4,241

4,257

As a % of all teachers in state funded secondary schools

2.2%

2.0%

1.9%

1.9%

The majority of teachers of citizenship also teach other subjects.

The number of trainees who successfully completed training in citizenship education from the 2015/16 to the 2018/19 academic year inclusive is summarised in the table below:

Academic Year

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Postgraduate trainees awarded qualified teacher status

78

45

37

31

The data on numbers of postgraduate trainees awarded qualified teacher status, for the academic years 2019/20 and 2020/21 is not yet available. Due to a change in the recording of subjects in the Initial Teacher Training data, we will not be able to specifically identify Citizenship trainees for the academic year 2019/2020 onwards.

24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many teachers specialising in citizenship education completed their training in (1) 2016, (2) 2017, (3) 2018, (4) 2019, (5) 2020, and (6) 2021.

The number of teachers in state funded secondary schools in England, who are recorded as teaching one or more lessons of citizenship per week, are shown in the table below. The latest information gives the situation in November 2019. Information for November 2020 will be published in June 2021. Information for 2021 will be collected via the School Workforce Census later this year.

As at November 2019

2016

2017

2018

2019

Headcount of teachers teaching citizenship

4,826

4,451

4,241

4,257

As a % of all teachers in state funded secondary schools

2.2%

2.0%

1.9%

1.9%

The majority of teachers of citizenship also teach other subjects.

The number of trainees who successfully completed training in citizenship education from the 2015/16 to the 2018/19 academic year inclusive is summarised in the table below:

Academic Year

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Postgraduate trainees awarded qualified teacher status

78

45

37

31

The data on numbers of postgraduate trainees awarded qualified teacher status, for the academic years 2019/20 and 2020/21 is not yet available. Due to a change in the recording of subjects in the Initial Teacher Training data, we will not be able to specifically identify Citizenship trainees for the academic year 2019/2020 onwards.

20th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will set a date for the commencement of the provisions of the Deregulation Act 2015 which relate to public rights of way.

As set out in my answer of 27 July 2021 the Government intends to lay legislation as soon as reasonably practicable including the relevant provisions in the Deregulation Act 2015. Deferring the 2026 cut-off date for registration of historic rights of way is still under consideration.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Benyon on 27 July 2021 (HL1956), what progress has been made by officials in reviewing the deferral of the cut-off date for the registration of historic rights of way.

As set out in my answer of 27 July 2021 the Government intends to lay legislation as soon as reasonably practicable including the relevant provisions in the Deregulation Act 2015. Deferring the 2026 cut-off date for registration of historic rights of way is still under consideration.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the negative consequences for the existing public rights of way network arising from ending the cross-compliance requirement that recipients of Direct Payments keep paths open and accessible.

Clear arrangements are already in place through the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 to allow for the establishment, recording and appeal of rights of way to agreed standards, and local authorities have responsibility for their maintenance. Local authorities will continue to receive funding through the Revenue Support Grant for their various rights of way duties.

We will continue to pay for access and engagement through our existing environmental land management schemes and we will consider how to maintain investment in these areas as part of future schemes. Our ongoing commitment is visible through other funds and activities including through the Nature for Climate Fund, the Green Recovery Challenge Fund, our Farming in Protected Landscapes scheme and through Countryside Stewardship.

Alongside this ongoing support, as we continue to develop our new schemes throughout the transition and into the future, contact is being maintained with a range of stakeholders that represent a variety of interests including access, as well as with end users to determine the specific land management actions that will be paid for under our new schemes.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the amount of excess CO2 created as a result of light pollution.

The Government has not made an assessment specifically of the amount of excess CO2 created as a result of light pollution. Artificial light is a complex issue that falls across a number of central Government departments, the devolved administrations and, on a local level, local authorities and highways authorities. However, the Government is committed to cutting the UK's emissions to net zero by 2050 and has put a wide range of policies in place to achieve this.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of light pollution on wildlife and the environment.

Defra has published or contributed to a range of assessments of the impact of artificial light on insects and wider biodiversity, as well as global and national assessments of the drivers of biodiversity loss more generally.

Following publication of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution’s report, ‘Artificial light in the environment’ in 2009, Defra has supported assessments of impacts of artificial light on insects and on other organisms such as bats. These are published on our science website. Defra has also funded or co-funded national and international assessments of drivers of change on insects and wider biodiversity such as the global IPBES Assessment Report on Pollinators, Pollination and Food Production, which notes effects of light on nocturnal insects may be growing and identifies the need for further study.

There have been a number of externally funded studies which have highlighted potential impacts of artificial light pollution on insects, but based on the current available evidence, artificial light is not considered one of the main drivers of species decline. We are confident that we are focusing and taking action on the issues that will make a real difference to insect pollinators.

We recognise that there is ongoing research into the topic and together with our academic partners, we will keep this under review.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to reduce levels of light pollution; and if so, how they intend to do so.

The Government recognises the problem of light pollution. The Government's 25-Year Environment Plan includes a commitment to cut all forms of pollution and ease the pressure on the environment, including ensuring that light pollution is managed effectively.

Current measures include Defra working with the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government in the development of their Planning Policy Guidance on Light Pollution, which outlines factors which may be relevant when considering where, when and how much lights emanates from new developments together with possible human and ecological impacts.

The Department for Transport encourages all local authorities to replace their street lighting with low-impact LED lighting wherever economically feasible.

Additionally, Highways England is responsible for the strategic road network in England and is obliged to minimise the environmental impacts (including of road lighting) across the network. A full appraisal is carried out before any lighting project is commissioned, including in-depth analysis of the environmental impact and economic benefits of the scheme. All lighting on the network is designed according to current British standards which emphasise the importance of limiting light pollution, and older forms of lantern are in the process of being replaced with environmentally sensitive lighting when they become due for renewal.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have for public consultation over the creation of the UK Strategy on Protection of Civilians; and when they expect to publish the Strategy.

As part of the review of its approach to the protection of civilians (PoC), the Government has consulted extensively with civil society and academia. We hope to publish soon a document outlining our approach to PoC with examples of action the Government has been taking. We were unable to meet the previously stated publication date as we were required to adhere to the rules governing the publication of documentation in the run up to the December 2019 General Election. We further postponed publication in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the UN Human Rights Council Report of the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, published on 29 June, which found that the killing of Iranian General Soleimani by a US drone strike violated international law, what representations they have made to the government of the United States.

We are aware of the report presented by the UN Special Rapporteur, Agnes Callamard. Article 51 of the UN Charter recognises that all States have an inherent right of self-defence. The strike against Soleimani was not a UK operation. The United States set out the basis for its action in a letter to the UN Security Council of 8 January.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the legality of a state taking presumptive self defence under Article 51 of the Charter of the UN.

Article 2(4) of the UN Charter prohibits the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any state. Article 51 of the Charter also recognises that a state has the inherent right to use force to defend itself against an armed attack. The UK does not recognise a doctrine of "pre-emptive" self defence. Like many other states, however, the long-standing UK view is that Article 51 of the UN Charter does not require a state passively to await an attack, but includes the inherent right to use force in self-defence against an "imminent" armed attack. The position of Her Majesty's Government was set out in the then Attorney General's speech at the Institute of International and Strategic Affairs on 11 January 2017, available on Gov.uk.

13th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 21 January (HL142), when they were first notified that the government of the United States had made a decision to use lethal force against General Soleimani.

I refer the noble Lord to the answer of 21 January 2019, PQ HL142:

We became aware of the operation as it happened. We do not comment on our allies' operational decisions.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 7 January (HL Deb, col 258) and the Written Answer by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 21 January (HL523), whether the military operation on 3 January which killed General Soleimani met the test of imminence for the purposes of self-defence in international law.

Article 51 of the UN Charter recognises that all States have an inherent right of self-defence. The strike against Soleimani was not a UK operation. It is for the United States to say how the criteria for self-defence are met, and you will be aware that the United States set out the basis for its action in a letter to the UN Security Council dated 8 January 2020.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the total amount of index-linked government stock; and what percentage of total government debt it represents.

The total amount of index-linked gilts (ILGs) in issue on close of business 05 July 2021 stood at £476.93 billion including inflation uplift (£357.60 billion nominal excluding inflation uplift). Therefore, ILGs represent 22.79% of the total amount of wholesale government debt outstanding (£2,092.42 billion as of 05 July 2021 including inflation uplift for ILGs). Further details on the ILGs in issue can be found on the Debt Management Office (DMO) website.

Following a revision to the DMO’s financing remit in April 2021, £29.4 billion of ILGs are planned to be sold in 2021-22. This accounts for 11.6% of all gilt financing plans in this fiscal year.

The Government considers the appropriate balance between index-linked and conventional gilts when setting its financing plans, taking account of the level of structural demand, the diversity of the investor base, and the Government’s desired inflation exposure. Decisions on precise levels of ILGs and conventional issuance continue to be taken annually through the financing remit, taking into account market and demand conditions as well as other factors.

16th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to discuss with the insurance industry the implications of COVID-19 for firms which have taken out pandemic insurance.

The Chancellor has made clear that, for those businesses which have an appropriate policy that covers pandemics, government’s medical advice of 16 March is sufficient to allow businesses to make a claim against their insurance, provided the other terms and conditions in their policy are met.

In addition, the FCA’s rules require insurers to handle claims fairly and promptly; provide reasonable guidance to help a policyholder make a claim, and appropriate information on its progress; not reject a claim unreasonably; and settle claims promptly once settlement terms are agreed.

However, most businesses have not purchased insurance that covers pandemic related losses. As such, any affected businesses should note the government’s full package of support.

The Government is in continual dialogue with the insurance sector about its contribution to handling this unprecedented situation.

30th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which minister has cross-government responsibility for co-ordinating all matters relating to (1) citizenship, and (2) civic engagement.

Minister Kevin Foster has overall responsibility for matters relating to citizenship in the United Kingdom in the Home Office. This portfolio includes the current and future visa system, as well as immigration casework and nationality.

DCMS is responsible for youth engagement across Government and provides grant funding for the UK Youth Parliament programme and Youth Engagement Grant. These are key programmes through which young people can engage with policy and decision-makers and have a say on issues that matter to them. The lead minister is Nigel Huddleston.

DCMS is responsible for youth volunteering and social action across government, and supports the #iwill movement and the #iwill Fund, both of which aim to get 10 to 20 year-olds involved in volunteering, fundraising and campaigning in local communities

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to update the Life in the UK test; and when the test was last updated.

The Life in the UK test is based on the Life in the UK handbook, “Life in the UK: a guide for new residents”. An updated impression of the current edition of the handbook was published in early 2020.

Questions in the test are reviewed on an ongoing basis. New questions were added between October 2020 and January 2021.

The test is kept under review and will be updated further as needed.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what additional powers, if any, have been granted to the police and other bodies in relation to the use of drone surveillance technology during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Decisions to use drones and in which circumstances are operational matters for police forces who are subject to the requirements of the Air Navigation Order and Data Protection legislation when operating drones. The Police have not been granted any additional powers to use drones during the Covid-19 pandemic. The Health Protection Regulations 2020 give police the powers they need to enforce compliance with the social distancing measures and all use of police powers must be legitimate, necessary and proportionate.

The Civil Aviation Authority have granted the Emergency Services, including the police, an exemption from some of the requirements contained in the Air Navigation Order 2016, to support the enforcement of Government COVID-19 restrictions. These changes do not grant extra powers to police. They relax restrictions in place for operating drones for the specific case of enforcing Covid-19 restrictions. Mitigation for use of the exemption needs to be written into the Operations Manuals of drone teams and use needs to be reported to the CAA on renewal of the permission.

The Home Office does not hold any information on the use of drones by other public bodies in relation to Covid-19.

The Data Protection Act and the Surveillance Camera Code govern police use of surveillance cameras.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which (1) public bodies, and (2) private companies assisting public bodies, are using drone surveillance technology in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Decisions to use drones and in which circumstances are operational matters for police forces who are subject to the requirements of the Air Navigation Order and Data Protection legislation when operating drones. The Police have not been granted any additional powers to use drones during the Covid-19 pandemic. The Health Protection Regulations 2020 give police the powers they need to enforce compliance with the social distancing measures and all use of police powers must be legitimate, necessary and proportionate.

The Civil Aviation Authority have granted the Emergency Services, including the police, an exemption from some of the requirements contained in the Air Navigation Order 2016, to support the enforcement of Government COVID-19 restrictions. These changes do not grant extra powers to police. They relax restrictions in place for operating drones for the specific case of enforcing Covid-19 restrictions. Mitigation for use of the exemption needs to be written into the Operations Manuals of drone teams and use needs to be reported to the CAA on renewal of the permission.

The Home Office does not hold any information on the use of drones by other public bodies in relation to Covid-19.

The Data Protection Act and the Surveillance Camera Code govern police use of surveillance cameras.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance they have produced in relation to the use of drone surveillance technology during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Decisions to use drones and in which circumstances are operational matters for police forces who are subject to the requirements of the Air Navigation Order and Data Protection legislation when operating drones. The Police have not been granted any additional powers to use drones during the Covid-19 pandemic. The Health Protection Regulations 2020 give police the powers they need to enforce compliance with the social distancing measures and all use of police powers must be legitimate, necessary and proportionate.

The Civil Aviation Authority have granted the Emergency Services, including the police, an exemption from some of the requirements contained in the Air Navigation Order 2016, to support the enforcement of Government COVID-19 restrictions. These changes do not grant extra powers to police. They relax restrictions in place for operating drones for the specific case of enforcing Covid-19 restrictions. Mitigation for use of the exemption needs to be written into the Operations Manuals of drone teams and use needs to be reported to the CAA on renewal of the permission.

The Home Office does not hold any information on the use of drones by other public bodies in relation to Covid-19.

The Data Protection Act and the Surveillance Camera Code govern police use of surveillance cameras.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance has been issued on the collection, use and storage of data collected by drone surveillance technology during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Decisions to use drones and in which circumstances are operational matters for police forces who are subject to the requirements of the Air Navigation Order and Data Protection legislation when operating drones. The Police have not been granted any additional powers to use drones during the Covid-19 pandemic. The Health Protection Regulations 2020 give police the powers they need to enforce compliance with the social distancing measures and all use of police powers must be legitimate, necessary and proportionate.

The Civil Aviation Authority have granted the Emergency Services, including the police, an exemption from some of the requirements contained in the Air Navigation Order 2016, to support the enforcement of Government COVID-19 restrictions. These changes do not grant extra powers to police. They relax restrictions in place for operating drones for the specific case of enforcing Covid-19 restrictions. Mitigation for use of the exemption needs to be written into the Operations Manuals of drone teams and use needs to be reported to the CAA on renewal of the permission.

The Home Office does not hold any information on the use of drones by other public bodies in relation to Covid-19.

The Data Protection Act and the Surveillance Camera Code govern police use of surveillance cameras.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effectiveness of targeted killing as a counter-terrorism strategy.

The Ministry of Defence has not made any assessment as to the effectiveness of targeted killing as a counter-terrorism strategy.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the targeting of people directly participating in hostilities towards the UK who are located in non-belligerent states.

As the Government has stated previously, it has a policy to defend the UK and its citizens against both armed attacks and imminent threats of armed attack. In doing so the Government may draw on a wide range of tools including, in extremis, the use of lethal force where there is no other effective option. Every situation would be considered on its merits and the appropriate course of action would depend on the circumstances prevailing at that time.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Goldie on 16 January (HL Deb, col 861), on how many occasions UK personnel embedded in partner forces have been asked to engage in "unagreed operations" in (1) 2016, (2) 2017, and (3) 2018.

The Department does not hold these details centrally and they could only be provided at disproportionate cost. The parameters of an embeds duties are agreed before deployment. Should the host nation wish to change these after deployment the embed will seek further clearance from the MOD. As such, there are no 'unagreed operations' undertaken by UK Armed Forces embedded in our allies' Armed Forces. The reply given during the debate of 16 January was to assure the noble Lords that checks and balances are in place to protect our personnel and to ensure that they remain compliant with UK law and any policy restrictions we may place upon them.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Goldie on 16 January (HL Deb, col 861), on how many occasions UK personnel embedded in partner forces were given permission for "unagreed operations" in (1) 2016, (2) 2017, and (3) 2018.

The Department does not hold these details centrally and they could only be provided at disproportionate cost. The parameters of an embeds duties are agreed before deployment. Should the host nation wish to change these after deployment the embed will seek further clearance from the MOD. As such, there are no 'unagreed operations' undertaken by UK Armed Forces embedded in our allies' Armed Forces. The reply given during the debate of 16 January was to assure the noble Lords that checks and balances are in place to protect our personnel and to ensure that they remain compliant with UK law and any policy restrictions we may place upon them.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Ministry of Defence was informed of the operation to target Abdul Reza Shahlai in Yemen on 3 January before the failed strike took place; and if so, whether it provided any material support to that action.

We do not comment on our allies' operational decisions.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the proposed (1) name, (2) terms of reference, (3) membership, and (4) frequency of meetings, of the Cabinet Committee to be set up under the plans in the Levelling Up White Paper.

The terms of reference for the Domestic and Economic (Levelling Up) Cabinet Committee are: ‘To set direction for place-based strategies and embed levelling up within government policy and delivery’. The membership of the Committee comprises: the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities; the Chief Secretary to the Treasury; and, the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Levelling Up, The Union and Constitution. Other Ministers are invited according to the agenda.

It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they meet, is not normally shared publicly.

30th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which ministers sit on the Safe and Integrated Communities Inter-Ministerial Group; and how many times has the Group met in the last 12 months.

Government is committed to ensuring that our communities are both safe and well integrated. This is at the heart of our mission to level up communities across the whole of the UK. The specific inter-ministerial group last met in 2019. Ministers and officials continue to meet regularly, driving forward vital work across Government – and in local places - to create socially and economically stronger, more confident and integrated communities.