Lord German Portrait

Lord German

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

EU Internal Market Sub-Committee
23rd Jun 2015 - 2nd Jul 2019
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2015 - 7th Sep 2015


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 30th November 2021
15:45
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 14th December 2021
11:30
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 17th January 2022
16:00
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 21st February 2022
16:00
Division Votes
Tuesday 23rd November 2021
Armed Forces Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 58 Liberal Democrat Aye votes vs 0 Liberal Democrat No votes
Tally: Ayes - 210 Noes - 190
Speeches
Wednesday 24th November 2021
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill

In answer to a question—I cannot remember whether it was asked by me or by the noble Lord, Lord Ramsbotham—I …

Written Answers
Monday 22nd November 2021
Prisons: Pepper Spray
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been held in prisons where pelargonic acid vanillylamide (PAVA) incapacitant spray …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord German has voted in 185 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Greenhalgh (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(13 debate interactions)
Baroness Scott of Bybrook (Conservative)
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
(12 debate interactions)
Lord Wolfson of Tredegar (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
(12 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Home Office
(29 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(27 debate contributions)
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View all Lord German's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord German, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord German has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord German has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord German has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord German has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


55 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many jobs have been lost in each parliamentary constituency in Wales so far in the 2020/21 financial year.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

The Lord German OBE

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

15 February 2021

Dear Lord German,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking how many jobs have been lost in each parliamentary constituency in Wales so far in the 2020/21 financial year (HL13074).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) produces labour market statistics for small areas from the Annual Population Survey (APS), which is a survey of people resident in households in the UK.

The APS cannot be used to measure the number of people who have lost their jobs, but instead can provide estimates of how the size of the workforce has changed over time. The survey provides level estimates for 12-month periods, based on interviews taking place throughout that time. Comparisons should only be made between non-overlapping survey periods.

Table 1 shows the employment levels for the 12-month period ending September 2020, the latest available period, and the previous non-overlapping period for the 12-months ending September 2019, along with the net change between the two periods, for each parliamentary constituency in Wales.

Estimates from the APS are from a sample survey and as such are subject to a certain level of uncertainty. As the information provided is quite extensive, a copy has been placed in the House of Lords library.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number of people in employment1 for the 12 month periods ending September 2019 and September 2020, and net change between the 2 periods, in Parliamentary Constituencies in Wales

Thousands

Parliamentary Constituency

Geocode

Oct 2018-Sep 2019

Oct 2019-Sep 2020

Net change

Aberavon

W07000049

30

28

-2

Aberconwy

W07000058

25

26

1

Alyn and Deeside

W07000043

45

45

0

Arfon

W07000057

30

22

-8

Blaenau Gwent

W07000072

31

32

1

Brecon and Radnorshire

W07000068

32

29

-3

Bridgend

W07000073

42

42

-1

Caerphilly

W07000076

37

40

3

Cardiff Central

W07000050

37

41

4

Cardiff North

W07000051

58

58

0

Cardiff South and Penarth

W07000080

63

64

1

Cardiff West

W07000079

54

47

-7

Carmarthen East and Dinefwr

W07000067

31

30

-2

Carmarthen West and South Pembrokeshire

W07000066

33

35

2

Ceredigion

W07000064

34

35

2

Clwyd South

W07000062

39

35

-4

Clwyd West

W07000059

34

30

-4

Cynon Valley

W07000070

32

27

-5

Delyn

W07000042

34

34

0

Dwyfor Meirionnydd

W07000061

30

34

5

Gower

W07000046

43

41

-2

Islwyn

W07000077

38

39

1

Llanelli

W07000045

36

35

-1

Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney

W07000071

33

31

-2

Monmouth

W07000054

43

43

0

Montgomeryshire

W07000063

30

32

2

Neath

W07000069

37

35

-1

Newport East

W07000055

36

38

2

Newport West

W07000056

44

45

1

Ogmore

W07000074

31

33

2

Pontypridd

W07000075

36

41

5

Preseli Pembrokeshire

W07000065

38

37

-2

Rhondda

W07000052

30

26

-4

Swansea East

W07000048

31

33

2

Swansea West

W07000047

39

37

-2

Torfaen

W07000053

34

35

1

Vale of Clwyd

W07000060

29

31

2

Vale of Glamorgan

W07000078

46

44

-2

Wrexham

W07000044

33

34

1

Ynys Mon

W07000041

33

31

-2

Wales

1468

1452

-16

[1] Quality indicator

Shaded estimates are based on a small sample size. This may result in less precise estimates, which should be used with caution.

Unshaded estimates are based on a larger sample size. This is likely to result in estimates of higher precision, although they will still be subject to some sampling variability.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many businesses have declared bankruptcy in each parliamentary constituency in Wales so far in the 2020/21 financial year.

The Insolvency Service publishes National Statistics on insolvency cases for England and Wales combined. It is not possible to identify accurately companies that trade in Wales specifically, or companies that operated within specific parliamentary constituencies before entering insolvency. The data used for insolvency statistics is compiled from information at Companies House. The registered office address for a company may not be representative of its trading location, and often it is changed upon insolvency to the address of the appointed Insolvency Practitioner dealing with the case.

Subject to these caveats, the table below sets out the data on all company insolvencies registered at Companies House during the three quarters of 2020/21 ending December 2020:

Estimated number of registered company insolvencies in Wales by parliamentary constituency of company registered office1

1 April to 31 December 2020

Constituency

Total Company Insolvencies

Aberavon

0

Aberconwy

1

Alyn and Deeside

2

Arfon

1

Blaenau Gwent

1

Brecon and Radnorshire

0

Bridgend

1

Caerphilly

0

Cardiff Central

1

Cardiff North

10

Cardiff South and Penarth

37

Cardiff West

27

Carmarthen East and Dinefwr

1

Carmarthen West and South Pembrokeshire

0

Ceredigion

1

Clwyd South

0

Clwyd West

1

Cynon Valley

4

Delyn

1

Dwyfor Meirionnydd

0

Gower

0

Islwyn

0

Llanelli

0

Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney

0

Monmouth

0

Montgomeryshire

1

Neath

0

Newport East

0

Newport West

11

Ogmore

0

Pontypridd

0

Preseli Pembrokeshire

1

Rhondda

0

Swansea East

3

Swansea West

68

Torfaen

1

Vale of Clwyd

0

Vale of Glamorgan

2

Wrexham

1

Ynys Môn

0

Total

177

Source: Companies House, Insolvency Service

1 Companies House supplies quarterly data on company insolvencies to the Insolvency Service.

The Insolvency Service also holds data on personal bankruptcies in Wales during 2020 where the individual concerned ran a business as a sole trader or partnership. This information will be available later this year following the summer release of the official statistics covering the location, age and gender of individuals that entered insolvency in 2020 (provisionally to be released in August 2020). The latest published statistics cover the period 2000 to 2019 and are available on the GOV.UK website.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which categories of freelance workers and sole traders will be eligible for the COVID-19 Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme is available to self-employed individuals with an eligible business entity. The scheme is open to sole traders, freelancers, body corporates, limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships or any other legal entity carrying out a business activity in the United Kingdom, with a turnover of less than £45m, operating in most sectors. The turnover of the business must generate more than 50% of its turnover from trading activity.

Lenders, such as banks, are responsible for providing loans supported by the guarantee. The exact terms of each loan and length of application will depend on the circumstances of the borrower: lenders are fully aware of the current urgency with which some businesses need to access finance to support cash-flow during this difficult time, so we would expect them to respond appropriately to their customers’ needs.

The list of participating lenders that provide Coronavirus Interruption Business Loan Scheme facilities published on the British Business Bank website.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have made any assessment of (1) the desirability of establishing a UK Music Export Office, or (2) other methods to promote music exports.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK performing arts sector and the rich breadth of artistic talent across the UK.

UK performers and artists are of course still able to tour and perform in the EU, and vice versa. However, we understand the concerns about the new arrangements and we are working with the creative and cultural sectors to help them get to grips with the changes to systems and processes.

We are looking closely at a range of options to support musicians and performers to resume touring with ease as soon as it is safe to do so, including proposals for an Export Office that could provide further practical help. We will set out next steps in due course.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress has been made on establishing a transactional support fund for UK musicians looking to tour the EU.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK performing arts sector and the rich breadth of artistic talent across the UK.

UK performers and artists are of course still able to tour and perform in the EU, and vice versa. However, we understand the concerns about the new arrangements and we are working with the creative and cultural sectors to help them get to grips with the changes to systems and processes.

We are looking closely at a range of options to support musicians and performers to resume touring with ease as soon as it is safe to do so, including proposals for an Export Office that could provide further practical help. We will set out next steps in due course.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their COVID-19 guidance for rehearsals by non-professional choirs; when they plan to review this guidance; and whether the guidance has a statutory basis.

Non-professional groups of up to six people can now sing indoors, and can perform or rehearse in groups of up to 30 outdoors. In addition, multiple groups of 30 can now sing outdoors, provided the groups are kept separate throughout the activity, in line with other large events that follow the organised events guidance for local authorities.

We know that the restrictions on singing are frustrating to large numbers of amateur choirs and performance groups across the country and that many people have made sacrifices in order to drive down infections and protect the NHS over the last year.

The Performing Arts Guidance makes reference to the relevant regulations and provides recommendations for performing arts venues and operators. We expect everyone to comply with the law and the underlying guidance when arranging events or carrying out performing arts related activities.

We will continue to keep guidance and restrictions under review, in line with the changing situation. Further detail on step 4 will be set out as soon as possible.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Barran on 11 March (HL Deb, cols 1799–1800), what steps they have taken following the meeting of the working group on creative and cultural touring.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK creative and cultural sectors and the rich breadth of talent across the UK.

We understand the concerns about the new arrangements for touring following the end of the transition period, and we are committed to supporting the sectors as they get to grips with the changes to systems and processes. We are now working urgently across government and in collaboration with the music and wider creative industries, including through the DCMS-led working group, to help address these issues.

The first working group meeting was held on 5 February, and was chaired by the Minister of State for Digital and Culture. Further working group meetings took place on 15 February and 5 March. DCMS is looking at a range of options to ensure we can provide individuals and businesses with access to the right support, at the right time, so that touring in Europe can resume with ease as soon as it is safe to do so



Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Barran on 11 March (HL Deb, cols 1799–1800), on what dates the working group on creative and cultural touring has met since 5 February.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK creative and cultural sectors and the rich breadth of talent across the UK.

We understand the concerns about the new arrangements for touring following the end of the transition period, and we are committed to supporting the sectors as they get to grips with the changes to systems and processes. We are now working urgently across government and in collaboration with the music and wider creative industries, including through the DCMS-led working group, to help address these issues.

The first working group meeting was held on 5 February, and was chaired by the Minister of State for Digital and Culture. Further working group meetings took place on 15 February and 5 March. DCMS is looking at a range of options to ensure we can provide individuals and businesses with access to the right support, at the right time, so that touring in Europe can resume with ease as soon as it is safe to do so



Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether arts organisations in receipt of public money will have to repay that money if they cannot meet the grant payment requirements due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The majority of Government funding for arts organisations and individuals is provided through our arm’s length body Arts Council England (ACE). From the funding received ACE provides grants to over 800 National Portfolio organisations (NPO’s) and funds 30 Creative People and Places projects across the UK. ACE operates independently of Government, which protects both ACE and DCMS from questions of any political involvement in arts funding decisions.

During the Covid 19 pandemic ACE will be relaxing its funding conditions for National Portfolio Organisations and Creative People and Places projects where necessary, and are currently talking to each of them about how this will work. Grant conditions will also be relaxed on existing National Lottery Project Grants where necessary, and ACE will be providing more information on its website.

These measures, in conjunction with the initiatives announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer to support businesses and organisations that have been impacted by the pandemic, such as the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the deferral of VAT payments for the next 3 months, will provide organisations with more financial support during this period of uncertainty.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the gross amount per student paid by the Office for Students to universities for students studying music courses under the CAH25-02-02 code for the 2020–21 academic year; and what is the amount to be paid for the 2021–22 academic year.

The Strategic Priorities Grant, formerly referred to as the Teaching Grant, plays an important role in supporting providers and students to develop the skills and knowledge needed locally, regionally and nationally to support the economy.

We have asked the Office for Students (OfS) to reform the Grant for 2021-22. These reforms include the reallocation of high-cost subject funding towards the provision of high-cost subjects that support the NHS and wider healthcare policy, high-cost science, technology, and engineering subjects, and subjects meeting specific labour market needs.

One of our proposals is for a 50% reduction in the rate of high-cost subject funding, which is one element of the wider Strategic Priorities Grant, for some subjects in order to enable this reprioritisation.

Under current proposals, outlined in the OfS’ consultation on recurrent funding for 2021/22, the high-cost subject funding rate for students on music courses (CAH25-02-02) will be set at £121.50 in 2021/22, down from £243 in 2020/21. This fall is equivalent to a reduction of around 1% in combined funding from a £9,250 tuition fee and OfS funding. Music students will also attract other elements of OfS funding, such as funding for student access and success, which is unrelated to the subject they study.

The OfS’ methodology for calculating funding allocations, which are done at subject price group-level rather than on an individual subject basis, means that the total amount of high-cost subject funding cannot be calculated for individual subjects such as music. However, illustrative modelling performed by the OfS on funding allocations, which accompanied their consultation, calculated that the total amount of funding for C1.2 subjects, which includes performing arts, creative arts, media studies and archaeology, decreased from £36 million in academic year 2020/21 to £19 million in academic year 2021/22. We have asked the OfS to invest an additional £10 million in our world-leading specialist providers. Many of these specialise in arts provision such as the Royal College of Music or the Royal Academy of Music which are both world-leading institutions for music education. We want to ensure that our specialist providers receive additional support, and that grant funding is used to effectively support students.

5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of delays in renewing driving licences; what steps they are taking to reduce such delays; and what advice they are giving to applicants renewing their driving licence by paper application, who need their licence for hiring a motor vehicle either in the UK or abroad.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency’s (DVLA) online services have been available throughout the pandemic and are the quickest and easiest way to renew a driving licence. There are no delays in successful online applications and customers should receive their driving licence within a few days.

However, many people still choose or have to make a paper application for a driving licence. The DVLA receives around 60,000 items of mail every day which must be dealt with in person. Ongoing industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services union, along with fewer operational staff being on site to allow for social distancing in line with Welsh Government requirements has led to delays in dealing with paper applications. The DVLA has leased an additional building to accommodate more operational staff.

The number of paper applications awaiting processing fluctuates daily as driving licences are issued and new applications received. The latest information on turnaround times for paper driving licence applications can be found on GOV.UK.

Drivers who need to hire a vehicle and have sent their licence to the DVLA for renewal, can view and share their driving licence information with a car hire company by generating a share code online at GOV.UK.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many paper applications for (1) the renewal of a driving licence, and (2) renewal of a driving licence for persons aged over 70, remained unprocessed in each week in June.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency’s (DVLA) online services have been available throughout the pandemic and are the quickest and easiest way to renew a driving licence. There are no delays in successful online applications and customers should receive their driving licence within a few days.

However, many people still choose or have to make a paper application for a driving licence. The DVLA receives around 60,000 items of mail every day which must be dealt with in person. Ongoing industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services union, along with fewer operational staff being on site to allow for social distancing in line with Welsh Government requirements has led to delays in dealing with paper applications. The DVLA has leased an additional building to accommodate more operational staff.

The number of paper applications awaiting processing fluctuates daily as driving licences are issued and new applications received. The latest information on turnaround times for paper driving licence applications can be found on GOV.UK.

Drivers who need to hire a vehicle and have sent their licence to the DVLA for renewal, can view and share their driving licence information with a car hire company by generating a share code online at GOV.UK.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how any post-manufacture alteration to a motor cycle exhaust system is monitored to ensure that any changes conform with legislation.

New motorcycles are required to meet strict noise limits in a range of driving conditions before being placed on the market. The current limit within the approval test is between 73 and 77 decibels (dBA) depending on the power to weight ratio of the machine and is not specific to types of roads.

Once on the road, regulations require that exhausts and silencers shall not be altered to increase noise above the level the motorcycle was originally approved to. The police also have powers to take action if they believe excessive vehicle noise could have been avoided through reasonable driver care.

The annual vehicle MOT test requires an inspection of the state of repair of the exhaust and the tester uses their experience to make a subjective assessment of the noise levels. A vehicle should fail the MOT if the silencer has been altered to increase noise above the level expected from a standard system.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what motorcycle exhaust volume levels are permitted under current legislation; and whether the legislation only relates to tests undertaken as part of type conformity permissions.

New motorcycles are required to meet strict noise limits in a range of driving conditions before being placed on the market. The current limit within the approval test is between 73 and 77 decibels (dBA) depending on the power to weight ratio of the machine and is not specific to types of roads.

Once on the road, regulations require that exhausts and silencers shall not be altered to increase noise above the level the motorcycle was originally approved to. The police also have powers to take action if they believe excessive vehicle noise could have been avoided through reasonable driver care.

The annual vehicle MOT test requires an inspection of the state of repair of the exhaust and the tester uses their experience to make a subjective assessment of the noise levels. A vehicle should fail the MOT if the silencer has been altered to increase noise above the level expected from a standard system.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what restrictions exist, if any, on the volume levels of motorcycle exhausts when travelling (1) on dual carriageways, and (2) on roads with a lower speed restriction.

New motorcycles are required to meet strict noise limits in a range of driving conditions before being placed on the market. The current limit within the approval test is between 73 and 77 decibels (dBA) depending on the power to weight ratio of the machine and is not specific to types of roads.

Once on the road, regulations require that exhausts and silencers shall not be altered to increase noise above the level the motorcycle was originally approved to. The police also have powers to take action if they believe excessive vehicle noise could have been avoided through reasonable driver care.

The annual vehicle MOT test requires an inspection of the state of repair of the exhaust and the tester uses their experience to make a subjective assessment of the noise levels. A vehicle should fail the MOT if the silencer has been altered to increase noise above the level expected from a standard system.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the damage to the new overhead electric lines in the Severn Tunnel.

As of the December 2019 timetable, Network Rail have been unable to successfully operate electric services in the Severn Tunnel due to contamination of overhead line insulators. This does not affect the benefits delivered by the December 2019 timetable, as the small journey time impact of running in diesel can be absorbed by the timetable. They have been working with Cardiff University to assess ways of mitigating the effects of the contamination and are installing electrical switching equipment to allow maintenance cleaning to be done more easily in the future. Testing will commence in Spring 2020, with an aim of commencing electric services before the end of 2020.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners aged 80 years old and over received the COVID-19 vaccination by, and including, 15 January.

The information is not currently held centrally in the format requested.

2nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they intend to take to develop healthy nutrition for children in their global support programmes.

Following the conclusion of the Spending Review, the Government is actively considering nutrition programming within the business planning process. No decisions on individual programmes have yet been made.

Tackling malnutrition remains a core focus of our work on global health, humanitarian response and in support of UK goals on girls' education and climate.  It is critical for reducing preventable deaths and ensuring children get the best start in life in the poorest countries of the world.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they intend to take to influence children's healthy nutrition needs in the developing world at the United Nations for Growth Summit in Japan in December.

FCDO is working closely with the Government of Japan to make sure the 2021 Tokyo Nutrition for Growth Summit supports meaningful action by governments, donors, businesses, the UN and civil society.

Following the conclusion of the Spending Review, the Government is actively considering its approach to the Tokyo Nutrition for Growth Summit and will set this out as early as possible as part of the business planning process.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their estimate of the total financial support which will be given to children's healthy nutrition programmes in the Official Development Assistance budget in (1) 2021, and (2) 2022.

Information about our nutrition spend in financial year 2021 and 2022 will be publicly available through Statistics for International Development (SIDS) in due course. Following the conclusion of the Spending Review, the Government is actively considering its approach to nutrition programming and will set this out as early as possible as part of the business planning process.

Information about our nutrition spend in financial year 2021 and 2022 will be publicly available through Statistics for International Development (SIDS) in due course.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much has been paid in payments under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme in each parliamentary constituency in Wales to date.

The value of claims split by Parliamentary Constituency is not available. The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme provides funds to PAYE schemes to support employers to pay a proportion of the wages of furloughed staff. The registered address for PAYE schemes can be in a different area to that where their employees live and work. In addition, for PAYE schemes claiming for between 1 and 99 employments there has been no requirement to specify the amount claimed for each employment. As a consequence, it is not possible to provide reliable figures for the monetary value of the support provided by geographical area.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the increase in personal debt by individuals who have lost their jobs during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government works closely with the Money and Pensions Service to monitor financial difficulty through an annual survey and notes the Financial Conduct Authority’s biennial Financial Lives Survey.

The Government recognises that some people are struggling with their finances at this challenging time. To help people in problem debt get their finances back on track, an extra £37.8 million support package has been made available to debt advice providers this financial year, bringing this year's budget for free debt advice in England to over £100 million.

In May 2020, the Government announced the immediate release of £65 million of dormant assets funding to Fair4All Finance, an independent organisation that has been founded to support the financial wellbeing of people in vulnerable circumstances. The funding is used to increase access to fair, affordable and appropriate financial products and services for those in financial difficulties.

From May 2021, the Breathing Space scheme will offer people in problem debt a pause of up to 60 days on most enforcement action, interest, fees and charges, and will encourage them to seek professional debt advice.

The Government has delivered unprecedented support for living standards during this challenging time, protecting livelihoods with the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS), the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS), and temporary welfare measures.

The Government has extended the CJRS until 31 March 2021. Eligible employees will continue to receive 80% of their usual salary for hours not worked, up to a maximum of £2,500 per month.

The Government has increased the overall level of the third grant under the SEISS to 80% of average trading profits, meaning that the maximum grant available has now increased to £7,500.

The Government has provided local authorities with £500 million to support people who may struggle to meet their council tax payments this year. The Government expects that this will provide all recipients of working age local council tax support with a further reduction in their annual council tax bill of £150 this financial year.

These measures are in addition to the changes this Government has made to make the welfare system more generous, worth over £7 billion according to recent estimates by the Office for Budget Responsibility.

The Government has worked with mortgage lenders, credit providers and the Financial Conduct Authority to ensure the financial sector provides support for people across the UK to manage their finances by providing payment holidays on mortgages and consumer credit products.

The Government has also delivered protections for renters, including an extension to the ban on bailiff evictions for all but the most egregious cases until at least 21 February 2021, with measures kept under review.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for permitting freelance musicians to defer (1) all, or (2) part, of their income tax payments during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, on 20 and 26 March 2020 the Chancellor announced numerous easements to help businesses through this difficult time. This included the option for all Self-Assessment (SA) taxpayers, including the self-employed, to defer paying their second Payment on Account (POA) for the tax year 2019-20, ordinarily payable by 31 July 2020, for 6 months. All SA taxpayers, including self-employed freelance musicians, have until 31 January 2021 to make that payment without it incurring any late payment interest.

Furthermore, the Government understands that many SA taxpayers may have difficulty in paying their SA payments becoming due on 31 January 2021. To help them, HMRC have enhanced their automated online Time to Pay service, enabling taxpayers to clear their January 2021 SA liabilities in up to 12 monthly instalments.

Prior to October 2020, that service could only be used to pay tax liabilities of up to £10,000. However, HMRC increased the threshold to £30,000, to ensure it is now available to far more SA taxpayers than before. SA taxpayers eligible to use this service can set up a direct debit payment arrangement online without having to contact HMRC directly. HMRC estimate that up to 95% of SA taxpayers owing SA payments on 31 January 2021 will be able to use this online payment service.

Taxpayers with SA tax liabilities over £30,000 may still agree a Time to Pay arrangement with HMRC by contacting them directly. Further information is available on GOV.UK.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the debate on Port Examination Codes of Practice and National Security Determinations Guidance Regulations 2020 on 10 July (HL Deb, cols 1327–46), whether they plan for those regulations to apply to the proposed Free Ports which are intended to be established from 2021.

The powers under Schedule 7 to the Terrorism Act 2000 or Schedule 3 to the Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Act 2019 may only be used to examine goods at the following locations: a port (as defined at paragraph 1(3) of Schedule 7); at premises operated by a sea cargo agent or an air cargo agent; at a temporary storage facility; or at a location designated by the Secretary of State. The government consultation on Freeports closed on Monday 13th July. Any UK Freeport model will ensure that the UK’s high standards with respect to security will not be compromised.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
11th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to make the creation of false personas online, for the purpose of coercing people into fraudulent relationships, a criminal offence.

The Government is aware of the harms caused by identity crime and that criminals use false identities to commit and enable a range of offences. We are deeply concerned by the growth in scale and complexity of scams and fraudulent activity online. Victims can suffer both financial and emotional harm, and we are conscious that criminals exploit social relationships to achieve their objectives.

Where a person:

  • dishonestly makes a false representation knowing that it is untrue or misleading, or knowing that it might be, and

  • they intend to make a gain, to cause loss to another, or to expose another to a risk of loss

then they will be committing an offence under section 2 of the Fraud Act 2006 of fraud by false representation.

The Government is firmly committed to making the UK the safest place to be online, and we are looking to bring forward legislation to do so as soon as possible.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
11th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to make creating a false identity on a social networking platform, for the purpose of deception, abuse or fraud, a criminal offence.

The Government is aware of the harms caused by identity crime and that criminals use false identities to commit and enable a range of offences. We are deeply concerned by the growth in scale and complexity of scams and fraudulent activity online. Victims can suffer both financial and emotional harm, and we are conscious that criminals exploit social relationships to achieve their objectives.

Where a person:

  • dishonestly makes a false representation knowing that it is untrue or misleading, or knowing that it might be, and

  • they intend to make a gain, to cause loss to another, or to expose another to a risk of loss

then they will be committing an offence under section 2 of the Fraud Act 2006 of fraud by false representation.

The Government is firmly committed to making the UK the safest place to be online, and we are looking to bring forward legislation to do so as soon as possible.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people were held in immigration detention centres in each month of 2020 to date.

The Home Office publishes data on people in detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Data on the number of people detained under immigration powers at the end of each quarter are published in table Det_D02 of the immigration detention detailed datasets. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/returns-and-detention-datasets#immigration-detention

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to those in detention as at 31 December 2019. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the 'summary tables'. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

Figures covering the first quarter of 2020, including those detained as at 31 March 2020 will be released on 21st May 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/returns-and-detention-datasets#immigration-detention

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Advanced Electronically Scanned Array Radar units will be provided for use by the Royal Air Force's Eurofighter Typhoons as a result of the contract with Leonardo and BAE systems.

The contract with Leonardo and BAE Systems is the latest critical step in the development of a European Common Radar System (ECRS) Mk2 for the RAF's Typhoon fleet.

The intent is to install ECRS Mk2 on all 40 of the RAF's Tranche 3 Typhoon aircraft and a small number of Ministry of Defence and industry test assets.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been held in prisons where pelargonic acid vanillylamide (PAVA) incapacitant spray has been issued, broken down by (1) ethnicity, (2) religion, and (3) disability status, since 1 April 2019.

PAVA is presently in 80 HMPPS prisons *, the below tables provide population figures across those 80 prisons firstly by ethnicity and secondly by religion. We are unable to provide this breakdown for disability as data is not available.

Note* The 80 prisons comprises 26 live sites which have issued to over 50% of their staff and the remainder have only issued to a small number of staff as part of an exceptional deployment.

Table 1: Prisoners held in prisons where pelargonic acid vanillylamide (PAVA) incapacitant spray has been issued, by ethnicity, March 2019 - September 2021, in England and Wales

31-Mar-19

30-Sep-19

31-Mar-20

30-Sep-20

31-Mar-21

30-Sep-21

All

59,070

59,958

59,657

57,223

56,594

57,224

Asian / Asian British

4,599

4,642

4,635

4,464

4,534

4,709

Black / African / Caribbean / Black British

7,786

7,964

7,839

7,615

7,541

7,494

Mixed / Multiple ethnic groups

2,724

2,808

2,848

2,803

2,758

2,764

Other ethnic group

918

916

932

888

853

858

White

42,624

43,228

42,912

40,918

40,399

40,869

Not recorded

240

236

320

376

314

354

Not stated

179

164

171

159

195

176

Table 2: Prisoners held in prisons where pelargonic acid vanillylamide (PAVA) incapacitant spray has been issued, by religion, March 2019 - September 2021, in England and Wales

31-Mar-19

30-Sep-19

31-Mar-20

30-Sep-20

31-Mar-21

30-Sep-21

All

59,070

59,958

59,657

57,223

56,594

57,224

Anglican

9,751

9,750

9,522

8,866

8,391

8,223

Free Church

505

535

547

559

539

531

Roman Catholic

10,380

10,453

10,386

9,873

9,547

9,723

Other Christian

7,741

7,828

7,584

7,302

7,350

7,570

Muslim

9,612

9,920

10,096

9,953

10,202

10,424

Hindu

263

271

271

237

247

256

Sikh

431

399

406

365

344

349

Buddhist

1,181

1,183

1,227

1,171

1,135

1,104

Jewish

363

406

406

395

384

383

Other religious groups

1,345

1,420

1,433

1,410

1,366

1,362

Other non-recognised

7

5

6

6

5

5

No religion

17,381

17,702

17,676

16,879

16,843

17,120

Not recorded

110

86

97

207

241

174

Data sources and quality
The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Source: Prison NOMIS System


PQ HL3793 (Ministry of Justice; DASD-DES)

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government on how many occasions pelargonic acid vanillylamide (PAVA) incapacitant spray has been (1) drawn, or (2) drawn and deployed, in prisons since 1 April 2019, broken down by prison.

We ensure all our prison officers are trained in how to use PAVA professionally, safely and lawfully and that it is only used when necessary and proportionate.

The data provided for this response is collected as internal management information and reflects the data held at the date of extraction. It is not quality assured in the same way as data prepared for publication and is subject to change.

Establishment*

Total

Drawn only

Drawn and deployed

Aylesbury

20

5

15

Bedford

6

4

2

Belmarsh

1

1

0

Berwyn

1

0

1

Brinsford

18

4

14

Bure

1

1

0

Channings Wood

1

1

0

Durham

4

4

0

Elmley

1

0

1

Featherstone

6

4

2

Ford

1

0

1

Garth

1

0

1

Gartree

1

1

0

Hindley

13

5

8

Hull

25

4

21

Humber

1

0

1

Isis

1

0

1

Manchester

3

2

1

Moorland

3

1

2

Norwich

4

3

1

Nottingham

1

1

0

Preston

22

3

19

Ranby

2

1

1

Risley

42

15

27

Rochester

1

0

1

Stafford

2

1

1

Stocken

1

0

1

Swaleside

1

1

0

Swinfen Hall

31

5

26

Wakefield

7

6

1

Wandsworth

2

1

1

Wayland

2

2

0

Wealstun

36

11

25

Whitemoor

11

4

7

Winchester

3

0

3

Woodhill

3

1

2

Total

279

92

187

Ford

1

0

1

Garth

1

0

1

Gartree

1

1

0

Hindley

13

5

8

Hull

25

4

21

Humber

1

0

1

Isis

1

0

1

Manchester

3

2

1

Moorland

3

1

2

Norwich

4

3

1

Nottingham

1

1

0

Preston

22

3

19

Ranby

2

1

1

Risley

42

15

27

Rochester

1

0

1

Stafford

2

1

1

Stocken

1

0

1

Swaleside

1

1

0

Swinfen Hall

31

5

26

Wakefield

7

6

1

Wandsworth

2

1

1

Wayland

2

2

0

Wealstun

36

11

25

Whitemoor

11

4

7

Winchester

3

0

3

Woodhill

3

1

2

Total

279

92

187

Note* The above prisons comprise both those which have been through full rollout and deployed to over 50% of their eligible staff, and also prisons that have only issued as part of an exceptional deployment to a very small number of staff.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government on how many occasions pelargonic acid vanillylamide (PAVA) incapacitant spray has been (1) drawn, or (2) drawn and deployed, in prisons since 1 April 2019, broken down by (a) ethnicity, (b) religion, and (c) disability status, of the prisoner.

We ensure all our prison officers are trained in how to use PAVA professionally, safely and lawfully and that it is only used when necessary and proportionate.

The data provided for this response is collected as internal management information and reflects the data held at the date of extraction. It is not quality assured in the same way as data prepared for publication and is subject to change.

There haves been a total of 279 incidents involving PAVA since 1st April 2019, of those incidentsin 187 incidents PAVA was drawn and deployed and in 92 PAVA were as drawn only.

We are unable to provide this for disability as data for this is not available.

Ethnicity

Individuals Impacted

%

Drawn and Deployed

%

Drawn only

%

Asian/Asian British

33

6%

28

7%

5

3%

Black/Black British

182

35%

147

39%

35

24%

Mixed

57

11%

38

10%

19

13%

Other ethnic group

8

2%

7

2%

1

1%

White

241

46%

159

42%

82

57%

Not recorded

4

1%

2

1%

2

1%

Total

525

100%

381

100%

144

100%

Religion

Individuals Impacted

%

Drawn and Deployed

%

Drawn only

%

Buddhist

0

0%

0

0%

0

0%

Christian

198

38%

131

34%

67

46%

Hindu

0

0%

0

0%

0

0%

Jewish

3

1%

2

1%

1

1%

Muslim

133

25%

103

27%

30

21%

Sikh

2

0%

1

0%

1

1%

Other

12

2%

10

3%

2

1%

No religion

151

29%

112

29%

39

27%

Not recorded

26

5%

22

6%

4

3%

Total

525

100%

381

100%

144

100%

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Scott of Bybrook on 9 November 2020 (HL Deb, col 798) and the answer by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar on 6 July (HL Deb, col 1149), what work has been undertaken by the team of officials appointed to work on the royal commission on criminal justice since November 2020; and what work are they currently undertaking.

Work to establish a Royal Commission was slowed down last year to prioritise the safe operation of the Criminal Justice System in response to the impact of Covid. As we continue to recover and build back the CJS, it is right that we now pause work on the Royal Commission to allow space for the recovery work before revisiting where a Commission might add most value. As work on the Commission has paused, officials have been redeployed to other roles in government.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
8th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan to ensure women prison leavers supported by the Ministry of Justice’s temporary accommodation service are supported into permanent accommodation.

We are investing more than £20m in supporting prison leavers at risk of homelessness into temporary accommodation. Individuals released from prison will be provided up to 12 weeks of temporary accommodation and will be supported into long-term settled accommodation before the end of that 12-week period. Initially launching in five national probation regions, the service will support around 3,000 offenders in its first year and will be commencing this Summer. It will be in operation during the financial year 2021-22, with a view to scaling up and rolling out nationally.

The service will take account of the needs of women, including those with complex needs and accommodation provision will be dedicated to single gender usage as required. Community Probation Practitioners, working together with local partners, will be responsible for ensuring that vulnerable female prison leavers receive appropriate support and are provided with housing beyond the 12 weeks’ emergency accommodation.

In 2020, Hestia Battersea was changed from a male to female Approved Premises to give better geographic spread of AP provision for women, becoming the first AP for women in London since 2008.

In addition, Eden House, the first new AP in over thirty years, will open in this month supporting female offenders.

HMPPS will work in conjunction with MHCLG’s announced funding to support both male and female prison leavers at risk of homelessness into private rental tenancies. Funded schemes to support women will be developed to recognise their specific needs and will be part of plans to secure settled accommodation by the end of the 12 weeks’ temporary accommodation provided by HMPPS.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners have been released on bail in each month since 1 March because they have reached the maximum permissible period of remand.

The Department does not currently collect this data centrally.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
30th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord Keen of Elie on 29 June (HL Deb, col 464), when they expect to publish their White Paper on community justice and sentencing.

We intend to publish a Sentencing White Paper this year ahead of legislating next year.

16th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the bidding process for third sector bodies to provide probation services will be conducted on a national or a regional basis.

In his statement to the House of Commons on 11th June 2020, the Lord Chancellor confirmed plans for a Probation Services Dynamic Framework through which the National Probation Service and other public bodies can commission rehabilitative and resettlement services. It opened on 11th June for registration by prospective suppliers with an interest in provision of one or more of 14 service categories.

Our plans for the first set of contracts to be commissioned through the Framework reflect our assessment of the relative distribution of offender needs, the availability of existing local provision, and the capacity of both the third sector and HMPPS (in light of the impact of COVID-19) to complete call-off competitions and mobilise services in time for the start of future arrangements in June 2021. These contracts will be commissioned for delivery at police force or probation region level. We initially intend to run competitions for lots which cover the following Probation Services Dynamic Framework service categories:

• Accommodation

• Employment, training, and education

• Family and significant others

• Lifestyle and associates

• Emotional wellbeing

• Social inclusion

• Women

• Young adults (in Wales only)

Of these, accommodation and employment, training and education services will be commissioned at NPS regional level. All others will be commissioned at Police Force Area level.

As we finalise the detail of these plans, Ministers and members of the Probation Reform Programme team will continue to meet regularly with voluntary sector organisations to seek their feedback on our plans. Officials are supporting workshops which will be run by Clinks and which will cover a range of topics linked to participation in the Probation Services Dynamic Framework, including consortia building, to aid voluntary sector organisations in their bids for contracts.

I will place a copy of the Framework in the library of the House.

16th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what role Clinks will play in the Dynamic Framework for the provision of probation services.

In his statement to the House of Commons on 11th June 2020, the Lord Chancellor confirmed plans for a Probation Services Dynamic Framework through which the National Probation Service and other public bodies can commission rehabilitative and resettlement services. It opened on 11th June for registration by prospective suppliers with an interest in provision of one or more of 14 service categories.

Our plans for the first set of contracts to be commissioned through the Framework reflect our assessment of the relative distribution of offender needs, the availability of existing local provision, and the capacity of both the third sector and HMPPS (in light of the impact of COVID-19) to complete call-off competitions and mobilise services in time for the start of future arrangements in June 2021. These contracts will be commissioned for delivery at police force or probation region level. We initially intend to run competitions for lots which cover the following Probation Services Dynamic Framework service categories:

• Accommodation

• Employment, training, and education

• Family and significant others

• Lifestyle and associates

• Emotional wellbeing

• Social inclusion

• Women

• Young adults (in Wales only)

Of these, accommodation and employment, training and education services will be commissioned at NPS regional level. All others will be commissioned at Police Force Area level.

As we finalise the detail of these plans, Ministers and members of the Probation Reform Programme team will continue to meet regularly with voluntary sector organisations to seek their feedback on our plans. Officials are supporting workshops which will be run by Clinks and which will cover a range of topics linked to participation in the Probation Services Dynamic Framework, including consortia building, to aid voluntary sector organisations in their bids for contracts.

I will place a copy of the Framework in the library of the House.

16th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what specialist rehabilitation services they plan to make available to third sector organisations.

In his statement to the House of Commons on 11th June 2020, the Lord Chancellor confirmed plans for a Probation Services Dynamic Framework through which the National Probation Service and other public bodies can commission rehabilitative and resettlement services. It opened on 11th June for registration by prospective suppliers with an interest in provision of one or more of 14 service categories.

Our plans for the first set of contracts to be commissioned through the Framework reflect our assessment of the relative distribution of offender needs, the availability of existing local provision, and the capacity of both the third sector and HMPPS (in light of the impact of COVID-19) to complete call-off competitions and mobilise services in time for the start of future arrangements in June 2021. These contracts will be commissioned for delivery at police force or probation region level. We initially intend to run competitions for lots which cover the following Probation Services Dynamic Framework service categories:

• Accommodation

• Employment, training, and education

• Family and significant others

• Lifestyle and associates

• Emotional wellbeing

• Social inclusion

• Women

• Young adults (in Wales only)

Of these, accommodation and employment, training and education services will be commissioned at NPS regional level. All others will be commissioned at Police Force Area level.

As we finalise the detail of these plans, Ministers and members of the Probation Reform Programme team will continue to meet regularly with voluntary sector organisations to seek their feedback on our plans. Officials are supporting workshops which will be run by Clinks and which will cover a range of topics linked to participation in the Probation Services Dynamic Framework, including consortia building, to aid voluntary sector organisations in their bids for contracts.

I will place a copy of the Framework in the library of the House.

16th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by Lord Keen of Elie on 16 June (HL Deb, col 2029), whether they will lay before the House a copy of the dynamic framework for specialist rehabilitative services.

In his statement to the House of Commons on 11th June 2020, the Lord Chancellor confirmed plans for a Probation Services Dynamic Framework through which the National Probation Service and other public bodies can commission rehabilitative and resettlement services. It opened on 11th June for registration by prospective suppliers with an interest in provision of one or more of 14 service categories.

Our plans for the first set of contracts to be commissioned through the Framework reflect our assessment of the relative distribution of offender needs, the availability of existing local provision, and the capacity of both the third sector and HMPPS (in light of the impact of COVID-19) to complete call-off competitions and mobilise services in time for the start of future arrangements in June 2021. These contracts will be commissioned for delivery at police force or probation region level. We initially intend to run competitions for lots which cover the following Probation Services Dynamic Framework service categories:

• Accommodation

• Employment, training, and education

• Family and significant others

• Lifestyle and associates

• Emotional wellbeing

• Social inclusion

• Women

• Young adults (in Wales only)

Of these, accommodation and employment, training and education services will be commissioned at NPS regional level. All others will be commissioned at Police Force Area level.

As we finalise the detail of these plans, Ministers and members of the Probation Reform Programme team will continue to meet regularly with voluntary sector organisations to seek their feedback on our plans. Officials are supporting workshops which will be run by Clinks and which will cover a range of topics linked to participation in the Probation Services Dynamic Framework, including consortia building, to aid voluntary sector organisations in their bids for contracts.

I will place a copy of the Framework in the library of the House.

15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many ‘use of force incidents’ have occurred on the prison estate in each month of the last 12-month period for which data are available.

The below table is the total number of use of force incidents from April 2019 to March 2020. This data is collated from management information and due to how the data is validated it may not tally with official statistics.

Period

Total

Apr 2019

5415

May 2019

5746

Jun 2019

5489

Jul 2019

5422

Aug 2019

5264

Sep 2019

5172

Oct 2019

5888

Nov 2019

5202

Dec 2019

4858

Jan 2020

5591

Feb 2020

5487

Mar 2020

5577

We have been introducing PAVA to the adult male estate to help protect staff and prisoners from incidents where there is serious violence, or an imminent or perceived risk of serious violence.

Since the roll out of PAVA began in April 2019, it has been used on 81 prisoners. It has been drawn (but not used) on 36 individuals, totalling 117 prisoners.

The table below shows the number of times PAVA has been drawn or used, broken down by ethnicity. Revised guidance on PAVA guidance was issued in April and the first prison outside the pilot began using PAVA in August. Therefore, data between April and July will only reflect usage at the pilot sites (HMPs Risley, Hull, Preston and Wealstun)

Ethnicity

Deployed

Drawn

Total

Asian/Asian British

5

~

~

Black/Black British

10

7

17

Mixed

3

3

6

White

52

24

76

Not recorded

11

~

~

Total

81

36

117

The ‘not recorded’ category includes those prisoners who do not disclose their ethnicity on reception into custody.

Prisoners from BAME backgrounds made up 27% of all prisoners. In March 2019, prisoners who declared themselves in the White ethnic group made up almost three quarters (59,911 or 73%) of the prison population in England and Wales. Prisoners who declared their ethnicity as Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic (BAME) represented 22,227 (or 27%) of all prisoners.

PAVA is just one of many tools we give to prison officers to help them do their job more safely, alongside body worn video cameras training, and rigid bar handcuffs. Above all, we know that one of the most effective tools in managing people safely is the interpersonal skills of our staff.

HMPPS is committed and duty bound to eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation, advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not and to foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.

In response to the Lammy Review, we are updating the training we give to officers to raise awareness among all staff of how biases can affect decision making, and strategies to combat these.

PAVA, as with any use of force, must always only be used if necessary and proportionate to the seriousness of the circumstances. The application of physical techniques, or the use of PAVA, is to be used only when other methods not involving force have been repeatedly tried and failed, or are judged unlikely to succeed, and action needs to be taken to prevent serious injury or harm to prisoners or staff.

Quality assurance and scrutiny of incidents is vital to ensuring that force is used legally and appropriately. Governors will be expected to ensure that scrutiny takes place after any drawing and/or use of PAVA. We have developed a toolkit of resources to assist prisons in maintaining effective scrutiny.

15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many times PAVA spray has been used (1) in total, and (2) against BAME prisoners, on the prison estate since it’s rollout; what proportion of the total prison population are BAME; and what analysis they have undertaken to ensure proportionate use of that spray.

The below table is the total number of use of force incidents from April 2019 to March 2020. This data is collated from management information and due to how the data is validated it may not tally with official statistics.

Period

Total

Apr 2019

5415

May 2019

5746

Jun 2019

5489

Jul 2019

5422

Aug 2019

5264

Sep 2019

5172

Oct 2019

5888

Nov 2019

5202

Dec 2019

4858

Jan 2020

5591

Feb 2020

5487

Mar 2020

5577

We have been introducing PAVA to the adult male estate to help protect staff and prisoners from incidents where there is serious violence, or an imminent or perceived risk of serious violence.

Since the roll out of PAVA began in April 2019, it has been used on 81 prisoners. It has been drawn (but not used) on 36 individuals, totalling 117 prisoners.

The table below shows the number of times PAVA has been drawn or used, broken down by ethnicity. Revised guidance on PAVA guidance was issued in April and the first prison outside the pilot began using PAVA in August. Therefore, data between April and July will only reflect usage at the pilot sites (HMPs Risley, Hull, Preston and Wealstun)

Ethnicity

Deployed

Drawn

Total

Asian/Asian British

5

~

~

Black/Black British

10

7

17

Mixed

3

3

6

White

52

24

76

Not recorded

11

~

~

Total

81

36

117

The ‘not recorded’ category includes those prisoners who do not disclose their ethnicity on reception into custody.

Prisoners from BAME backgrounds made up 27% of all prisoners. In March 2019, prisoners who declared themselves in the White ethnic group made up almost three quarters (59,911 or 73%) of the prison population in England and Wales. Prisoners who declared their ethnicity as Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic (BAME) represented 22,227 (or 27%) of all prisoners.

PAVA is just one of many tools we give to prison officers to help them do their job more safely, alongside body worn video cameras training, and rigid bar handcuffs. Above all, we know that one of the most effective tools in managing people safely is the interpersonal skills of our staff.

HMPPS is committed and duty bound to eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation, advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not and to foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.

In response to the Lammy Review, we are updating the training we give to officers to raise awareness among all staff of how biases can affect decision making, and strategies to combat these.

PAVA, as with any use of force, must always only be used if necessary and proportionate to the seriousness of the circumstances. The application of physical techniques, or the use of PAVA, is to be used only when other methods not involving force have been repeatedly tried and failed, or are judged unlikely to succeed, and action needs to be taken to prevent serious injury or harm to prisoners or staff.

Quality assurance and scrutiny of incidents is vital to ensuring that force is used legally and appropriately. Governors will be expected to ensure that scrutiny takes place after any drawing and/or use of PAVA. We have developed a toolkit of resources to assist prisons in maintaining effective scrutiny.

15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what safeguards are in place to ensure against the inappropriate use of PAVA spray.

The below table is the total number of use of force incidents from April 2019 to March 2020. This data is collated from management information and due to how the data is validated it may not tally with official statistics.

Period

Total

Apr 2019

5415

May 2019

5746

Jun 2019

5489

Jul 2019

5422

Aug 2019

5264

Sep 2019

5172

Oct 2019

5888

Nov 2019

5202

Dec 2019

4858

Jan 2020

5591

Feb 2020

5487

Mar 2020

5577

We have been introducing PAVA to the adult male estate to help protect staff and prisoners from incidents where there is serious violence, or an imminent or perceived risk of serious violence.

Since the roll out of PAVA began in April 2019, it has been used on 81 prisoners. It has been drawn (but not used) on 36 individuals, totalling 117 prisoners.

The table below shows the number of times PAVA has been drawn or used, broken down by ethnicity. Revised guidance on PAVA guidance was issued in April and the first prison outside the pilot began using PAVA in August. Therefore, data between April and July will only reflect usage at the pilot sites (HMPs Risley, Hull, Preston and Wealstun)

Ethnicity

Deployed

Drawn

Total

Asian/Asian British

5

~

~

Black/Black British

10

7

17

Mixed

3

3

6

White

52

24

76

Not recorded

11

~

~

Total

81

36

117

The ‘not recorded’ category includes those prisoners who do not disclose their ethnicity on reception into custody.

Prisoners from BAME backgrounds made up 27% of all prisoners. In March 2019, prisoners who declared themselves in the White ethnic group made up almost three quarters (59,911 or 73%) of the prison population in England and Wales. Prisoners who declared their ethnicity as Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic (BAME) represented 22,227 (or 27%) of all prisoners.

PAVA is just one of many tools we give to prison officers to help them do their job more safely, alongside body worn video cameras training, and rigid bar handcuffs. Above all, we know that one of the most effective tools in managing people safely is the interpersonal skills of our staff.

HMPPS is committed and duty bound to eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation, advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not and to foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.

In response to the Lammy Review, we are updating the training we give to officers to raise awareness among all staff of how biases can affect decision making, and strategies to combat these.

PAVA, as with any use of force, must always only be used if necessary and proportionate to the seriousness of the circumstances. The application of physical techniques, or the use of PAVA, is to be used only when other methods not involving force have been repeatedly tried and failed, or are judged unlikely to succeed, and action needs to be taken to prevent serious injury or harm to prisoners or staff.

Quality assurance and scrutiny of incidents is vital to ensuring that force is used legally and appropriately. Governors will be expected to ensure that scrutiny takes place after any drawing and/or use of PAVA. We have developed a toolkit of resources to assist prisons in maintaining effective scrutiny.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many suicides there have been on the prison estate since 1 March.

There have been four self-inflicted deaths in prisons in England and Wales in the period 1st - 31st March 2020. Our condolences are with the family and friends of the prisoners who have died.

These figures are derived from the HMPPS Deaths in Prison Custody database. As classification of deaths may change following an inquest or as new information emerges, numbers are subject to change. Self-inflicted deaths are classified as any death of a person who has apparently taken his or her own life irrespective of intent.

Data covering the period 1st April – 30th June is not yet available and will be published on 30th July.

The health and welfare of prisoners is a priority. Self-inflicted deaths remain a huge concern, and we must continue to make jails safer and ensure prisoners can access the support they need – which is why we are extending telephone access and providing dedicated support to each individual.

21st May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners have been tested for COVID-19 (1) in each of the last five weeks, and (2) in total up to 20 May.

NHS England and Improvement is responsible for commissioning healthcare in prisons and are, therefore, responsible for testing for Covid-19. As such, we do not hold this data on prisoner testing.

Covid-19 testing is ongoing in prisons and is being conducted by internal or external healthcare practitioners on symptomatic prisoners on site. The testing capacity is dependent on local commissioning services, therefore the numbers of those tested varies by establishment. Prisoners that require hospital care are being transferred to hospital and may also be tested there.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners were held on remand for non-violent offences in (1) January, (2) February, (3) March, and (4) April.

In answering this question we have interpreted ‘violent’ as ‘Violence Against The Person’.

The table below therefore provides information on the total numbers of prisoners that were held on both pre-trial and post-conviction remand for offences excluding those in the ‘Violence Against The Person’ offence group on 31 January, 29 February and 31 March 2020. It has not been possible to provide this information for April because the data will not be available until the end of July 2020 when the next Offender Management Statistics Quarterly will be published.

Table 1: Remand prison population (excluding (alleged) “Violence Against The Person” offence group), as at 31 January to 31 March 2020; England & Wales

31-Jan-20

29-Feb-20

31-Mar-20

Total 'non-violent' remand population

7,622

7,709

7,589

Data sources and quality

The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Source: PQ HL 3825 (Ministry of Justice; DASD-JSAS)

29th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to seek powers for the End of Custody Temporary Release scheme to apply to Secure Children’s Homes, and if so, when.

The safety and well-being of children in custody is of utmost importance. We are committed to containing the spread of COVID-19 within all secure settings, including in secure children’s homes (SCHs) – all of which are abiding by the principles of physical distancing within revised regimes.

The End of Custody Temporary Release (ECTR) scheme does not currently apply to SCHs.

Although there are currently no children in SCHs who would meet the public or child protection criteria for ECTR, we will determine how to extend ECTR to SCHs should it become necessary i.e. a child is identified as potentially being or becoming in-scope.

29th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners were, are, or will be within two months of the end of their release date in (1) March, (2) April, (3) May, and (4) June 2020.

In the prison population serving a determinate sentence (excluding recalls) as at 31 March 2020, there were:

  • 7,346 with a release date from 31 March 2020 to 31 May 2020 (inclusive)
  • 5,503 with a release date from 30 April 2020 to 30 June 2020 (inclusive)
  • 4,503 with a release date from 31 May 2020 to 31July 2020 (inclusive)
  • 4,185 with a release date from 30 June 2020 to 31 August 2020 (inclusive)
29th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government at which prisons temporary cells are being created; and how many temporary cells are to be provided in each such prison.

Further to the statement I made during the debate on 23 April relating to this issue, I can confirm that as of 11 May nearly 450 cells have been delivered to 13 HMPPS sites. The below table shows the number of cells we have agreed to deploy at each site and how many have currently been delivered:

Site

Number of Cells Agreed

Number of Cells Delivered to date

Askham Grange

48

48

Coldingley

48

48

Foston Hall

34

0

Guys Marsh

24

0

Hatfield

36

36

Highpoint

24

24

Hollesley Bay

24

24

Kirkham

86

0

Kirklevington Grange

24

24

Lindholme

24

24

Littlehey

24

24

Moorland

48

48

North Sea Camp

48

48

Prescoed

40

36

Stafford

15

15

Sudbury

80

0

The Verne

24

0

Wymott

48

48

Grand Total

699

447

The former Medway Secure Training Centre, has been brought back into operation temporarily as an annex to HMP/YOI Rochester. The location, which is the site of the first secure school, will provide temporary accommodation for 70 category D adult males, with provision managed by HMPPS and staffed by HMPPS officers. The first men were received on 29 April.

Our ambition is to secure and install around 2,000 additional cells to help contain the spread of COVID-19 within our prisons. These cells are a temporary measure to mitigate the impact of COVID-19. Prisoners will return to their usual accommodation arrangements when safe to do so. Once the units are no longer required they will be removed.

We continue to consider other suitable locations based on whether extra accommodation is needed and if there is sufficient space.

23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been remanded in custody in England and Wales in each month of 2020 to date.

The requested data is not available at this time. Court data up to the year ending December 2019 is due to be published in May 2020, and data for the year ending December 2020 is planned for publication in May 2021. Prison receptions data covering January to March 2020 is planned for publication in July 2020 and data covering April to June 2020 is planned for publication in October 2020.

23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people were sentenced to a prison term of six months or less in each month of 2020 to date.

The requested data is not available at this time. Data on custodial sentences up to December 2018 has been published. Data for the years ending December 2019 and December 2020 is due to be published in May 2020 and May 2021 respectively.

5th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners were released on temporary licence from each category of prison in the most recent twelve-month period for which figures are available.

All offenders must meet strict criteria and pass a thorough risk assessment before being considered for release on temporary licence (ROTL). ROTL is proven to reduce reoffending, helping offenders build and maintain family ties as well as find work.

The table below shows the number of prisoners released on temporary licence in England and Wales between 1 October 2018 and 30 September 2019 by category/type of prison from which they were released for the first time during that period.

Table 1: Individuals released on temporary licence by predominant prison function, October 2018 - September 2019

Predominant Prison Function

Number

Open

7,106

Female

650

Local

396

Category C

306

Young Offender Institution

89

Category B

*

Category A

*

Total

8,548

Data sources and quality

The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Disclosure control

An asterisk (*) has been used to suppress values of two or less. This is to prevent the disclosure of individual information. Further disclosure control may be completed where this alone is not sufficient.

Notes

The above data shows unique individuals and their first release on temporary licence, based on date. There may be cases where an individual moves between establishments and is released on temporary licence from more than one establishment type. In these instances, only the establishment type of their first ROTL in the time period is recorded.

Source: PQ HL 2263 (Ministry of Justice; DASD-JSAS)

21st May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that the UK Shared Prosperity Fund matches the (1) money currently received by Wales from EU funding programmes, and (2) level of discretion the Welsh Government has over the use of such funds.

Wales has received more than £4 billion in European structural fund support since 2000, almost half of which will have accrued in the current spending round. The UK Government recognises the vital role that European structural funds have played in Wales over the past two decades, and has committed, at a minimum, to matching current levels of funding for each nation. We are determined that Wales will not be out of pocket now that we have left the EU, and the UK Shared Prosperity Fund will be instrumental in making good on this.

In terms of the powers that the Welsh Government will have over these funds, the UK Government is fully committed to respecting devolution and the devolved institutions. We want to ensure that the UK Shared Prosperity Fund can deliver for the people of Wales, and the Secretary of State for Wales has had positive discussions with colleagues in the Welsh Government on how our two Governments can work together to make a success of the Fund.

Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)