Lord Freyberg

Crossbench - Excepted Hereditary

1 APPG membership (as of 29 Dec 2021)
Design and Innovation
1 Former APPG membership
Art, Craft and Design in Education
Works of Art Committee (Lords)
23rd Nov 1999 - 7th Nov 2002


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Monday 17th January 2022
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
voted No
One of 32 Crossbench No votes vs 14 Crossbench Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 163 Noes - 216
Speeches
Tuesday 2nd February 2021
Trade Bill
My Lords, as I rise to speak to Motion D1 in the name of the noble Baroness, Lady Thornton, the …
Written Answers
Tuesday 1st September 2020
Coronavirus: Screening
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many COVID-19 tests have been made available but not processed; and of those, how …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Freyberg has voted in 159 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord McKenzie of Luton (Labour)
(1 debate interactions)
Baroness Thornton (Labour)
Shadow Spokesperson (Equalities and Women's Issues)
(1 debate interactions)
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Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Freyberg, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Freyberg has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Freyberg has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Freyberg has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Freyberg has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


26 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support they provide to broadband consumers in urban areas who are not able to access superfast broadband from Openreach.

According to Ofcom’s latest Connected Nations report, more than 98% of premises in urban areas can access superfast broadband. The Government’s Superfast programme has been instrumental in reaching this level of coverage, with £1.8 billion invested to date. The programme is still ongoing, and future delivery will further increase superfast coverage.

For consumers unable to access download speeds of at least 10 megabits per second, including those on exchange only lines, the Government has legislated to introduce the broadband Universal Service Obligation, which provides households with a legal right to request this minimum speed up to a reasonable cost threshold of £3,400 per premise.

In addition, the Government is committed to delivering nationwide gigabit-capable broadband as soon as possible and has already invested in stimulating demand for gigabit broadband, including in urban areas. The £200 million Local Full Fibre Networks programme has funded projects in urban areas such as Belfast and London, for example.

The Government has also announced that it will invest a further £5 billion to provide gigabit-capable networks in the hardest to parts of the UK. This funding will focus on connecting more rural and remote areas but, alongside this, the Government is also taking action to reduce the barriers to deployment, and make it cheaper and easier for BT Openreach and other operators to roll out broadband commercially, including in urban and suburban areas. For example, we are taking the Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill through Parliament, which will make it easier for network builders to access blocks of flats where there is an absent or unresponsive landlord.

Finally, mobile network operators already provide 4G mobile broadband services which provide a viable alternative to superfast coverage in urban areas. In addition, according to Ofcom’s December 2019 Connected Nations report, more than 40 towns and cities already have access to even faster 5G mobile services, and the rollout has developed further since then.

As part of this, the Government has allocated £200 million from 2017 to March 2022 to support the further development of 5G through its 5G Testbeds & Trials Programme, including up to £20 million in the West Midlands 5G (WM5G) Programme (over three years, to March 2022).

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support they provide to broadband consumers who are unable to access (1) fibre-to-the-premises, or (2) fibre-to-the-cabinet, broadband from Openreach in urban areas where Openreach has no plans to make such services available.

According to Ofcom’s latest Connected Nations report, more than 98% of premises in urban areas can access superfast broadband. The Government’s Superfast programme has been instrumental in reaching this level of coverage, with £1.8 billion invested to date. The programme is still ongoing, and future delivery will further increase superfast coverage.

For consumers unable to access download speeds of at least 10 megabits per second, including those on exchange only lines, the Government has legislated to introduce the broadband Universal Service Obligation, which provides households with a legal right to request this minimum speed up to a reasonable cost threshold of £3,400 per premise.

In addition, the Government is committed to delivering nationwide gigabit-capable broadband as soon as possible and has already invested in stimulating demand for gigabit broadband, including in urban areas. The £200 million Local Full Fibre Networks programme has funded projects in urban areas such as Belfast and London, for example.

The Government has also announced that it will invest a further £5 billion to provide gigabit-capable networks in the hardest to parts of the UK. This funding will focus on connecting more rural and remote areas but, alongside this, the Government is also taking action to reduce the barriers to deployment, and make it cheaper and easier for BT Openreach and other operators to roll out broadband commercially, including in urban and suburban areas. For example, we are taking the Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill through Parliament, which will make it easier for network builders to access blocks of flats where there is an absent or unresponsive landlord.

Finally, mobile network operators already provide 4G mobile broadband services which provide a viable alternative to superfast coverage in urban areas. In addition, according to Ofcom’s December 2019 Connected Nations report, more than 40 towns and cities already have access to even faster 5G mobile services, and the rollout has developed further since then.

As part of this, the Government has allocated £200 million from 2017 to March 2022 to support the further development of 5G through its 5G Testbeds & Trials Programme, including up to £20 million in the West Midlands 5G (WM5G) Programme (over three years, to March 2022).

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that all consumers with exchange-only broadband connections are able to access superfast broadband.

According to Ofcom’s latest Connected Nations report, more than 98% of premises in urban areas can access superfast broadband. The Government’s Superfast programme has been instrumental in reaching this level of coverage, with £1.8 billion invested to date. The programme is still ongoing, and future delivery will further increase superfast coverage.

For consumers unable to access download speeds of at least 10 megabits per second, including those on exchange only lines, the Government has legislated to introduce the broadband Universal Service Obligation, which provides households with a legal right to request this minimum speed up to a reasonable cost threshold of £3,400 per premise.

In addition, the Government is committed to delivering nationwide gigabit-capable broadband as soon as possible and has already invested in stimulating demand for gigabit broadband, including in urban areas. The £200 million Local Full Fibre Networks programme has funded projects in urban areas such as Belfast and London, for example.

The Government has also announced that it will invest a further £5 billion to provide gigabit-capable networks in the hardest to parts of the UK. This funding will focus on connecting more rural and remote areas but, alongside this, the Government is also taking action to reduce the barriers to deployment, and make it cheaper and easier for BT Openreach and other operators to roll out broadband commercially, including in urban and suburban areas. For example, we are taking the Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill through Parliament, which will make it easier for network builders to access blocks of flats where there is an absent or unresponsive landlord.

Finally, mobile network operators already provide 4G mobile broadband services which provide a viable alternative to superfast coverage in urban areas. In addition, according to Ofcom’s December 2019 Connected Nations report, more than 40 towns and cities already have access to even faster 5G mobile services, and the rollout has developed further since then.

As part of this, the Government has allocated £200 million from 2017 to March 2022 to support the further development of 5G through its 5G Testbeds & Trials Programme, including up to £20 million in the West Midlands 5G (WM5G) Programme (over three years, to March 2022).

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to mandate the rollout by Openreach of fibre-to-the-premises broadband to urban areas; and what is their timeframe for this rollout.

The Government's ambition is for nationwide coverage of gigabit capable broadband as soon as possible. Gigabit capable broadband can be delivered by fibre to the premise broadband, as well as other technologies, such as upgraded cable networks.

We believe the best way to deliver nationwide coverage is to promote network competition and commercial investment by BT Openreach and other operators wherever possible, and to intervene with public subsidy where necessary. To deliver this, we are taking action to reduce barriers to commercial deployment including, for example, through the Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold) Property Bill, which will make it easier to connect tenanted properties with an unresponsive landlord. At Budget, we also committed to invest £5 billion to deliver gigabit capable deployment to the hardest to reach areas of the country.

The Government does not have formal powers to mandate the rollout of gigabit capable broadband by a private sector company like BT. However, BT recently announced their ambition to deliver gigabit connectivity to 20 million premises during the 2020s.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in ensuring that every home and business in the UK will have access to (1) full fibre, and (2) gigabit-capable, broadband by 2025.

Ofcom’s latest Connected Nations update found that, as of January 2020, over 3.5 million premises or 12% of the UK had access to full fibre broadband. This represents a considerable increase from 7% coverage in January 2019. In addition, the independent ThinkBroadband website estimates that around 19% of UK premises currently have access to gigabit capable broadband, including full fibre, but also upgraded cable broadband.

Full fibre figures for London boroughs are generally higher than the UK average. According to Connected Nations, 19 London Boroughs had full fibre coverage above the national average. However, there are notable differences between boroughs, ranging from full fibre coverage of 50.9% in Barking and Dagenham, compared to 1.1% in Bromley.


We are taking action to reduce barriers to commercial deployment and are confident that telecoms providers will step up and deliver gigabit capable coverage across London by 2025.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what funding is available to help with the cost of installing (1) superfast, and (2) gigabit-capable, broadband to residential premises, either individually or as part of a Community Fibre Partnership; and whether such funding is available throughout the UK.

Under the Government’s Superfast Broadband programme, premises that are included in a rollout programme do not need to pay for the upgrade to their broadband speeds. They are, however, liable for the recurring costs associated with taking out a superfast service once the upgrade has been completed. These publicly funded rollout programmes are taking place across the UK. To date £1.8 billion of public funding has been invested into this programme, and a further £836 million of new procurement is underway utilising a variety of public funding sources.

Delivery under the Superfast programme is now utilising Fibre to the Premise (FTTP) technology where possible. This technology provides homes and businesses with a fast, reliable and future-proof connection. Furthermore commercial build operators are also rolling out FTTP to homes and businesses across the UK. This commercial build activity is not utilising public funding.

Through our Rural Gigabit Connectivity Programme (RGC), DCMS runs a voucher scheme that can be used by rural communities across the UK to reduce the cost of installing gigabit-capable connectivity. This provides a voucher worth up to £3,500 for eligible small businesses and vouchers worth up to £1,500 for residents.

Community Fibre Partnerships are an initiative offered by Openreach. Openreach will work with local communities to build a customised fibre solution to bring fibre broadband to homes and businesses. A joint funding arrangement is put in place, which means Openreach will contribute to some of the costs and the rest is funded by the community.

Our vouchers can be used in an Openreach Community Fibre Partnership to reduce the costs borne by the community. It is worth noting, however, that Openreach is not the only supplier offering community fibre solutions, and we have over 700 network suppliers registered on the scheme. Our voucher website enables residents or small businesses to enter their postcode and see which suppliers are active in their area.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to amend the Data Protection Act 2018, following the introduction of the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill.

The Government is committed to ensuring that the UK’s data protection and rights framework remains fit for purpose and can continue to operate in a fast-changing landscape. The Government and the Information Commissioner’s Office keep legislation under constant review to ensure it keeps pace with technical and societal changes. There are powers in the Data Protection Act 2018, overseen by Parliament, to make changes using secondary legislation where appropriate.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to ask the Information Commissioner's Office to issue further guidance on the scope of exemptions to the Data Protection Act 2018 and the General Data Protection Regulation in relation to (1) research and development, and (2) science and innovation; and what plans they have, if any, to introduce statutory instruments on those matters.

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is an independent regulator and has the power to issue guidance under the UK’s data protection legislation. The ICO has stated that it is working on guidance for Data Sharing, Direct Marketing and Journalism. They can produce their own guidance should they have concerns on a specific area of the law.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Court of Appeal judgment in Lloyd v Google; and what action, if any, they intend to take as a result.

The Government is considering the implications of the judgment and will monitor any actions that may follow it, including any further stages in the legal process.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to replicate the provisions in the Republic of India's Data Protection Bill in relation to the state's right to access, control and process personal data obtained by private enterprises.

The Government has no plans to amend the UK’s Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA) to replicate those provisions contained in the Republic of India’s Personal Data Protection Bill.

The Government takes the protection of personal data and the right to privacy seriously. The DPA sets standards for protecting personal data in accordance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and ensures that our laws are fit for the digital age in which an ever increasing amount of data is being processed.

The DPA has various exemptions that disapply a number of obligations on data controllers in certain circumstances, for example, the information required to be disclosed in connection with legal proceedings, crime and taxation. These exemptions do not oblige an organisation to disclose personal information.

All data controllers, including public authorities, are required to comply with the DPA. Organisations that collect and use personal data must do so with an appropriate legal basis and apply exemptions to the rules on a case by case basis.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the data localisation restrictions on sensitive personal and biometric data in place in India and China; and what plans they have, if any, to introduce similar restrictions in the UK.

The Government considers that in the UK, data localisation should be limited to cases that are specific and well-justified.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to transfer responsibility for data protection from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport to another Government Department.

Questions about the machinery of Government are not made at Departmental level, but the Government attaches great importance to the issue of data protection and the role it plays in building a strong and trusted data economy.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether notices issued under the Health Service (Control of Patient Information) Regulations 2002 in March cover the release of patient identifiable information to local public health teams; and if so, which (1) legal, or (2) policy, provisions prevent local directors of public health from receiving such information.

It is of vital importance that the health and care sector is able to access the data it needs to respond to COVID-19. A Control of Patient Information Notice was issued to require a range of organisations to share and process data for COVID-19 purposes. This should include sharing data with public health teams responding to COVID-19.

The Notice only applies to data processed for COVID-19 purposes and organisations must also meet other regulatory and legal requirements such as the General Data Protection Regulation.

Public Health England is making available to all local authorities information on positive tests

for COVID-19. Public Health England also routinely shares personal data with local authorities to manage and control local clusters and outbreaks of certain infectious diseases.

6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many COVID-19 tests have been made available but not processed as part of the NHS Test and Trace programme, broken down by the local authority area (1) to which they were sent, or (2) in which they were administered.

The Department does not hold data in this format. There will be many instances where the National Testing Programme sends kits out that are not used immediately, for example to be held at local sites for when they are needed.

6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what has been the total cost of COVID-19 tests which have been made available but not processed since 1 January.

The Department does not hold data in this format. There will be many instances where the National Testing Programme sends kits out that are not used immediately, for example to be held at local sites for when they are needed.

6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Data Protection Impact Assessment for the NHS COVID-19 Data Store published on 5 June covers the release of patient identifiable information to local public health teams; and if so, which (1) legal, or (2) policy, provisions prevent local directors of public health from receiving such information.

The COVID-19 Data Store does not hold patient identifiable data, as all data is de-identified (pseudonymised) in line with Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) guidance and best practice, prior to being imported to the database. Therefore, the release of patient identifiable information to local public health teams, via the COVID-19 Data Store, is not possible.

NHS England is the data controller for all data held within the COVID-19 data store and ensures (via contractual arrangements) that data storage and processes are fully compliant with legislation and best practice.

6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Infrastructure and Projects Authority (1) has been, or (2) will be, involved in the NHS Test and Trace programme.

The Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) has been and continues to be involved with the NHS Test and Trace Programme. IPA provided assurance at the outset and has since supported independent peer reviews. IPA will continue to be involved by providing advice and support.

25th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to competitively tender for future technology products and services that were commissioned during the first stage of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Department and its agencies have always secured digital and technology products and services in accordance with the requirements of United Kingdom procurement laws and will continue to do so; in responding quickly to the COVID-19 pandemic, it has made direct awards where permitted under regulation 32 of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015.

25th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to consult key stakeholders and external experts on future Data Protection Impact Assessments for the management, storage and handling of NHS controlled data.

Under the General Data Protection Regulations 2016, data controllers are under a legal obligation to complete Data Protection Impact Assessments (DPIAs) particularly where it involves high risk processing. All National Health Service organisations processing patient data as data controllers are therefore required to complete DPIAs and where necessary, to consult with key stakeholders to ensure risks to privacy are identified and mitigated as far as possible.

A DPIA for the NHS COVID-19 Data Store has been completed and is published on the NHS England website. The data held in the Data Store has gone through a process of pseudonymisation. Identifiable data is not held or made available to users and nor are they permitted to remove the data from the controlled area.

25th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why the Data Protection Impact Assessment of Palantir’s role in combining NHS data had no analysis of data analytics as contained in their G-Cloud 11 call-Off contract (version 4); and whether they intend to publish an additional report to cover this.

Whilst we have made no specific assessment, the Government is committed to ensure that the United Kingdom continues to be one of the best places in the world for research and innovation and is at the forefront of health and social care research internationally and specifically, global research on pandemics.

The UK has pledged £388 million in aid funding for research into vaccines, tests and treatments which is part of a larger £744 million existing commitment to help end the pandemic and support the global economy. This also includes £250 million for global Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations to develop vaccines against coronaviruses. The UK will also provide £330 million a year for the next five years to the Global Vaccine Alliance, readying it to distribute a COVID-19 vaccine in developing countries.

25th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish a Data Protection Impact Assessment of Faculty AI’s work on data dashboards and modelling for NHSX.

The Data Protection Impact Assessment is already published online by NHS England.

25th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to carry out a Data Protection Impact Assessment on the rights and freedoms of the people whose health data is collected by the NHS; and whether any such data is protected against access by intelligence services.

Under the General Data Protection Regulations 2016, data controllers are under a legal obligation to complete Data Protection Impact Assessments (DPIAs) particularly where it involves high risk processing. All National Health Service organisations processing patient data as data controllers are therefore required to complete DPIAs and where necessary, to consult with key stakeholders to ensure risks to privacy are identified and mitigated as far as possible. It would be inappropriate for the Government to undertake a DPIA in relation to the health data held by those organisations. It is the responsibility of each of these organisations to protect the confidentiality of patients and to ensure that there is a legal basis for the disclosure of any personal information.

25th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they intend to take to increase (1) access to data controlled by the NHS, and (2) associated opportunities to innovate, for UK start-ups and SMEs (a) during, and (b) after, the COVID-19 pandemic.

To simplify access to data controlled by the National Health Service and encourage innovation partnerships, the Government is developing a policy framework underpinned by five guiding principles. This will offer support and guidance to NHS organisations that are considering entering into data access agreements with researchers and commercial partners.

The framework is expected to be published later this year and is being developed in consultation with patient representative groups, health and data experts, NHS bodies and industry. To support the NHS in embedding the framework in practice, the Government has set up a National Centre of Expertise in NHSX to provide commercial and legal expertise to NHS organisations on agreeing fair terms when negotiating partnerships.

The Government has also committed funding for the Digital Innovation Hubs Programme which aims to enable a United Kingdom-wide life sciences environment that provides responsible and safe access to rich, research-ready health data, technology and science, research and innovation services.

3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Summary of Impacts: Coronavirus Bill, published on 19 March, when they will publish the equalities assessment undertaken as part of the Public Sector Equalities Duty.

The duty to have regard to the impact on equalities is an ongoing one.

The Government’s commitment to transparency and accountability is reflected in the duties set out in the Coronavirus Act 2020 to publish a status report every two months; carry out a review every six months with a debate and vote in the House of Commons; and publish a status report for debate in both Houses after one year.

We are considering how best to update Parliament on the equalities impact of the legislation as part of this broader commitment.