Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer Portrait

Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

Draft Marine Bill (Joint Committee)
13th May 2008 - 22nd Jul 2008
Draft Climate Change Bill (Joint Committee)
23rd Apr 2007 - 3rd Aug 2007


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Thursday 10th June 2021
Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development etc.) (England) (Amendment) Order 2021
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 79 Liberal Democrat Aye votes vs 0 Liberal Democrat No votes
Tally: Ayes - 260 Noes - 229
Speeches
Tuesday 14th September 2021
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill

My Lords, I congratulate the noble Lord, Lord Sandhurst, and I look forward to hearing many more of his contributions …

Written Answers
Wednesday 22nd September 2021
Bereavement Support Payment
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the total number of children who, between 6 April …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer has voted in 122 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Goldie (Conservative)
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
(4 debate interactions)
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(2 debate interactions)
Baroness Penn (Conservative)
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
(2 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Ministry of Defence
(3 debate contributions)
Home Office
(3 debate contributions)
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View all Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


50 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
8th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of British citizens who are resident overseas and who can no longer vote in general elections due to the 15 year rule, since 2010.

British citizens resident overseas who are registered to vote in UK Parliamentary elections as overseas electors are listed under ‘other electors’ at the end of the electoral register for each area/constituency.

The Government does not hold statistics on the number of British citizens living abroad who have been previously registered to vote in the UK.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether British citizens who are resident overseas and registered to vote with the local authority in which they last lived in the UK are included on the Electoral Register; and if not, whether there is an alternative national register of such citizens.

British citizens resident overseas who are registered to vote in UK Parliamentary elections as overseas electors are listed under ‘other electors’ at the end of the electoral register for each area/constituency.

The Government does not hold statistics on the number of British citizens living abroad who have been previously registered to vote in the UK.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many requests for assistance have been received by (1) the Department of Work and Pensions, (2) HM Revenue and Customs, and (3) other Government departments, from British citizens who are resident overseas in each of the past five years.

This information is not held centrally.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what arrangement each department has for dealing with inquiries from British citizens who are resident overseas; and whether all departments (1) have a dedicated phone line for, and (2) provide training to staff about how to deal with, such inquiries.

This information is not held centrally.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which departments hold information on British citizens who are resident overseas; and what categories of  information each of those departments hold.

This information is not held centrally.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Child Development GCSE covers the feeding of newborn babies; and if so, how it is taught.

?There is no Child Development GCSE available in England. Education is a devolved matter, and questions on GCSEs available in Wales and Northern Ireland should be directed to the appropriate devolved administrations.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education and Health Education curriculums include on breastfeeding.

?From September, we are making the subjects of relationships education compulsory in all primary schools, relationships and sex education (RSE) compulsory in all secondary schools and health education compulsory in all state-funded schools.

The statutory guidance sets out that as part of RSE, pupils should be taught about sexual and reproductive health, including pregnancy and the role and responsibilities of parents with respect to raising of children. Schools are free to adapt their content to meet the needs of their pupils and may want to cover breastfeeding when teaching about parenting or pregnancy. The statutory guidance can be accessed via the following link, which is also attached: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/805781/Relationships_Education__Relationships_and_Sex_Education__RSE__and_Health_Education.pdf.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to amend the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 to prevent harm to birds and other wildlife from drones.

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 prohibits the intentional or reckless disturbance of any wild bird included in Schedule 1 while it is building a nest or is in, on or near a nest containing eggs or young; or the dependent young of such a bird. The Act also prohibits the intentional or reckless disturbance of any animal included on Schedule 5 while it is occupying a structure or place which it uses for shelter or protection. In both instances this would include disturbance by drones.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they made an assessment of the effects on the travel industry of their decision to require British citizens to quarantine when returning to the UK from France; and if so, what were the conclusions of that assessment.

The Government has always been clear that we will not hesitate to act immediately should the data show that countries risk ratings have changed. The decision on France was taken following the persistent presence of cases in France of the Beta variant, which was first identified in South Africa.

The Government recognises the challenging circumstances businesses in the travel industry face as a result of Covid-19, which is why we have provided an unprecedented package of support to protect jobs and businesses totalling over £350 billion. This includes support through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, support for businesses through grants and loans, business rates and VAT relief. We continue to take a flexible approach and keep all impacts and policies under review.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when UK citizens in EU Member States with whom reciprocal arrangements on driving licences have not been signed will lose their right to drive in those countries.

The UK has secured either permanent or interim arrangements with all EU Member States so that valid UK licence holders resident in the EU can continue to drive. The vast majority of the interim arrangements do not have an expiry date, pending finalisation of a permanent agreement. In EU Member States where there is an expiry date to the interim arrangements, the Department for Transport and our diplomatic Posts are working hard to reach a swift agreement.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why a reciprocal agreement on driving licences between the UK and France has not yet been signed.

The Department for Transport has successfully agreed arrangements with France for the mutual recognition of photocard licences. As such, visitors with UK photocard licences will not need to carry an additional International Driving Permit when driving in France. We have also secured interim arrangements with the French authorities which will allow UK licence holders resident in France, to continue to use their valid UK licence until 1 January 2022. We are working with the French Government to finalise a permanent licence exchange agreement as soon as possible.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when an agreement on driving licences will be signed with the government of Spain given UK citizens in that country will lose their right to drive on 30 June.

Department for Transport officials are making every effort to reach a swift understanding with Spain regarding long-term arrangements for licence exchange, without the need for a practical test, for UK licence holders resident in Spain. The British Embassy in Madrid is also working with the Spanish Government to secure an extension to the current interim arrangements, to allow UK licence holders to continue to use their UK licence while discussions on the agreement conclude.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government with which EU Member States they have (1) reached, and (2) signed, reciprocal agreements on driving licences.

The Department for Transport has successfully agreed arrangements with all EU/EEA Member States for the mutual recognition of photocard licences. As such, visitors with UK photocard licences will not need to carry an additional International Driving Permit (IDP) when driving in any EU/EEA Member State.

The UK has secured permanent or long-term reciprocal arrangements for the exchange of licences with: Austria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia Switzerland, Bulgaria, Iceland, Lithuania, Hungary, Netherlands, Sweden, Latvia and Belgium. The UK is working to conclude the formal agreements where required.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 2 March (HL13474), whether they (1) know, or (2) have estimated the number of UK nationals living in France who have been left without a valid driving licence since the end of the transition period for the UK's departure from the EU; and what assessment they have made of the reasons for such licences no longer being valid.

An estimate of the number of UK nationals in France without a valid licence since 1 January 2021 has not yet been obtained. UK nationals who became resident in France before 1 January 2021 can continue to use their valid UK licences until 31 December 2021. The French authorities have confirmed that a valid UK licence will continue to be exchanged in this period, until a reciprocal agreement is reached between the United Kingdom and France.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what reciprocal arrangements are in place between the UK and each EU member state with regard to driving licences.

All EU/EEA Member States, except for Italy, have confirmed reciprocal arrangements for exchanging licences, confirming that a retest will not be required for resident UK nationals. Most of our agreements are permanent arrangements and a small number require formal agreements which will be concluded before the end of this year. Where these agreements are needed, the UK has secured interim arrangements with the relevant Member States. All EU/EEA countries have confirmed that International Driving Permits will not be required by UK visitors.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have for th DVLA to be able to grant an extension to UK drivers' licences that are due to expire, where there are no reciprocal arrangements regarding driving licences with EU member states.

UK legislation does not permit the DVLA to extend a UK national’s driving licence, if they are not a UK resident. There are no plans to amend the regulations. All EU/EEA Member States, except for Italy, have confirmed reciprocal arrangements for exchanging licences. Most of our agreements are permanent arrangements and a small number require formal agreements which will be concluded before the end of this year. Where these agreements are needed, the UK has secured interim arrangements with the relevant Member States.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made on their negotiations with the government of France on driving licences; and whether negotiations will conclude next month.

The Government is making every effort to reach an understanding with France regarding long-term licence exchange arrangements for UK nationals resident in France, and vice-versa. While those discussions are ongoing, the French Government has also confirmed that UK licence holders resident in France can continue to use their UK licence until 31 December 2021, provided that it remains valid in the UK. It is not possible at this time to say when negotiations will conclude.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance they provide to British nationals living in France whose UK driving licence has just expired, or is about to expire.

The Living in France guidance published on gov.uk was updated at the end of 2020 with information for UK nationals living in France who hold UK driving licences. The rules for exchanging UK licences have not yet been confirmed by the French authorities but are the subject of discussions between the UK and French Governments. We will update this page when more information is available. UK nationals are also directed to consult the guidance published by France.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of British nationals living in France who have been left without a valid driving licence since the end of the transition period for the UK's departure from the EU; and what assessment they have made of the reasons for such licences no longer being valid.

UK nationals who became resident in France before 1 January 2021 can continue to use their valid UK licences for a one-year period until 31 December 2021. There is no requirement imposed by France for these valid UK licences to be exchanged in this period until a reciprocal agreement is reached between the United Kingdom and France.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many certificates of entitlement (D737) have been issued since the end of the transition period for the UK’s departure from the EU.

During January 2021, 1,368 certificates of entitlement (D737) were issued. Information is not yet available for February 2021.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 4 February (HL705), whether the Civil Aviation Authority’s Drone and Model Aircraft Code includes rules regarding the disturbance of wildlife; and if not, why not.

The Civil Aviation Authority’s Drone and Model Aircraft Code provides important guidance on how to fly responsibly and within the law. Point 7 of the Drone and Model Aircraft Code has a section reminding users not to fly where animals would be disturbed. Some local authorities also have Byelaws which restrict flight in places such as forests and parks to ensure that wildlife is protected.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to introduce a requirement that drones display a licence number on the side of the drone, clear enough to be identified through binoculars, that could be reported to the Civil Aviation Authority if users do not comply with the Drone and Model Aircraft Code.

Since the end of November 2019, operators of SUA from 250g up to 20kg need to register with the CAA and their ID number needs to be displayed on the aircraft. In most cases this will be clearly visible on the outside of the aircraft. However, it is important to be proportionate, therefore in some cases the number may be contained within a compartment that can be easily accessed without using a tool.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to introduce a requirement for those purchasing drones to be informed of the risk drones pose to nesting birds and their feeding grounds.

While there are no current plans to require those purchasing drones to be informed specifically of the risk drones pose to nesting birds and their feeding grounds, the Government has been working closely with the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and other agencies to encourage the responsible use of drones. For example, the CAA launched a website, www.dronesafe.co.uk, which serves to raise awareness of the current rules of the air and the “drone and model aircraft code” sets these out in a clear and simple way.

The CAA has also developed a competency test, which is compulsory for remote pilots flying unmanned aircraft, including drones, from 250g up to 20kg. It covers subjects such as flight restriction zones, height restrictions, registration and how close to people and buildings a drone can legally fly, as well as reminding those flying drones to be aware and considerate of their surroundings wherever they are being flown.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Supreme Court judgment [2018] UKSC 48, what consideration they have given to providing retrospective Bereavement Support Payment to families where the date of death of a family member was prior to 30 August 2018.

The draft Bereavement Benefits (Remedial Order) 2021 was laid before Parliament on 15 July 2021 and proposes to extend eligibility to Bereavement Support Payment (BSP) and Widowed Parent’s Allowance (WPA) to cohabitees with dependent children.

The changes proposed by the draft Order have effect from 30 August 2018, as this was the date of the Supreme Court judgment in the McLaughlin case and from when we became aware of an incompatibility. Where a death occurred before 30 August 2018, there can be eligibility for either WPA or BSP, but awards can only be made in respect of entitlement arising from that date.

The proposals in the draft Order are subject to a 60-day laying period during which comments are invited from parliamentarians and stakeholders about the proposals. These comments will then be reviewed and next steps considered.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the total number of children who, between 6 April 2017 and 30 August 2018, experienced the death of a parent but whose family unit (1) was not eligible for Bereavement Support Payment, and (2) remains ineligible for support under the Draft Bereavement Benefits (Remedial) Order 2021.

No assessment has been made of the total number of children who experience the death of a parent between 6th April 2017 and 30th August 2018 whose family unit (1) was not eligible for Widowed Parents Allowance or Bereavement Support Payment, and (2) will remain ineligible for support under the Draft Bereavement Benefits (Remedial) Order 2021.

As part of the BSP claimant process, the number of dependent children are not captured, and therefore we do not hold the data required.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the total number of children who experienced the death of a parent between 9 February 2016 and 30 August 2018 whose family unit (1) was not eligible for Widowed Parents Allowance or Bereavement Support Payment, and (2) will remain ineligible for support under the Draft Bereavement Benefits (Remedial) Order 2021.

No assessment has been made of the total number of children who experience the death of a parent between 9th February 2016 and 30th August 2018 whose family unit (1) was not eligible for Widowed Parents Allowance or Bereavement Support Payment, and (2) will remain ineligible for support under the Draft Bereavement Benefits (Remedial) Order 2021.

As part of the BSP claimant process, the number of dependent children are not captured, and therefore we do not hold the data required.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the total number of children who experienced the death of a parent between 9 April 2001 and 30 August 2018 whose family unit (1) was not eligible for Widowed Parents Allowance or Bereavement Support Payment, and (2) will remain ineligible for support under the Draft Bereavement Benefits (Remedial) Order 2021.

No assessment has been made of the total number of children who experience the death of a parent between 9th April 2001 and 30th August 2018 whose family unit (1) was not eligible for Widowed Parents Allowance or Bereavement Support Payment, and (2) will remain ineligible for support under the Draft Bereavement Benefits (Remedial) Order 2021.

As part of the BSP claimant process, the number of dependent children are not captured, and therefore we do not hold the data required.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Supreme Court judgment [2018] UKSC 48, what assessment have they made of the impact on family finances of not providing retrospective Bereavement Support Payment to families where the date of death of a family member was prior to 30 August 2018.

The Supreme Court and the High Court have declared the legislation governing Widowed Parent’s Allowance (WPA) and Bereavement Support Payment (BSP) respectively to be incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in that surviving cohabitees with children cannot access these benefits.

The draft proposal for a Bereavement Benefits (2021) Remedial Order was laid before Parliament on 15th July 2021 and proposes to extend eligibility for Widowed Parent’s Allowance (WPA) and Bereavement Support Payment (BSP) to surviving cohabitees with dependent children.

The changes proposed by the draft Order have effect from 30th August 2018, as this was the date of the Supreme Court judgment in the McLaughlin case. Where a death occurred before 30th August 2018, there can be eligibility for both WPA and BSP, but awards can only be made in respect of entitlement arising from that date.

The proposals in the draft Order are subject to a 60-day laying period during which comments are invited from parliamentarians and stakeholders about the proposals. These comments will then be reviewed and next steps considered.

An assessment of the impact on family finances of not providing BSP to families where the death of a family member occurred prior to 30th August 2018 has not been made.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they made of the prevalence of the Beta variant of COVID-19 in (1) mainland France, and (2) French overseas territories, when deciding to require British citizens to quarantine when returning to the UK from France.

The Joint Biosecurity Centre (JBC) produces risk assessments of countries and territories. This risk is based on factors such as the level of community transmission of variants of concern or variant under investigation, levels of testing, genomic sequencing and reporting. The JBC assessed that France is a high-risk COVID-19 destination due to the circulation of variants of concern, most notably the beta variant, which is the variant that presents the greatest risk for vaccine escape. As of 19 July, GISAID data shows there have been to date 2,959 cases of beta in France (5.2% of all cases uploaded) compared to 1,052 cases of beta in the United Kingdom (0.2% of all cases uploaded), 44 cases in Greece (0.5% of all cases uploaded) and 621 cases in Spain (1.4% of all cases uploaded), from the start of the pandemic. GISAID is a live repository and the number of sequences attributed to a specific lineage, country or region may be revised upwards or downwards as new lineages are identified and countries update and amend their data. The quarantine rules and testing for travellers into the United Kingdom from France will significantly decrease the risk of importing beta cases, which could then grow rapidly into community clusters or outbreaks.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what comparison they have made of the percentage of women breastfeeding their babies at six months (1) currently, (2) 10 years ago, and (3) 20 years ago.

Breastfeeding at six months has been measured through the Infant Feeding Survey United Kingdom, which last ran in 2010. The results were published in 2012 and reported the breastfeeding prevalence for the UK outlined in the following table.

Breastfeeding prevalence for babies aged six months in 2000, 2005 and 2010 in the UK:

2000

2005

2010

Exclusively breastfed

Less than 1%

Less than 1%

1%

At all breastfed

21%

25%

34%

Notes:

  1. Source: Infant Feeding Survey - UK, 2010. NHS Digital.
  2. Prevalence of breastfeeding is based on all mothers who completed Stage 3 of the survey.

The UK has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world. Data published in the Lancet shows that 0.5% of babies in the UK are being breastfed up to one year compared with 23% in Germany, 56% in Brazil and 99% in Senegal. A copy of the Lancet article, Breastfeeding in the 21st Century: epidemiology, mechanisms, and lifelong effect, is attached.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of World Health Organisation guidance that breastfeeding a baby for two years has health benefits that last into adulthood.

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) is reviewing the scientific basis of current recommendations for feeding young children aged 12 to 60 months. Where evidence is available, this will cover the impact of continued breastfeeding up to two years of age or beyond as recommended by the World Health Organization on short and long-term health outcomes into adulthood.

In July 2018, the SACN published its report on Feeding in the First Year of Life, providing updated recommendations on infant feeding up to 12 months of age in the United Kingdom. Based on SACN’s advice, the UK Government recommends that women exclusively breastfeed for around the first six months of life and continue breastfeeding for at least the first year of life once solid foods have been introduced. A copy of Feeding in the First Year of Life is attached.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what comparison they have made of the difference in breastfeeding rates between the UK and other countries.

Breastfeeding at six months has been measured through the Infant Feeding Survey United Kingdom, which last ran in 2010. The results were published in 2012 and reported the breastfeeding prevalence for the UK outlined in the following table.

Breastfeeding prevalence for babies aged six months in 2000, 2005 and 2010 in the UK:

2000

2005

2010

Exclusively breastfed

Less than 1%

Less than 1%

1%

At all breastfed

21%

25%

34%

Notes:

  1. Source: Infant Feeding Survey - UK, 2010. NHS Digital.
  2. Prevalence of breastfeeding is based on all mothers who completed Stage 3 of the survey.

The UK has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world. Data published in the Lancet shows that 0.5% of babies in the UK are being breastfed up to one year compared with 23% in Germany, 56% in Brazil and 99% in Senegal. A copy of the Lancet article, Breastfeeding in the 21st Century: epidemiology, mechanisms, and lifelong effect, is attached.

17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether UK citizens who are exempt from the requirement for a Schengen visa are also exempt from the requirement for an attestation d’acceuil to stay in France with friends or family; and if not, what steps they intend to take to negotiate a waiver with the government of France for any such requirement.

The EU has legislated such that British Citizens can travel visa-free in the Schengen area for short-stays, such as for tourism, for up to 90 days in any 180-day period. The EU's Schengen Borders Code governs the rules for entry and exit in the Schengen area. EU Member State authorities are responsible for the implementation of these rules. At border control, British Citizens visiting the Schengen area will need to meet the third-country national requirements under the Schengen Borders Code. They should be prepared to show proof of their return or onward travel and proof of accommodation, which is defined in law by the relevant Member State. In France this is the 'attestation d'accueil' certificate if staying with friends or family, or a booking confirmation. In the absence of this, they should be prepared to show they have enough money for their stay. Such a requirement is in line with the treatment of third-country nationals under the Schengen Borders Code. Information, including on entry requirements, for British Citizens planning to travel to EU Member States is available on the country-specific Travel Advice pages published on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/france

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remark by Baroness Goldie on 23 March (HL Deb, col 808) that "We are satisfied that we are compliant with the non-proliferation treaty", what assessment they have made of the statement on 17 March by a UN spokesperson that the decision of the Government to increase their nuclear weapons arsenal is "contrary to its obligations to Article Six of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons".

Maintaining and renewing elements of the UK's nuclear deterrent capability is fully consistent with our international legal obligations, including those under Article VI of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The UK remains committed to the step-by-step approach to nuclear disarmament under the framework of the NPT, and the long-term goal of a world without nuclear weapons.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the UK's obligations under Article VI of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.

Under Article VI of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) the UK is obliged to pursue negotiations in good faith on effective measures relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race at an early date and to nuclear disarmament, and on a treaty on general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control. Maintaining and renewing elements of the UK's nuclear deterrent capability is fully consistent with this obligation.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the UK's obligations as a depositary government of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; and what steps they take to fulfil the responsibilities of that role.

The UK government acts in accordance with Article IX of the NPT which states: 'The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification or of accession, the date of the entry into force of this Treaty, and the date of receipt of any requests for convening a conference or other notices.'

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of lifting the cap on the number of Trident nuclear warheads the UK can stockpile on negotiations at the next Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.

The UK will continue to work for a successful NPT Review Conference that continues to lay the groundwork and helps build the trust and confidence necessary for multilateral disarmament, as well as strengthening the non-proliferation and peaceful uses pillars of the Treaty. We will continue to play a leading role in developing nuclear disarmament verification, on which our ability to achieve and maintain a world without nuclear weapons will depend. We will also continue to build trust and confidence amongst nuclear weapon states, and between nuclear weapon states and non-nuclear weapon states.

As coordinator of the P5 Process in 2019 and 2020, we pushed forward work on transparency, leading the way with our consultation exercise on the UK's national implementation report that has now been taken up by others, and securing agreement to a presentation by the nuclear weapon states of their national nuclear doctrines at the Review Conference. We look forward to continuing these discussions and picking up other important issues such as strategic risk reduction.

As we approach the NPT Review Conference, we will continue to demonstrate our commitment to all pillars of the NPT, including disarmament.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many British embassies have a consular section; what is the remit of a consular section; and whether such sections keep a register of British citizens resident in their territorial scope.

The UK is represented by 187 Diplomatic missions with a Consular presence, as well as a network of over 200 Honorary Consuls. We provide help and support 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year, through our network of trained staff. Details of the remit of our consular support are set out in Support for British Nationals Abroad: A Guide (https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/914039/FCO_BritsAbroad_A4web_020920.pdf). We do not require British travellers to register with us when they are overseas.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of British citizens who are resident outside of the UK, broken down by country of residence.

The FCDO does not hold data on the number of British citizens who are resident overseas. This is because there is no requirement for British travellers or residents to register with us when they go overseas.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of British citizens who are resident overseas.

The FCDO does not hold data on the number of British citizens who are resident overseas. This is because there is no requirement for British travellers or residents to register with us when they go overseas.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by the Select Committee on International Relations Rising nuclear risk, disarmament and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, published on 24 April 2019 (HL Paper 338); and what plans they have to ensure high level UK representation at the next Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.

The Government welcomes the continued engagement with the International Relations and Defence Committee, including during the inquiry. We are grateful for the Committee's feedback on the Government's approach to the NPT, and the Review Conference. The Government's full response to the report's recommendations has been published by the Committee and can be found here: https://www.parliament.uk/globalassets/documents/lords-committees/International-Relations-Committee/NPT-and-Nuclear-Disarmament/Government-Response-Risng-nuclear-risk-disarmament-and-the-Nuclear-Non-Proliferation-Report.pdf .The next NPT Review Conference has been postponed until August 2021; the Government has not yet made a decision on UK representation.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are their priorities for the next Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.

The Government's priority is to reinforce the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) as a vital part of the international security architecture, and to highlight the UK's strong track record across all three pillars of the treaty. The Government will work to promote transparency between nuclear and non-nuclear states, emphasise the important role of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy in achieving our sustainable development goals, and submit a National Report to highlight our achievements in supporting the NPT.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to undertake further work on nuclear disarmament verification; and what budget has been allocated for this work.

The Government continues to research nuclear disarmament verification through our well-established Atomic Weapons Establishment programme. Areas of focus include solving the challenges of verifying inventories of warheads or fissile material; and determining how non-nuclear weapon states can participate in verification while preventing the release of proliferative information. The Government participates in international initiatives such as the International Partnership for Nuclear Disarmament Verification and the Quad Partnership. The Government is unable to disclose budgetary information as it may prejudice commercial interests.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps the UN Security Council’s five permanent members have taken to ensure a productive Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.

The P5 continue to work towards a successful NPT Review Conference in 2021. During the UK's leadership of the P5, the Government hosted a series of P5 meetings on exchanging nuclear doctrines, risk reduction and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. In February 2020, the London P5 Conference provided a platform for open and frank discussions amongst the P5, civil society and the wider NPT community.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remark by Lord Bethell on 16 January (HL Deb, col 839) that a country-by-country guide to UK citizens’ rights and associated obligations in each of the EU 27 countries is desirable, whether they intend to produce such a guide; and if so, when.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office maintains 'Living in Country Guides' for all EU Member States, EEA EFTA countries and Switzerland on GOV.UK. The guides cover approximately a dozen different areas including, the Withdrawal Agreement, residency, healthcare and pensions and benefits.

The guides are updated on a constant basis and users can sign up for an email alert for their relevant guide so that they are notified when new content is added.

Where Her Majesty's Government policy that affects British nationals is relevant, it features on the guides and is updated with input from the government department that owns the policy as necessary.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office will continue to update these pages as more information becomes available from Member State governments about what actions British nationals need to take to confirm their status under the Withdrawal Agreement.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government with which of the EU 27 member states they have negotiated a reciprocal agreement covering citizens rights; what each agreement covers; and what plans they have to pursue any more such agreements.

The Withdrawal Agreement protects the rights of UK nationals living in the EU for as long as they remain resident in their host country. They will be able to live, work, study, access healthcare and collect their pensions in their Member State of residence as they do now.

The agreement sets out a transition period until 31 December 2020. During the transition period, EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU will be able to live, work and travel broadly as they do now.

We are pursuing a relationship with the EU which is based on friendly cooperation between sovereign equals, and centred on free trade. The details, including on the mobility of citizens, are a matter for future negotiation.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many British citizens who are resident overseas paid either (1) Class 2, or (2) Class 3, voluntary National Insurance contributions between 2010 and 2020.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost. HMRC do not require individuals to declare their citizenship or nationality. Therefore while they are able to identify overseas residents who pay National Insurance contributions, they are unable to determine the proportion of these that are British citizens.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)