Pat Glass

Labour - Former Member for North West Durham

Shadow Minister (Transport)
9th Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Secretary of State for Education
27th Jun 2016 - 29th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
5th Jan 2016 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Education)
18th Sep 2015 - 5th Jan 2016
Education Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015


Division Voting information

Pat Glass has voted in 1131 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

23 Feb 2015 - Serious Crime Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Pat Glass voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 28 Labour Aye votes vs 178 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 201 Noes - 292
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Pat Glass voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Labour No votes vs 50 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 203 Noes - 82
View All Pat Glass Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Sam Gyimah (Liberal Democrat)
(89 debate interactions)
Alex Cunningham (Labour)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
(24 debate interactions)
Michael Gove (Conservative)
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
(23 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Education
(251 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(45 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(42 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Pat Glass's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Pat Glass

1st March 2017
Pat Glass signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 1st March 2017

CLOSURE OF VINOVIUM HOUSE IN BISHOP AUCKLAND

Tabled by: Helen Goodman (Labour - Bishop Auckland)
That this House notes that there are 1.1 million families registered with the old Child Support Agency; further notes that £3.4 billion of arrears are outstanding; that this averages £3,000 per family which would make a significant impact on keeping these families out of poverty; notes that administration of the …
23 signatures
(Most recent: 9 Mar 2017)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 19
Scottish National Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
20th February 2017
Pat Glass signed this EDM on Tuesday 28th February 2017

EDUCATION: STUDENTS FEES, AWARDS AND SUPPORT

Tabled by: Jeremy Corbyn (Independent - Islington North)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Education (Student Fees, Awards and Support) (Amendment) Regulations 2017 (S.I.,2017, No. 114), dated 7 February 2017, a copy of which was laid before this House on 9 February, be annulled.
93 signatures
(Most recent: 25 Apr 2017)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 76
Independent: 5
Scottish National Party: 5
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Non-affiliated: 2
Liberal Democrat: 2
Green Party: 1
Ulster Unionist Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Pat Glass's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Pat Glass, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Pat Glass has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Pat Glass has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Pat Glass


A Bill to amend the Parliamentary Constituencies Act 1986 to make provision about the number and size of parliamentary constituencies in the United Kingdom; to specify how the size of a constituency is to be calculated; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 18th November 2016
(Read Debate)

Pat Glass has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


30 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6 Other Department Questions
20th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what discussions he has had with his Cabinet colleagues on cases in which workers do not receive compensation awarded by an employment tribunal because the companies which were paying them less than the national minimum wage have moved into voluntary liquidation.

The Government is committed to the effective enforcement of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and will take tough action where employers are found to have underpaid their staff. BIS Ministers regularly discuss issues of enforcement with colleagues in other relevant Departments to ensure the system is effective.


Ensuring employees get the money they are owed is a priority. Where employees are owed monies but their employer has gone in to liquidation, they are entitled to claim for the difference between their rate of pay and the NMW, through the Insolvency Service’s Redundancy Payments Service (RPS). The RPS will consider these claims and make payments, within certain statutory limits, to employees.


The Government has also taken action to strengthen the enforcement powers available for NMW breaches, including ensuring that every criminal breach of the NMW Act is considered for Director Disqualification.

9th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will take steps to increase apprenticeship places and support small businesses through greater use of government procurement.

Under the industrial strategy, we encourage a long term approach to procurement, including training and apprenticeships.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what information his Department holds on the number of families with children in (a) North West Durham constituency and (b) the UK who are currently in debt to their energy suppliers.

The Department does not hold information on how many families are in debt with their energy companies.

Ofgem closely monitors domestic energy suppliers’ performance and publishes information in relation to debt owed by domestic electricity and gas account holders in Great Britain, but they do not publish data relating to families with children or constituency areas. At the end of 2013, latest data available, 1.5 million domestic electricity account holders and 1.4 million domestic gas accounts holders were in debt to their energy supplier:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/ofgem-publications/92186/annualreport2013finalforpublication.pdf.

(Ofgem’s Domestic Suppliers’ Social Obligations: 2013 Annual Report)

23rd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to ensure that families with children are treated as a vulnerable group by energy companies.

A new Strategy and Policy Statement, which Government consulted on last year makes it clear that helping vulnerable households is one of the Government’s strategic priorities to which Ofgem should have regard when carrying out its regulatory functions. The statement will replace the existing Social and Environmental Statutory Guidance to the Gas and Electricity Market Authority, as recommended by the Ofgem Review of 2010-11.

23rd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what steps he is taking to support families with children who fall behind on payments to energy companies.

This Government has implemented a range of measures to help vulnerable households reduce their energy bills, including colder weather payments and warm home discount.

For those customers who fall behind on payments, suppliers are obligated to take their ability to pay into account when setting a repayment plan. Some suppliers also provide special grants and services to help families. Further information is available free from the Home Heat Helpline on 0800 33 66 99.

8th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Academies were rated as requires improvement or worse by Ofsted at their last inspection.

This is a matter for Ofsted. I have asked Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, to write to the Hon Member with the information requested. A copy of his reply will be placed in the House library.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
11th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent progress her Department has made on tackling Ebola in West Africa.

The UK is leading the international response to the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone. We have already committed £230m, delivered over 880 treatment and isolation beds, opened three laboratories and doubled the number of burial teams.

7th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the number of additional road vehicle movements per year resulting from the decision to reduce the budget for rail freight mode shift revenue support grants.

Following the final bid round of 2016/17, the maximum number of lorry journeys that Mode Shift Revenue Grant (MSRS) support would help to remove from Britain’s roads is 983,162 for that year. Funding allocated at the first bid round for 2017/18 and 2018/19 will help to remove up to 796,854 and 776,497 lorry journeys respectively.

These are estimates not definitive figures. This is because awards may not be delivered in full. There are also some further bid rounds to come for 2017/18 and 2018/19, which may increase the figures or alter what is covered by this grant and the parallel Waterborne Freight Grant scheme.

13th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the evaluation of the longer semi-trailer trial: annual report 2015, published in August 2016, whether the information supplied by haulage operators on minor injuries and damage to street furniture arising from longer semi-trailers has been independently verified.

The entire trial evaluation is being carried out by an independent consultant, Risk Solutions which collects the data, liaise with the operators and analyse the results before reporting to the Department for Transport. The annual reports produced by Risk Solutions are published by the Department without further editing. Risk Solutions maintains its independence strongly, reviews major departmental statements regarding the trial and results and challenges wording or claims strongly if they are not fully supported by the evidence.

All injuries reported by the operators, including minor/slight injuries, are checked against the national STATS19 data, which is collated from submissions by police forces. Risk Solutions has details of a very small number of incidents involving very minor injuries reported by the operator or by the injured party, but where the police did not attend and the injured party did not attend hospital. These are incidents which, had they involved standard trailers, would not have been reported or counted in any official data, but have been included in the LST trial injury statistics.

Studying incidents where there is no injury (and hence no police report) is challenging since there is no national standard process or format for recording such events. Any study of such incidents for longer semi-trailers (LSTs) requires that there also be a comparative dataset for non-injury incidents involving other long, articulated HGVs. Risk Solutions engaged with a small sample of operators to analyse their in-house data on all incidents to see whether LSTs were over or under-represented in the data. The results from that exercise are explained in the latest annual report. Risk Solutions are currently engaging with a larger sample of operators to expand this dataset and anticipate publishing those results in the next annual report.

13th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the evaluation of the longer semi-trailer trial: annual report 2015, published in August 2016, what roads are being used by longer semi-trailers; and what the mileage is of such trailers on minor and urban roads.

The original trial terms of reference and operator undertaking issued in 2011 did not place a requirement on participating companies to track the exact movements of each Longer Semi Trailer (LST) or to log routes taken. When the trial started in 2012 GPS tracking was a new technology and to have placed such a tracking requirement on the operators would have been considered an unreasonable burden on the industry and would probably have excluded smaller operators from participating, limiting the coverage and value of the trial.

The expectation across the industry has always been that compared with other long articulated HGVs, LSTs would be likely to operate a greater proportion of their journeys on major roads, performing trunking duties. This is supported by the leg type use charts in the Annual Report, but is not ‘proven’.

During 2015, DfT and Risk Solutions looked into the options for studying LST routing by road types including sampling of the part of the fleet that is fitted with trailer GPS, backfitting the entire fleet (or those not currently fitted) with trailer GPS, or modelling the ‘likely’ routing of LSTs using the origin and destination data already provided in the trial data submissions. Modelling the likely route was chosen because it would effectively provide an insight into the balance of road types used by LSTs at a reasonable cost to the taxpayer, while minimising the additional burden on the industry.

After a feasibility study in late 2015, the trial data requirement was adjusted to make journey start/end postcodes a requested item for 2016-P1 (Jan-May) and mandatory thereafter. Operators have responded well to this requirement and Risk Solutions have start/end postcode data for more than 90% of all LST journeys) to date in 2016.

13th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the evaluation of the longer semi-trailer trial; annual report 2015, published in August 2016, what independent research has been carried out on the crashes and incidents affecting longer semi-trailers that were logged in the September 2016 trial report.

The entire trial evaluation is being carried out by an independent consultant, Risk Solutions which collects the data, liaise with the operators and analyse the results before reporting to the Department for Transport. The annual reports produced by Risk Solutions are published by the Department without further editing. Risk Solutions maintains its independence strongly, reviews major departmental statements regarding the trial and results and challenges wording or claims strongly if they are not fully supported by the evidence.

All injuries reported by the operators, including minor/slight injuries, are checked against the national STATS19 data, which is collated from submissions by police forces. Risk Solutions has details of a very small number of incidents involving very minor injuries reported by the operator or by the injured party, but where the police did not attend and the injured party did not attend hospital. These are incidents which, had they involved standard trailers, would not have been reported or counted in any official data, but have been included in the LST trial injury statistics.

Studying incidents where there is no injury (and hence no police report) is challenging since there is no national standard process or format for recording such events. Any study of such incidents for longer semi-trailers (LSTs) requires that there also be a comparative dataset for non-injury incidents involving other long, articulated HGVs. Risk Solutions engaged with a small sample of operators to analyse their in-house data on all incidents to see whether LSTs were over or under-represented in the data. The results from that exercise are explained in the latest annual report. Risk Solutions are currently engaging with a larger sample of operators to expand this dataset and anticipate publishing those results in the next annual report.

11th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of the number of private equity owned firms which are commissioned by local authorities to provide social care services; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested is not collected centrally. Local authorities are free to commission social care services to suit local need. The Department does not specify which providers local authorities should commission services from.

6th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had in the Council of the EU as part of negotiations on the UK's membership of the EU on free movement of people in the EU and access to in-work benefits.

The Government is negotiating reform of the EU and a new relationship for Britain with the EU to fix the aspects of our membership that cause so much frustration in Britain. Following a substantive and constructive discussion at the December European Council, Member States agreed to work toward ‘mutually satisfactory solutions’ at the February European Council.

11th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what representations he has received about the ethical care charter initiated by UNISON.

The Department of Health is responsible for policy on care and support, including the commissioning of social care services by local authorities. The commissioning of social care is a matter for individual local authorities.

The Care Quality Commission, as regulator of health and adult social care services, regulates social care providers to ensure services comply with essential standards of safety and quality.

My Department has not issued any guidance to local authorities about compliance with the National Minimum Wage by social care providers.HM Revenue and Customs has recently carried out an evaluation of compliance with the National Minimum Wage in the social care sector. This was published on 29 November 2013 and a copy has been placed in the Library of the House.

11th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what recent discussions he has had with local authorities about commissioning social care providers who are compliant with the national minimum wage.

The Department of Health is responsible for policy on care and support, including the commissioning of social care services by local authorities. The commissioning of social care is a matter for individual local authorities.

The Care Quality Commission, as regulator of health and adult social care services, regulates social care providers to ensure services comply with essential standards of safety and quality.

My Department has not issued any guidance to local authorities about compliance with the National Minimum Wage by social care providers.HM Revenue and Customs has recently carried out an evaluation of compliance with the National Minimum Wage in the social care sector. This was published on 29 November 2013 and a copy has been placed in the Library of the House.

11th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what guidance his Department provides to local authorities on ensuring they do not commission home care services from organisations which are not compliant with national minimum wage legislation.

The Department of Health is responsible for policy on care and support, including the commissioning of social care services by local authorities. The commissioning of social care is a matter for individual local authorities.

The Care Quality Commission, as regulator of health and adult social care services, regulates social care providers to ensure services comply with essential standards of safety and quality.

My Department has not issued any guidance to local authorities about compliance with the National Minimum Wage by social care providers.HM Revenue and Customs has recently carried out an evaluation of compliance with the National Minimum Wage in the social care sector. This was published on 29 November 2013 and a copy has been placed in the Library of the House.

11th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, which local authorities have commissioned home care providers which are non-compliant with the national minimum wage legislation.

The Department of Health is responsible for policy on care and support, including the commissioning of social care services by local authorities. The commissioning of social care is a matter for individual local authorities.

The Care Quality Commission, as regulator of health and adult social care services, regulates social care providers to ensure services comply with essential standards of safety and quality.

My Department has not issued any guidance to local authorities about compliance with the National Minimum Wage by social care providers.HM Revenue and Customs has recently carried out an evaluation of compliance with the National Minimum Wage in the social care sector. This was published on 29 November 2013 and a copy has been placed in the Library of the House.

11th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what representations his Department has received on the effect of non-payment of the national minimum wage in the social care sector on care standards.

The Department of Health is responsible for policy on care and support, including the commissioning of social care services by local authorities. The commissioning of social care is a matter for individual local authorities.

The Care Quality Commission, as regulator of health and adult social care services, regulates social care providers to ensure services comply with essential standards of safety and quality.

My Department has not issued any guidance to local authorities about compliance with the National Minimum Wage by social care providers.HM Revenue and Customs has recently carried out an evaluation of compliance with the National Minimum Wage in the social care sector. This was published on 29 November 2013 and a copy has been placed in the Library of the House.

11th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues about naming social care providers who do not pay their employees the national minimum wage.

The Department of Health is responsible for policy on care and support, including the commissioning of social care services by local authorities. The commissioning of social care is a matter for individual local authorities.

The Care Quality Commission, as regulator of health and adult social care services, regulates social care providers to ensure services comply with essential standards of safety and quality.

My Department has not issued any guidance to local authorities about compliance with the National Minimum Wage by social care providers.HM Revenue and Customs has recently carried out an evaluation of compliance with the National Minimum Wage in the social care sector. This was published on 29 November 2013 and a copy has been placed in the Library of the House.

11th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for the Home Department on measures to reduce overcrowding in prisons.

The Justice Secretary regularly meets with Cabinet colleagues, including the Home Secretary, to discuss measures that impact on the prison population.

We will always have enough prison places for those sent to prison by the courts, and they are operated in a way that gives taxpayers the best value for money. In 2013/14 crowding in prisons was at the lowest level for 10 years, and, by May 2015, this Government will provide more adult male prison places than it inherited from the previous administration.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
24th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many hours per week prisoners in HM Prison Feltham spent (a) in cells and (b) working in each of the last three years; what proportion of such prisoners were classed as unemployed on the last date for which figures are available; and what the average number of hours per week spent working was by prisoners in that prison in (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13 and (iii) 2013-14.

Up until the end of 2011-12 information was collected on the average hours per weekday that prisoners were unlocked. By subtracting the average hours unlocked from the 24 hours in a day it is possible to estimate hours spent locked in cell. Figures for each prison establishment for the three years from 2009-10 to 2011-12 have been placed in the library of the House.

It should be noted that time in cell includes hours when prisoners are asleep. Time unlocked includes time where a prisoner is either out of their cell or where the cell door is unlocked allowing them to move freely in and out of the cell.

Figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. Figures for time in cell for the years 2012-13 and 2013-14 could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Work in prisons is a key priority to ensure prisoners are engaged purposefully whilst they are in custody. It also gives them the opportunity to learn skills and a work ethic which can increase their chances of finding employment on release, a key element to reducing reoffending.

The number of prisoners working in industrial activity across public sector prisons increased from around 8,600 in 2010-11 (the first year for which figures are available) to around 9,700 in 2012-13. This delivered an increase in the total hours worked in industrial activities from 10.6 million hours to 13.1 million hours. Private sector prisons have also been supporting this agenda and have reported that they delivered over 1½ million prisoner working hours in commercial and industrial workshops in 2012-13 which provided work for over 1,200 prisoners. In addition there are substantial numbers of prisoners who work to keep prisons running on tasks such as cooking, serving meals, maintenance and cleaning.

Figures for public sector prisons are published in the NOMS Annual Report Management Information Addendum:https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225225/mi-addendum.pdf

The establishment-level breakdown of weekly hours worked is not available centrally for 2011-12 and 2012-13 and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Information on the proportion of prisoners classed as unemployed is not available centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Our reforms to the Incentives and Earned Privileges national policy framework came into effect in adult prisons on 1 November 2013. Prisoners will be expected to engage in purposeful activity, as well as demonstrate a commitment towards their rehabilitation, reduce their risk of reoffending, behave well and help others if they are to earn privileges.

24th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many hours per week prisoners in HM Prison Forest Bank spent (a) in cells and (b) working in each of the last three years; what proportion of such prisoners were classed as unemployed on the latest date for which figures are available; and what the average number of hours per week spent working by prisoners in that prison was in (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13 and (iii) 2013-14.

Up until the end of 2011-12 information was collected on the average hours per weekday that prisoners were unlocked. By subtracting the average hours unlocked from the 24 hours in a day it is possible to estimate hours spent locked in cell. Figures for each prison establishment for the three years from 2009-10 to 2011-12 have been placed in the library of the House.

It should be noted that time in cell includes hours when prisoners are asleep. Time unlocked includes time where a prisoner is either out of their cell or where the cell door is unlocked allowing them to move freely in and out of the cell.

Figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. Figures for time in cell for the years 2012-13 and 2013-14 could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Work in prisons is a key priority to ensure prisoners are engaged purposefully whilst they are in custody. It also gives them the opportunity to learn skills and a work ethic which can increase their chances of finding employment on release, a key element to reducing reoffending.

The number of prisoners working in industrial activity across public sector prisons increased from around 8,600 in 2010-11 (the first year for which figures are available) to around 9,700 in 2012-13. This delivered an increase in the total hours worked in industrial activities from 10.6 million hours to 13.1 million hours. Private sector prisons have also been supporting this agenda and have reported that they delivered over 1½ million prisoner working hours in commercial and industrial workshops in 2012-13 which provided work for over 1,200 prisoners. In addition there are substantial numbers of prisoners who work to keep prisons running on tasks such as cooking, serving meals, maintenance and cleaning.

Figures for public sector prisons are published in the NOMS Annual Report Management Information Addendum:https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225225/mi-addendum.pdf

The establishment-level breakdown of weekly hours worked is not available centrally for 2011-12 and 2012-13 and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Information on the proportion of prisoners classed as unemployed is not available centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Our reforms to the Incentives and Earned Privileges national policy framework came into effect in adult prisons on 1 November 2013. Prisoners will be expected to engage in purposeful activity, as well as demonstrate a commitment towards their rehabilitation, reduce their risk of reoffending, behave well and help others if they are to earn privileges.

24th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many hours per week prisoners in HM Prison Ford spent (a) in cells and (b) working in each of the last three years; what proportion of such prisoners were classed as unemployed on the latest date for which figures are available; and what the average number of hours per week spent working by prisoners in that prison was in (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13 and (iii) 2013-14.

Up until the end of 2011-12 information was collected on the average hours per weekday that prisoners were unlocked. By subtracting the average hours unlocked from the 24 hours in a day it is possible to estimate hours spent locked in cell. Figures for each prison establishment for the three years from 2009-10 to 2011-12 have been placed in the library of the House.

It should be noted that time in cell includes hours when prisoners are asleep. Time unlocked includes time where a prisoner is either out of their cell or where the cell door is unlocked allowing them to move freely in and out of the cell.

Figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. Figures for time in cell for the years 2012-13 and 2013-14 could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Work in prisons is a key priority to ensure prisoners are engaged purposefully whilst they are in custody. It also gives them the opportunity to learn skills and a work ethic which can increase their chances of finding employment on release, a key element to reducing reoffending.

The number of prisoners working in industrial activity across public sector prisons increased from around 8,600 in 2010-11 (the first year for which figures are available) to around 9,700 in 2012-13. This delivered an increase in the total hours worked in industrial activities from 10.6 million hours to 13.1 million hours. Private sector prisons have also been supporting this agenda and have reported that they delivered over 1½ million prisoner working hours in commercial and industrial workshops in 2012-13 which provided work for over 1,200 prisoners. In addition there are substantial numbers of prisoners who work to keep prisons running on tasks such as cooking, serving meals, maintenance and cleaning.

Figures for public sector prisons are published in the NOMS Annual Report Management Information Addendum:https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225225/mi-addendum.pdf

The establishment-level breakdown of weekly hours worked is not available centrally for 2011-12 and 2012-13 and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Information on the proportion of prisoners classed as unemployed is not available centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Our reforms to the Incentives and Earned Privileges national policy framework came into effect in adult prisons on 1 November 2013. Prisoners will be expected to engage in purposeful activity, as well as demonstrate a commitment towards their rehabilitation, reduce their risk of reoffending, behave well and help others if they are to earn privileges.

24th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many hours per week prisoners in HM Prison Featherstone spent (a) in cells and (b) working in each of the last three years; what proportion of such prisoners were classed as unemployed on the latest date for which figures are available; and what the average number of hours per week spent working by prisoners in that prison was in (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13 and (iii) 2013-14.

Up until the end of 2011-12 information was collected on the average hours per weekday that prisoners were unlocked. By subtracting the average hours unlocked from the 24 hours in a day it is possible to estimate hours spent locked in cell. Figures for each prison establishment for the three years from 2009-10 to 2011-12 have been placed in the library of the House.

It should be noted that time in cell includes hours when prisoners are asleep. Time unlocked includes time where a prisoner is either out of their cell or where the cell door is unlocked allowing them to move freely in and out of the cell.

Figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. Figures for time in cell for the years 2012-13 and 2013-14 could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Work in prisons is a key priority to ensure prisoners are engaged purposefully whilst they are in custody. It also gives them the opportunity to learn skills and a work ethic which can increase their chances of finding employment on release, a key element to reducing reoffending.

The number of prisoners working in industrial activity across public sector prisons increased from around 8,600 in 2010-11 (the first year for which figures are available) to around 9,700 in 2012-13. This delivered an increase in the total hours worked in industrial activities from 10.6 million hours to 13.1 million hours. Private sector prisons have also been supporting this agenda and have reported that they delivered over 1½ million prisoner working hours in commercial and industrial workshops in 2012-13 which provided work for over 1,200 prisoners. In addition there are substantial numbers of prisoners who work to keep prisons running on tasks such as cooking, serving meals, maintenance and cleaning.

Figures for public sector prisons are published in the NOMS Annual Report Management Information Addendum:https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225225/mi-addendum.pdf

The establishment-level breakdown of weekly hours worked is not available centrally for 2011-12 and 2012-13 and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Information on the proportion of prisoners classed as unemployed is not available centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Our reforms to the Incentives and Earned Privileges national policy framework came into effect in adult prisons on 1 November 2013. Prisoners will be expected to engage in purposeful activity, as well as demonstrate a commitment towards their rehabilitation, reduce their risk of reoffending, behave well and help others if they are to earn privileges.

20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what progress she has made on implementation of the Stormont House Agreement; and if she will make a statement.

I refer the hon Lady to the answer I gave earlier today to the hon Member for Glasgow North East.

4th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what steps she has taken to ensure that the Police Service of Northern Ireland has adequate resources to ensure a peaceful marching season.

The issue of police resources is primarily a matter for the Northern Ireland Executive. However, I have regular discussions with the Chief Constable and David Ford concerning police resources.

The additional £231 million funding provided to the PSNI by the Government for national security matters releases resources to assist with the policing of matters such as parading and public order.

7th Jul 2014
To ask the Leader of the House, what recent guidance he has given to his ministerial colleagues on making statements to the House before they are made to the media.

The Ministerial Code is clear; when Parliament is in session the most important announcements of Government policy should be made in the first instance to Parliament.

I regularly remind my colleagues of this.