Edward Miliband Portrait

Edward Miliband

Labour - Doncaster North

Shadow Secretary of State of Climate Change and Net Zero

(since November 2021)
1 APPG membership (as of 17 Nov 2021)
Sustainable Finance
Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
6th Apr 2020 - 29th Nov 2021
Leader of Her Majesty's Official Opposition
25th Sep 2010 - 8th May 2015
Leader of the Labour Party
25th Sep 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
12th May 2010 - 25th Sep 2010
Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
3rd Oct 2008 - 6th May 2010
Minister (Cabinet Office) and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
28th Jun 2007 - 3rd Oct 2008
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
5th May 2006 - 28th Jun 2007


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 1st December 2021
Finance (No. 2) Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 149 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 301 Noes - 206
Speeches
Wednesday 1st December 2021
Oral Answers to Questions

I know I am shadowing the Department that the right hon. Gentleman would quite like to run, so perhaps that …

Written Answers
Thursday 22nd July 2021
Business Premises: Ventilation
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2021 to Question …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 17th March 2015
CONSULTANT LOBBYING
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Registration of Consultant Lobbyists Regulations 2015 [SI, 2015, …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th July 2021
1. Employment and earnings
1 July 2021, received £105 from the BBC, Broadcasting House, Portland Place, London W1 1AA, for participation in BBC Radio …
EDM signed
Tuesday 28th January 2020
Max Freedman's service to parliamentary staff
That this House recognises Max Freedman's commitment over 10 years as the chair of the Parliamentary staff UNITE trade union …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 11th June 2019
Climate Change (Emissions Targets) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Edward Miliband has voted in 260 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Edward Miliband Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Kwasi Kwarteng (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
(42 debate interactions)
Alok Sharma (Conservative)
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
(40 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(29 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(2 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Edward Miliband's debates

Doncaster North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Edward Miliband has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Edward Miliband

22nd January 2020
Edward Miliband signed this EDM on Tuesday 28th January 2020

Max Freedman's service to parliamentary staff

Tabled by: John Cryer (Labour - Leyton and Wanstead)
That this House recognises Max Freedman's commitment over 10 years as the chair of the Parliamentary staff UNITE trade union branch representing staff of all parties in Parliament and constituency offices; appreciates that over the past decade he has worked tirelessly in representing staff of hon. Members both in individual …
77 signatures
(Most recent: 23 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 59
Scottish National Party: 9
Conservative: 2
Independent: 2
Liberal Democrat: 2
Plaid Cymru: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Green Party: 1
23rd April 2019
Edward Miliband signed this EDM on Thursday 3rd October 2019

PROVIDING FINANCIAL RESTITUTION TO 1950s WOMEN

Tabled by: Anna McMorrin (Labour - Cardiff North)
That this House welcomes the positive interventions from many hon. Members from across the House on behalf of women born in the 1950s who have lost their pensions; welcomes the equalisation of retirement ages between women and men; recalls that women born in the 1950s were subject to discriminatory employment …
225 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 133
Scottish National Party: 24
Conservative: 24
Liberal Democrat: 15
Independent: 10
Democratic Unionist Party: 10
Plaid Cymru: 3
Non-affiliated: 3
Crossbench: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 2
Green Party: 1
View All Edward Miliband's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Edward Miliband, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


3 Urgent Questions tabled by Edward Miliband

Wednesday 24th November 2021
Thursday 23rd September 2021

Edward Miliband has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Edward Miliband has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


9 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to help ensure adequate ventilation in businesses to reduce risk of covid-19 infection; what plans he has to issue guidance to businesses on ventilation of premises that (a) are and (b) are not open to the public; what standards or criteria his Department advises are used to plan and measure ventilation; of businesses; and whether his Department plans to make funds available to improve standards of ventilation in businesses.

Public Health England has published guidance on the ventilation of indoor spaces which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-ventilation-of-indoor-spaces-to-stop-the-spread-of-coronavirus/ventilation-of-indoor-spaces-to-stop-the-spread-of-coronavirus-covid-19.

The Health and Safety Executive has published guidance on ventilation and air conditioning here:
https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/index.htm.


Using this guidance, Local Authorities should assess the risk from Covid-19 and implement the appropriate transmission risk controls. The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 require employers to assess risks and implement the appropriate controls. Health and Safety Executive is the health and safety enforcement authority for Local Authority activities and can take proportionate enforcement action.


Venues are advised to pay due regard to the published guidance above, alongside any sector-specific guidance.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the (a) Minister for Business, Energy and Clean Growth and (b) Minister for Climate Change and Corporate Responsibility have had discussions (i) in person and (ii) by e-mail with relevant stakeholders on the Aquind Interconnector project.

Information regarding meetings of ministers with stakeholders is published online[1], and there have been no discussions or email correspondence between my noble Friend the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State and I, and stakeholders from the Aquind interconnector project.

All applications for development consent are dealt with by the Department in line with Government Propriety Guidance. Neither the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State nor I will have any role in the decision.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/beis-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether any officials in his Department receive any remuneration for paid work for organisations or companies outside of Government.

On 23 April, the Cabinet Secretary wrote to the Chair of the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee on the management of outside interests in the Civil Service.

The Committee published this letter on 26 April. It can be found here:

https://committees.parliament.uk/publications/5623/documents/55584/default/.

The Cabinet Secretary’s letter sets out a series of steps to improve processes. This programme of work will also take account of any recommendations that emerge from Nigel Boardman’s review.

The Civil Service Management Code sets out, at paragraph 4.3.4, the requirement that civil servants must seek permission before accepting any outside employment which might affect their work either directly or indirectly. The applicable principles are those set out in the Business Appointment Rules. The Civil Service Management Code is published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-servants-terms-and-conditions.

Where the civil servant is a member of the departmental board any outside employment, as well as other relevant interests will be published as part of the Annual Report and Accounts or other transparency publication.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the Pay As You Grow scheme on loss rates from the Bounce Back Loan Scheme.

The Pay As You Grow measures give Bounce Back Loan borrowers more time and greater flexibility to repay their loans.

Work is currently underway with data scientists, other Government departments and external consultants on a range of projects to develop our analysis on various datasets, in order to give us the best possible insight into the scheme.

The Department will report updated estimates of expected credit losses as part of its Annual Report and Accounts for 2020-21, to be published later this year.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of allowing extensions on repayment periods from six to 10 years on loss rates from the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

The Government has enabled lenders to extend the repayment period for Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan (CBILS) facilities beyond 6 years (up to a maximum of 10 years) where this is needed in connection with the provision of forbearance. CBILS term extensions are offered at the discretion of lenders. This measure is designed to help businesses that would struggle to repay their CBILS facility on their existing terms, by reducing monthly repayments.

Work is currently underway with data scientists, other Government departments and external consultants on a range of projects to develop our analysis on various datasets, in order to give us the best possible insight into the scheme.

The Department will report updated estimates of expected credit losses as part of its Annual Report and Accounts for 2020-21, to be published later this year.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish his Department's estimate of the number of fathers who were eligible for shared parental leave in the latest quarter; and how many new fathers are ineligible for that leave because they do not meet criteria on work history or status.

Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Pay was introduced in December 2014 for the parents of children due or adopted from 5 April 2015. The scheme enables eligible working parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year, where the mother does not intend to use her full maternity entitlements.

At the time of introduction, we estimated that c. 285,000 fathers or partners would be eligible for SPL a year and between 2 and 8 per cent of them would take up the entitlement.[1] Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) suggests that take up is broadly in line with our initial forecast. Table 1 below shows the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter.

Table 1: Individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay based on the total number of individuals in that quarter


Statutory Shared Parental Pay (total number of claimants[1] in that quarter)

Q1 15/16

1,500

Q2 15/16

1,900

Q3 15/16

2,200

Q4 15/16

3,000

Q1 16/17

3,100

Q2 16/17

3,300

Q3 16/17

3,000

Q4 16/17

3,300

Q1 17/18

3,400

Q2 17/18

3,700

Q3 17/18

3,300

Q4 17/18

3,400

Q1 18/19

3,600

Q2 18/19

4,200

Q3 18/19

4,000

Q4 18/19

4,100

Q1 19/20

4,500

Q2 19/20

5,500

Q3 19/20

4,600

Q4 19/20

4,800

Q1 20/21

4,200

Q2 20/21

2,600

Notes

  1. Data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in December 2020. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”. This may especially be the case for the first two-quarters of 2020/21.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. The table shows the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter, based on the total number of individuals in that quarter irrespective of when the payment first started. Quarterly figures should not be added together to make a yearly count of individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) due to double counting claimants from quarter to quarter.
  4. For the 2015-16 tax year, those receiving Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP) for children born before 6 April 2015 cannot be distinguished from those claiming Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) within RTI data.
  5. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  6. This data represents individuals in receipt of Shared Parental Pay only, so those who take unpaid Shared Parental Leave are not included.

Eligible parents can also take unpaid SPL so information relating to claims of ShPP only gives a partial picture of take up. We are currently evaluating the Shared Parental Leave and Pay scheme, which includes large scale, representative surveys of employers and parents, and a qualitative study. We are currently analysing the data from the research that we commissioned and will report on the evaluation of the scheme later this year.

We do not hold estimates of the number of fathers eligible for SPL by quarter, however in 2013 we estimated that c. 285,000 fathers or partners would be eligible for SPL a year.[2] We will update and publish an estimate of the number of parents who are eligible for SPL and an updated estimation of take-up rates for the scheme when we report on the evaluation.

[1] Impact Assessment of Shared Parental Leave and Pay, BIS 2013 https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukia/2013/256/pdfs/ukia_20130256_en.pdf

[2] See footnote 1

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish his Department's estimate of the take up of shared parental leave by fathers (a) on the latest figures available as (i) an absolute number and (ii) proportion of those fathers eligible and (b) for each quarter since the introduction of that policy as (i) an absolute number and (ii) a proportion of those eligible.

Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Pay was introduced in December 2014 for the parents of children due or adopted from 5 April 2015. The scheme enables eligible working parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year, where the mother does not intend to use her full maternity entitlements.

At the time of introduction, we estimated that c. 285,000 fathers or partners would be eligible for SPL a year and between 2 and 8 per cent of them would take up the entitlement.[1] Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) suggests that take up is broadly in line with our initial forecast. Table 1 below shows the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter.

Table 1: Individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay based on the total number of individuals in that quarter


Statutory Shared Parental Pay (total number of claimants[1] in that quarter)

Q1 15/16

1,500

Q2 15/16

1,900

Q3 15/16

2,200

Q4 15/16

3,000

Q1 16/17

3,100

Q2 16/17

3,300

Q3 16/17

3,000

Q4 16/17

3,300

Q1 17/18

3,400

Q2 17/18

3,700

Q3 17/18

3,300

Q4 17/18

3,400

Q1 18/19

3,600

Q2 18/19

4,200

Q3 18/19

4,000

Q4 18/19

4,100

Q1 19/20

4,500

Q2 19/20

5,500

Q3 19/20

4,600

Q4 19/20

4,800

Q1 20/21

4,200

Q2 20/21

2,600

Notes

  1. Data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in December 2020. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”. This may especially be the case for the first two-quarters of 2020/21.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. The table shows the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter, based on the total number of individuals in that quarter irrespective of when the payment first started. Quarterly figures should not be added together to make a yearly count of individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) due to double counting claimants from quarter to quarter.
  4. For the 2015-16 tax year, those receiving Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP) for children born before 6 April 2015 cannot be distinguished from those claiming Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) within RTI data.
  5. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  6. This data represents individuals in receipt of Shared Parental Pay only, so those who take unpaid Shared Parental Leave are not included.

Eligible parents can also take unpaid SPL so information relating to claims of ShPP only gives a partial picture of take up. We are currently evaluating the Shared Parental Leave and Pay scheme, which includes large scale, representative surveys of employers and parents, and a qualitative study. We are currently analysing the data from the research that we commissioned and will report on the evaluation of the scheme later this year.

We do not hold estimates of the number of fathers eligible for SPL by quarter, however in 2013 we estimated that c. 285,000 fathers or partners would be eligible for SPL a year.[2] We will update and publish an estimate of the number of parents who are eligible for SPL and an updated estimation of take-up rates for the scheme when we report on the evaluation.

[1] Impact Assessment of Shared Parental Leave and Pay, BIS 2013 https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukia/2013/256/pdfs/ukia_20130256_en.pdf

[2] See footnote 1

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2021 to Question 30321 on Business Premises: Coronavirus, what budget has been made available for enforcement activities in respect of business premises ventilation in each of the last 10 years; what enforcement action has been taken in respect of ventilation of business premises in each of the last 10 years; and when she most recently discussed ventilation of business premises with national bodies representing businesses.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) allocates resources based on planned levels of activity to deliver it’s published strategy and plans. It does not allocate budgets by specific risk areas such as business premises ventilation, but inspectors will take action to respond to poor ventilation if identified during regulatory activity.

During the coronavirus pandemic, the risks associated with poor general ventilation in a workplace increased due to the risk of transmitting coronavirus. HSE has carried out more than 300,000 interventions since the start of the pandemic, to check how businesses are implementing measures to reduce transmission of coronavirus at their sites, including whether employees are working in poorly ventilated spaces. Where contraventions are identified, HSE inspectors will take action to secure compliance by providing verbal advice, written correspondence or serving enforcement notices.

HSE has also updated their website guidance to support businesses in addressing the issue of ventilation in businesses www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/index.htm.

HSE does not collate all enforcement action taken specifically in respect of ventilation. However, HSE’s operational database shows that in the last ten years, there have been 7 enforcement notices specifically citing Regulation 6 of the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 (as amended), which imposes general requirements for ensuring workplaces are adequately ventilated. Please see table below for figures:

Year

Number of enforcement notices citing contraventions of Regulation 6 of the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 (as amended)

2011

2

2012

1

2013

0

2014

1

2015

0

2016

0

2017

0

2018

0

2019

3

2020

0

Total

7

This table does not, however, provide a full picture of HSE enforcement in respect of ventilation, for example because enforcement action on coronavirus-related ventilation deficiencies may be taken under the general provisions of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974, without reference to the above-mentioned regulation (and in such cases cannot readily be identified on HSE systems). Further, HSE does not collate information to identify how often verbal advice or written correspondence has been provided by inspectors to deal specifically with ventilation deficiencies.

HSE has had numerous recent meetings with national representative groups in which the issue of workplace ventilation was discussed and is involved in scientific activities researching ventilation issues. The Secretary of State has not been involved in these discussions personally.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)