Bridget Phillipson Portrait

Bridget Phillipson

Labour - Houghton and Sunderland South

Shadow Secretary of State for Education

(since November 2021)
Bridget Phillipson is not a member of any APPGs
1 Former APPG membership
Medicines and Medical Devices
Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury
6th Apr 2020 - 29th Nov 2021
Public Accounts Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 21st Sep 2020
Committee on Standards
2nd Mar 2020 - 13th May 2020
Committee of Privileges
2nd Mar 2020 - 13th May 2020
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
21st Jan 2020 - 11th May 2020
European Statutory Instruments
18th Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Privileges
26th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Standards
26th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Accounts Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
10th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
European Statutory Instruments Committee
18th Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee of Privileges
26th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Accounts Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
11th Oct 2010 - 3rd May 2017
Opposition Whip (Commons)
7th Oct 2013 - 18th Sep 2015
Home Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 4th Nov 2013
Procedure Committee
26th Jul 2010 - 11th Oct 2011


Department Event
Monday 6th December 2021
14:30
Department for Education
Oral questions - Main Chamber
6 Dec 2021, 2:30 p.m.
Education (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 1st December 2021
Finance (No. 2) Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 152 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 212 Noes - 306
Speeches
Tuesday 2nd November 2021
Budget Resolutions

Absolutely; 60 times we have had announcements on the plan, but not a single spade in the ground. I will …

Written Answers
Wednesday 1st December 2021
Revenue and Customs: Telephone Services
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC self-assessment helpline were (a) answered and …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 15th November 2021
1. Employment and earnings
Payment of £200 expected from CMD, 31 Carolside Avenue, Glasgow G76 7AA, for an interview on 23 September 2021. Hours: …
EDM signed
Thursday 12th March 2015
BETTING, GAMING AND LOTTERIES
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Gaming Machine (Circumstances of Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2015 …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Bridget Phillipson has voted in 291 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jesse Norman (Conservative)
(55 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Chancellor of the Exchequer
(13 debate interactions)
Steve Barclay (Conservative)
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(95 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(14 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(2 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Bridget Phillipson's debates

Houghton and Sunderland South Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Houghton and Sunderland South signature proportion
Bridget Phillipson has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Bridget Phillipson

10th February 2015
Bridget Phillipson signed this EDM on Thursday 12th March 2015

BETTING, GAMING AND LOTTERIES

Tabled by: Edward Miliband (Labour - Doncaster North)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Gaming Machine (Circumstances of Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2015 (S.I., 2015, No. 121), dated 2 February 2015, a copy of which was laid before this House on 4 February, be annulled.
60 signatures
(Most recent: 25 Mar 2015)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 32
Independent: 3
The Independent Group for Change: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Bridget Phillipson's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Bridget Phillipson, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Bridget Phillipson

Tuesday 26th October 2021

Bridget Phillipson has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Bridget Phillipson has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Bridget Phillipson has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


390 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, on which date each of the freeports announced in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021 (a) came into or (b) is planned to come into operation.

At Budget, on 27 October 2021, it was announced that the first Freeport tax sites would be in Humber, Teesside and Thames. Eligible businesses that base themselves in tax sites at these Freeports can benefit from several tax incentives. On 19 November, these tax sites and a customs site in Teesside were designated meaning that businesses are able to benefit from the tax benefits and customs facilitations from that date.

The Government is working hard to support all Freeports. Subject to agreeing their business cases, we expect the next set of Freeports to begin operations in 2022.

Neil O'Brien
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has issued any guidance, internally or to other Departments on the risks or benefits of contracting companies to provide payroll finance solutions to staff delivering public services, in the last 10 years.

A joint communication from the Chief People Officer, Director General of Public Spending (HMT) and Government Chief Commercial Officer was issued in December 2020. This communication related to early payroll schemes, advising departments to ensure they were making full use of all options already available, including salary advances and loan schemes before considering proposals from third party finance providers. It further reminded departments that if they did want to introduce a new type of finance arrangement, they were required to seek internal sign off from their departmental Accounting Officer before approaching HM Treasury for final approval.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing further funding in port infrastructure following the Ports Infrastructure Fund.

Ports are commercial enterprises and would normally be expected to fund any infrastructure required to comply with legislation on border controls.

However, in recognition of the unique circumstances of EU Exit, the UK Government made £705 million of funding available to support border readiness.

This included the £200 million Port Infrastructure Fund which has been allocated; there are no plans to invite further applications.

Going forward, as commercial enterprises, it is for ports to make business decisions about which services they provide and how these are financed.



Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion in cost terms of the (a) furniture, including desks and chairs, (b) IT hardware and (c) programming for new visualizations and data outputs in respect of the operations room constructed in 70 Whitehall in the financial year 2020-21 is capable of being reused in other government buildings.

  1. Total £3,710,000.00

  1. Furniture £ 36,000.00

  2. IT/AV costs £ 450,000.00

  3. Visualisation & Programming £2,440,000.00

All furniture and systems are potentially capable of being reused in other Cabinet Office secure environments.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much his Department spent (a) in total, (b) on furniture, including desks and chairs, (c) on IT hardware and (d) on programming for new visualizations and data outputs in respect of the operations room constructed in 70 Whitehall in the financial year 2020-21.

  1. Total £3,710,000.00

  1. Furniture £ 36,000.00

  2. IT/AV costs £ 450,000.00

  3. Visualisation & Programming £2,440,000.00

All furniture and systems are potentially capable of being reused in other Cabinet Office secure environments.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the eight successful Freeport bids, (a) how many and (b) which of those bids stated that they would benefit from the funding available through the Port Infrastructure Fund.

All of the Freeport locations have received funding from the Port Infrastructure Fund. The Freeport process was designed to align with other government funding. One of the bidders out of the eight successful locations made specific reference to the Port Infrastructure Fund in its bid.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Treasury's publication entitled Build Back Better: our plan for growth, dated March 2021, and the target set out on page 14 of that publication to relocate 22,000 civil servants out of London by 2030, whether that target is to relocate those civil servants out of (a) London or (b) London and the South East; and if he will confirm the exact boundaries of the areas he would denote by the terms (i) London, (ii) the South East and (iii) London and the South East.

At Budget 2020, the Government committed to relocating a minimum of 22,000 civil service roles out of central London, the vast majority to the other regions and nations of the UK.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much money from the public purse has been spent on digital advertising on (a) the transition period and (b) public health advice on Covid-19 in (i) February 2020 and (ii) since the beginning of March 2020.

Cabinet Office publishes expenditure, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling monthly basis on gov.uk as part of routine government transparency arrangements.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of civil?servants' (a) parents and (b) guardians are also civil servants.

The information requested is not routinely collected.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of interns each Government Department accepted to the (a) Summer Diversity Internship Programme and (b) Civil Service graduate fast stream in each year since 2015 were (a) female, (b) male or (c) identified as neither.

As both the Summer Diversity Internship Programme and the Civil Service graduate fast stream are cross-Civil Service programmes, the information requested is not broken down by department.

Information relating to gender for those recommended for appointment to the Summer Diversity Internship Programme and Civil Service graduate Fast Stream in each year since 2015 is available in the relevant Civil Service Fast Stream annual reports.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average hourly pay is of employees identified as (a) male, (b) female and (c) other gender identity at each grade in the Prime Minister's Office.

The Prime Minister’s Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office and is included in this reply.

The Cabinet Office, along with other Government Departments, has published information about the gender pay gap in its workforce annually since 2017. The report for 2019 is available at https://gender-pay-gap.service.gov.uk/Employer/FukQqlAW.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many senior?civil?servants appointed to positions in his private office had previously been (a) political appointees in the Cabinet Office and (b) employed by a political party since 2015.

Information on Government Special Advisers is published regularly. Other Civil Servants are recruited in accordance with civil service recruitment principles.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of civil servants are employed on flexible working arrangements.

The Civil Service supports flexible working, recognising that flexible working patterns can be mutually beneficial, helping to attract and retain workforce, increasing productivity and reducing costs.

Arrangements are made departmentally and locally. Working patterns are agreed subject to business need depending on circumstances.

We do not hold information centrally about overall numbers of civil servants across all flexible working patterns. However, some information on civil servants working part-time is reported each quarter by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) as part of their quarterly public sector employment statistics.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what university each intern on the Summer Diversity Internship Programme attended in each year since 2015.

We do not currently cross-tabulate the information relating to university and the Summer Diversity Internship Programme. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average hourly pay is of (a) White or White British and (b) black, Asian or other minority ethnic group employees at each grade in the Prime Minister's Office.

Cabinet Office staff are not required to declare their ethnic origin and therefore a complete breakdown of all staff by grade; salary and ethnicity is not held.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether individuals who own more than one business can receive a covid-19 Bounce Back Loan for each of their businesses which requires such a loan.

A single business will not be eligible for multiple Bounce Back Loans; however, an individual who owns a number of separate businesses which do not fall under the same group, may apply for a Bounce Back Loan for each separate business entity.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent meetings he has had with representatives of (a) the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders and (b) Nissan to discuss the health of the UK automotive industry.

Ministers in the Department have been regularly engaging with with key industry bodies, to understand how we can support the continued resilience and competitiveness of UK manufacturing during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Organisations include the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) and Nissan, which has been a critical part of the UK’s automotive industry and the North East’s manufacturing landscape for the past 30 years.

In order to support UK business and industry during the Covid-19 outbreak, the Chancellor has announced an unprecedented package including government-backed and guaranteed loans. We have made an initial £330 billion of guarantees available, alongside the Coronavirus Job Retention and VAT deferral schemes.

The Government also has a long-standing programme of support to maintain the competitiveness of the UK automotive sector. Through our landmark Automotive Sector Deal, we have secured joint investment and long-term commitments to develop world-leading battery technologies, positioning the UK as the location of choice for the development and deployment of connected and autonomous vehicle technologies.

The Government, alongside industry, have jointly committed almost £1.5 billion through the Advanced Propulsion Centre and Faraday Battery Challenge to research, develop, and commercialise low carbon automotive innovations. In October last year, we announced up to £1 billion of new money to support research and development, including within supply chains, to support electric vehicle manufacture.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 February 2020 to Question 13518 on Unemployment: Ethnic Groups, what estimate he has made of the average wage of workers from BAME backgrounds.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has published estimates of the earnings for different ethnic groups in Great Britain.

In 2018, on average, the median gross hourly pay for people from an ethnic minority background was £11.54.

The full analysis can be found in the link below:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/articles/ethnicitypaygapsingreatbritain/2018

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps she is taking to amend Ofgem’s remit to incorporate the Government’s Net Zero target.

Ofgem will have an important role in the transition to net zero and already has various powers and duties in relation to decarbonisation, including a duty to consider reductions in targeted greenhouse gas emissions. The regulator is planning to publish a decarbonisation "action plan" in February and we look forward to working closely with Ofgem to help them to implement the contents of the plan.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what fiscal steps the Government plans to take to ensure that the creative industries can start growing again as the economy recovers from the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government is committed to working with the creative industries to support their recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Government’s response to Covid-19 has been one of the most generous and comprehensive in the world. This includes the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, both of which have been extended until April 2021.The Chancellor has announced a further £4.6 billion in new lockdown grants to support businesses and protect jobs through the current national lockdown.

In addition to an extensive package of economy-wide support, last year the Government announced the unprecedented £1.57 billion support package for the culture sector and, as of 11 December 2020, over £1 billion has been allocated across all four nations of the UK. This funding is supporting the arts and culture sector to survive the pandemic.

In July 2020, the Government announced a UK-wide £500 million Restart scheme to support film and TV production companies that have been unable to film due to the lack of insurance covering Covid-related risks. As of 20 January, the scheme is supporting over 16,000 jobs and over £470 million of production spend across the UK.

20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the economic effect on UK exports of musicians being unable to tour as freely in the EU after 1 January 2021 as they used to.

The Government recognises the importance of international touring for UK cultural and creative practitioners, and their support staff.

We know that while leaving the EU will bring changes and new processes to touring and working in the EU, it will also bring new opportunities. In all circumstances, we expect the UK’s creative output to continue to be an export that is as highly valued in the European Union as it is across the world.

Leaving the EU has always meant that there would be changes to how practitioners operate in the EU. DCMS has engaged with the sector extensively throughout negotiations and since the announcement of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement to understand the diverse circumstances of companies, organisations and individual practitioners and how they may need to adapt as they plan activity across the European Union.

Going forward we will continue to work closely with the sector, including with representative organisations, to assess impact and to ensure businesses and individuals have the advice and guidance they need to meet new requirements.

20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the Government’s policy position is on supporting job creation in the creative industries as part of its covid-19 recovery plan.

The Government’s response to Covid-19 impacts on workers has been one of the most generous and comprehensive in the world. This includes the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, both of which have been extended until April 2021. The £2 billion Kickstart Scheme is creating job placements for 16 to 24 year olds on Universal Credit.

In addition, the £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund is providing further targeted support to critical cultural, arts and heritage organisations to help them, and the skilled workers that work in them, survive and recover from the Covid-19 pandemic. As of 11 December 2020, over £1 billion of the fund has been allocated across all four nations of the UK.

In July 2020, the Government also announced a UK-wide £500 million Restart scheme to support film and TV production companies and their workforce. As of 20 January, the scheme is supporting over 16,000 jobs and over £470 million of production spend across the UK.

20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent economic assessment the Government has made of the effect on UK-based creative workers not being able to travel freely within the EU after 1 January 2021.

The Government recognises the importance of international touring for UK cultural and creative practitioners, and their support staff.

We know that while leaving the EU will bring changes and new processes to touring and working in the EU, it will also bring new opportunities. In all circumstances, we expect the UK’s creative output to continue to be an export that is as highly valued in the European Union as it is across the world.

Leaving the EU has always meant that there would be changes to how practitioners operate in the EU. DCMS has engaged with the sector extensively throughout negotiations and since the announcement of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement to understand the diverse circumstances of companies, organisations and individual practitioners and how they may need to adapt as they plan activity across the European Union.

Going forward we will continue to work closely with the sector, including with representative organisations, to assess impact and to ensure businesses and individuals have the advice and guidance they need to meet new requirements.

2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of youth club closures on the rate of crime committed by young people.

The Government recognises that there are a range of complex causes of youth crime and that these are often tied to local factors. However, it is the local authorities’ role to allocate funding and deliver youth services in line with local need. We are not aware of any conclusive evidence of a direct link between the closure of youth clubs and crimes committed by young people.

This government is committed to young people and levelling up opportunities. We are investing £500 million over five years through the new Youth Investment Fund to build new youth centres, refurbish existing youth facilities, provide mobile facilities for harder to reach areas, and to invest in the youth work profession and frontline services.

Government is also funding up to £7 million this financial year through the Youth Accelerator Fund, expanding existing successful projects that are delivering positive activities for young people, and to address urgent needs in the youth sector. UK Youth is distributing over £1 million of this funding to grassroots youth organisations across the country.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Government’s loneliness strategy in helping to tackle loneliness.

Government is committed to understanding the impact of its activity on loneliness and will use this insight to inform future decision-making. The 60 commitments made in the loneliness strategy vary widely and so learning is captured in different ways. Many of these commitments are still in progress and findings will emerge over time. For example, an independent evaluation of the £11.5m Building Connections Fund is underway, and findings will be published from mid-2020 onwards.

The first annual report on government’s work on tackling loneliness was published on 20th January 2020. It highlighted the progress made so far, including action by frontline workers across the public sector to recognise and act on loneliness, the launch of the Let’s Talk Loneliness campaign, the commitment to include measures in the Public Health Outcomes Framework so we can understand local rates of loneliness, and the announcement of an additional £2m of grant-funding to help frontline grassroots organisations that bring people together.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much and what proportion of the £560 million for the Multiply programme announced in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021 he plans to disburse in each region of England in 2022-23.

All local areas in the UK will benefit from the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) in order to deliver Multiply, a bespoke adult numeracy programme. Multiply will help people improve their basic numeracy skills through free digital training, flexible courses, and tutoring.

We estimate that up to 500,000 learners across the UK could gain a recognised qualification and/or improve their skills. The government will set out further details of the UKSPF later this year.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much and what proportion of the £560 million for the Multiply programme announced in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021 he plans to disburse in (a) 2022-23, (b) 2023-24 and (c) 2024-25.

All local areas in the UK will benefit from the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) in order to deliver Multiply, a bespoke adult numeracy programme. Multiply will help people improve their basic numeracy skills through free digital training, flexible courses, and tutoring.

We estimate that up to 500,000 learners across the UK could gain a recognised qualification and/or improve their skills. The government will set out further details of the UKSPF later this year.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the Kickstart Scheme on apprenticeship starts; and if he will publish that modelling.

The Kickstart scheme is distinct from an apprenticeship and the types of opportunities employers offer under each scheme will be different.

Kickstart will offer a subsidised six-month work placement for a young person who otherwise might not have got into work or be ready for an apprenticeship. Further guidance on the Kickstart Scheme will be issued in due course. An apprenticeship is a sustained job of at least 12 months with training. Through their apprenticeship, apprentices will gain the technical knowledge, practical experience and wider skills they need to achieve full competence in a recognised occupation.

We are supporting employers, apprentices and training providers during this challenging time, so that people can continue to access high-quality apprenticeship opportunities, to continue to build the skills capabilities the country needs now and in the future.

As part of the Government’s Plan for Jobs, apprenticeships will be more important than ever in helping businesses to recruit the right people and develop the skills they need to recover and grow. To help businesses offer new apprenticeships, they will be able to claim £1,500 for every apprentice they hire as a new employee from 1 August 2020 until 31 January 2021- rising to £2,000 if they hire a new apprentice under the age of 25 - in recognition of the particular impacts of COVID-19 on the employment prospects of this group.

The new payment means it’s a great time for employers to offer new apprenticeship opportunities and take advantage of existing flexibilities to train their apprentices in a way that suits their needs.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what criteria was used to select schools included in the delivery plan for Opportunity North East.

We selected Ofsted ‘Requires Improvement’ as the criterion to be in scope for the ONE Vision schools programme, with ‘Inadequate’ schools included by exception. We then undertook a comprehensive review of their performance data, pupil demographics, Ofsted history, and drew on intelligence from local authorities and trusts to identify the schools’ relative level of need. Schools with the greatest need were invited to participate in the programme. The ONE Strategic board ratified the final list of 28 schools.

The ambition of the ONE Vision programme, as published in the Opportunity North East delivery plan, is to support these schools to move towards ‘Good’ and to improve the outcomes of young people at the end of the secondary phase.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of the use of isolation booths in schools on the (a) mental health and (b) behaviour of pupils placed in those booths for disruptive behaviour.

The Government trusts schools to develop their own policies and strategies for managing disruptive behaviour according to their particular circumstances. To help schools develop effective strategies, the Department has produced advice for schools which covers what should be included in their behaviour policy. This advice can be viewed here:
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/488034/Behaviour_and_Discipline_in_Schools_-_A_guide_for_headteachers_and_School_Staff.pdf.

Existing guidance makes clear that schools can adopt a policy which allows disruptive pupils to be placed in isolation away from other pupils for a limited period. If a school uses isolation as a disciplinary penalty, this should be made clear in their behaviour policy. As with other disciplinary penalties, schools must act lawfully, reasonably and proportionately in all cases. The school must also ensure the health and safety of pupils. The guidance is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/behaviour-and-discipline-in-schools.

The Department does not collect or record information about schools’ use of isolation.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Financial Conduct Authority on the role of Flood Re in the flood insurance market since 14 February 2020 .

Defra ministers have not met with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) since the 14 February 2020.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent meetings he has had with representatives of (a) the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders and (b) Nissan to discuss the Government's (i) net zero emissions and (ii) clean air targets.

The Secretary of State has not met the SMMT or Nissan. Defra officials have recently updated members of the automotive trade on plans to reduce nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Officials also met SMMT to discuss gathering vehicle data for the Clean Air Zone vehicle checker, which is directly related to the NO2 target.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the effect of (a) shock collars and (b) other aversive training devices on animals' long-term health and wellbeing; and if he will make a statement.

The Government remains committed to banning the use of remote controlled hand-held electronic training collars (e-collars) for dogs and cats in England. This is based on Defra funded research carried out between 2007 and 2010 which showed that e-collars compromise the welfare of some dogs. Anyone causing unnecessary suffering to a dog through the misuse or otherwise of a training device would be in breach of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and subject to a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or an unlimited fine. The Government is committed to increasing the maximum custodial penalty for this offence to five years.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to prevent the Pet Travel Scheme being used to illegally bring dogs into the UK.

The Government takes the welfare of all animals seriously, and that is why we have committed to cracking down on the illegal import of dogs and puppies. This is an abhorrent trade which causes suffering to puppies and puts the health of pets and people in the UK at risk.

All dogs entering the UK must be compliant with specific documentary and health preparations intended to safeguard their welfare and the biosecurity of this country. We have one of the most rigorous pet travel checking regimes in the world and any dogs found to be non-compliant with the Pet Travel Scheme rules may be refused entry or detained until compliant.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of replicating the provisions of Scotland’s wild camping laws in English law.

We are considering a range of options for promoting access to the countryside to meet the ‘connecting people with nature’ goals of the 25 Year Environment Plan. There are no current plans or assessments underway to legislate for wild camping in England, including replicating Scottish camping laws.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of flood defences in the North East.

In the North East of England there are over 22,000 properties in areas at risk of flooding from Main Rivers and the sea. The Environment Agency (EA) maintain over 1,500 flood risk assets to protect communities in the North East against these risks. All EA-maintained assets are visually inspected on a routine basis as part of a risk based programme, with additional intrusive inspections undertaken where required. Where issues are identified during inspections the need for further works are prioritised through the EA’s programme of capital or maintenance works.

The overall investment in the Northumbria Regional Flood and Coastal Committee (NRFCC) in the North East of England for the 6 year capital programme Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management up to 20/21 totals over £100 million. This includes Local Levy and public and private sector contributions, with £48.8 million from Government funding.

The impacts of future climate change are taken into account when considering the levels of flood risk and the level of mitigation required as part of any investment decision.

There are a number of Risk Management Authorities, such as local councils, who also maintain flood risk assets to reduce the risk of surface water and groundwater flooding and better protect from the impacts of coastal erosion.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the Government’s policy on freeports forms part of the negotiating mandate for UK negotiators.

Freeports will be national hubs for international trade, innovation and commerce, attracting new businesses, spreading jobs, and bringing investment to towns and cities across the country.

Our approach to trade negotiations with the US, Australia, New Zealand and to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) is published on GOV.UK.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has undertaken an assessment of the potential economic benefits to the (a) North East and (b) UK of reopening the Leamside Line.

In January 2020 the Government pledged £500 million for the Restoring Your Railway programme to deliver on our manifesto commitment to start reopening lines and stations to reconnect smaller communities, regenerate local economies and improve access to jobs, homes and education. The bid for the Leamside Line to the third round of the Ideas Fund was unsuccessful. My Officials have provided feedback on the scheme and advice on alternative funding routes to the Hon Member and her colleagues

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the feasibility of expanding (a) rail and (b) light rail services on the former Leamside railway line.

In January 2020 the Government pledged £500 million for the Restoring Your Railway programme to deliver on our manifesto commitment to start reopening lines and stations. The bid for the Leamside Line to the third round of the Ideas Fund was unsuccessful. My Officials have provided feedback on the scheme and advice on alternative funding routes to the Hon Member and her colleagues.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if (a) he or (b) another Minister will visit the Leamside Line to discuss the case for its proposed reopening.

Having already been asked by the Hon Member for Sedgefield to come and visit I have asked my Officials to find a mutually convenient time to do so. I would be delighted to meet the Hon Lady and other promoters of the line on the visit.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to provide financial support to the Tees Valley Combined Authority in respect of the costs associated with Teesside Airport.

We do not comment on the commercial or financial matters of private firms, because this information is commercially sensitive.

The Government recognises the challenging circumstances facing the aviation industry because of Covid-19 and firms experiencing difficulties can draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor.

This support includes the Airport and Ground Operations Scheme which provides eligible commercial airports and ground operators support towards permitted fixed costs subject to certain conditions. These eligible businesses can claim based on the equivalent of their business rates liabilities, or COVID losses, whichever is lower.

The Scheme originally opened for applications on 29 January for the 2020/21 financial year. In the March Budget, the Chancellor announced a six month renewal to the scheme from 1 April 2021. The renewed scheme opened for applications on 28 May 2021. £86.9m was awarded in grants under the first round of AGOSS, of which £65.1m was awarded to commercial airports. Applications for support under the second round of AGOSS are currently being considered. We continue to take a flexible approach and keep all policies under review.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has received a request from the Tees Valley Combined Authority for additional financial support in respect of the costs associated with Teesside Airport.

We do not comment on the commercial or financial matters of private firms, because this information is commercially sensitive.

The Government recognises the challenging circumstances facing the aviation industry because of Covid-19 and firms experiencing difficulties can draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor.

This support includes the Airport and Ground Operations Scheme which provides eligible commercial airports and ground operators support towards permitted fixed costs subject to certain conditions. These eligible businesses can claim based on the equivalent of their business rates liabilities, or COVID losses, whichever is lower.

The Scheme originally opened for applications on 29 January for the 2020/21 financial year. In the March Budget, the Chancellor announced a six month renewal to the scheme from 1 April 2021. The renewed scheme opened for applications on 28 May 2021. £86.9m was awarded in grants under the first round of AGOSS, of which £65.1m was awarded to commercial airports. Applications for support under the second round of AGOSS are currently being considered. We continue to take a flexible approach and keep all policies under review.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of opening a proposed Leamside South line on congestion on the East Coast Mainline.

The Department received a bid for funding to develop proposals to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

The third round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund closed on 5 March and a revised bid was received, which is currently undergoing assessment. We expect to announce outcomes in the Summer.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine the scope of the assessments that would be carried out should they be successful. The proposal to reinstate the Leamside Line is also being examined by Transport for the North to inform the design of Northern Powerhouse Rail, and, as such, is being considered as part of the IRP. Its forthcoming publication will therefore inform the Department’s planning for the long-term future of both the East Coast Main Line and additional rail routes throughout the North East.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has undertaken an environmental impact assessment of opening a proposed Leamside South line.

The Department received a bid for funding to develop proposals to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

The third round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund closed on 5 March and a revised bid was received, which is currently undergoing assessment. We expect to announce outcomes in the Summer.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine the scope of the assessments that would be carried out should they be successful.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
5th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the timescale for opening the proposed Leamside South line.

I understand that the Hon Member has supported a well-supported bid to the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund for the reinstatement of the Leamside South railway line. The bid is currently being assessed and we expect to announce the outcomes in the summer.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has undertaken an environmental impact assessment of (a) reopening the Leamside Line and (b) opening a Leamside South line.

The Department received a bid to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

A further round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund will open shortly and we expect to receive a stronger revised bid at that point.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine its scope.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the length of time it would take to (a) reopen the Leamside Line and (b) open a Leamside South line.

The Department received a bid to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

A further round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund will open shortly and we expect to receive a stronger revised bid at that point.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine its scope.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect on congestion on the East Coast Mainline of (a) reopening the Leamside Line and (b) opening a proposed Leamside South line.

The Department received a bid to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

A further round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund will open shortly and we expect to receive a stronger revised bid at that point.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine its scope.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has undertaken an assessment of the potential economic benefits to the (a) North East and the (b) UK of (i) reopening the Leamside Line and (ii) opening a Leamside South line.

The Department received a bid to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

A further round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund will open shortly and we expect to receive a stronger revised bid at that point.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine its scope.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what projects received funding from the Restoring Your Railway Fund.

The ten bidders for the first round of the Ideas Fund who have been successful in their application for funding to enable them to progress their proposals towards developing a business case, have been published on GOV.UK and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/re-opening-beeching-era-lines-and-stations/re-opening-beeching-era-lines-and-stations

The second round closed on 19 June and we received 50 bids which are listed in the link above.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to allocate additional financial support to local transport authorities as a result of lower passenger numbers during the covid-19 outbreak.

On 3 April we made available to bus operators and local authorities up to £167 million of new funding over twelve weeks under the new Covid-19 Bus Services Support Grant to keep key routes running. Another £30 million has also been reallocated to local authorities to safeguard bus services. This is on top of £3.2 billion of additional funding, the Government has announced to help local authorities respond to the immediate impacts of coronavirus.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether (a) the North East Combined Authority and (b) other combined authorities without a mayor will be able to bid for funding from the £4.2 billion fund for local transport set out in Budget 2020.

At Budget, Government announced its new £4.2 billion fund for local transport in eight city regions as part of its commitment to level up urban transport. Funding will be delivered through five-year, consolidated transport settlements agreed with central government and based on plans put forward by Mayors. In Tyne and Wear, funding will be conditional on the formation of a single Mayoral Combined Authority across the city region, to ensure accountability and effective delivery of funding, following the model that has worked for London. The details of how Government will take forward the settlement in Tyne and Wear will be set out in due course.

In addition, the whole of England will benefit from the largest ever programme of investment in strategic roads, the £2.5 billion Potholes Fund, and the Transforming Cities Fund. Further local transport funding will be set out at the Spending Review, including the £5 billion announced by the Prime Minister for buses and cycling.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of ticket prices on (a) train and (b) buses on the accessibility of public transport.

We have made no specific assessment of the effect of train ticket prices on the accessibility of public transport. However, we have frozen regulated rail fares in line with inflation for the seventh year in a row, cut costs for thousands of young people with the 26-30 and 16-17 Saver railcards, and will be rolling out a new Veteran’s Railcard later this year.

Bus fares are primarily a matter for the commercial judgement of bus operators. However, we support council spending of around £1 billion a year so older and disabled people can travel on buses up and down the country for free and a further £250 million in Bus Service Operators Grant to keep fares down and maintain an extensive network. Our commitments in the Better Deal for Bus Users will also help passengers secure best value tickets.

On 11 February the Government announced plans for £5 billion of new funding to overhaul bus and cycling links across England. This will include higher frequency services and more affordable and simpler fares. The details of these programmes will be announced in the upcoming National Bus Strategy, to be published later this year.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to build cycle paths in (a) the North East and (b) Houghton and Sunderland South constituency.

The construction of cycle paths is a matter for local authorities. Decisions on future funding for cycling and walking infrastructure will be a matter for the Budget and forthcoming Spending Review.

However, on 11 February the Prime Minister announced £5 billion of new funding to overhaul bus and cycle links for every region outside London.

In addition, in the last Parliament the Department for Transport provided support to 46 local authorities across England to help them develop Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure plans (LCWIPs). Four Local Authorities in the North East - Newcastle, North Tyneside, Northumberland and Tees Valley - have produced draft LCWIPs. The Department is currently working with the sector to develop further support for authorities on LCWIP scheme development.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the oral contribution of the hon. Member for Houghton and Sunderland South of 5 February 2020, Official Report column 395, if (a) he or (b) a Minister will visit the Leamside line to discuss its proposed reopening.

I would be happy to visit the Hon. Member’s constituency at a suitable opportunity to discuss the case for reopening the Leamside line.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the feasibility of expanding (a) rail and (b) light rail services on the former Leamside railway line.

As part of its Continuous Modular Strategic Planning work on long term strategy for the rail network, Network Rail is assessing what is required to make sure that the rail network between York and Newcastle meets the needs of passengers and freight users in the coming decades. This study is considering the potential role of reinstatement of the Leamside line in meeting those needs, including for local connectivity through extension of the Tyne and Wear local conventional rail or Metro network. It will make recommendations for further option development.

To help communities across the country, the Government has pledged £500m to start reopening lines closed following the Beeching report. I am inviting Honourable Members to work with local authorities and community groups to come forward with proposals to explore. I have set out how this should be done and my officials are providing further guidance and assistance. We will consider the proposals received and expect to make a further announcement on development funding in autumn this year.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the annual cost to businesses of paying statutory sick pay at its current rate of £95.85 a week.

The estimated cost to employers of SSP is £1.5 billion a year. This is based on survey data from 2011. Data is not available on the total amount of SSP currently paid each year.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Chancellor of the Exchequer's oral contribution, Official Report, 11 March 2020 col 280, what the evidential basis was for the Government's commitment to reimburse businesses with fewer than 250 employees for statutory sick pay costs in relation to employees being off work for covid-19-related reasons for up to a fortnight as potentially providing over £2 billion for up to two million businesses; and if she will place the modelling used to underpin that estimate in the Library.

The government recognises that small and medium enterprises (SMEs) may need financial support where they incur additional costs of paying Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) due to increased absences relating to Covid-19. Under the Statutory Sick Pay Rebate Scheme, SMEs can reclaim up to two weeks of SSP per employee paid for sickness absences relating to Covid-19.

A range of costings were carried out in March 2020 based on the situation at the time. This was prior to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme being developed.

We will continue to revise costings based on outturn data from initial claims and the latest information about the Covid-19 outbreak.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how her Department plans to promote the take-up of the Kickstart Scheme in the private sector.

We will engage with a wide range of private sector employers, as well as those in the public and third sector, both to promote interest in the scheme and to explore how we enable employers from all sectors to take part. DWP and HM Treasury Ministers and officials have plans to meet a wide range of businesses and employer organisations.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the Kickstart Scheme will be targeted at regions with higher levels of youth unemployment.

Kickstart is a national scheme which will support young people across Britain. We want to support as many people as possible through this scheme, starting with young people at risk of long-term unemployment. We will call on public, private and voluntary sector organisations across the country to create placements, we will cover the cost, and ensure that those who will benefit most are first in line.

More details about the scheme will be published in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will commit to a peer-reviewed evaluation of the Kickstart Scheme after its implementation.

The government will be monitoring and evaluating the Kickstart scheme throughout its implementation.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he is taking to work with (a) other Departments and (b) local authorities to deliver the Kickstart scheme; and how bids from employers wishing to take part in the scheme will be assessed.

DWP will continue to work closely with a range of other government departments including DCMS, BEIS and MHCLG to develop and deliver the Kickstart Scheme.

We know that mayoralties and all local authorities have an important role in the economic recovery. DWP will continue to work with them, and skills advisory panels, to make best use of their expertise and ensure the Kickstart Scheme meets their areas’ economic needs.

Details on how bids will be assessed are yet to be finalised. We aim to make the process as straightforward as possible to allow the widest range of organisations to take part, whilst ensuring value for money. More information will be available in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what conditions will be placed on employers seeking to hire people under the Kickstart scheme.

It is an employer's duty to protect the health, safety and welfare of their employees including young people who will be employed through the Kickstart scheme.

Further details about the Kickstart Scheme will be set out in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions he has had on the delivery of the Kickstart scheme with (a) the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government; (b) Jobcentre Plus Regional Offices and (c) local authorities.

DWP is implementing the Kickstart Scheme. We will continue to work closely with a wide range of government departments including MHCLG, to develop and deliver the Scheme as part of the wider package announced in the Chancellor’s Summer Statement.

With MHCLG we are setting up joint design groups to optimise the effectiveness of the scheme at a local and regional level. I have already discussed the Kickstart Scheme with the M9 Mayors and we have engaged extensively with the Jobcentre network.

We are keen to develop an effective and comprehensive economic response that works nationally and locally. Our Job Centre Plus partnership managers and employer advisors already work closely with key local partners, such as Mayoral Combined Authorities and Local Enterprise Partnerships.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he will take to monitor the Kickstart scheme to ensure people employed under that scheme start new rather than previously existing jobs.

Kickstart jobs will be new jobs - with the funding conditional on the employer demonstrating that these jobs are additional. Further details about the Kickstart Scheme monitoring and evaluation processes will be set out in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the effect of the roll-out of universal credit on the level of income of disabled people.

I refer the Rt.Hon Member to the answer I gave on 3rd March 2020 to Question UIN 20604

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much pension credit was unclaimed in (a) Houghton and Sunderland South constituency, (b) the North East of England and (c) the UK in each of the last three years.

It is important to highlight that in 2017/18 there were around 1.7 million Pension Credit claimants, amounting to around £5.1 billion of Pension Credit payments. The Government is committed to making sure that all pensioners eligible can claim the Pension Credit to which they are rightly entitled.

The information requested on the amount of Pension Credit which remains unclaimed in (a) Houghton and Sunderland South, (b) the North East of England and (c) the UK, is only available at the Great Britain level. Below are the figures on the amount of unclaimed Pension Credit within Great Britain over the past 3 years of data available.

Year

Estimated Amount Unclaimed (Millions of Pounds)

Range (Millions of Pounds)

2017/18

2,160

1,840 - 2,500

2016/17

2,850

2,440 - 3,300

2015/16

2,720

2,330 - 3,140

*Methodological refinements have been applied to the data for 2016/17 and 2017/18. Therefore, comparisons to previous years should be treated with caution.

Official statistics on the take-up of income-related benefits at Great Britain level, including Pension Credit, can be found in the ‘Income-related benefits: estimates of take-up in 2017 to 2018’ publication. Which was published on 27th February 2020.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/income-related-benefits-estimates-of-take-up-financial-year-2017-to-2018

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Feb 2020
To the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to tackle levels of unemployment among the BAME community.

The Government is committed to levelling up skills and opportunity across the country. Using data from the Race Disparity Audit, first published in October 2017, and the Department for Work and Pensions own analysis we are helping those underrepresented in the labour market. Since 2010, 1,223,000 more people from ethnic minority backgrounds are in employment - that’s a 45 per cent increase in the number of ethnic minority people employed.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessments he has made of the adequacy of financial support available from the public purse for unpaid carers.

This Government recognises and values the vital contribution made by carers in supporting some of the most vulnerable in society.

The Government is supporting carers in a number of ways, including through the benefit system. The rate of Carer’s Allowance, the main social security benefit for carers, has increased from £53.90 in 2010 to £66.15 a week, meaning an additional £635 a year for carers since 2010. Subject to Parliamentary approval, Carer’s Allowance will further increase to £67.25 a week in April 2020. By 2023/24, we are forecast to spend £3.7 billion a year on Carer’s Allowance.

The Government also provides targeted financial support for carers on low incomes through means-tested benefits, including Pension Credit and Universal Credit. Subject to Parliamentary approval, in April 2020, the associated carer premia in means-tested benefits will increase from £36.85 to £37.50 a week; and the carer element in Universal Credit will increase from £160.20 to £162.92 per monthly assessment period. These amounts recognise the additional contribution and responsibilities associated with caring and mean that these benefits can be paid to carers at a higher rate than those without caring responsibilities.

A table of proposed benefit rates for 2020/2021 was deposited in the House libraries on 29 November 2019. https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/business-papers/commons/deposited-papers/

27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect of the two child benefit limit on the income of single parents.

DWP and HMRC produce a joint report with statistics related to the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children, the latest of which was published in July 2019 and can be found online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-tax-credit-and-universal-credit-claimants-statistics-related-to-the-policy-to-provide-support-for-a-maximum-of-2-children-april-2019

Providing support for a maximum of two children, or qualifying young persons in Universal Credit and Child Tax Credit, ensures fairness between claimants and those taxpayers who support themselves solely through work.

We recognise that some claimants are not able to make the same choices about the number of children in their family, which is why exceptions have been put in place to protect certain groups. On migration to Universal Credit, families’ existing entitlement will be protected.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2021 to Question 29801 on GP Surgeries: Ventilation, what budget has been made available for enforcement activities in respect of ventilation in GP surgeries in each of the last ten years; what enforcement action has been taken in respect of ventilation in each of the last ten years; and when he or other Ministers in his Department last met representatives of (a) general practitioners and (b) trades unions recognised within the NHS to discuss the ventilation of GP surgeries.

The Care Quality Commission’s (CQC) enforcement activity is funded by Grant-in-Aid from the Department. However, the CQC has advised that information on the budget specifically for enforcement activities is not held in the format requested.

The CQC can consider ventilation as part of an inspection of a hospital or general practitioner practice and has a range of tools it can use on a proportionate basis, in line with its enforcement policy. However, the CQC do not record centrally the specific reason for taking regulatory action and to obtain information relating to enforcement on ventilation issues could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. There have been no specific meetings to discuss ventilation.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2021 to Question 290800 on Hospitals: Ventilation, what budget has been made available for enforcement activities in respect of ventilation in hospitals in each of the last ten years; what enforcement action has been taken in respect of ventilation in each of the last ten years; and when he last met representatives of (a) relevant NHS Trusts and (b) trade unions recognised within the NHS to discuss the ventilation of hospitals.

The Care Quality Commission’s (CQC) enforcement activity is funded by Grant-in-Aid from the Department. However, the CQC has advised that information on the budget specifically for enforcement activities is not held in the format requested.

The CQC can consider ventilation as part of an inspection of a hospital or general practitioner practice and has a range of tools it can use on a proportionate basis, in line with its enforcement policy. However, the CQC do not record centrally the specific reason for taking regulatory action and to obtain information relating to enforcement on ventilation issues could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. There have been no specific meetings to discuss ventilation.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of operating the Track and Trace app compared with operating the Track and Trace service by telephone call.

To date, the cost of developing the National Health Service COVID-19 app is £10.8 million. We will provide information in due course on the cost of the wider Track and Trace programme.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which companies won Government contracts to develop the covid-19 track and trace app; and what the value of those contracts was.

Details on individual contracts can be found on Contract Finder on GOV.UK. Companies which helped to develop the National Health Service COVID-19 contact tracing app include Vmware/Vmware Pivotal Labs, Zuhlke Engineering, Microsoft, and Amazon Web Services.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of the (a) development of the Track and Trace app and (b) merger of that app with Google and Apple.

To date the cost of developing the National Health Service COVID-19 app is £10.8 million. We will publish the total costs in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the additional cost will be of the further data protection requirements of the new covid-19 track and trace app.

We will publish the total costs in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to make available additional (a) funding and (b) resources to ensure that NHS (i) doctors and (ii) nurses are able to access psychological support during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Chancellor has been clear that the National Health Service will receive the resources it needs to manage the COVID-19 pandemic. I have commissioned the NHS to create a package of support for NHS staff during the COVID-19 response. This will include training and guidance, access to psychological support and other practical measures to sustain staff wellbeing.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of psychological support and resources available to doctors and nurses in primary care.

The National Health Service currently provides comprehensive mental health support for doctors and dentists in England through the NHS Practitioner Health Programme, a mental health assessment and treatment service that NHS doctors including general practitioners and dentists can access confidentially via self-referral.

Last year, we asked NHS England to develop an NHS People Plan to address workforce challenges and improve the support offered to all NHS staff. The health and wellbeing of NHS staff is very important. As part of the NHS People Plan, we plan to set out a comprehensive package of support that all NHS staff can expect to receive from their employer, including rapid access to occupational health services and psychological support. Publication of the final NHS People Plan has been deferred to allow the NHS to provide maximum operational effort to COVID-19 response. However, we have commissioned the NHS to urgently put in place a package of support for NHS staff during the COVID-19 response. Details of this will be released soon.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to monitor the effect of emergency legislation on Coronavirus on recipients of social care.

The Coronavirus Act 2020 introduced new Care Act easements to ensure the best possible care for people in our society during this exceptional period.

The guidance states that local authorities should report any decision to operate under easements, and the reasoning behind this decision, to the Department. This information is collated and will be used to monitor the easements internally.

The Care Quality Commission, Think Local Act Personal, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, the Local Government Association, the Care and Support Alliance and the Chief Social Worker are currently considering how to monitor the use of easements and gain a wider understanding of how COVID-19 impacts people receiving care and support by using a more person-centred approach to monitoring.

Full guidance has been published at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-changes-to-the-care-act-2014/care-act-easements-guidance-for-local-authorities

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to facilitate online consultations for outpatients to reduce non-essential contact with clinicians.

The NHS Long Term Plan outlines NHS England and NHS Improvement’s commitment to redesigning outpatient appointments, offering patients the choice of virtual outpatient appointments where appropriate. A pilot programme in April 2019 implemented video consultation in outpatient services at 40 providers. In light of the COVID-19 outbreak, NHS England and NHS Improvement are accelerating this work, rapidly scaling up video consultation capability within National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts to reduce the need for physical attendances.

The decision to conduct a consultation via video will be clinically led. NHS England and NHS Improvement are making a web-based video consultation platform available. It works on multiple devices, does not rely on software downloads and access will be free of charge to all NHS trusts and foundation trusts. NHS England and NHS Improvement will provide training and support materials to facilitate rapid deployment of video consulting technology; a nationally assured Data Protection Impact Assessment; a telephone support desk for clinicians and patients; and up to £20,000 per NHS provider for the purchasing of hardware to support the delivery of video consultations.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant?to the Answer of 30 January 2020 to Question 7625 on Cervical Cancer: Screening, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the recommendation on self-test cervical cancer screening contained in the review of adult screening programmes in England published in October 2019.

The United Kingdom National Screening Committee (UK NSC) reviewed the evidence on the use of human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling as a programme modification within the NHS Cervical Screening Programme at its meeting in February 2019. The Committee recognised that HPV self-sampling offered a promising test but that further work was required to ensure its feasibility and value in the current screening programme. Minutes of the UK NSC’s meeting can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/uk-national-screening-committee-uk-nsc

Public Heath England is now in the early stages of planning for a formal evaluation of HPV self-sampling as a primary test in the national cervical screening programme. The aim of this evaluation is to address key questions from the UK NSC external review of HPV self-sampling, published in 2017.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many full-time equivalent GP clinical staff there were in (a) Sunderland Clinical Commissioning Group area and (b) the North East in 2018-2019.

The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) doctors, direct patient care practitioners and nurses in general practice who worked in general practices in England, the North East and Yorkshire and NHS Sunderland Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) on 31 December 2018 and on 31 December 2019 are presented in the following table.

Due to a change in the regions, there is no comparable ‘North East’ region between September 2018 and 2019.

Full-time equivalent

All regular general practitioners (GPs) (excludes locums)

All nurses

All direct patient care

England

December 2018

34,510

16,348

12,858

December 2019

34,708

16,819

14,050

North East and Yorkshire

December 2018

5,122

3,154

2,454

December 2019

-

-

-

Sunderland CCG

December 2018

151

96

56

December 2019

144

100

58

Source: NHS Digital

Notes:

1. Data as of 31 December.

2. Figures shown do not include general practitioners, direct patient care staff and nurses working in prisons, army bases, educational establishments, specialist care centres including drug rehabilitation centres, walk-in centres and other alternative settings.

3. Each period, figures contain estimates, for practices that did not provide fully valid General Medical Practice general practitioner/nurse/direct patient care/admin/non-clinical staff records.

4. FTE refers to the proportion of full time contracted hours that the post holder is contracted to work. 1 would indicate they work a full set of hours (37.5), 0.5 that they worked half time. In Registrars' contracts 1 FTE = 40 hours. To ensure consistency, these FTEs have been converted to the standard wMDS measure of 1 FTE = 37.5 hours in the table.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to abolish tuition fees for (a) student nurses, (b) midwives and (c) allied health professionals.

The Government has no plans to abolish tuition fees for student nurses, midwives or those studying one of the allied health profession subjects.

The Government announced in December 2019 that new and continuing students from September 2020 will receive a £5,000-£8,000 grant during their course to help with their cost of living – and they will not have to pay it back. Eligible students will receive at least £5,000 and an additional £1,000 for those with child dependents with further funding of up to £2,000 available to new students in regions or disciplines that are struggling to recruit.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee's seventh report of Session 2017-19, Social care funding: time to end a national scandal, published on 4 July 2019, HL Paper 392, if he will make it his policy to allocate an additional £8 billion of funding per year to adult social care.

Putting social care on a sustainable footing, where everyone is treated with dignity and respect, is one of the biggest challenges we face as a society.

The Government is providing councils with access to an additional £1.5 billion for adults and children’s social care in 2020/21. This includes an additional £1 billion of grant funding for adults and children’s social care, and a proposed 2% precept that will enable councils to access a further £500 million for adult social care.

This £1.5 billion is on top of maintaining £2.5 billion of existing social care grants and will support local authorities to meet rising demand and continue to stabilise the social care system.

Future funding for social care will be set out at the next spending review.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 6 February 2020 to Question 11501 on Suicide: Males, if he will make it his policy to include representatives from the LGBTQ+ communities in the ONS working group.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is leading the programme of work to analyse the latest data relating to suicide registrations, informed by a group of academics. The ONS has selected the academics from the National Suicide Prevention Strategy Advisory Group according to their specific expertise in suicide prevention. We expect the ONS will publish its findings in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant?to the Answer of 29 January 2020 to Question 7623 on NHS: Computer Software, whether the table used in the previous answers represents the (a) number of accounts made or (b) number of active individuals using the app on a regular basis.

The NHS App now has over 250,000 registered users and has been designed over many iterations to be usable by all age groups. The table referred to in Question 7623 is the number of active users of the NHS App. These users have been through the registration process, and of these, 76% use the app more than once a month.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the availability of paediatric continence services for children throughout (a) England, (b) the North East and (c) Sunderland.

Continence services are commissioned locally by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). Later this year the National Bladder and Bowel Project Group will undertake an audit of CCGs across all regions in England to assess the commissioning of continence services.

Sunderland CCG is working with providers to improve the pathway in the local area, where continence services are currently provided by:

- South Tyneside and Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust (commissioned by Sunderland CCG), which provides a bladder and bowel service for both adults and children. This includes the provision of products using a locally agreed policy; and

- Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust (commissioned by Sunderland City Council), which provides the 0-19 service and support services including level 1 continence support for nocturnal enuresis, constipation and toilet training and initiating first line treatments.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant?to the Answer of 11 February 2020 to Question 12283 on Dementia: Diagnosis, if he will make it his policy to instruct CCGs to allocate funding for dementia sufferers.

The Government has no plans to change the policy on the commissioning of services or to instruct clinical commissioning groups to allocate specific amounts of funding for dementia.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant?to the Answer of 6 February 2020 to Question 11501 on Suicide: Males, if he will make it policy to include representatives from BAME communities in the ONS working group.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is leading the programme of work to analyse the latest data relating to suicide registrations, informed by a group of academics. The ONS has selected the academics from the National Suicide Prevention Strategy Advisory Group according to their specific expertise in suicide prevention. We expect the ONS will publish its findings in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the report of the Independent Review of Adult Screening Programmes in England, published by Sir Mike Richards in October 2019, what plans he has to develop the IT system supporting the cervical screening programme with the functionality recommended in that report.

Professor Sir Mike Richards’ Review on Adult Screening included a recommendation to develop screening IT systems that focus on the functionality needed to support improvements in the uptake and coverage of screening programmes, including the NHS Cervical Screening and Breast Screening Programmes.

NHSX is taking forward a comprehensive Digital Transformation of Screening programme. As part of this, NHSX is developing an interim cervical screening call/recall system, to end the current reliance on National Health Application and Infrastructure Services (NHAIS). A team has been established to deliver the new system and to migrate data from NHAIS and a technical architecture has been approved. A roadmap for the build and implementation of the new system and a plan with an estimated go-live date are being developed.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many full-time equivalent clinical staff there were in each GP practice in Houghton and Sunderland South constituency in 2018-19.

The data is not available in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant?to the Answer of 29 January 2020 to question 7622 on Social Services, when he plans to publish a Green Paper on adult social care.

We will work across parties to seek consensus on a plan to fix the crisis in social care – giving every older person the dignity and security they deserve. We will bring forward a plan for social care this year.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many full-time equivalent GP clinical staff there were in (a) Houghton and Sunderland South constituency, (b) the North East and (c) England in 2018-2019.

The number (headcount) of doctors (excluding locums), direct patient care practitioners and nurses in general practice who worked full time and part time according to their weekly contracted hours in general practices in NHS Sunderland Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), North East and Yorkshire NHS region and England on 30 September 2018 and 2019 is attached. NHS Sunderland CCG includes Houghton and Sunderland South constituency but does not map directly to the borders. North East and Yorkshire NHS region was formed in April 2019 therefore no data exists for this region prior to this date. The data is divided by those who are contracted to work 15 hours or less, more than 15 but less than 37.5 hours, and more than 37.5 hours per week. General practitioner (GP) locums are excluded as improvements have been made to GP locum recording methodology and figures are not comparable across the time series.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time equivalent clinical staff there were in each GP practice in Houghton and Sunderland South constituency in 2018-19.

The data is not available in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will allocate additional funding to support the early diagnosis of dementia.

NHS England allocates funding to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) which commission services on behalf of their local populations. It is for CCGs to decide how best to use the funding allocated to them in line with local healthcare needs and priorities, working with other local commissioners and organisations.

The Challenge on Dementia 2020 sets out the ambition for two thirds of people with dementia in England to receive a formal diagnosis. This has been achieved and exceeded nationally.

3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the National Suicide Prevention Strategy in helping to prevent men aged between 45 and 49 years old from taking their own lives.

The National Suicide Prevention Strategy highlights men, and especially middle-aged and young men, as a group at high risk of suicide. In September 2018, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) published the final suicide registrations data for 2018, which showed a significant increase amongst men, following four consecutive years of decreases. These latest figures reinforce why suicide prevention continues to be a priority for this Government.

Experts are clear that we need more data to be able to draw firm conclusions, and we have set up a working group with the ONS, Professor Louis Appleby and other academics to consider the data in more detail.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of elderly people to engage with NHS digital services.

We are committed to ensuring that all those using the National Health Service have fair and equitable access to high quality, effective healthcare services that are responsive to all patients’ needs.

Digital tools, such as the NHS App, which have been designed to be useable by all age groups. They can support older people to manage repeat prescriptions, book and cancel appointments and view their medical record.

In July 2019, we published the Digital Inclusion Guide for Health and Social Care to help support local commissioners and designers ensure that services delivered digitally are as inclusive as possible to meet the needs of all members of the population.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of elderly people to engage with the NHS App.

The NHS App launched following a period of testing from September 2018-January 2019, and now has over 250,000 registered users.

The NHS app has been designed over many iterations to be as usable by all age groups. Over 65s have been included in mixed method sessions including in depth interviews and usability testing for every feature of the app produced to date, and the app overall.

Over 10% of the total users are above 65 years old. As of 27 January 2020, the total number of users above 65 years old is:

Age group

Total Number of Users

Over 65

24,307

Over 75

4,674

Over 90

181

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made on the adequacy of the availability of cervical cancer screenings for women with physical disabilities.

General practitioner practices are required to ensure that their premises are suitable for the delivery of essential services and that they are sufficient to meet the reasonable needs of its patients, including those with disabilities. This involves making any necessary reasonable adjustments; making alternative arrangements, such as referral to a specialist screening provider; or undertaking the procedures in another setting that is more suitable given any limitations to a patient’s mobility. Where a patient requires specialist equipment, clinical staff will ensure that patients have access to its use in a safe environment.

NHS England is continuously investing in initiatives to help ensure equality of access to screening and, through the Section 7A public health functions agreement, aims to improve public health outcomes and reduce inequalities.

Professor Sir Mike Richards’ review of Adult Screening programmes was published on 16 October 2019. As part of this review, it was recommended that good practice on physical disabilities is shared to enable this to be adopted more widely. The Department, NHS England and Public Health England is considering the recommendations from Professor Richards’ report and will publish an implementation plan in spring 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure sustainable workforce planning for GPs.

We recognise general practice is under pressure nationally and that is why we have committed to growing the workforce by 6,000 more doctors in general practice and 6,000 more primary care professionals. This is in addition to the 20,000 primary care professionals NHS England is providing funding towards, and other commitments in the NHS Long Term Plan, with primary and community care set to receive at least £4.5 billion more a year by 2023/24, in real terms. The five-year General Practitioner Contract will provide greater financial security and certainty for practices to plan ahead. It will also see billions of extra pounds of investment for improved access, expanded services at local practices, the development of Primary Care Networks, launched in July 2019, and longer appointments for patients who need them.

The full People Plan, published later this year, will set out a broader strategy for a sustainable general practice workforce and how we will meet our commitments through both recruitment and retention programmes.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish a Green Paper on adult social care.

Putting social care on a sustainable footing, where everyone is treated with dignity and respect, is one of the biggest challenges we face as a society. As the Prime Minister has said, the Government will bring forward a plan for social care this year.

The Government will seek to build cross-party consensus and will outline next steps shortly.

24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his Department's policy to increase the level of funding for the early stage of clinical trials of dementia medicines.

The Government remains strongly committed to supporting research into dementia and the United Kingdom research community is playing a significant role in the global effort to find a cure or a major disease-modifying treatment by 2025.

The Government’s 2020 Challenge contained the commitment to spend £300 million on dementia research over the five years to March 2020. This commitment was delivered a year early with £341 million spent on dementia research over the four years to 31 March 2019. We are currently working on ways to significantly boost further research on dementia at all stages of the translation pathway, including on early-phase clinical trials.

26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC Tax Credits helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered within ten minutes in each of the last 36 months.
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC VAT helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered within ten minutes in each of the last 36 months.
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC self-assessment helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered within ten minutes in each of the last 36 months.
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC VAT helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered within five minutes in each of the last 36 months.
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC national insurance helpline were (a) answered, (b) not answered within 10 minutes in each of the last 36 months.
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC Tax Credits helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered, within five minutes, in each of the last 36 months.
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC national insurance helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered, within five minutes, in each of the last 36 months.
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC employers helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered, within five minutes, in each of the last 36 months.
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC self-assessment helpline were (i) answered and (ii) not answered within five minutes in each of the last 36 months.
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC employers helpline were not answered at all, in each of the last 36 months.
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC Tax Credits helpline were not answered at all, in each of the last 36 months.
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC National Insurance helpline were not answered at all, in each of the last 36 months.
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC VAT helpline were not answered at all, in each of the last 36 months.
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC self-assessment helpline were not answered at all, in each of the last 36 months.
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what data is (a) collected and (b) analysed by his Department on staff working locations, patterns of working in person and remotely, and times at which staff are (i) working, and (ii) physically present in HM Treasury buildings to underpin the adoption, management and assessment of smart working practices in his Department.

The department does not use data collected on staff working locations, patterns of working in person or remotely, or times at which staff are working and physically present in HMT Treasury buildings as the sole indicators analysed to underpin the adoption, management, and assessment of smart working practices.

HMT started work to adopt smarter working practices pre-pandemic and underwent an initial assessment by the Government Property Agency (GPA) in February 2020 in which it was assessed as a ‘new’ adopter of smarter working practices. A further smarter working assessment by the GPA to measure progress is planned to take place in February 2022.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 19 November 2021 to Question 75875 on Ministerial meetings with Aquind Energy, on which dates Ministers in his Department (a) met and (b) spoke with (i) directors and (ii) other representatives of Aquind Energy since 1 July 2021.

Details of HMT Ministers’ official meetings with external organisations are published and can be found here: www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel. Details of meetings from 1 July onwards will be published in due course.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what data is (a) collected and (b) analysed by HM Revenue and Customs on staff working locations, patterns of working in person and remotely, and times at which staff are (i) working and (ii) physically present in HM Revenue and Customs buildings to underpin the adoption, management and assessment of smart working practices in that department.

To ensure HMRC’s estate is optimised to support smarter working, HMRC collects data on when and where staff log-in. This is done via a unique identifier and does not involve any personal information. Any data collected is then further anonymized and aggregated to provide information at organisation and location level.

In terms of the assessment of smarter working practices, the standard code for smarter working maturity across Government departments is PAS3000. Maturity continues to be assessed by the Government Property Agency, on behalf of Cabinet Office, against four areas: Culture & People, Leadership, Workspace and Technology. The assessment programme was paused due to the pandemic and relaunched earlier this year.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has set targets for the length of time callers to HMRC's helpline for queries on self-assessment tax returns should wait before their call is answered.

HMRC does not have a target for the length of time callers should wait before their calls are answered. Instead, HMRC measures the percentage of callers who wish to speak to an advisor who are able to do so. They call this Advisor Attempts Handled.

Information on HMRC’s current performance is published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmrc-monthly-performance-reports

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmrc-quarterly-performance-updates

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what (a) reports, (b) consultation responses, (c) formal consultations and (d) other documents his Department plans to publish between 22 November and 31 December 2021.

Documents published by HM Treasury during this timeframe will be made available on GOV.UK in the usual way at the time of publication.

As set out in a Written Ministerial Statement on 18 November, and as announced in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021, the government will bring forward a further set of plans for tax administration and maintenance on 30 November. The Tax Administration and Maintenance Command Paper will outline further steps the government is taking to progress tax simplification, tackle non-compliance and ensure our tax system is fit for the modern world. This follows a similar set of announcements published after the Spring Budget in “Tax policies and consultations: Spring 2021" [CP 404]

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Education on assessing the (a) impact and (b) value for money of the Multiply programme announced in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021.

I and HMT officials had regular discussions with the Secretary of State for Education and his officials on the Spending Review.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 November 2021 to Question 73813 on smarter working practices in his department, whether the current project to embed new ways of working scheduled to complete at the end of Q1 in financial year 2021-22 has completed; and whether the planned reassessment has begun.

It has come to my attention that the information provided in response to Question 73813 contained an error. The current project to embed new ways of working is scheduled to complete at the end of Q1 in financial year 2022-23, not 2021-22 as previously stated. The planned reassessment will begin following this.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the data on rateable properties published by the Valuation Office Agency (VOA) on 10 June 2021 on mean and median rateable value by property type, Table SOP1.2 of that release, if he will publish the (a) counts, (b) mean and (c) median values by English region for each property type.

The Valuation Office Agency (VOA) will publish data on counts, mean and median rateable value for both special category and property type by English region in due course. VOA statistics can be found on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/valuation-office-agency/about/statistics

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the data on rateable properties published by the Valuation Office Agency (VOA) on 10 June 2021 on mean and median rateable value by special category, Table SC1.1 of that release, if he will publish the (a) counts, (b) mean and (c) median values by English region for each special category.

The Valuation Office Agency (VOA) will publish data on counts, mean and median rateable value for both special category and property type by English region in due course. VOA statistics can be found on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/valuation-office-agency/about/statistics

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 19 November 2021 to Question 75874, on which dates on and after 1 July 2021 the Chief Secretary to the Treasury has (a) met, and (b) spoken with, the Police and Crime Commissioner for Cleveland.

Details of HMT Ministers’ official meetings with external organisations are published and can be found on Gov.uk. Details of meetings from 1 July onwards will be published in due course.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps HMRC has taken to help improve the rate at which checks are performed on goods imported into the UK in each of the last twelve months.

The Government’s priority is to keep goods moving and avoid delays at the border. HMRC use a risk based and intelligence-led response to compliance issues, working alongside Border Force.

As the Government has made consistently clear, we will not compromise on the security of the UK at the border. Keeping goods flowing over the border is of vital importance.

HMRC, Border Force and other Government departments make targeted interventions. These are based on intelligence and threat assessment and will typically involve documentary checks and physical interventions, designed, wherever possible, to avoid delaying traffic flows across the border.

HMRC will continue to work closely with industry to ensure interventions are carried out in a way that minimises delays and additional burdens for legitimate trade, while robustly ensuring compliance.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what lessons have been learned by HMRC as a result of the time taken for imported good to pass through ports in December 2020.

December 2020 saw the end of the transition period coinciding with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including requirements for HGV drivers to have COVID tests before entering France. During that time, the Government remained focused on keeping goods moving and avoiding delays at the border.

The Government’s priority continues to be to keep goods moving and avoid delays at the border, but as the Government has made consistently clear, we will not compromise on the security of the UK at the border.

HMRC continues to use a risk based and intelligence-led response to compliance issues, working alongside Border Force to ensure interventions are carried out in a way that minimises delays and additional burdens for legitimate trade, while robustly ensuring compliance.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on which dates in the last six months the Chief Secretary to the Treasury has (a) met and (b) spoken to the Police and Crime Commissioner for Cleveland.

Details of HMT Ministers’ official meetings with external organisations are published and can be found on Gov.uk

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on which dates in the last six months each of the Ministers in his Department (a) met and (b) spoke to (i) directors and (ii) other representatives of Aquind Energy.

Details of HMT Ministers’ official meetings with external organisations can be found here: www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 4 November 2021 to Question 67134 on Budgets: Disclosure of Information, with what regularity all staff are reminded of the security and integrity of the Budget and the Spending review process; by what means such a message is made; when such a message was most recently made to all staff ahead of the October 2021 budget; whether such messages are made in writing; and if he will publish a sample of such a message, along with details of the persons to whom it was addressed and by whom it was sent.

The security and integrity of the Budget and Spending Review process is of the utmost importance to the Treasury and is reiterated regularly to all staff.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 27 October to Question 61147, by what date in 2022 the Treasury will have completed the implementation of smarter working.

The work HMT is undertaking to embed new ways of working adopting smarter working principles is currently scheduled to complete at the end of Q1 in FY21/22.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 27 October 2021 to Question 61147 on Treasury: Staff, what information he (a) has collected, (b) is collecting and (c) plans to collect in order to (i) establish a baseline against which the implementation of smarter working by 2022 may be measured, (ii) track the progress of that implementation and (iii) evaluate the effectiveness of that implementation.

HMT started work to adopt smarter working practices pre-pandemic, and to establish a baseline, underwent an initial smarter working assessment by the Government Property Agency (GPA) in February 2020. Following this assessment which assessed HMT as a ‘new’ adopter of smarter working practices, work to adopt new ways of working has continued, adapting leadership, culture, technology, workplace and process to enable the adoption of smarter working practices. A further smarter working assessment by the GPA to measure progress is planned to take place in February 2022. The current project to embed new ways of working scheduled to complete in at the end of Q1 in FY21/22 with re-assessment planned at the end of the programme.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many jobs his Department has moved from his Department's premises in central London to Treasury North in Darlington as of 3 November 2021.

There will be at least 750 roles based at the Darlington economic campus, with the Treasury expecting to provide up to 300 of these. The Treasury’s workforce in Darlington will be made up of existing staff who voluntarily relocate from London in their existing roles and people who are recruited directly to the campus. The campus is now operational and we are continuing to work at pace to develop it as quickly as possible. The expression of interest process remains open for existing Treasury staff who wish to move, and relocations are taking place on a gradual basis. Almost all Treasury roles are advertised as available in Darlington, and we have recently run a series of recruitment campaigns exclusively for Darlington based Treasury roles. We will publish details of relocations and recruitment in HMT’s 21/22 annual report and accounts.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 29 October 2021 to Questions 63715-9 on Budgets: Disclosure of Information, what supplementary guidance he or the Permanent Secretary of his Department has produced or authorised, such that the 2013 Macpherson review wording of section 5.3 on the pre-release of the core of the Budget may be understood as only applying to tax changes with immediate effect; on what date such guidance was circulated to civil servants; by which Minister it was authorized; and whether he will place a copy in the Library.

HM Treasury takes the recommendations of the Macpherson review seriously, and has followed these in full.

Security and integrity of the Budget and the Spending review process is of the upmost importance to the department and is reiterated regularly to all staff.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury was physically present in the Darlington Economic Campus on (a) Monday, (b) Tuesday, (c) Wednesday, (d) Thursday and (e) Friday of the week commencing 11 October 2021.

All HMT offices are open and available for use. Ministers work from both the London and Darlington offices.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many (a) Treasury and (b) non-Treasury civil servants were physically present and working in the Economic Campus in Darlington on (i) Monday, (ii) Tuesday, (iii) Wednesday, (iv) Thursday and (v) Friday in the week commencing 11 October 2021 in which the Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury was working in that campus.

All HMT offices are open and available for use by HMT staff. We are not able to share separate breakdowns by location and do not hold information on non-HMT staff use of the Darlington economic campus.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph A.29 of the Office for Budget Responsibility's report on the Economic and Fiscal Outlook, published in October 2021, what assessment he has made of validity of the assumption used in that report that the effect of freeports will be to alter the location rather than the volume of economic activity.

Our focus has been to encourage new investment to create new businesses and new economic activity.

When designating Freeports we required bidders to explain how their choice of tax site locations minimises displacement of economic activity from wider local areas, especially other economically disadvantaged areas. The OBR recognised this in their Economic and Fiscal Outlook.

As announced at the Budget, the first Freeport tax sites will be designated on 19 November.

We are already seeing positive evidence of new investment at Freeports. For example, DP World announced an investment of £300 million to support Thames Freeport, while GE Renewable Energy plans to bring their new blade manufacturing plant to Teesport and Siemens Gamesa are investing £186m in expanding their offshore blade manufacturing plant in Hull.

There will be a monitoring and evaluation programme to ensure that Freeports deliver on their objectives and present good value for money.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the recommendation of Sir Nicholas Macpherson's 2013 review of pre-Budget announcements that the Treasury introduces a ban on the pre-release of the core of the Budget (and Autumn Statement), that is: the economic and fiscal projections, the fiscal judgement and individual tax rates, reliefs and allowances, for what reason his Department disclosed to the Telegraph, ahead of the 2021 Budget, plans to announce in the Budget that companies investing in greener environmentally-friendly ships will also be prioritised for the tax regime; and if he will make a statement.

HM Treasury takes the recommendations of the Macpherson review seriously, and has followed these in full.

The reforms to the UK’s Tonnage Tax regime which the Honourable lady has asked about have been announced months before they come into force in April 2022.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the recommendation of Sir Nicholas Macpherson's 2013 review of pre-Budget announcements that the Treasury introduces a ban on the pre-release of the core of the Budget (and Autumn Statement), that is: the economic and fiscal projections, the fiscal judgement and individual tax rates, reliefs and allowances, for what reason his Department disclosed to the Telegraph ahead of the 2021 Budget that shipping firms flying the Red Ensign will stand a better chance from April next year of being accepted when applying for the UK’s tonnage tax regime; and if he will make a statement.

HM Treasury takes the recommendations of the Macpherson review seriously, and has followed these in full.

The reforms to the UK’s Tonnage Tax regime which the Honourable lady has asked about have been announced months before they come into force in April 2022.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the recommendation of Sir Nicholas Macpherson's 2013 review of pre-Budget announcements that the Treasury introduces a ban on the pre-release of the core of the Budget (and Autumn Statement), that is: the economic and fiscal projections, the fiscal judgement and individual tax rates, reliefs and allowances, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on share values or market sentiment of his decision to release to the Telegraph before announcing to the House that companies investing in greener environmentally-friendly ships will also be prioritised for the tax regime; and if he will make a statement.

HM Treasury takes the recommendations of the Macpherson review seriously, and has followed these in full.

The reforms to the UK’s Tonnage Tax regime which the Honourable lady has asked about have been announced months before they come into force in April 2022.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the recommendation made by Sir Nicholas Macpherson in his 2013 review of pre-Budget announcements, that the Treasury introduces a ban on the pre-release of the core of the Budget (and Autumn Statement), that is: the economic and fiscal projections, the fiscal judgement and individual tax rates, reliefs and allowances, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on share values or market sentiment of his decision to release to the Telegraph before announcing to the House that Shipping firms flying the Red Ensign will stand a better chance from April 2022 of being accepted when applying for the UK’s tonnage tax regime; and if he will make a statement.

HM Treasury takes the recommendations of the Macpherson review seriously, and has followed these in full.

The reforms to the UK’s Tonnage Tax regime which the Honourable lady has asked about have been announced months before they come into force in April 2022.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he has taken to ensure staff employed as special advisors in his Department, and in his Press Office, are familiar with the findings of Sir Nicholas Macpherson's 2013 review into pre-budget announcements; whether the review's recommendation that the Treasury introduces a ban on the pre-release of the core of the Budget (and Autumn Statement), that is: the economic and fiscal projections, the fiscal judgement and individual tax rates, reliefs and allowances, remains his Department's policy; and if he will make a statement.

HM Treasury takes the recommendations of the Macpherson review seriously, and has followed these in full.

The reforms to the UK’s Tonnage Tax regime which the Honourable lady has asked about have been announced months before they come into force in April 2022.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
22nd Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the mean proportion is of officials in his Department physically working in their office whose office is in (a) Darlington and (b) London on each day in each of the last three months; and what information on staff working patterns his Department is collecting to understand and plan for accommodation and facilities.

The Treasury does not hold the information requested.

As part of the Government Estate Strategy, the Treasury has agreed a commitment, along with all departments and their executive agencies, to implement smarter working by 2022. As part of the department’s work with the Government Property Agency on this important public sector initiative, the Treasury will consider lessons learned from ways of working during lockdown to make its final policy decisions on the smarter working remit including remote working.

The Treasury will publish its approach to managing workspace during the Covid-19 pandemic in the Performance Report of its Annual Report and Accounts as it has done in 2019/20 and 2020/21.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many jobs his Department has moved from his Department's premises in central London to Treasury North in Darlington as at 3 October 2021.

There will be at least 750 roles based at the Darlington economic campus, with the Treasury expecting to provide up to 300 of these. The Treasury’s workforce in Darlington will be made up of existing staff who voluntarily relocate from London in their existing roles and people who are recruited directly to the campus. The expression of interest process remains open for existing Treasury staff who wish to move, and relocations are taking place on a gradual basis. Almost all Treasury roles are advertised as available in Darlington, and we have launched a series of recruitment campaigns exclusively for Darlington based Treasury roles. We are working at pace to establish the campus as quickly as possible and will publish details of relocations and recruitment in HMT’s 21/22 annual report and accounts.
Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many of his Department's roles have been moved out of central London in the last (a) 12 months, (b) six months and (c) three months; and how many of those roles have been filled by staff (i) of his Department who previously filled that same role when the role was located in central London, (ii) who previously worked for his Department in other roles and (iii) who have not previously worked for his Department.

There will be at least 750 roles based at the Darlington economic campus, with the Treasury expecting to provide up to 300 of these. The Treasury’s workforce in Darlington will be made up of existing staff who voluntarily relocate from London in their existing roles and people who are recruited directly to the campus. The expression of interest process remains open for existing Treasury staff who wish to move, and relocations are taking place on a gradual basis. Almost all Treasury roles are advertised as available in Darlington, and we have launched a series of recruitment campaigns exclusively for Darlington based Treasury roles. We are working at pace to establish the campus as quickly as possible and will publish details of relocations and recruitment in HMT’s 21/22 annual report and accounts.
Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Department's policy on the super-deduction announced on 3 March 2021 setting out a new 130 per cent first-year capital allowance for qualifying plant and machinery assets and a 50 per cent first-year allowance for qualifying special rate assets, whether he has made an estimate of the number of firms that are likely to take up that allowance for investment in plant and machinery in (a) England, broken down by each region, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland, (d) Northern Ireland and (e) in the UK during the financial years (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23.

A geographical breakdown of the number of businesses taking up these allowances in 2021-22 and 2022-23 will not be available until HMRC has received and processed the relevant tax returns.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate he has made of the total amount which is due to HM Revenue and Customs as a result of tax credit overpayments.

The most recent estimate of the total amount due from Tax Credits overpayments was published in October 2020 in the 2019/20 HM Revenue and Customs Annual Report and Accounts as £4.8 billion as at 31 March 2020.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many financing arrangements have been made by the National Infrastructure Bank (a) since it was set up and (b) in each month of its operation; and what is (i) the total amount of financing advanced (i) since it was set up and (ii) in each month of its operation.

The UK Infrastructure Bank (UKIB) launched in June and is open for business. The UKIB is actively engaging with the private sector and local authorities and is in live conversations about a number of projects. UKIB has taken over management of the UK Guarantee Scheme, consisting of 9 guarantees totalling £1.8 billion of Treasury-backed infrastructure bonds and loans, supporting over £4 billion worth of investment. The Bank also operates the Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund and the Digital Infrastructure Investment Fund – previously managed by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many staff on a (a) FTE and (b) headcount basis work for the National Infrastructure Bank (i) as at 1 October 2021 and (ii) for each month of its operation.

The UK Infrastructure Bank (UKIB) formally launched on 17th June 2020. The UKIB will publish details of its headcount in the usual way in their first set of Annual Reports & Accounts, due to be published next year.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the HMRC policy paper entitled, Temporary increase in annual investment allowance for plant and machinery, published 3 March 2021, whether he has made an estimate of the number of firms likely to invest more than £1 million in plant and machinery in (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland, (d) Northern Ireland and (e) in the UK during the 2021-22 financial year.

The temporary increase in the limit of annual investment allowance (AIA) from £200,000 to £1,000,000 for expenditure on plant and machinery incurred during the period of 1 January to 31 December 2021 was estimated to impact 31,500 businesses.

A geographical breakdown of the number of businesses by levels of capital expenditure in 2021-22 will not be available until HMRC has received and processed the relevant tax returns.
Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 86 in the technical annex of the Government's September 2021 publication, Building Back Better: Our plan for Health and Social Care, whether the Government's plan to compensate departments and other public sector employers in England at the Spending Review for the increased cost of the health and social care levy will extend to covering employment costs incurred by private companies delivering NHS services.

The Government intends to compensate departments and other public sector employers in England at the Spending Review for the increased cost of the Health and Social Care Levy, and provide Barnett consequentials on this funding to the devolved administrations. Further details on the approach to this compensation will be set out at the conclusion of the Spending Review on 27 October 2021.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 86 in the technical annex of the Government's September 2021 publication, Building Back Better: Our plan for Health and Social Care, whether the Government's plan to compensate departments and other public sector employers in England at the Spending Review for the increased cost of the health and social care levy will extend to compensating charities delivering public services under contract to local authorities.

The Government intends to compensate departments and other public sector employers in England at the Spending Review for the increased cost of the Health and Social Care Levy, and provide Barnett consequentials on this funding to the devolved administrations. Further details on the approach to this compensation will be set out at the conclusion of the Spending Review on 27 October 2021.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 86 in the technical annex of the Government's September 2021 publication, Building Back Better: Our plan for Health and Social Care, whether the Government's plan to compensate departments and other public sector employers in England at the Spending Review for the increased cost of the health and social care levy will extend to providing that support to further education colleges in England.

The Government intends to compensate departments and other public sector employers in England at the Spending Review for the increased cost of the Health and Social Care Levy, and provide Barnett consequentials on this funding to the devolved administrations. Further details on the approach to this compensation will be set out at the conclusion of the Spending Review on 27 October 2021.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 86 in the technical annex of the Government's September 2021 publication, Building Back Better: Our plan for Health and Social Care, whether the Government's plan to compensate departments and other public sector employers in England at the Spending Review for the increased cost of the health and social care levy will extend to providing that support to childcare providers in England.

The Government intends to compensate departments and other public sector employers in England at the Spending Review for the increased cost of the Health and Social Care Levy, and provide Barnett consequentials on this funding to the devolved administrations. Further details on the approach to this compensation will be set out at the conclusion of the Spending Review on 27 October 2021.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 86 in the technical annex of the Government's September 2021 publication, Building Back Better: Our plan for Health and Social Care, whether the Government's plan to compensate departments and other public sector employers in England at the Spending Review for the increased cost of the health and social care levy will extend to providing that support to universities.

The Government intends to compensate departments and other public sector employers in England at the Spending Review for the increased cost of the Health and Social Care Levy, and provide Barnett consequentials on this funding to the devolved administrations. Further details on the approach to this compensation will be set out at the conclusion of the Spending Review on 27 October 2021.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many roles have been moved out of central London by his Department in the last (a) six and (b) three months; and how many of those roles have been filled by staff (i) of his Department who previously filled that same role when it was located in central London, (ii) who previously worked for his Department in other roles and (iii) who have not previously worked for his Department.

There will be at least 750 roles based at the Darlington economic campus, with the Treasury expecting to provide 200 – 300 of these. The Treasury’s workforce in Darlington will be made up of existing staff who voluntarily relocate from London in their existing roles and people who are recruited directly to the campus. An expression of interest process is open for existing Treasury staff who wish to move, and relocations are taking place on a gradual basis. Almost all Treasury roles are now being advertised as available in Darlington, and we have begun recruitment campaigns exclusively for Darlington based Treasury roles. We are working at pace to establish the campus as quickly as possible and will publish details of relocations and recruitment in HMT’s 21/22 annual report and accounts.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many jobs his Department has moved from his Department's premises in central London to Treasury North in Darlington as at 3 September 2021.

There will be at least 750 roles based at the Darlington economic campus, with the Treasury expecting to provide 200 – 300 of these. The Treasury’s workforce in Darlington will be made up of existing staff who voluntarily relocate from London in their existing roles and people who are recruited directly to the campus. An expression of interest process is open for existing Treasury staff who wish to move, and relocations are taking place on a gradual basis. Almost all Treasury roles are now being advertised as available in Darlington, and we have begun recruitment campaigns exclusively for Darlington based Treasury roles. We are working at pace to establish the campus as quickly as possible and will publish details of relocations and recruitment in HMT’s 21/22 annual report and accounts.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the mean proportion is of officials of his Department physically working in their office as opposed to working from home or elsewhere whose office is in (a) Darlington and (b) London, on each day in each of the last three months.

Our offices are open and the majority of HMT staff have worked in our offices at some point over the last 3 months. We do not have separate breakdowns for new offices.
Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
8th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 8 July 2021 to Question 27140 on Treasury: Buildings and with reference to the staffing of the Darlington Economic Campus, what estimate he has made of the number of existing roles that will be moved to Darlington from each of the (a) Department for International Trade, (b) Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, (c) Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and (d) Office for National Statistics; from which existing office locations those jobs will be moved; what estimate he has made of the number of new jobs that will be created in Darlington in each of the (a) Department for International Trade, (b) Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, (c) Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, and (d) Office for National Statistics; what the timescale is for those departments moving work to the Darlington Economic Campus; and if he will make a statement.

The Darlington economic campus is an important part of the government’s wider Places for Growth programme, which aims to move 22,000 Civil Servants out of London by 2030. There will be at least 750 roles relocated to Darlington from across HM Treasury, the Department for International Trade, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, and the Office for National Statistics. The roles across the campus will be filled through both voluntary relocations of existing staff and direct recruitment. The economic campus will have a phased opening and all departments are working at pace to establish the campus as quickly as possible. The estimated number of roles to be based in Darlington by Department and timescales for moves will be announced by those Departments in due course.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury's Answer of 5 July 2021 to Question 23171 on Treasury: Buildings, which part or parts of Government other than the Treasury will be deploying the remaining 450 to 550 staff to the Darlington economic campus; and if he will make a statement.

There will be at least 750 roles based in the Darlington Economic Campus. In addition to HM Treasury, there will be roles from the Department for International Trade, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, and the Office for National Statistics.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 1 July 2021 to Question 23166 on Treasury: Email, if he will place in the Library a copy of all the Acceptable Use policies currently in force for technology used by HM Treasury civil servants and special advisers.

It is Departmental policy not to publish the content of our security related policies externally.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in his Department; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in UK Government Investments; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in UK Asset Resolution Limited; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in the Royal Mint; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in the Payment Systems Regulator; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in the Infrastructure and Projects Authority; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in the Financial Conduct Authority; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in The Crown Estate; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in Reclaim Fund Ltd; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260, on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in the UK Debt Management Office; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic by the National Infrastructure Commission; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in the Government Internal Audit Agency; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic at National Savings and Investments; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in the Government Actuary's Department; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that using an approach which threatens to ‘fire and rehire’ staff is not acceptable as a negotiation tactic. HM Treasury is committed to maintaining the reputation of the Civil Service as a good employer and does not use this approach as a negotiation tactic.

Government departments are responsible for ensuring that terms and conditions of employment for civil servants are in accordance with the rules of Civil Service Management Code. The Civil Service Management Code only binds organisations that employ civil servants. Departments covered by the Civil Service Management Code are obliged to submit to the Cabinet Office workforce proposals or arrangements which are contentious or raise questions of propriety (which is made clear in paragraph 4).

Our Arm's Length Bodies (ALBs) are responsible for managing their own staff but are governed by the Framework document that sets out the remit and governance arrangements for each ALB. ALBs are also governed by the Civil Service Management Code if they employ Civil Servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2021 to Question 15260 on Civil Service Agencies: Standards, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that fire and rehire is not being used as a negotiating tactic in HM Revenue and Customs; and if he will make a statement.

Current recruitment policy in place does not include firing and rehiring, and there are no plans to change this. HMRC have recognised unions (PCS and ARC) with whom they negotiate if the department wishes to make changes to terms and conditions.
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has carried out a risk assessment on the secure holding of CCTV footage within (a) HM Treasury and (b) HM Revenue and Customs.

As has been the case under successive Administrations, it is not government policy to comment on security procedures in government buildings.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the mean overall proportion is of officials of his Department physically working in the office as opposed to working from home or elsewhere whose office is in (a) Darlington and (b) London in each day in each of the last three months.

Our offices remain open for those who need to use them and the majority of HMT staff have been working in our offices at some point over the last 3 months. We do not have separate breakdowns for new offices.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many roles have been moved out of central London by his Department in the last three months; and how many of those roles have been filled by staff (a) of his Department who previously filled that same role when it was located in central London, (b) who previously worked for his Department in other roles and (c) who have not previously worked for his Department.

There will be at least 750 roles based at the Darlington economic campus, with the Treasury expecting to provide 200 – 300 of these. We are working at pace to establish the campus as quickly as possible. The Treasury’s workforce in Darlington will be made up of existing staff who voluntarily relocate from London and people who are recruited directly to the campus. An expression of interest process is open for existing Treasury staff who wish to move, and relocations are taking place on a gradual basis. A Treasury Director General has been appointed to lead the new office. There are also a number of live HMT vacancies where successful candidates can choose to work from Darlington. We will publish details of relocations and recruitment in HMT’s 21/22 annual report and accounts. The campus will be fully operational by the end of this Parliament.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, as at 3 June 2021, how many jobs in his Department have moved from his Department's premises in central London to Treasury North in Darlington.

There will be at least 750 roles based at the Darlington economic campus, with the Treasury expecting to provide 200 – 300 of these. We are working at pace to establish the campus as quickly as possible. The Treasury’s workforce in Darlington will be made up of existing staff who voluntarily relocate from London and people who are recruited directly to the campus. An expression of interest process is open for existing Treasury staff who wish to move, and relocations are taking place on a gradual basis. A Treasury Director General has been appointed to lead the new office. There are also a number of live HMT vacancies where successful candidates can choose to work from Darlington. We will publish details of relocations and recruitment in HMT’s 21/22 annual report and accounts. The campus will be fully operational by the end of this Parliament.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether any departmental business within (a) his Department and (b) HM Revenue and Customs has been conducted on private email addresses; and what mechanisms are in place to ensure that full records are kept of that business.

I refer the Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

It is government policy not to comment on specific technical security controls; however, the incidental personal use of private email accounts from departmental systems is subject to our Acceptable Use policy, in spare time.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his departmental IT systems in (a) HM Treasury and (b) HM Revenue and Customs routinely allow officials, advisers and Ministers to access private email accounts from their office desktop computers, department-issue laptop computers and mobile phone devices.

I refer the Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

It is government policy not to comment on specific technical security controls; however, the incidental personal use of private email accounts from departmental systems is subject to our Acceptable Use policy, in spare time.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has referred any Freedom of Information requests received by his Department to the central Cabinet Office Clearing House on Freedom of Information requests for advice on handling in the last two years.

FOI requests are referred to the Clearing House in line with the published criteria available on gov.uk. The Clearing House, which has been in existence since 2004, provides advice to ensure a consistent approach across government to requests for information.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether HM Revenue and Customs has referred any Freedom of Information requests received by his Department to the central Cabinet Office Clearing House on Freedom of Information requests for advice on handling in the last two years.

FOI requests are referred to the Clearing House in line with the published criteria available on GOV.UK. The Clearing House, which has been in existence since 2004, provides advice to ensure a consistent approach across Government to requests for information.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Answer of 29 April 2021 to Question 188144 on Government Assistance: Coronavirus, what work (a) has been completed, (b) is in progress and (c) is planned on using the experience gained by his Department during the covid-19 pandemic to inform contingency plans for potential future pandemics, including recurrences of covid-19; and if he will make a statement.

Thanks to people’s hard work and sacrifice, supported by the success of the vaccine rollout, there is now a path to reopening the economy. We will continue to take a flexible but cautious approach as we review restrictions, ensuring support reflects the easing of restrictions to enable the economy to bounce back as quickly as possible.

The Treasury looks to learn from experience on a continuous basis across all areas of Department business, including its response to the Covid-19 pandemic. We keep all impacts and policies under review.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what work (a) Theleme Partners LLP (OC347655) and (b) partners in that company have undertaken for (i) his Department, (ii) other Departments and (iii) organisations for whose operations he is responsible to Parliament since 13 February 2020.

No work was undertaken by this company for HM Treasury, HM Revenue and Customs and their Executive Agencies in the timeframe requested.

Information for other Treasury Arms Length Bodies is not centrally available.

Procurement decisions for these bodies are made independently of HM Treasury, with each accountable officer ensuring compliance with the regulations.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of HMRC’s Large Business Directorate since its establishment in the context of his Department's 2014 strategy on Tackling aggressive tax planning in the global economy; and if he will make a statement.

The UK has been at the forefront of the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) project, which aims to curb international tax avoidance and reduce tax lost, including introducing the Diverted Profits Tax (DPT).

As at 31 March 2020, HMRC had secured over £6 billion of additional tax revenues through the impact of DPT rules, and had a further 100 investigations under way into multinationals’ arrangements considered to divert profits out of the UK, with a total amount of tax under consideration of £5.3bn.

In the March 2021 Budget, the Chancellor announced a review of tax administration for large businesses, in order to examine large businesses' experience of UK tax administration and explore improvements including for tax compliance.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will provide information on the (a) mean and (b) median duration of all enquiries concluded that year by HMRC’s Large Business Directorate in each financial year between 2014-15 and 2019-20; and if he will make a statement.

The mean and median duration in months for all enquiries concluded by HMRC’s Large Business Directorate was as follows:

Year

Mean

Median

2014-15

11.2

4

2015-16

11.2

4

2016-17

14.3

5

2017-18

12.9

6

2018-19

14.8

8

2019-20

17.2

7

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will provide information on the number of (a) active enquiries, (b) enquiries initiated and (c) enquiries closed by HMRC’s Large Business Directorate in each year between 2014-15 and 2019-20.

The information requested has been provided in the table below:

Year

Active enquiries at each 31/3

Enquiries initiated during the year

Enquiries closed during the year

2014-15

3722

3041

3135

2015-16

3875

3251

3112

2016-17

3617

2825

3109

2017-18

3302

2845

2667

2018-19

3263

1993

2551

2019-20

3220

1940

1986

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will provide information on the (a) number and (b) volume of enquiries undertaken by HMRC’s Large Business Directorate in respect of businesses of which the registered location of the parent group is in the (a) UK Crown dependencies and (b) British overseas territories, broken down by territory and dependency in each year between 2014-15 to 2019-20.

Information has been provided in the table below:

Risks Closed
During each Year Ended 31 March

2014/15

Crown Dependencies

24

British Overseas Territories

54

2015/16

Crown Dependencies

25

British Overseas Territories

50

2016/17

Crown Dependencies

33

British Overseas Territories

30

2017/18

Crown Dependencies

16

British Overseas Territories

43

2018/19

Crown Dependencies

28

British Overseas Territories

31

2019/20

Crown Dependencies

25

British Overseas Territories

31

Data in respect of individual dependencies and territories has not been provided, in order to protect taxpayer confidentiality.

Any information that could identify individual taxpayers, including aggregate information concerning a small number of taxpayers, is exempt under Section 18 Commissioners for Revenue and Customs Act 2005.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will provide information on compliance yield from activities relating to ensuring the proper payment of corporation tax in respect of the work of HMRC’s Large Business Directorate in each year between 2014-15 and 2019-20.

The Large Business Directorate compliance yield in respect of Corporation Tax is below:

Year

CT yield (£m)

2014-15

3,453

2015-16

3,650

2016-17

3,577

2017-18

2,882 (includes Petroleum Revenue Tax)

2018-19

2,608

2019-20

2,582

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will provide information on the average (a) headcount and (b) full time equivalent number of staff working on each active enquiry undertaken by HMRC’s Large Business Directorate in each year between 2014-15 to 2019-20.

The full-time equivalent number of staff working for HMRC’s Large Business Directorate was as follows:

31 March 2015

2,022

31 March 2016

2,137

31 March 2017

2,392

31 March 2018

2,338

31 March 2019

2,367

31 March 2020

2,395

The Large Business Directorate manages the tax compliance of the UK’s 2,000 largest and most complex businesses through a Customer Compliance Manager (CCM) model. CCMs are highly trained specialists, who lead teams of highly skilled tax professionals and other specialists to scrutinise these most complex and potentially high-risk business customers.

HMRC deploy their Large Business Directorate teams flexibly and their compliance professionals are likely to work on a number of different customer enquiries and tax issues at any one time. It is therefore not possible to say how many staff work on each individual Large Business Directorate enquiry.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will provide information on the total spend on compliance activities by HMRC’s Large Business Directorate in each year between 2014-15 and 2019-20.

The full-time equivalent number of staff working for HMRC’s Large Business Directorate was as follows:

31 March 2015

2,022

31 March 2016

2,137

31 March 2017

2,392

31 March 2018

2,338

31 March 2019

2,367

31 March 2020

2,395

The Large Business Directorate manages the tax compliance of the UK’s 2,000 largest and most complex businesses through a Customer Compliance Manager (CCM) model. CCMs are highly trained specialists, who lead teams of highly skilled tax professionals and other specialists to scrutinise these most complex and potentially high-risk business customers.

HMRC deploy their Large Business Directorate teams flexibly and their compliance professionals are likely to work on a number of different customer enquiries and tax issues at any one time. It is therefore not possible to say how many staff work on each individual Large Business Directorate enquiry.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish the (a) headcount and (b) full-time equivalent number of staff employed in HMRC’s Large Business Directorate in each year between 2014-15 and 2019-20.

The full-time equivalent number of staff working for HMRC’s Large Business Directorate was as follows:

31 March 2015

2,022

31 March 2016

2,137

31 March 2017

2,392

31 March 2018

2,338

31 March 2019

2,367

31 March 2020

2,395

The Large Business Directorate manages the tax compliance of the UK’s 2,000 largest and most complex businesses through a Customer Compliance Manager (CCM) model. CCMs are highly trained specialists, who lead teams of highly skilled tax professionals and other specialists to scrutinise these most complex and potentially high-risk business customers.

HMRC deploy their Large Business Directorate teams flexibly and their compliance professionals are likely to work on a number of different customer enquiries and tax issues at any one time. It is therefore not possible to say how many staff work on each individual Large Business Directorate enquiry.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether goods processed and produced in a freeport in the UK, regardless of their prior origin, are entitled to the arrangements for goods originating in the UK for the purposes of trade with the EU, as governed by the EU-UK Trade and Co-operation Agreement; and which provisions in that treaty specify that treatment.

Goods processed and produced in a Freeport and then exported are subject to the relevant rules of origin under the applicable FTA.

This means to be considered as “originating” for the purpose of the TCA, goods processed and produced in a Freeport will need to satisfy the rules outlined in Chapter 2 Title 1 Part 2 of the TCA and the corresponding Annex ORIG-2. Goods processed and produced in a Freeport will benefit from the same rights to preferential access as other UK goods.

Businesses operating within Freeport customs sites can take advantage of tariff benefits, including import duty deferral while the goods remain on site, and duty inversion if the finished goods exiting the Freeport attract a lower tariff than their component parts. The Freeport customs offer for businesses also includes the ability to import goods into customs site with the duty suspended and subsequently re-exporting without paying the duty.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the UK-EU Trade and Co-operation Agreement, whether the Government’s policy on freeports formed part of the negotiating mandate for the UK negotiators.

The UK published its opening mandate in February 2020, this did not reference freeports directly. However, all our red lines on returning sovereignty have been achieved. The most important objective - in all policy areas, not just freeports- is for the UK to have genuine economic and political independence. The Agreement leaves us in full control of our laws and preserves policy space and flexibility, including creating Freeports which when developed will empower regions across the UK to become hubs for international trade and investment.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the receipts were to the Exchequer from VAT on goods imported to the UK directly by VAT end-users, in each of the last 144 months.

Data on import VAT receipts received directly from end-users is not available. Traders do not have to declare the position whether the goods are to be used privately, as this would impose an excessive administrative burden.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the receipts were to the Exchequer from customs duty on excise goods in each of the last 144 months.

A monthly breakdown of Customs Duty receipts is available in the ‘Receipts Published’ table within the ‘HMRC tax receipts and National Insurance contributions for the National Statistics publication: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmrc-tax-and-nics-receipts-for-the-uk.

It is not possible to disaggregate this monthly time series into excise and non-excise goods through this monthly receipts data. However, information on excise duties is published at Excise duties, VAT and other indirect tax statistics: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/vat-excise-duties-and-other-minor-industry-specific-duties-and-levies.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the receipts were to the Exchequer from customs duty, excluding those paid on excise goods, in each of the last 144 months.

A monthly breakdown of Customs Duty receipts is available in the ‘Receipts Published’ table within the ‘HMRC tax receipts and National Insurance contributions for the National Statistics publication: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmrc-tax-and-nics-receipts-for-the-uk.

It is not possible to disaggregate this monthly time series into excise and non-excise goods through this monthly receipts data. However, information on excise duties is published at Excise duties, VAT and other indirect tax statistics: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/vat-excise-duties-and-other-minor-industry-specific-duties-and-levies.

25th Mar 2021
Pay
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of hours worked in the UK and paid at the rates applicable for the (a) national living wage for those aged 23 and over (in the 2020-21 financial year, 25 and over), (b) national minimum wage for those aged 21 or 22 (in the 2020-21 financial year, 21 to 24), (c) national minimum wage for those aged 18 to 20, (d) national minimum wage for those aged under 18 and (e) national minimum wage at the apprentice rate in the (i) 2020-21 and (ii) 2021-22 financial years; and if he will make a statement.

Departments and workforces set levels of pay in compliance with National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage legislation. Remuneration for private sector employees are set independently of Government, although they must also comply with the relevant legislation.

Data is not held centrally on the pay distribution of all people who deliver public services.

Latest published survey data, see below, has the distribution of hourly pay for public sector workers, comprising of workers working in organisations defined as Public Corporation, Central Government or Local Authority.

Hourly pay - Gross (£) - For all employee jobs: United Kingdom, ASHE 2020 (provisional)

Percentiles

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

Public sector

9.88

10.90

11.61

12.46

14.27

18.77

21.11

22.62

23.87

28.89

Link: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/datasets/publicandprivatesectorashetable13

Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. Estimates for 2020 include employees who have been furloughed under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of hours worked by people (a) in public bodies and (b) employed as subcontractors who deliver public services and paid from the public purse who are paid at the rates applicable for the (i) national living wage for those aged 23 and over, (ii) national minimum wage for those aged 21 or 22, (iii) national minimum wage for those aged 18 to 20, (iv) the national minimum wage for those aged under 18 and (v) national minimum wage at the apprentice rate as at 1 April 2021; and if he will make a statement.

Departments and workforces set levels of pay in compliance with National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage legislation. Remuneration for private sector employees are set independently of Government, although they must also comply with the relevant legislation.

Data is not held centrally on the pay distribution of all people who deliver public services.

Latest published survey data, see below, has the distribution of hourly pay for public sector workers, comprising of workers working in organisations defined as Public Corporation, Central Government or Local Authority.

Hourly pay - Gross (£) - For all employee jobs: United Kingdom, ASHE 2020 (provisional)

Percentiles

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

Public sector

9.88

10.90

11.61

12.46

14.27

18.77

21.11

22.62

23.87

28.89

Link: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/datasets/publicandprivatesectorashetable13

Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. Estimates for 2020 include employees who have been furloughed under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people (a) in public bodies and (b) employed as subcontractors who deliver public services and paid from the public purse who are (i) aged 23 and over and are paid less than £11 per hour, (ii ) aged 21 or 22 and are paid less than £11 per hour, (iii) aged 18 to 20 and are paid less than £11 per hour (iv) are aged under 18 and are paid less than £11 per hour and (v) are apprentices and are paid less than £11 per hour as at 1 April 2021; and if he will make a statement.

Departments and workforces set levels of pay in compliance with National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage legislation. Remuneration for private sector employees are set independently of Government, although they must also comply with the relevant legislation.

Data is not held centrally on the pay distribution of all people who deliver public services.

Latest published survey data, see below, has the distribution of hourly pay for public sector workers, comprising of workers working in organisations defined as Public Corporation, Central Government or Local Authority.

Hourly pay - Gross (£) - For all employee jobs: United Kingdom, ASHE 2020 (provisional)

Percentiles

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

Public sector

9.88

10.90

11.61

12.46

14.27

18.77

21.11

22.62

23.87

28.89

Link: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/datasets/publicandprivatesectorashetable13

Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. Estimates for 2020 include employees who have been furloughed under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people (a) in public bodies and (b) employed as subcontractors who deliver public services and paid from the public purse who are (i) aged 23 and over and are paid less than £9 per hour, (ii) aged 21 or 22 and are paid less than £9 per hour, (iii) aged 18 to 20 and are paid less than £9 per hour and (iv) aged under 18 and are paid less than £9 per hour and (v) are apprentices and are paid less than £9 per hour as at 1 April 2021; and if he will make a statement.

Departments and workforces set levels of pay in compliance with National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage legislation. Remuneration for private sector employees are set independently of Government, although they must also comply with the relevant legislation.

Data is not held centrally on the pay distribution of all people who deliver public services.

Latest published survey data, see below, has the distribution of hourly pay for public sector workers, comprising of workers working in organisations defined as Public Corporation, Central Government or Local Authority.

Hourly pay - Gross (£) - For all employee jobs: United Kingdom, ASHE 2020 (provisional)

Percentiles

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

Public sector

9.88

10.90

11.61

12.46

14.27

18.77

21.11

22.62

23.87

28.89

Link: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/datasets/publicandprivatesectorashetable13

Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. Estimates for 2020 include employees who have been furloughed under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the current number of people (a) in public bodies and (b) employed as subcontractors who deliver public services and being paid less than £10 per hour from the public purse who are (a) are aged 23 and over, (b) aged 21 or 22, (c) are 18 to 20, (d) aged under 18 and (e) apprentices; and if he will make a statement.

Departments and workforces set levels of pay in compliance with National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage legislation. Remuneration for private sector employees are set independently of Government, although they must also comply with the relevant legislation.

Data is not held centrally on the pay distribution of all people who deliver public services.

Latest published survey data, see below, has the distribution of hourly pay for public sector workers, comprising of workers working in organisations defined as Public Corporation, Central Government or Local Authority.

Hourly pay - Gross (£) - For all employee jobs: United Kingdom, ASHE 2020 (provisional)

Percentiles

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

Public sector

9.88

10.90

11.61

12.46

14.27

18.77

21.11

22.62

23.87

28.89

Link: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/datasets/publicandprivatesectorashetable13

Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. Estimates for 2020 include employees who have been furloughed under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people who deliver public services, including those working in public bodies and their subcontractors that deliver those services, and are paid from public funds at the national (a) living wage for those aged 23 and over, (b) minimum wage for those aged 21 or 22, (c) minimum wage for those aged 18 to 20, (d) minimum wage for those aged under 18 and (e) minimum wage at the apprentice rate as at 1 April 2021; and if he will make a statement.

Departments and workforces set levels of pay in compliance with National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage legislation. Remuneration for private sector employees are set independently of Government, although they must also comply with the relevant legislation.

Data is not held centrally on the pay distribution of all people who deliver public services.

Latest published survey data, see below, has the distribution of hourly pay for public sector workers, comprising of workers working in organisations defined as Public Corporation, Central Government or Local Authority.

Hourly pay - Gross (£) - For all employee jobs: United Kingdom, ASHE 2020 (provisional)

Percentiles

10

20

25

30

40

60

70

75

80

90

Public sector

9.88

10.90

11.61

12.46

14.27

18.77

21.11

22.62

23.87

28.89

Link: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/datasets/publicandprivatesectorashetable13

Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. Estimates for 2020 include employees who have been furloughed under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his timetable for reviewing the population estimates used in the Barnett formula has been affected by the changes in timing to the 2021 census in some parts of the UK.

The population numbers used in the Barnett formula are the mid-year estimates published annually by the ONS, rather than just the estimates generated for the years when the census takes place. We will continue to use these annual estimates and they will reflect information from the census once this is available.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what guidance he has issued in the last year to Ministers in his Department on the disclosure of the identity of specific private individuals in respect of published records of Ministerial meetings; what guidance on that matter Ministers currently follow; and if he will make a statement.

Providing transparency guidance is the responsibility of the Cabinet Office which publishes guidance which the Treasury, like all government departments, implements. Transparency releases are published on a quarterly basis and are currently publicly available for Ministerial meetings up to and including September 2020, which is in line with normal reporting timelines on disclosures.
Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether any refurbishments or redecorations have been requested in respect of accommodation made available by the Government to Ministers in his Department since 13 February 2020; and if he will make a statement.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer redecorated the No.10 Downing Street flat last year. It was paid for upfront and entirely at his own expense. No request was made to HM Treasury.

No request was made in respect of Dorneywood.

No other accommodation is made available to HMT Ministers by the Government.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many and what proportion of the Answers to parliamentary questions given by him or other Ministers in his Department since 13 February 2020 were prepared by, or prepared in collaboration with, contractors not directly employed by the Crown.

All answers to parliamentary questions given by Treasury Ministers are drafted by civil servants.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish a table of the advice he has requested and received from the Office for Tax Simplification under the provisions of section 185 of the Finance Act 2016 but in a manner not engaging the provisions for publication in section 186 of that Act.

It is the practice of the OTS to publish the results of both Chancellor commissioned and own-initiative reviews, including any recommendations to Government, on their website at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/office-of-tax-simplification. A comprehensive index of OTS reviews and Government responses can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/index-of-ots-reports-and-government-responses
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of explicitly including in the terms of reference for the review of the Office of Tax simplification an examination of the effectiveness of tax reliefs in the work of the Office of Tax Simplification.

Work on the review has begun, with the final report expected in Autumn 2021. It will consider the work of the Office of Tax Simplification to date and engage with a wide variety of interested stakeholders including an advisory panel containing independent, external members. The process of forming the panel is under development. More information on engaging with the review will be made available in due course.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to announce the timeline for the review of the Office of Tax Simplification.

Work on the review has begun, with the final report expected in Autumn 2021. It will consider the work of the Office of Tax Simplification to date and engage with a wide variety of interested stakeholders including an advisory panel containing independent, external members. The process of forming the panel is under development. More information on engaging with the review will be made available in due course.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, who he plans to appoint to the advisory panel for the review of the Office of Tax Simplification; and (a) on what date and (b) by what process those individuals will be selected.

Work on the review has begun, with the final report expected in Autumn 2021. It will consider the work of the Office of Tax Simplification to date and engage with a wide variety of interested stakeholders including an advisory panel containing independent, external members. The process of forming the panel is under development. More information on engaging with the review will be made available in due course.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people were charged by HMRC with tax evasion in each calendar year from (a) 2005 to (b) 2020.

HMRC are able to provide data for questions 174103 and 174107. The earliest year for which data is available is 2011-12; data as far back as 2005 is not available. In relation to questions 174104, 174105 and 174106, HMRC are unable to provide information, as this level of data is not held centrally.

The following table (Table 1) details those individuals subject to criminal prosecution by HMRC each year since records began in 2011/2012. In order to obtain the total prosecutions figures, convictions and acquittals are included.

HMRC do not hold a central count of the offences relating to individual prosecutions, and so HMRC have provided prosecution totals only for each respective year. Please note HMRC report on a financial year basis and as such they have provided the data in that format and not by calendar year.

The reduced number of prosecutions is the result of HMRC increasingly focusing their criminal investigations on the most severe fraud, where a visible deterrent is needed or where other compliance approaches are likely to be ineffective; often this is at the top end of the highest-harm and most complex organised crime and serious frauds, where criminal interventions have the most impact.

HMRC’s publicly stated policy is clear that they deal with serious fraud by using the most cost-effective civil interventions when appropriate. HMRC focus criminal investigations on those cases where the behaviour is very severe, where civil sanctions alone will not work and where a criminal prosecution will act as a strong deterrent to others. HMRC’s focus is on reaching the right outcome for the UK, rather than chasing arbitrary targets for arrests and prosecutions.

It should also be noted that HMRC are not a prosecuting authority. HMRC prepare cases to the highest evidential standard and pass the case to the relevant prosecuting authority to make a decision on whether the case proceeds to court, or not.

Table 1:

Prosecutions

Financial Year

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Total

449

576

761

709

880

887

917

749

691

HMRC are unable to provide data in relation to questions 174104, 174105 and 174106 as they only hold prosecution details at individual level. The level of data requested would be held by the various case teams on a case by case basis, but HMRC do not hold this centrally.

The following table (Table 2) details the number of individuals charged with Tax Evasion by HMRC each year since their records began in 2011/2012. The figures include all regimes excluding Drugs, International Trade, Miscellaneous : Obstruction, Money Laundering/Money Laundering Regulations (ML/MLR), Other, Other Prohibitions & Restrictions (OPR) and Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA) (or name variances thereof). Please note HMRC report on a financial year basis and as such they have provided the data in that format and not by calendar year.

However, as there will be cases recorded under those regimes which form part of HMRC’s work to tackle tax evasion, HMRC are currently reviewing how they define and report on Tax Evasion, so HMRC have also provided the total number of charging decisions over the same period, to show the full picture.

Table 2:

Positive Charging Decisions

Year

Total

Tax Evasion

2011/12

545

501

2012/13

770

739

2013/14

915

880

2014/15

1288

1254

2015/16

1135

1066

2016/17

1097

1067

2017/18

999

914

2018/19

831

757

2019/20

573

548

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many limited liability partnerships were the subject of a criminal prosecution by HMRC in each calendar year from (a) 2005 to (b) 2020; and in respect of how many total offences those prosecutions were so brought in each of those years.

HMRC are able to provide data for questions 174103 and 174107. The earliest year for which data is available is 2011-12; data as far back as 2005 is not available. In relation to questions 174104, 174105 and 174106, HMRC are unable to provide information, as this level of data is not held centrally.

The following table (Table 1) details those individuals subject to criminal prosecution by HMRC each year since records began in 2011/2012. In order to obtain the total prosecutions figures, convictions and acquittals are included.

HMRC do not hold a central count of the offences relating to individual prosecutions, and so HMRC have provided prosecution totals only for each respective year. Please note HMRC report on a financial year basis and as such they have provided the data in that format and not by calendar year.

The reduced number of prosecutions is the result of HMRC increasingly focusing their criminal investigations on the most severe fraud, where a visible deterrent is needed or where other compliance approaches are likely to be ineffective; often this is at the top end of the highest-harm and most complex organised crime and serious frauds, where criminal interventions have the most impact.

HMRC’s publicly stated policy is clear that they deal with serious fraud by using the most cost-effective civil interventions when appropriate. HMRC focus criminal investigations on those cases where the behaviour is very severe, where civil sanctions alone will not work and where a criminal prosecution will act as a strong deterrent to others. HMRC’s focus is on reaching the right outcome for the UK, rather than chasing arbitrary targets for arrests and prosecutions.

It should also be noted that HMRC are not a prosecuting authority. HMRC prepare cases to the highest evidential standard and pass the case to the relevant prosecuting authority to make a decision on whether the case proceeds to court, or not.

Table 1:

Prosecutions

Financial Year

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Total

449

576

761

709

880

887

917

749

691

HMRC are unable to provide data in relation to questions 174104, 174105 and 174106 as they only hold prosecution details at individual level. The level of data requested would be held by the various case teams on a case by case basis, but HMRC do not hold this centrally.

The following table (Table 2) details the number of individuals charged with Tax Evasion by HMRC each year since their records began in 2011/2012. The figures include all regimes excluding Drugs, International Trade, Miscellaneous : Obstruction, Money Laundering/Money Laundering Regulations (ML/MLR), Other, Other Prohibitions & Restrictions (OPR) and Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA) (or name variances thereof). Please note HMRC report on a financial year basis and as such they have provided the data in that format and not by calendar year.

However, as there will be cases recorded under those regimes which form part of HMRC’s work to tackle tax evasion, HMRC are currently reviewing how they define and report on Tax Evasion, so HMRC have also provided the total number of charging decisions over the same period, to show the full picture.

Table 2:

Positive Charging Decisions

Year

Total

Tax Evasion

2011/12

545

501

2012/13

770

739

2013/14

915

880

2014/15

1288

1254

2015/16

1135

1066

2016/17

1097

1067

2017/18

999

914

2018/19

831

757

2019/20

573

548

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many unincorporated associations were the subject of a criminal prosecution by HMRC in each calendar year from (a) 2005 to (b) 2020; and in respect of how many total offences those prosecutions were so brought in each of those years.

HMRC are able to provide data for questions 174103 and 174107. The earliest year for which data is available is 2011-12; data as far back as 2005 is not available. In relation to questions 174104, 174105 and 174106, HMRC are unable to provide information, as this level of data is not held centrally.

The following table (Table 1) details those individuals subject to criminal prosecution by HMRC each year since records began in 2011/2012. In order to obtain the total prosecutions figures, convictions and acquittals are included.

HMRC do not hold a central count of the offences relating to individual prosecutions, and so HMRC have provided prosecution totals only for each respective year. Please note HMRC report on a financial year basis and as such they have provided the data in that format and not by calendar year.

The reduced number of prosecutions is the result of HMRC increasingly focusing their criminal investigations on the most severe fraud, where a visible deterrent is needed or where other compliance approaches are likely to be ineffective; often this is at the top end of the highest-harm and most complex organised crime and serious frauds, where criminal interventions have the most impact.

HMRC’s publicly stated policy is clear that they deal with serious fraud by using the most cost-effective civil interventions when appropriate. HMRC focus criminal investigations on those cases where the behaviour is very severe, where civil sanctions alone will not work and where a criminal prosecution will act as a strong deterrent to others. HMRC’s focus is on reaching the right outcome for the UK, rather than chasing arbitrary targets for arrests and prosecutions.

It should also be noted that HMRC are not a prosecuting authority. HMRC prepare cases to the highest evidential standard and pass the case to the relevant prosecuting authority to make a decision on whether the case proceeds to court, or not.

Table 1:

Prosecutions

Financial Year

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Total

449

576

761

709

880

887

917

749

691

HMRC are unable to provide data in relation to questions 174104, 174105 and 174106 as they only hold prosecution details at individual level. The level of data requested would be held by the various case teams on a case by case basis, but HMRC do not hold this centrally.

The following table (Table 2) details the number of individuals charged with Tax Evasion by HMRC each year since their records began in 2011/2012. The figures include all regimes excluding Drugs, International Trade, Miscellaneous : Obstruction, Money Laundering/Money Laundering Regulations (ML/MLR), Other, Other Prohibitions & Restrictions (OPR) and Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA) (or name variances thereof). Please note HMRC report on a financial year basis and as such they have provided the data in that format and not by calendar year.

However, as there will be cases recorded under those regimes which form part of HMRC’s work to tackle tax evasion, HMRC are currently reviewing how they define and report on Tax Evasion, so HMRC have also provided the total number of charging decisions over the same period, to show the full picture.

Table 2:

Positive Charging Decisions

Year

Total

Tax Evasion

2011/12

545

501

2012/13

770

739

2013/14

915

880

2014/15

1288

1254

2015/16

1135

1066

2016/17

1097

1067

2017/18

999

914

2018/19

831

757

2019/20

573

548

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many corporations were the subject of a criminal prosecution by HMRC in each calendar year from (a) 2005 to (b) 2020; and in respect of how many total offences those prosecutions were so brought in each of those years.

HMRC are able to provide data for questions 174103 and 174107. The earliest year for which data is available is 2011-12; data as far back as 2005 is not available. In relation to questions 174104, 174105 and 174106, HMRC are unable to provide information, as this level of data is not held centrally.

The following table (Table 1) details those individuals subject to criminal prosecution by HMRC each year since records began in 2011/2012. In order to obtain the total prosecutions figures, convictions and acquittals are included.

HMRC do not hold a central count of the offences relating to individual prosecutions, and so HMRC have provided prosecution totals only for each respective year. Please note HMRC report on a financial year basis and as such they have provided the data in that format and not by calendar year.

The reduced number of prosecutions is the result of HMRC increasingly focusing their criminal investigations on the most severe fraud, where a visible deterrent is needed or where other compliance approaches are likely to be ineffective; often this is at the top end of the highest-harm and most complex organised crime and serious frauds, where criminal interventions have the most impact.

HMRC’s publicly stated policy is clear that they deal with serious fraud by using the most cost-effective civil interventions when appropriate. HMRC focus criminal investigations on those cases where the behaviour is very severe, where civil sanctions alone will not work and where a criminal prosecution will act as a strong deterrent to others. HMRC’s focus is on reaching the right outcome for the UK, rather than chasing arbitrary targets for arrests and prosecutions.

It should also be noted that HMRC are not a prosecuting authority. HMRC prepare cases to the highest evidential standard and pass the case to the relevant prosecuting authority to make a decision on whether the case proceeds to court, or not.

Table 1:

Prosecutions

Financial Year

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Total

449

576

761

709

880

887

917

749

691

HMRC are unable to provide data in relation to questions 174104, 174105 and 174106 as they only hold prosecution details at individual level. The level of data requested would be held by the various case teams on a case by case basis, but HMRC do not hold this centrally.

The following table (Table 2) details the number of individuals charged with Tax Evasion by HMRC each year since their records began in 2011/2012. The figures include all regimes excluding Drugs, International Trade, Miscellaneous : Obstruction, Money Laundering/Money Laundering Regulations (ML/MLR), Other, Other Prohibitions & Restrictions (OPR) and Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA) (or name variances thereof). Please note HMRC report on a financial year basis and as such they have provided the data in that format and not by calendar year.

However, as there will be cases recorded under those regimes which form part of HMRC’s work to tackle tax evasion, HMRC are currently reviewing how they define and report on Tax Evasion, so HMRC have also provided the total number of charging decisions over the same period, to show the full picture.

Table 2:

Positive Charging Decisions

Year

Total

Tax Evasion

2011/12

545

501

2012/13

770

739

2013/14

915

880

2014/15

1288

1254

2015/16

1135

1066

2016/17

1097

1067

2017/18

999

914

2018/19

831

757

2019/20

573

548

23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people were the subject of a criminal prosecution by HMRC in each calendar year from (a) 2005 to (b) 2020; and in respect of how many offences those prosecutions were so brought in each of those years.

HMRC are able to provide data for questions 174103 and 174107. The earliest year for which data is available is 2011-12; data as far back as 2005 is not available. In relation to questions 174104, 174105 and 174106, HMRC are unable to provide information, as this level of data is not held centrally.

The following table (Table 1) details those individuals subject to criminal prosecution by HMRC each year since records began in 2011/2012. In order to obtain the total prosecutions figures, convictions and acquittals are included.

HMRC do not hold a central count of the offences relating to individual prosecutions, and so HMRC have provided prosecution totals only for each respective year. Please note HMRC report on a financial year basis and as such they have provided the data in that format and not by calendar year.

The reduced number of prosecutions is the result of HMRC increasingly focusing their criminal investigations on the most severe fraud, where a visible deterrent is needed or where other compliance approaches are likely to be ineffective; often this is at the top end of the highest-harm and most complex organised crime and serious frauds, where criminal interventions have the most impact.

HMRC’s publicly stated policy is clear that they deal with serious fraud by using the most cost-effective civil interventions when appropriate. HMRC focus criminal investigations on those cases where the behaviour is very severe, where civil sanctions alone will not work and where a criminal prosecution will act as a strong deterrent to others. HMRC’s focus is on reaching the right outcome for the UK, rather than chasing arbitrary targets for arrests and prosecutions.

It should also be noted that HMRC are not a prosecuting authority. HMRC prepare cases to the highest evidential standard and pass the case to the relevant prosecuting authority to make a decision on whether the case proceeds to court, or not.

Table 1:

Prosecutions

Financial Year

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Total

449

576

761

709

880

887

917

749

691

HMRC are unable to provide data in relation to questions 174104, 174105 and 174106 as they only hold prosecution details at individual level. The level of data requested would be held by the various case teams on a case by case basis, but HMRC do not hold this centrally.

The following table (Table 2) details the number of individuals charged with Tax Evasion by HMRC each year since their records began in 2011/2012. The figures include all regimes excluding Drugs, International Trade, Miscellaneous : Obstruction, Money Laundering/Money Laundering Regulations (ML/MLR), Other, Other Prohibitions & Restrictions (OPR) and Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA) (or name variances thereof). Please note HMRC report on a financial year basis and as such they have provided the data in that format and not by calendar year.

However, as there will be cases recorded under those regimes which form part of HMRC’s work to tackle tax evasion, HMRC are currently reviewing how they define and report on Tax Evasion, so HMRC have also provided the total number of charging decisions over the same period, to show the full picture.

Table 2:

Positive Charging Decisions

Year

Total

Tax Evasion

2011/12

545

501

2012/13

770

739

2013/14

915

880

2014/15

1288

1254

2015/16

1135

1066

2016/17

1097

1067

2017/18

999

914

2018/19

831

757

2019/20

573

548

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 22 March 2021 Question 170613, on Revenue and Customs: Staff, when HMRC plans to complete the development of the operational processes required to support the introduction of freeports; and if he will make a statement.

The Chancellor has set out that the first freeports will be open for business in 2021. Initial tax reliefs are planned to be implemented from April 2021 and the ambition is for freeports to be operational from Autumn 2021.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many self-assessment forms in respect of the tax year 2019-2020 have been submitted late as at 19 March 2021; and how that compares with the volume of late returns (a) in total, and (b) 19 March in each of the last ten years.

HMRC do not have complete figures readily available for the number of self-assessment forms submitted late.

Taxpayers who are sent a notice to file after 31 October will have a filing deadline after 31 January.

It would take additional processing to establish precisely which returns are late, and additional analysis to separate paper returns from some other types of Income Tax Self-Assessment contact in HMRC’s administrative data.

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many additional FTE staff HMRC plans to recruit or transfer internally to deal with taxation, duty, excise and customs issues pertaining solely to freeports, in the financial year (a) 2021-22 and (b) 2022-23.

Work is in progress to develop the HMRC operational processes required to support the introduction of freeports. Once completed, this work will inform HMRC recruitment and resourcing requirements.

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 16 March 2021 to Question 164436 on Free Zones: National Insurance Contributions, when he plans to publish the draft legislation on anti-tax avoidance provisions in freeports.

The Government will publish legislation in due course and will ensure sufficient time for full Parliamentary scrutiny and approval.

The exact timing is subject to Parliamentary process and approval.

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people held at least one Premium Bond, in each of the last 30 months.

Approximately 21.9 million people have held at least £1 in Premium Bonds in each of the last 30 months between September 2018 and March 2021. This figure includes customers that held Premium Bonds in September 2018 and have maintained a positive balance of £1 or more up to March 2021.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on how many occasions guidance on the taxation of (a) individuals and (b) businesses on the Government website has been updated in each of the last 30 months.

The information requested is not recorded in the format requested and it is not possible to calculate the requested figures from the data that is held.

Guidance on gov.uk is regularly updated, including in relation to covid support schemes.

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the process is for updating guidance on the taxation of (a) individuals and (b) businesses on the Government website; and if he will outline the respective roles of (i) HMRC and (ii) the Government Digital Service.

The process for updating guidance on the taxation of individuals and businesses on the Government website (GOV.UK) is the same. Specialist content designers from HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) and Government Digital Services (GDS) work with HMRC’s policy, technical and operational specialists to take the technical and policy intent and present it as guidance that meets the needs of GOV.UK users.

HMRC own the factual accuracy of all of their guidance and can update independently, without consulting GDS, the vast majority of their guidance on GOV.UK.

A small proportion of HMRC’s guidance on GOV.UK is administered by GDS directly. This is generally the most commonly used guidance, designed for members of the public (or small to medium-sized businesses) who may have little or no experience on a given topic. GDS follow strict guidelines to make sure that Government information is consistent across departments, accessible and understandable to all. GDS own the words and user experience of the guidance they directly administer and HMRC own and assure the factual accuracy.

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls to HMRC's telephone advice lines for people completing a self assessment form were not answered by an HMRC call agent within 20 minutes on (a) 29 January 2019, (b) 30 January 2019, (c) 31 January 2019, (d) 29 January 2020, (e) 30 January 2020, (f) 31 January 2020, (g) 29 January 2021, (h) 30 January 2021 and (i) 31 January 2021.

The information requested is provided in the table below.

Date

Answered within

Abandoned in Queue

0 - 5 Mins

5.01 - 10 Mins

10.01 - 20 Mins

20+ Mins

30-Jan-19

23,354

10,109

10,400

1,681

4,656

29-Jan-19

19,290

9,615

9,986

1,119

4,041

31-Jan-19

27,841

13,178

6,309

738

4,241

29-Jan-20

27,407

7,504

1,986

1,119

2,714

30-Jan-20

25,365

3,164

8,497

1,873

4,363

31-Jan-20

13,395

10,252

11,302

3,923

7,305

29-Jan-21

8,619

3,440

5,799

8,671

5,904

30-Jan-21

1,032

1,941

2,637

4,568

2,154

31-Jan-21

724

665

820

3,591

1,608

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls to HMRC's telephone advice lines for people completing a self assessment form were not answered by an HMRC call agent within 10 minutes on (a) 29 January 2019, (b) 30 January 2019, (c) 31 January 2019, (d) 29 January 2020, (e) 30 January 2020, (f) 31 January 2020, (g) 29 January 2021, (h) 30 January 2021 and (i) 31 January 2021.

The information requested is provided in the table below.

Date

Answered within

Abandoned in Queue

0 - 5 Mins

5.01 - 10 Mins

10.01 - 20 Mins

20+ Mins

30-Jan-19

23,354

10,109

10,400

1,681

4,656

29-Jan-19

19,290

9,615

9,986

1,119

4,041

31-Jan-19

27,841

13,178

6,309

738

4,241

29-Jan-20

27,407

7,504

1,986

1,119

2,714

30-Jan-20

25,365

3,164

8,497

1,873

4,363

31-Jan-20

13,395

10,252

11,302

3,923

7,305

29-Jan-21

8,619

3,440

5,799

8,671

5,904

30-Jan-21

1,032

1,941

2,637

4,568

2,154

31-Jan-21

724

665

820

3,591

1,608

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls to HMRC's telephone advice lines for people completing a self assessment form were not answered by an HMRC call agent within five minutes on (a) 29 January 2019, (b) 30 January 2019, (c) 31 January 2019, (d) 29 January 2020, (e) 30 January 2020, (f) 31 January 2020, (g) 29 January 2021, (h) 30 January 2021 and (i) 31 January 2021.

The information requested is provided in the table below.

Date

Answered within

Abandoned in Queue

0 - 5 Mins

5.01 - 10 Mins

10.01 - 20 Mins

20+ Mins

30-Jan-19

23,354

10,109

10,400

1,681

4,656

29-Jan-19

19,290

9,615

9,986

1,119

4,041

31-Jan-19

27,841

13,178

6,309

738

4,241

29-Jan-20

27,407

7,504

1,986

1,119

2,714

30-Jan-20

25,365

3,164

8,497

1,873

4,363

31-Jan-20

13,395

10,252

11,302

3,923

7,305

29-Jan-21

8,619

3,440

5,799

8,671

5,904

30-Jan-21

1,032

1,941

2,637

4,568

2,154

31-Jan-21

724

665

820

3,591

1,608

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls to HMRC's telephone advice lines for people completing a self assessment form were abandoned by the caller before reaching an HMRC call handling agent on (a) 29 January 2019, (b) 30 January 2019, (c) 31 January 2019, (d) 29 January 2020, (e) 30 January 2020, (f) 31 January 2020, (g) 29 January 2021, (h) 30 January 2021 and (i) 31 January 2021.

The information requested is provided in the table below.

Date

Answered within

Abandoned in Queue

0 - 5 Mins

5.01 - 10 Mins

10.01 - 20 Mins

20+ Mins

30-Jan-19

23,354

10,109

10,400

1,681

4,656

29-Jan-19

19,290

9,615

9,986

1,119

4,041

31-Jan-19

27,841

13,178

6,309

738

4,241

29-Jan-20

27,407

7,504

1,986

1,119

2,714

30-Jan-20

25,365

3,164

8,497

1,873

4,363

31-Jan-20

13,395

10,252

11,302

3,923

7,305

29-Jan-21

8,619

3,440

5,799

8,671

5,904

30-Jan-21

1,032

1,941

2,637

4,568

2,154

31-Jan-21

724

665

820

3,591

1,608

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to (a) conduct and (b) publish a review of the criteria and process used to select the freeports he designated on 3 March 2021.

At Budget, the Chancellor announced 8 Freeports from 8 regions of England, as selected by the Secretary of State for the Ministry for Housing, Communities & Local Government.

The Freeports Bidding Prospectus set out a fair, open and transparent assessment process to select Freeport locations in England, informed by relevant experts across government to ensure objective and robust assessment.

The Ministry for Housing, Communities & Local Government published a note on 17 March, which set out the decision-making process for determining Freeport locations.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether any changes were made by the Government to either (a) the criteria used to judge bids for freeport status or (b) the relative weighting of that criteria, between 12 noon on 5 February 2021 and his Financial Statement on 3 March 2021.

The Ministry for Housing, Communities & Local Government published a note on 17 March, which set out the decision-making process for determining Freeport locations.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether any changes were made by the Government to either (a) the criteria used to judge bids for freeport status or (b) the relative weighting of that criteria, between the publication of the bidding prospectus on 16 November 2020 and 12 noon on 5 February 2021.

The Ministry for Housing, Communities & Local Government published a note on 17 March, which set out the decision-making process for determining Freeport locations.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 11 March 2021 to Question 164429 on Free zones, whether he is able to give a date for publication of the rationale for his decisions; and for what reason it has not been possible to publish that information to date.

The Ministry for Housing, Communities & Local Government published a note on 17 March, which set out the decision-making process for determining Freeport locations.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the level of profit shifting into the UK as a result of the corporation tax super deduction in (a) 2021-22 and (b) 2022-23.

The UK has been at the forefront of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) Project, which seeks to address the gaps and mismatches in the global tax system used to shift profits artificially to low or no tax locations where there is little or no economic activity.

The Government has already taken decisive action to ensure the UK’s tax laws remain robust and that multinational companies operating in the UK pay the right amount of tax on the profits earned here, including Corporate Interest Restriction rules (which raise approximately £1 billion a year), hybrid mismatch rules (expected to raise £900 million between 2016/17 and 2020/21) and the requirement for large businesses to provide HMRC with a country-by-country breakdown of their profits, tax and assets.

The super-deduction benefits businesses that have real physical substance (plant and machinery) in the UK, not those who try to shift profits artificially. The Government keeps the tax system under review at all times and will take any necessary action to address any emerging risks.

11th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the planned (a) FTE and (b) headcount staffing numbers will be for the new National Infrastructure Bank; and what share of that number will be based in Leeds.

The UK Infrastructure Bank (UKIB) is a new institution and will be headquartered in Leeds. The UKIB will be launched in interim form later in the Spring with the recruitment of the Bank’s Chair currently underway. Recruitment for further roles and details of overall staffing levels will follow in due course.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect the £50,000 threshold for the new small profits rate of corporation tax will have on incentives for corporations with profits just below that level to expand their worth.

From April 2023 companies with small profits, those companies with profits of £50,000 or less, will continue to pay 19%. That means that c.70% of actively trading companies will be protected from a rate increase.

Marginal relief will be available for companies with profits between £50,000 and £250,000 ensuring that the effective rate of Corporation Tax increases gradually for companies with profits over £50,000, and that only about 10% of companies will pay the full main rate.

11th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether investment in plant and machinery intended to be subsequently leased is eligible for the new 130 per cent super deduction capital allowance.

Expenditure on the provision of plant and machinery for leasing is not eligible for the new 130% super-deduction capital allowance, as is the case with other first year allowances such as Enhanced Capital Allowances in Enterprise Zones.

The super-deduction applies to investment on qualifying plant and machinery, including where that plant and machinery is for the purposes of digital transformation.

The Government takes fraud, abuse and tax avoidance very seriously, which is why the Government has taken repeated action at fiscal events to tackle fraud, abuse and avoidance in the tax system.

The super-deduction has been designed to safeguard against those risks. The legislation includes an anti-avoidance provision that applies to counteract arrangements which are contrived, abnormal or lacking a genuine commercial purpose. Further, there are existing rules that exclude connected party transactions from first-year allowances.

10th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish, for each the eight successful freeport bids, the list of Standard Industrial Classification codes which that bid identified as ones which, in accordance with section 4.4 of the bidding prospectus, were classes of businesses (a) which formed part of the bid and (b) the bid aimed to attract.

The Ministry for Housing, Communities & Local Government will shortly publish the rationale behind the selection of these Freeport locations according to the process laid out in the Prospectus.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what level of involvement the devolved Administrations will have with respect to the development of freeport policy in each of (a) Scotland, (b) Wales and (c) Northern Ireland.

We want to ensure that the whole of the UK can benefit, not just England. We remain in ongoing discussions with the DAs to establish at least one Freeport in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland as soon as possible.

It is important that a Freeport model is developed that is in the best interests of the whole of the UK and we have been engaging with the DAs in the appropriate way.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the total number of freeport bids from among which eight successful applications were announced on 3 March 2021, how many separate bids there were in total; and how many of those bids (a) were unsuccessful as a result of their proposed governance arrangements, (b) received the (i) highest and (ii) lowest score available in respect of their proposed governance arrangements, (c) received the highest score available in respect of their proposed governance arrangements and were not successful overall and (d) received the lowest score available in respect of their proposed governance arrangements and were successful overall.

The government received 18 bids for Freeport status in the England bidding process. The government has decided to create eight Freeports in England, with selection processes for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland still to be announced.

The Ministry for Housing, Communities & Local Government will shortly publish the rationale behind the selection of these Freeport locations according to the process laid out in the Prospectus.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the proposed National Insurance Contributions relief for employers in freeports employing people on salaries below £25,000, what steps the Government will take to ensure it has the power to prevent access to that support for any firms found to be abusing that relief by manipulating their employment practices, for example by dismissing staff specifically to benefit from it; which enforcement body will exercise those oversight powers; and what resources and powers will be allocated to that body to ensure it is able to discharge that function adequately.

The Government’s commitment to combatting abusive tax practices, such as avoidance and evasion, has been a key consideration throughout the design of the Freeports tax offer.

On top of existing HMRC powers to detect and pursue those who abuse the system, the Government intends to legislate for anti-avoidance provisions where employers are found to abuse this relief.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment the Government has made of the potential effect on the distribution of wages in the labour market in freeports or their surrounding areas of having a relief on employer National Insurance Contributions for salaries up to £25,000.

The National Insurance contribution relief will be key in supporting the government’s objectives for the Freeports programme, which includes regeneration through job creation. However, the extent to which the relief will affect the distribution of wages will depend on employers and will vary depending on a number of circumstances, including the location of the Freeport tax site.

The Government will publish an assessment of the broader impact of this relief in a Tax Information and Impact Note when legislation is introduced.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether nationally-secured sectoral industrial agreements covering matters of health and safety and rights at work will apply as equally to freeports as they apply to rest of the UK.

Bidders set out the proposed membership for their Governance Body in their bids. As stated in the Prospectus, final governance structures will be agreed between bidders and HMG.

Businesses in Freeports – like any other business in the UK – will have to adhere to the UK’s high regulatory standards. Our Freeport model ensures that the UK’s high standards with respect to security, safety, workers’ rights, data protection, biosecurity and the environment will not be compromised.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to each of the eight approved freeport bids announced as part of Budget 2021, whether each bid proposed that (a) one or more or (b) two or more hon. Members should sit on the Freeport Governance Body; and whether each bid proposed a role for democratically elected local councillors, elected mayors, or council leaders, on the Freeport Governance Body.

Bidders set out the proposed membership for their Governance Body in their bids. As stated in the Prospectus, final governance structures will be agreed between bidders and HMG.

Businesses in Freeports – like any other business in the UK – will have to adhere to the UK’s high regulatory standards. Our Freeport model ensures that the UK’s high standards with respect to security, safety, workers’ rights, data protection, biosecurity and the environment will not be compromised.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the assessment of bids submitted for freeport status on or before 5 February 2021, whether the process set out on pages 38-39 of the Government's Freeports Bidding Prospectus, CP 315 was followed in full; what criteria was used to ensure the process was open; whether any part of the process had its initial timeline hastened or compressed to make it possible to announce the freeports at Budget 2021; on what date the decision on the eight designated freeports was taken; and on what date spending was authorized for transport costs associated with the Prime Minister's visit to Teesside on 4 March 2021.

Specific locations were chosen according to the fair, open and transparent assessment process set out in the Bidding Prospectus.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to publish details of the submissions made by the eight successful locations in the freeports bidding process.

The Ministry for Housing, Communities & Local Government will shortly publish the rationale behind the selection of the 8 successful Freeport locations.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the announcement of eight freeports as part of Budget 2021, whether the Government plans to designate any further freeports in England, on the basis of bids submitted in advance of the 5 February 2021 bid deadline.

The government has no plans to designate further Freeports in England beyond those allocated at this time.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, which international comparisons HMRC drew upon in designing the schemes it uses to recover VAT on goods imported into the UK.

VAT on goods imported to the UK is recoverable by the owners of the goods, via their VAT return, where they are VAT registered and the goods are intended for use in making taxable supplies. Details of this can be found in Revenue and Customs Briefs 2 (2019) and 15 (2020) at www.gov.uk/government/publications, and the approach is in line with international norms.

HMRC also use the overseas refund scheme to refund import VAT to overseas businesses importing goods into the UK. This scheme is the equivalent of the mechanism used in the EU to refund VAT to businesses that are outside the EU.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many companies based (a) outside the UK and (b) in Northern Ireland were registered with HMRC in respect of paying VAT on goods sold into Great Britain on (i) 31 December 2020 and (ii) 31 January 2021; and if he will make a statement.

The table below provides the information requested on the number of companies registered for VAT in respect of paying VAT on goods sold into Great Britain.

Number of Companies Registered for VAT in respect of paying VAT on goods sold into Great Britain

Total No of Companies who were Registered

No of Companies from outside the UK who were Registered

Companies with a Northern Ireland Post code who were Registered. Note – Not all these Companies Registered will supply goods to GB.

Month of December 2020

27,615

558

492

Month of January 2021

28,378

589

367

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of changes in the requirements for the levying of VAT on imported goods on (a) volumes of international trade between the UK and other countries, (b) volumes of trade between Great Britain and Northern Ireland, (c) prices of imported goods into Great Britain and (d) the availability to consumers in Great Britain of goods not produced in Great Britain; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has provided extensive guidance on the VAT treatment of cross-border goods and services following the end of the transition period and is committed to supporting businesses to enable them to continue to trade.

As with all tax measures, where new changes have been introduced, the Government includes its assessment of the impacts of the changes in Tax Information and Impact Notes. Notes for measures recently legislated for in the Taxation (Post-transition Period) Act were published alongside that legislation.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he will publish a dataset for the take-up of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme which lists the location of every individual participating venue, including those which are part of participating chain businesses with a number of venues at different locations.

When registering for the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme, businesses agreed to names and addresses being published. This was made available publicly through a Restaurant Finder that is now closed. A separate list of the Scheme’s registration data for software developers is still available on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eat-out-to-help-out-scheme-registration-data-for-software-developers/eat-out-to-help-out-scheme-registration-data-for-software-developers. This contains the details of all establishments for businesses with 25 or fewer establishments and the names of all large businesses (those with 26 or more establishments). Large businesses were not required to provide names and addresses of individual establishments.

Not every registered establishment went on to participate in the scheme.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he will publish a dataset for the take-up of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme which provides, in respect of every individual participating venue, including those which are part of participating chain businesses with a number of venues at different locations, the number of meals funded by the scheme at each and every participating location, both (a) for each individual day of the scheme's operation and (b) in total.

HMRC are unable to provide claim details for individual businesses. There is a statutory requirement on HMRC to maintain the confidentiality of individual businesses’ affairs, with very limited exceptions, none of which applies to the information requested.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on local government finances for particular authorities in the event that existing businesses paying national non-domestic rates use Freeport status in neighbouring authorities to relocate their premises, rendering their previous premises eligible for empty relief; what estimate he has made of (a) the number of businesses that may move to existing premises in respect of either particular Freeports or the wider Freeports policy and (b) the total amount of empty relief in respect of national non-domestic rates as a result of the Freeports policy; and if he will publish the model assumptions, parameters, calculations and methods which underpin those assessments.

Tax measures have been carefully designed to avoid displacement and the government will ensure it has the power to prevent access where businesses or operators are found to be abusing reliefs

Bidders will be required to explain how their choice of tax site locations minimise displacement of economic activity from wider local areas, especially other economically disadvantaged areas.

Freeports will encourage investment from around the world and within the UK to create new businesses and new economic activity in Freeports. This will create jobs in deprived communities across the country, rather than harmful displacement.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs on the potential effect of Freeports on national security; what the outcomes of those discussions were; and if he will make a statement.

Our Freeport model ensures that the UK’s high standards with respect to security will not be compromised.

The Freeports Consultation Response committed that Freeports will adhere to the OECD Code of Conduct for Clean Free Trade Zones and the specific anti-illicit trade and security measures therein, and that the current obligations set out in the UK’s Money Laundering Regulations 2017 will be maintained.

As part of the bidding process, bidders will have to show how they will meet the minimum standard of security in customs and tax sites before being able to operate as a Freeport.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment the Government has made of the number of people able to access the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme as a proportion of the self-employed workforce.

About 5 million individuals reported self-employment income for the tax year 2018/2019. Of those, 3.4 million met the criteria for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS). However, some of these businesses will not have been adversely affected by coronavirus or will have ceased trading since the tax year 2018/2019 so will not in fact have been eligible.

The first SEISS grant supported 2.7 million individuals with claims totalling £7.8 billion. A further £5.9 billion has been claimed through the second and, as of 13 December, £4.8 billion through the third SEISS grant.

The SEISS official statistics are published on GOV.UK.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 22 December 2020 to Question 130042 on Revenue and Customs: Internet, that HMRC do not usually publish data protection impact assessments, if he will nonetheless place in the Library copies of the data protection impact assessment on the webchat facilities available on HMRC's website; and if he will make a statement.

HMRC does not routinely publish DPIAs and there is no legal requirement to do so. The DPIA for webchat contains details of HMRC’s security controls which it would not be appropriate to put into the public domain.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 22 December 2020 to Question 130037 on Revenue and Customs: Racial Discrimination, what steps he is taking to ensure the workplace is supportive, fair and welcoming for all HMRC staff.

HMRC believe that greater inclusivity is not merely good in itself, but leads to better decision-making and improved outcomes. ‘Being a great place to work’ is one of the organisation’s five strategic objectives and why they have a change programme ‘Respect at Work’, that sets out how they will achieve that objective. Examples include: ‘

  • ‘Our Commitments’, a set of principles developed with about 17,000 colleagues that guide how colleagues should treat one another.
  • An overhaul of HMRC grievance, discipline, whistleblowing and conduct policies and processes to ensure they are fair.
  • Local action plans within HMRC teams designed to create a more supportive environment.
  • A suite of learning products to support respectful behaviour in the workplace from the point of induction for new starters at HMRC.
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 22 December 2020 to Question 130034 on Revenue and Customs: Vacancies, what assessment he has made of trends in the level of vacancies and staff turnover within HMRC in the last five years.

It is not possible to provide the data requested covering the last five years because the data is not readily available.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 22 December 2020 to Question 130035 on Revenue and Customs: Termination of Employment, if he will supply the same data for each year from April 2005 onwards; and what the total headcount was in HMRC in April of each year from 2005 to 2020.

The following table details the total headcount in HMRC in April of the last six years:

Year

HMRC Headcount

April 15

64,756

April 16

67,591

April 17

69,599

April 18

65,287

April 19

64,978

April 20

64,554

In the time available, it has not been possible to provide the information requested for earlier years. I will write to the Honourable Member with the further information requested in due course, and I will place a copy of the letter in the Library of the House.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 22 December 2020 to Question 130041 on Minimum Wage: Non-payment, what estimate he has made of the (a) amount of national minimum wage (NMW) arrears identified by HMRC, (b) number of firms identified by HMRC as liable to pay NMW arrears, (c) amount of those arrears paid to workers who should have been paid them in the first instance, (d) number of workers identified as eligible for such arrears, (e) amount of arrears paid to such workers and (f) number of workers identified as eligible for such arrears but not traced and paid in each year since 2010-11.

The Government is determined that everyone who is entitled to the National Minimum Wage (NMW) should receive it.

HMRC enforce the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and National Living Wage (NLW) in line with the law and policy set out by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

The table below provides a breakdown of figures for the total amount of arrears outstanding, number of businesses and the number of workers identified by HMRC for breaches of National Minimum Wage legislation since 2010.

Year

Amount of arrears (a)

Number of businesses (b)

Number of workers (d)

2010 - 2011

£3,818.396

1,140

22,919

2011 - 2012

£3,582,685

968

17,371

2012 – 2013

£3,974,008

736

26,519

2013 – 2014

£4.645,547

680

22,610

2014 – 2015

£3,291,529

735

26,318

2015 – 2016

£10,281,396

958

58,080

2016 – 2017

£10,918,047

1,134

98,150

2017 – 2018

£15,615,609

1,016

201,785

2018 – 2019

£24,447,919

1,357

221,581

2019 - 2020

£20,836,609

1,260

263,350

In all cases where employers are found to owe arrears to workers HMRC are able to recover almost all arrears and carry out checks to ensure the money is repaid to the workers in question. Where an employer fails to pay back arrears, HMRC will take legal action through the civil courts on behalf of the worker to enforce the debt. (c, e)

Where an officer identifies arrears for workers, they may issue a Notice of Underpayment (NOU) requiring the employer to pay those workers within a 28-day period. Any worker placed on a Notice of Underpayment must be able to be contacted/traced at the time the NOU is issued. Every effort is made to trace workers, but this is not always possible if for example they have moved and left no forwarding address. HMRC are unable to provide data about workers who were not included on Notices of Underpayment. (f)

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many complaints have been made of racist behaviour in the workplace by staff in his Department in each of the last five years, by directorate.

Calendar Year

Number of complaints

2015

0

2016

0

2017

0

2018

Fewer than five

2019

Fewer than five

2020 to date

0


HM Treasury takes complaints of racist behaviour very seriously, any form of bullying, harassment or discriminatory behaviour is not tolerated, and all complaints are investigated and addressed in accordance with the procedure laid out by the Civil Service and in HM Treasury’s Dispute Resolution policy.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he made of the potential merits of the second, third and fourth grants under the Self Employment Income Support Scheme to have a ceiling for the amount of support received, rather than a ceiling for eligibility for support, similar to the model of the Coronavirus Job Retention Support Scheme.

The eligibility criteria for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) grants have been designed to target support at self-employed people who most need it and who are most reliant on their self-employment income. In addition, the first three SEISS grants have a cap on the amount of support it is possible to receive.

The first SEISS grant was a taxable grant calculated at 80 per cent of three months’ average monthly trading profits, paid out in a single instalment and capped at £7,500 in total. The second SEISS grant was a taxable grant calculated at 70 per cent of three months’ average monthly trading profits, paid out in a single instalment and capped at £6,570 in total. The third SEISS grant is a taxable grant calculated at 80 per cent of three months’ average monthly trading profits, paid out in a single instalment and capped at £7,500 in total.

There will be a fourth SEISS grant covering February to April 2021. The Government will set out further details in due course.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on how many occasions since 1 April 2020 he has asked for an assessment of adequacy of the design of the Self Employment Income Support Scheme.

The Government acknowledges it has not been possible to support everyone as they might want. The Government recognises that the rules needed to ensure that the SEISS works for the vast majority may mean that some people are not eligible for the grant. However, as the NAO acknowledges, the SEISS has been successful in supporting millions of people and protecting from large scale job losses.

The Government continues to take a flexible and responsive approach and has extended the SEISS, to provide support over the winter months.

Further, on 22 October, HM Treasury and HM Revenue and Customs announced that the Government will carry out an evaluation of the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS). This will be undertaken through 2021 and 2022. This is because self-employment data necessary to carry out a full SEISS evaluation will not be available until 2022, upon receipt of Self-Assessment returns.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many HMRC staff have been employed at sites in Northern Ireland in each quarter of each of the last five years.

The table details the HMRC staff headcount and Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) employed in Northern Ireland in each quarter of the last four years and Q1, Q2 and Q3 of 2020-21.

2016-17

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

headcount

1,507

1,504

1,754

1,871

FTE

1364.4

1344.03

1589.22

1689.73

2017-18

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

headcount

1,855

1,899

1,893

1,877

FTE

1682.09

1719.62

1713.89

1709.41

2018-19

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

headcount

1,882

1,909

1,922

2,102

FTE

1705.01

1716.86

1738.2

1809.8

2019-20

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

headcount

2,013

1,955

1,952

1,903

FTE

1820.79

1769.28

1765.97

1722.89

2020-21

Q1

Q2

Q3

headcount

1,899

1,898

2,003

FTE

1735.12

1732.85

1855.51

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much HMRC spent on staff training in (a) 2016, (b) 2017, (c) 2018, (d) 2019 and (e) 2020 to date.

The total amount spent on recruitment and staff training is £26.7m for 2015-16, £32.6m for 2016-17, £20.7m for 2017-18, £22.0m for 2018-19, and £30.8m for 2019-20. This data includes training at the VOA, which is part of the HMRC group.

For 2020/21, the HMRC group have spent about £11m on recruitment and training up until 30 November 2020, and are forecasting to spend about £26m by the end of the year. However, this forecast is subject to change.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will place in the Library copies of correspondence in which he sought epidemiological advice on the Eat Out To Help Out scheme before the announcement of that scheme.

The hospitality sector was one of the worst affected by the lockdown and the Eat Out to Help Out scheme was intended to support 129,000 businesses and help protect almost 2 million jobs, disproportionately occupied by workers who are young, female and BAME. By midnight 31 August, there had been 100 million meals claimed for as part of the scheme.

The scheme was designed in a safe and responsible manner to aid business owners who worked hard to implement the social distancing guidelines and make their premises safe. All businesses eligible for the support under the scheme were required to implement all applicable health and safety measures, including social distancing guidelines and Covid-secure guidance. The scheme was also designed to boost demand when it is typically lowest – during the week, Monday-Wednesday – rather than at the weekend when some restaurants will face excess demand. It did not include spend on alcohol due to its public health impact, which has significant economic and social costs.

The government considers the effect of all measures in aggregate, including the support scheme and targeted restrictions required, based on a range of epidemiological evidence and the expert advice of SAGE. Public Health England’s National COVID-19 Surveillance Reports over August and the early part of September showed that only a small fraction of incidents investigated were linked to restaurant settings. These reports are available on the government’s website.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that will be created by the introduction of free ports in the UK; and what (a) methodology and (b) international examples he used to calculate that estimate; and if he will make a statement.

The Freeports policy will unleash the potential of our ports, regenerating communities across the UK, attracting new businesses and spreading jobs, investment and opportunity to towns and cities up and down the country.

We have developed an extremely ambitious and attractive offer, built on engagement with industry experts and economists, examination of international best practice and public consultation.

On Monday 16 November 2020 the government published the bidding prospectus for Freeports in England, setting out further details on our proposals for the policy and inviting bids by Friday 5 February 2021.

The bids will be assessed against the objectives of the policy, with regeneration and job creation as the lead objective.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has put forward the names of (a) economists or (b) scientists to Cabinet colleagues as persons from whom a presentation on the (i) covid-19 pandemic or (ii) economic effects of the Government's response to the covid-19 pandemic should be received.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer and the Government welcome the views of relevant experts from inside and outside Government when considering the impact of Covid-19 and the economic effects of the Government’s response to the pandemic.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) provides scientific and technical advice to support government decision makers during emergencies, but we will also continue to work closely with other government departments, local authorities, Public Health England, and with intergovernmental organisations and our G7 and G20 partners overseas in efforts to respond to Covid-19. This work and collaboration takes into account the views of a range of experts, including scientists and economists, and this is the case in the normal course of policy making.

The Chancellor has put on record his thanks to the Trades Union Congress, the CBI and other business groups, for their constructive conversations around support schemes the Government has provided for workers and businesses, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS). The Self Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) was also designed after extensive engagement with stakeholders including the TUC, the Federation of Small Businesses and IPSE - The Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the evidential basis was for the level of direct support through the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme to be set at (a) 20 per cent of prior taxable profits on 24 September 2020, (b) 40 per cent of prior taxable profits on 22 October 2020, (c) 55 per cent of prior taxable profits on 2 November 2020 and (d) 80 per cent of prior taxable profits on 5 November 2020; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has provided, and will continue to provide, generous support to the self-employed during the COVID-19 pandemic through the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) The third grant, combined with up to £14,070 worth of support for each individual from the first and second grants, makes the SEISS one of the most generous schemes for the self-employed in the world.

The Government has adapted the generosity of the SEISS in line with the evolution of the virus. The Government’s policy responses are carefully designed to provide certainty and support to people and businesses across the UK to respond to the current public health restrictions.

At the Winter Economy Plan, the government announced that the SEISS would be extended, with a third and fourth grant. The third grant was set at 20% of average monthly trading profits to support businesses through a period of reduced demand. As the health context changed, this was increased to 40% and provided broadly equivalent support to the Job Support Scheme.

Following the Prime Minister’s announcement to extend the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme for the month of November, the third SEISS grant was increased to 55% to provide broadly equivalent support to self-employed individuals. Following the Chancellor’s announcement to extend the CJRS until January 2021, the third SEISS grant was increased to 80% of average monthly trading profits. This is broadly equivalent to the government contribution in the CJRS.

We continue to take a flexible approach and keep all impacts and policies under review.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the quarterly publication of data by the Electoral Commission on political donations, whether he was aware at the time of appointment of Jayne-Ann Gadhia as Chair of HMRC that she had given more than £20,000 to the Conservative Party since the 2019 General Election.

Political donations made by Jayne-Anne Gadhia were fully disclosed in the course of a fair and open recruitment process conducted by HM Revenue and Customs. The department was not required to disclose to ministers political donations made by the successful applicant and, therefore, did not do so.

The Chancellor has not met Jayne-Anne Gadhia.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on how many occasions he met Jayne-Ann Gadhia from 14 February 2020 to 20 November 2020; and what the subject of each of those meetings was.

Political donations made by Jayne-Anne Gadhia were fully disclosed in the course of a fair and open recruitment process conducted by HM Revenue and Customs. The department was not required to disclose to ministers political donations made by the successful applicant and, therefore, did not do so.

The Chancellor has not met Jayne-Anne Gadhia.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many days have (a) posts, (b) director-level posts and (c) director-general-level posts been vacant in his Department in each of the last five years.

To provide this information would be at disproportionate cost.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on what basis the upper absolute limit of trading profits of £50,000 in the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme was initially set; whether that level was affected by his estimate of the length of time for which that support would be necessary; and if he will make a statement.

The £50,000 threshold for average trading profits was designed to ensure the Self Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) grant is targeted at those who most need it, and who are most reliant on their self-employment income.

The self-employed are very diverse and have a wide mix of turnover and profits, with monthly and annual variations even in normal times, and in some cases with substantial alternative forms of income too. About 95 per cent of those with more than half their income from self-employment in 2018-19 could be eligible for the SEISS.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many HMRC staff-hours have been devoted to receiving training in each of (a) 2015, (b) 2016, (c) 2017, (d) 2018, (e) 2019, and (f) 2020 to date.

HMRC’s learning provision is delivered via multiple platforms, including a new platform rolled out in 2019.

The table below provides figures for 2014 to 2018. The data from each platform is not directly comparable, and there has not been sufficient time to reconcile the records for 2019 and 2020. In addition, the table below does not capture learning carried out without system registration; there will also be experienced staff who take self-study courses as part of continuing professional development, as well as staff who move into specific areas of work. It is therefore not possible to collate learning hours fully for all years in question.

Year

Total duration (days)

2014

126,834.77

2015

148,558.65

2016

169,255.73

2017

96,087.05

2018

85,315.14

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will place in the Library a copy of the epidemiological advice he received on the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme before announcing that scheme on 8 July 2020.

The hospitality sector was one of the worst affected by the lockdown and the Eat Out to Help Out scheme was designed to support 129,000 businesses and help protect almost 2 million jobs, disproportionately occupied by workers who are young, female and BAME. By midnight 31 August, there had been 100 million meals claimed for as part of the scheme.

The scheme was designed in a safe and responsible manner to aid business owners who worked hard to implement the social distancing guidelines and make their premises safe. The scheme was designed to boost demand when it is typically lowest – during the week, Monday-Wednesday – rather than at the weekend when some restaurants will face excess demand. It did not include spend on alcohol due to its public health impact, which has significant economic and social costs.

The Government considers the effect of all measures in aggregate, based on a range of epidemiological evidence and the expert advice of SAGE. Public Health England’s National COVID-19 Surveillance Reports over August and the early part of September showed that only a small fraction of incidents investigated were linked to restaurant settings. These reports are available on the Government’s website.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of the workforce management information published by the Valuation Office Agency.

The VOA has put processes in place designed to assure the accuracy of workforce management information before it is published.

Workforce information published in the Annual Report is assured within the VOA’s Chief People Officer Group where the information is checked, approved and signed off by the Finance Director. Further internal assurance is carried out by the Audit and Risk Assurance Committee, as well as the internal verification by the Chief Finance Officer and Chief Executive Officer. The management information is then subject to external review and clearance by the NAO. These combined provide strong assurance over the accuracy of the workforce information published in the Annual Report.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many (a) staff, (b) director-level staff and (c) director-general level staff have taken up a post in his Department in each of the last five years.

The number of staff joining the department at the levels requested can be found in the following table:

16/17

17/18

18/19

19/20

20/21*

All staff

355

443

451

473

347

Director

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

Director General

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

Fewer than 5

*The data for 20/21 covers the period April 20 to September 20

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many complaints have been made by staff in his Department of sexist behaviour in the workplace in each of the last five years, by directorate.

HM Treasury has received no formal complaints in relation to sexist behaviour in the workplace, within the last five years.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to announce details of the fourth grant for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

The Government recognises the importance of supporting the self-employed during the COVID-19 outbreak. The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) provides generous support to self-employed people who meet the eligibility criteria.

The first SEISS grant supported 2.7 million individuals with claims totalling £7.8 billion. A further £5.9 billion has been claimed through the second SEISS grant.

Applications for the third SEISS grant could be made from 30 November. The third grant covers the period from November 2020 until January 2021.

There will be a fourth grant covering February to April 2021. The Government will set out further details, including the level of the fourth grant, in due course.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will place in the Library the estimates that were produced with regard to the UK Global Tariff and freeports policy of which forms of industrial activity using the standard industrial classification would benefit most from tariff inversion in new freeports in the UK.

Freeports will benefit the UK by increasing trade, employment and investment. Firms importing goods into Freeports can take advantage of several customs benefits, including tariff inversion, alongside wider benefits. The Freeport Bidding Prospectus provides the full details that interested parties need in order to assess the benefits of Freeport status to them and join a Freeport Bidding Coalition.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many staff have taken up a post in National Savings & Investments, in each of the last five years.

Table: Number of staff NS&I has recruited in each of the last five years.

Year

Number of staff

2019-20

24

2018-19

22

2017-18

17

2016-17

21

2015-16

16

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many complaints have been made by staff of National Savings & Investments of sexist behaviour in the workplace in each of the last five years.

NS&I treats all discrimination, bullying and harassment, as misconduct and follows disciplinary procedure.

NS&I has not received any formal complaints of sexist behaviour in the workplace in each of the last five years.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the directorates are in his Department.

The information on the directorates in the department is published as part of this year’s annual report and account (page 69/70).

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many working days have been lost to staff sickness in National Savings & Investments in each month of the last five years.

The table attached provides the information requested.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many words are in the most recent assessment prepared by HMRC on the security and infrastructure that would be required solely for customs purposes on the Ireland/UK land border in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a trade deal.

As a consequence of the Northern Ireland Protocol, there is no requirement for any new security or infrastructure in respect of the Ireland/UK land border. Goods in Northern Ireland can move freely from and into Ireland and the rest of the EU without any customs checks or controls.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to update his Department's guidance, Managing public money, in response to the findings of the Public Accounts Committee on the Town Deals selection process in its report Selecting towns for the Towns Fund, published 11 November 2020.

The Government welcomes the Public Account Committee’s report on this issue and will respond to the Committee’s report in due course through a Treasury Minute.

Managing Public Money and associated guidance is reviewed and updated as necessary.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on eligibility for financial support of people who found new work on or after 31 October 2020 as a result of the planned resumption of live performances in December and January and have since been affected by the introduction of new covid-19 restrictions announced on 14 December 2020.

The Government recognises the extreme disruption the necessary actions to combat Covid-19 are having on the live events industry.

The Government has put in place an economic package of support which will provide businesses and individuals with certainty over the winter months, even as measures to prevent further spread of the virus change. This includes the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS), the Self Employed Income Support Scheme and government-backed loan schemes.

An employer can claim CJRS for employees who were employed and on their PAYE payroll on 30 October 2020. The employer must have made a PAYE Real Time Information (RTI) submission to HMRC between 20 March 2020 and 30 October 2020, notifying a payment of earnings for that employee. This means that the former cut-off date for CJRS (which was 19 March) no longer applies for claim periods from 1 November, and will now include all new employees that have been hired since, so long as their employer have notified payment to HMRC about the employee (via a Real Time Information claim) between 20 March and 30 October.

However, eligible businesses organizing liver performances may benefit from the £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund. To date, more than £790m of grants and loans have been allocated to over 3,000 cultural organisations in England. Organisations supported include theatres, performing arts, galleries, museums, orchestras, music venues, comedy clubs and festivals. This funding will help to enable performances to restart, protect jobs and create opportunities for freelancers.

The government has also provided funding to local authorities, to support both open and closed businesses through the Local Restrictions Support Grants and the Additional Restrictions Grant.

Treasury Ministers and officials are working intensively with departments like the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport in order to understand the impact that Covid-19 is having on workers and sectors.

We will continue to take a flexible approach and keep all impacts and policies under review as we respond to this pandemic.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the ending of the temporary VAT reduction on personal protective equipment on funeral director companies.

The temporary zero rate was an extraordinary measure introduced to help affected sectors (such as hospitals and care homes) during the initial shock of the COVID-19 crisis, when global supply of PPE did not meet demand and PPE was procured directly from the open market.

DHSC have now committed in the Winter Plan to provide free PPE for COVID-19 needs to adult social care until March 2021 via the PPE portal and will supply all other adult social care services that will not be supplied via the PPE portal via a combination of the local resilience forums and local authorities.

The funeral sector source their own PPE through their normal supply routes. In extreme circumstances, there is provision for them to approach their local resilience forum or local authority to discuss access to an emergency supply.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of which sectors of the economy have been most affected by increases in the cost of personal protective equipment since the ending of the temporary VAT exemption on that equipment on 31 October 2020.

The temporary zero rate was an extraordinary measure introduced to help affected sectors (such as hospitals and care homes) during the initial shock of the COVID-19 crisis, when global supply of PPE did not meet demand and PPE was procured directly from the open market.

DHSC have now committed in the Winter Plan to provide free PPE for COVID-19 needs to adult social care until March 2021 via the PPE portal and will supply all other adult social care services that will not be supplied via the PPE portal via a combination of the local resilience forums and local authorities.

The funeral sector source their own PPE through their normal supply routes. In extreme circumstances, there is provision for them to approach their local resilience forum or local authority to discuss access to an emergency supply.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to support funeral director companies to access Government stocks of personal protective equipment after the end of the temporary VAT reduction on those items.

The temporary zero rate was an extraordinary measure introduced to help affected sectors (such as hospitals and care homes) during the initial shock of the COVID-19 crisis, when global supply of PPE did not meet demand and PPE was procured directly from the open market.

DHSC have now committed in the Winter Plan to provide free PPE for COVID-19 needs to adult social care until March 2021 via the PPE portal and will supply all other adult social care services that will not be supplied via the PPE portal via a combination of the local resilience forums and local authorities.

The funeral sector source their own PPE through their normal supply routes. In extreme circumstances, there is provision for them to approach their local resilience forum or local authority to discuss access to an emergency supply.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the accuracy of the workforce management information published by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs.

There are processes in place to assure the accuracy of workforce management information before it is published. Workforce information published in the Annual Report is assured within HMRC’s Chief People Officer Group where the information is checked, approved and signed off by the Finance Director. Further internal assurance is carried out by the Audit and Risk Committee, as well as internal verification by the Chief Finance Officer and Permanent Secretary. The management information is then subject to external review and clearance by the NAO. These combined provide strong assurance over the accuracy of the workforce information published in the Annual Report.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many working days have been lost to staff sickness in HMRC in each month of the last five years, by directorate.

The tables attached detail the average sick absence working days lost in HMRC directorates from 1 April 2015–30 November 2020.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will list the directorates within HMRC.

A copy of the HMRC Organisational Structure as at 30 November 2020 is provided in the attached PDF.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will place in the Library the (a) total headcount and (b) full-time equivalent staffing of each directorate of HMRC.

The table below details the headcount and full-time equivalent staffing in HMRC directorates on 30 November 2020:

HMRC staff in post per Directorate as at 30 Nov 2020

Directorate

Headcount (a)

FTE (b)

Adjudicators Office

58

54.24

Benefits & Credits Delivery

4170

3499.67

Border Delivery Group

3

2.9

Borders & Trade

12

11.17

Borders Design to Delivery

248

243.65

Borders Strategies

44

43.72

Business Tax & Customs

4735

4312.07

Business, Assets & International Policy

467

437.61

CCG Central Services

851

833.28

CCG Transformation

37

35.86

CDIO - Core

2795

2677.99

CDIO - CSIR

235

222.59

CFO Corporate Support

88

84.17

CFO Transformation Programmes

138

130.1

Change, Assurance and Investment

32

29.82

Commercial Directorate

137

130.41

Corporate Centre

40

39.48

Corporate Finance

1344

1132.11

Counter Avoidance Directorate

1512

1389.04

COVID-19

81

78.53

CS Director General

21

19.85

CS&TD Business Architecture

17

16.73

CSG Transformation

270

255.57

Cust Exp, Professionalism, EU Transition

279

265.61

Customer Insight & Design

475

444.9

Customs & Borders Directorate

597

562.78

Customs Transformation

295

286.23

Debt Management

4722

4218.44

Estates

606

578.91

EU Transition Unit

89

87.39

EXCOM

39

24.81

Finance Planning & Performance

304

285.11

Fraud Investigation Service

4991

4721.36

Government Banking Service

34

32.82

HMRC Change Portfolio

82

78.83

HMRC Communications

262

252.86

HMRC Strategies

69

67.39

HR

1606

1488.51

Indirect Tax Directorate

299

283.83

Individuals & Small Business Compliance

9056

8484.68

Individuals Policy

306

292.8

Internal Audit

68

65.02

Investment Planning Team

42

40.39

Knowledge, Analysis & Intelligence

547

524.44

Large Business Service

2328

2187.96

MTDB Transformation Programmes

227

222.31

Off Payroll Working Programme

52

49.9

Operational Excellence & Output Mgmt

1219

1094.5

PDC Customer Strategy & Tax Design

161

149.71

PT Operations

8551

7182.51

Risk & Intelligence

3063

2851.52

Solicitors Office

1381

1295.96

Surge & ODP

544

542.5

Tax Administration

340

320.36

Tax Strategy & Professionalism

82

80.39

Total Organisational Capabilities

13

12.3

Trader Support Service (TSS)

14

13.35

Wealthy & Mid-sized Business Compliance

4024

3695.94

Other *

8

Grand Total

64110

58466.88

* There are eight people unassigned to a directorate as they are either non-Executive directors, or employees whose identity is withheld for security reasons.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many days have (a) posts, (b) director-level posts and (c) director-general-level posts been vacant in HMRC in each month of each of the last five years.

The information requested concerning the number of posts vacant in HMRC in each month of the last five years cannot be provided, as this data is not available.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many (a) staff, (b) director-level staff and (c) director-general-level staff have left a post in HMRC in each of the last five years.

The HMRC HR system does not identify the information requested by Director, or Director General grade, although HMRC can extract the information for all Senior Civil Service (SCS).

Over the last five years, 27,175 staff have left HMRC, 181 of whom were members of the SCS.

Leavers Data

Grades below SCS

SCS Grades

Total

April 2015 - March 2016

1418

2

1420

April 2016 - March 2017

2056

9

2065

April 2017 - March 2018

5982

27

6009

April 2018 - March 2019

7097

54

7151

April 2019 - March 2020

6511

45

6556

April 2020 - November 2020

3930

44

3974

Total

26,994

181

27,175

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many (a) staff, (b) director-level staff and (c) director-general-level staff have taken up a post in HMRC in each of the last five years.

The HMRC HR system does not identify the information requested by Director, or Director General grade, although HMRC can extract the information for all Senior Civil Service (SCS).

Over the last five years, 38,681 staff have taken up post, 156 of whom are members of the SCS.

Entrants Data

Grades below SCS

SCS Grade

Total

April 2015 - March 2016

8336

4

8340

April 2016 - March 2017

8720

26

8746

April 2017 - March 2018

4367

40

4407

April 2018 - March 2019

6023

32

6055

April 2019 - March 2020

5897

35

5932

April 2020 - November 2020

5182

19

5201

Totals

38525

156

38681

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many complaints there have been of racist behaviour in the workplace in HMRC in each of the last five years, by directorate.

Since 2016 there have been 38 complaints categorised under race, detailed below.

Year

Formal Complaints recorded under race category

2016

5

2017

6

2018

6

2019

11

2020 (to date)

10

Release of these figures by directorate would breach HMRC’s statutory obligations under the General Data Protection Regulation, as it could lead to identification of the individuals concerned.

The figures provided are for formal complaints recorded under the ‘race’ category. It is possible that other complaints may have included a racial element, but if that was not deemed the primary reason for the complaint it could have been recorded under a different category.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many complaints there have been of sexist behaviour in the workplace in HMRC in each of the last five years, by directorate.

Since 2016 there have been 22 complaints of sexist behaviour as detailed below.

Year

Formal Complaints recorded under sex category

2016

less than 5

2017

6

2018

6

2019

6

2020 (to date)

less than 5

On the request to break these figures down further by directorate, releasing this data would breach HMRC’s statutory obligations under the General Data Protection Regulation, as it could lead to identification of the individuals concerned.

The figures provided are for formal complaints recorded under the ‘sex’ category, which includes sex discrimination and sexual harassment. It is possible that other complaints may have had an aspect of sexist behaviour, but if it was not the primary reason for the complaint it could have been recorded under a different category.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many businesses have been investigated by HMRC for potential infractions of the National Minimum Wage, in each of the last 10 years.

HMRC enforce the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and National Living Wage (NLW) in line with the law and policy set out by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

A majority of NMW cases are subject to civil (non-criminal) sanctions, which include penalties of up to 200% of the arrears, and public naming and, for the worst offences, criminal prosecution. Prosecution does not guarantee payment of arrears to workers, can be lengthy, is expensive for the taxpayer, and is generally reserved for the most serious cases that form part of a pattern of wider criminality. Cases are referred to the Crown Prosecution Service who decide whether or not to prosecute.

HMRC have a strong enforcement record on NMW and since 2010-11?have completed nearly 25,000 NMW investigations, identifying over £100 million in national minimum wage arrears for over 950,000 workers and levying more than £59 million in penalties.

The table below provides figures for businesses that HMRC have investigated, prosecuted and the amount of fine imposed following a prosecution, totalling £27,423 for breaches of National Minimum Wage legislation since 2010.

Year

Number of businesses investigated

Number of prosecutions

Fines for prosecuted employers

2010 - 2011

2901

1

£3,696

2011 - 2012

2534

0

£0

2012 – 2013

1696

1

£1,000

2013 – 2014

1455

0

£0

2014 – 2015

2204

0

£0

2015 – 2016

2667

0

£0

2016 – 2017

2674

4

£19,500

2017 – 2018

2402

1

£2,977

2018 – 2019

3018

0

£0

2019 - 2020

3376

1

£250

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many businesses have been taken to court by HMRC for potential infractions of the National Minimum Wage, in each of the last 10 years.

HMRC enforce the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and National Living Wage (NLW) in line with the law and policy set out by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

A majority of NMW cases are subject to civil (non-criminal) sanctions, which include penalties of up to 200% of the arrears, and public naming and, for the worst offences, criminal prosecution. Prosecution does not guarantee payment of arrears to workers, can be lengthy, is expensive for the taxpayer, and is generally reserved for the most serious cases that form part of a pattern of wider criminality. Cases are referred to the Crown Prosecution Service who decide whether or not to prosecute.

HMRC have a strong enforcement record on NMW and since 2010-11?have completed nearly 25,000 NMW investigations, identifying over £100 million in national minimum wage arrears for over 950,000 workers and levying more than £59 million in penalties.

The table below provides figures for businesses that HMRC have investigated, prosecuted and the amount of fine imposed following a prosecution, totalling £27,423 for breaches of National Minimum Wage legislation since 2010.

Year

Number of businesses investigated

Number of prosecutions

Fines for prosecuted employers

2010 - 2011

2901

1

£3,696

2011 - 2012

2534

0

£0

2012 – 2013

1696

1

£1,000

2013 – 2014

1455

0

£0

2014 – 2015

2204

0

£0

2015 – 2016

2667

0

£0

2016 – 2017

2674

4

£19,500

2017 – 2018

2402

1

£2,977

2018 – 2019

3018

0

£0

2019 - 2020

3376

1

£250

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many businesses have fined following court proceedings brought by HMRC in relation to non-payment of the national minimum wage in each of the last ten years; and what the sum total was of those fines in each of the last ten years.

HMRC enforce the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and National Living Wage (NLW) in line with the law and policy set out by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

A majority of NMW cases are subject to civil (non-criminal) sanctions, which include penalties of up to 200% of the arrears, and public naming and, for the worst offences, criminal prosecution. Prosecution does not guarantee payment of arrears to workers, can be lengthy, is expensive for the taxpayer, and is generally reserved for the most serious cases that form part of a pattern of wider criminality. Cases are referred to the Crown Prosecution Service who decide whether or not to prosecute.

HMRC have a strong enforcement record on NMW and since 2010-11?have completed nearly 25,000 NMW investigations, identifying over £100 million in national minimum wage arrears for over 950,000 workers and levying more than £59 million in penalties.

The table below provides figures for businesses that HMRC have investigated, prosecuted and the amount of fine imposed following a prosecution, totalling £27,423 for breaches of National Minimum Wage legislation since 2010.

Year

Number of businesses investigated

Number of prosecutions

Fines for prosecuted employers

2010 - 2011

2901

1

£3,696

2011 - 2012

2534

0

£0

2012 – 2013

1696

1

£1,000

2013 – 2014

1455

0

£0

2014 – 2015

2204

0

£0

2015 – 2016

2667

0

£0

2016 – 2017

2674

4

£19,500

2017 – 2018

2402

1

£2,977

2018 – 2019

3018

0

£0

2019 - 2020

3376

1

£250

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will place in the Library copies of the data protection impact assessment on the webchat facilities available on HMRC's website.

HMRC do not usually publish Data Protection Impact Assessments, as there is no legal requirement to do so.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls to the telephone lines operated for taxation advice by HMRC were abandoned by the caller before reaching an advisor, in each quarter of the last five years.

It is not possible to provide comparable data for 2015-16 because HMRC changed their telecoms provider part way through the year. The data for the other years is below.

130043

130044

Taxes Helplines (number of calls abandoned by customers)

Taxes Helplines (percentage of all calls made that were abandoned by customers)

Average wait time by customer before abandoning

2016-17

Q1

Jun-16

283,568

6.75%

425 sec

Q2

Sep-16

138,762

4.10%

387 sec

Q3

Dec-16

96,601

2.80%

381 sec

Q4

Mar-17

166,170

3.68%

398 sec

2017-18

Q1

Jun-17

336,547

8.27%

337 sec

Q2

Sep-17

338,128

9.30%

312 sec

Q3

Dec-17

261,231

7.98%

317 sec

Q4

Mar-18

355,659

8.08%

317 sec

2018-19

Q1

Jun-18

394,781

10.06%

380 sec

Q2

Sep-18

296,443

8.58%

322 sec

Q3

Dec-18

295,416

9.41%

329 sec

Q4

Mar-19

386,537

9.39%

343 sec

2019-20

Q1

Jun-19

532,869

14.23%

768 sec

Q2

Sep-19

342,882

10.06%

350 sec

Q3

Dec-19

256,363

8.36%

312 sec

Q4

Mar-20

450,578

11.61%

449 sec

2020-21

Q1

Jun-20

465,585

22.47%

764 sec

Q2

Sep-20

398,630

15.58%

568 sec

HMRC publish their monthly and quarterly performance data: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmrc-monthly-performance-reports and https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmrc-quarterly-performance-updates.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion of calls to the HMRC taxation advice line were terminated by the caller before reaching an adviser in each quarter of the last five years; and what the average wait in seconds was before the call was terminated in each quarter of the last five years.

It is not possible to provide comparable data for 2015-16 because HMRC changed their telecoms provider part way through the year. The data for the other years is below.

130043

130044

Taxes Helplines (number of calls abandoned by customers)

Taxes Helplines (percentage of all calls made that were abandoned by customers)

Average wait time by customer before abandoning

2016-17

Q1

Jun-16

283,568

6.75%

425 sec

Q2

Sep-16

138,762

4.10%

387 sec

Q3

Dec-16

96,601

2.80%

381 sec

Q4

Mar-17

166,170

3.68%

398 sec

2017-18

Q1

Jun-17

336,547

8.27%

337 sec

Q2

Sep-17

338,128

9.30%

312 sec

Q3

Dec-17

261,231

7.98%

317 sec

Q4

Mar-18

355,659

8.08%

317 sec

2018-19

Q1

Jun-18

394,781

10.06%

380 sec

Q2

Sep-18

296,443

8.58%

322 sec

Q3

Dec-18

295,416

9.41%

329 sec

Q4

Mar-19

386,537

9.39%

343 sec

2019-20

Q1

Jun-19

532,869

14.23%

768 sec

Q2

Sep-19

342,882

10.06%

350 sec

Q3

Dec-19

256,363

8.36%

312 sec

Q4

Mar-20

450,578

11.61%

449 sec

2020-21

Q1

Jun-20

465,585

22.47%

764 sec

Q2

Sep-20

398,630

15.58%

568 sec

HMRC publish their monthly and quarterly performance data: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmrc-monthly-performance-reports and https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmrc-quarterly-performance-updates.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on what dates the HMRC Resources and Performance Committee has met since April 2020; and whether at those meetings the Committee (a) considered the adequacy of HMRC's level of staffing, (b) recommended an increase in staffing and (c) recommended a reduction in staffing.

HMRC’s Resources and Performance Committee met on the following dates:

  • 20 April 2020
  • 18 May 2020
  • 15 June 2020
  • 20 July 2020
  • 17 August 2020
  • 21 September 2020
  • 19 October 2020
  • 16 November 2020

The Resources and Performance Committee receives updates on HMRC’s workforce position and considers resourcing on a monthly basis to help inform ExCom. The Committee did not recommend an increase or reduction in HMRC staffing.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on what dates the HMRC Audit and Risk Committee has met since April 2020 24 July 2019; and whether at those meetings the Committee (a) considered the organisational risks of HMRC's level of staffing, (b) recommended an increase in staffing and (c) recommended a reduction in staffing.

HMRC’s Audit and Risk Committee provides assurance to the Board and the Principal Accounting Officer on the integrity of the financial statements and the comprehensiveness and reliability of assurances across HMRC on governance, risk management and the control environment.

Since 1 April 2020, the Audit and Risk Committee has met on:

  • 7 April 2020
  • 21 May 2020
  • 23 June 2020
  • 23 July 2020
  • 6 October 2020
  • 3 November 2020
  • 1 December 2020

The Committee routinely considers the Department’s corporate level risks. The Committee did not recommend an increase or a reduction in staffing.

10th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reason NS&I decided to discontinue sending paper prize warrants to winners of Premium Bonds prizes.

Since 2011, Premium Bonds holders have been able to have their prizes paid directly into a UK bank account in their name. Since March 2020, more than 750,000 customers have switched from receiving paper warrants (cheques) to having their prizes paid directly into their bank account or automatically reinvested. As of December 2020, 82.5% of Premium Bonds prizes were either paid directly into a UK bank account or reinvested back into Premium Bonds.

The decision by NS&I, announced on 17 September 2020, to pay all Premium Bonds prizes direct to customers’ bank accounts was informed by a number of factors. These included changing customer behaviors, the ability to manage Premium Bonds prize distribution more quickly, more cost-effectively and have a much lower environmental impact.

In addition, paying prizes directly to the customers bank account has significantly reduced the proportion of Premium Bonds prizes from going unclaimed. Between 2011 and end of June 2018, NS&I paid out 110,300,054 prizes by warrant. Of these 569,461 (0.5%) have not yet been cashed and are therefore deemed unclaimed. In comparison between 2011 and December 2020, NS&I have paid out 72,385,607 directly to customers’ bank account. As of September 2020, of these 8,610 (0.01%) of the prizes have not been claimed.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the age breakdown is of people holding one or more Premium Bonds with National Savings and Investments.

Table: age breakdown of Premium Bond holders as of 14 December 2020

Current age

Holding value

Number of holdings

0-19

2,339,232,544

1,186,323

20-49

15,655,632,812

4,373,746

50-79

67,168,657,879

6,275,677

80-90+

14,188,424,938

820,332

Unknown

2,620,257,254

11,049,139

Total

101,972,205,427

23,705,217

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what equality impact assessment was undertaken prior to NS&I's decision to discontinue sending paper prize warrants to winners of Premium Bonds prizes; and if he will place a copy of that assessment in the Library.

NS&I has not carried out an Equalities Impact Assessment for the operational decision to mandate Premium Bonds prizes direct to customers’ bank accounts, with notification by email or text message

The department is, and will remain, committed to having a robust exceptions policy – allowing those vulnerable customers who are excluded from doing business through digital channels to opt for paper and phone channels.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the age breakdown is of all Premium Bonds prize winners in (a) the most recent year for which figures are available and (b) the four years previous to that.

Number of customers winning prizes by year and age at time of draw

Age at time of draw

Prize winning year

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

0 - 7

58,418

51,264

47,974

44,541

48,268

54,341

8-15

127,884

121,865

118,232

105,275

108,811

114,131

16 - 19

76,245

71,707

68,674

61,989

62,695

65,048

20 - 29

238,694

211,369

197,538

171,500

164,426

164,758

30 - 39

274,319

233,201

215,303

188,873

177,352

178,391

40 - 49

357,591

323,493

315,785

299,621

301,463

315,043

50 - 59

688,877

636,967

615,902

580,711

564,163

565,019

60 - 69

918,911

866,450

852,753

825,120

832,777

848,568

70 - 79

933,362

874,944

830,634

762,068

701,447

661,476

80 - 89

461,488

438,250

415,650

382,568

359,765

339,288

90+

116,799

105,336

95,667

84,347

89,222

162,529

Unknown

329,309

348,243

364,683

348,121

378,254

422,131

Total

4,581,897

4,283,089

4,138,795

3,854,734

3,788,643

3,890,723

*Age at time for winning is based on the current age. For example, -1 for 2019, -2 for 2018 etc.

*Based on current age between 0-107, any age over 107 or null is classified as unknown

* Based on number of customers winning, not number of prizes. A customer may win multiple prizes within any year.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many paper prize warrants were sent out to winners of Premium Bond prizes in each of the last ten years; and if he will make a statement.

Table: Prizes won each year between 2010-2020 by prize payment type

Prize winning year

Auto Prize Investment

Prize by Warrant

Prize by BACS

Other

Total

% of prizes that were warrants

2010

4,155,504

16,406,467

6

48,992

20,561,977

80%

2011

4,323,678

16,610,306

284,312

47,026

21,218,296

78%

2012

4,484,871

16,170,837

1,143,668

55,670

21,799,376

74%

2013

4,520,633

15,612,451

1,856,448

56,874

21,989,532

71%

2014

5,518,122

13,971,588

2,998,525

63,893

22,488,235

62%

2015

6,974,548

14,074,705

4,279,531

78,658

25,328,784

56%

2016

7,104,185

13,457,970

5,571,947

87,799

26,134,102

51%

2017

7,314,839

12,900,783

7,858,434

111,635

28,074,056

46%

2018

9,322,849

14,802,366

12,540,401

174,215

36,665,616

40%

2019

10,021,102

14,133,249

15,492,951

200,340

39,647,302

36%

2020

10,917,668

11,680,178

20,359,390

356,003

42,957,236

27%

*Other prize payment type includes, death claim forms, high value prize claim forms, prize queries etc.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of changing the level of VAT payable on laptops, tablets, routers and other items important to the delivery of distance learning for school children; and if he will make a statement.

VAT has always been designed to be a broad-based tax on consumption. Introducing a reduced rate of VAT on laptops, tablets, routers and other items for the delivery of distance learning would come at a considerable cost to the Exchequer, and the Government has no current plans to change the VAT treatment of such goods.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish data by (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) local authority for (i) the number of premises registered for the Eat Out to Help Out scheme, (ii) the number of covers in respect of which claims have been made, (iii) the total amount so far claimed, and (iv) the total amount so far disbursed; and if he will publish that data on a fortnightly basis.

HMRC have published data about registered premises and claims received on GOV.UK on a weekly basis.

HMRC will be publishing constituency level data on claims received in due course. There are also plans to develop a wider official statistics release for the scheme once the claims service closes at the end of September.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has change the rate of VAT applied to the construction of new village halls.

Consumers already benefit from a reduced VAT rate of 5 per cent on residential construction under certain conditions. This includes conversions of buildings from one use to another, and the renovation of properties that have been empty for two years or more prior to the renovation work.

Going further would be very expensive: reducing VAT on all property renovation, repairs and improvements would cost the Exchequer approximately £6 billion per year. Although all taxes are kept under review, the Government has no plans to change the VAT treatment of construction at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to the conversion for a housing association of a non-residential building into a communal residential building.

Consumers already benefit from a reduced VAT rate of 5 per cent on residential construction under certain conditions. This includes conversions of buildings from one use to another, and the renovation of properties that have been empty for two years or more prior to the renovation work.

Going further would be very expensive: reducing VAT on all property renovation, repairs and improvements would cost the Exchequer approximately £6 billion per year. Although all taxes are kept under review, the Government has no plans to change the VAT treatment of construction at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to domestic alterations to suit the condition of a resident with disabilities.

Consumers already benefit from a reduced VAT rate of 5 per cent on residential construction under certain conditions. This includes conversions of buildings from one use to another, and the renovation of properties that have been empty for two years or more prior to the renovation work.

Going further would be very expensive: reducing VAT on all property renovation, repairs and improvements would cost the Exchequer approximately £6 billion per year. Although all taxes are kept under review, the Government has no plans to change the VAT treatment of construction at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to first time gas and electricity connections.

Consumers already benefit from a reduced VAT rate of 5 per cent on residential construction under certain conditions. This includes conversions of buildings from one use to another, and the renovation of properties that have been empty for two years or more prior to the renovation work.

Going further would be very expensive: reducing VAT on all property renovation, repairs and improvements would cost the Exchequer approximately £6 billion per year. Although all taxes are kept under review, the Government has no plans to change the VAT treatment of construction at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals in 2020 to implement the recommendations of the Office of Tax Simplification on reforming the turnover threshold for Value Added Tax registration by businesses; and if he will make a statement.

The case for change of the VAT registration threshold has been regularly reviewed over the years, and public views are divided. Whilst some argue that a lower threshold would provide a fairer competitive environment, others contend that a higher threshold would reduce financial and administrative burdens.

In 2018, the Government consulted on how the design of the VAT registration threshold could better incentivise growth and considered the effects of a smoothing mechanism, however there was no clear option for reform. The summary of responses to the call for evidence can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/vat-registration-threshold-call-for-evidence.

At Budget 2018, the Government announced it would maintain the VAT registration threshold at £85,000 until March 2022.

22nd Jul 2020
VAT
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change VAT arrangements in the UK after the transition period; and if he will make a statement.

From 1 January 2021, the UK will need to introduce new arrangements for VAT at its borders. New measures for movements of goods within and into Great Britain were published on 20 July, and the treatment of travellers with personal goods, which was recently subject to consultation, will be made available in due course. The Government continues to work through the implications of the Northern Ireland Protocol, including in relation to VAT, and is committed to providing guidance on how the Northern Ireland Protocol will work ahead of the end of the transition period.

There are no further changes planned to domestic UK VAT law following the end of the transition period and any future changes are for the Chancellor to announce at fiscal events.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to carrycots with restraint straps.

Families already benefit from a reduced rate of VAT of 5 per cent on children’s carrycots with restraint straps. The Government has no plans to change this VAT treatment at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to children's booster seats.

Families already benefit from a reduced rate of VAT of 5 per cent on children’s carrycots with restraint straps. The Government has no plans to change this VAT treatment at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to children's car seats.

Families already benefit from a reduced rate of VAT of 5 per cent on children’s carrycots with restraint straps. The Government has no plans to change this VAT treatment at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to amend the rate of VAT applied to advertising services for charities.

Under the current VAT rules, charities benefit from a zero rate of VAT on costs of advertising in public media when the supply is made by a third party. The Government has no plans to change this VAT treatment at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to pasties baked for sale by retailers where there is no intention that they be consumed hot, they are not cooked to order, are not kept hot after cooking, are advertised merely as freshly baked, and are provided to customers in a simple standard paper bag.

VAT raised £130 billion in 2019-20 and is an important source of revenue for the Exchequer, funding the Government's spending priorities including hospitals, schools, and defence.

VAT is levied on supplies of hot takeaway food. “Hot food” is food that is supplied and intended to be eaten when hot (above ambient air temperature). However, some takeaway food may be zero rated if it is not intended to be eaten hot and is sold warm simply because it happens to be freshly baked and is in the process of cooling down. Therefore, freshly baked takeaway pasties that are not intended to be eaten hot are zero rated.

While all taxes are kept under review, there are currently no plans to change the rate of VAT applied to pasties.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to food of a kind used for human consumption.

There are no current plans to change the rate of VAT applied to:

- Magazines

- Renovating a dwelling that has been empty for at least two years

- Smoking cessation products

- Installation of mobility aids for the elderly for use in domestic accommodation

- Supplies of magnetic tape adapted for recording speech for blind people

- Motorcycle helmets that meet safety standards

- Cycle helmets marked CE

- Maps and charts

- Printed music

- Newspapers

- Books

- Food of a kind used for human consumption

- Children’s clothes

- Children’s shoes

- Clothes for babies

- Equipment for blind or partially sighted people

- Incontinence products

- Low Vision aids

- Emptying domestic septic tanks and cesspools

- Water supplied to households.

There are limits to the changes the Government can make to the VAT treatment of these goods under the framework of European law. While the UK is in the transition period, all existing EU VAT rules will continue to apply. Although all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to change these reliefs at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to children's clothes.

There are no current plans to change the rate of VAT applied to:

- Magazines

- Renovating a dwelling that has been empty for at least two years

- Smoking cessation products

- Installation of mobility aids for the elderly for use in domestic accommodation

- Supplies of magnetic tape adapted for recording speech for blind people

- Motorcycle helmets that meet safety standards

- Cycle helmets marked CE

- Maps and charts

- Printed music

- Newspapers

- Books

- Food of a kind used for human consumption

- Children’s clothes

- Children’s shoes

- Clothes for babies

- Equipment for blind or partially sighted people

- Incontinence products

- Low Vision aids

- Emptying domestic septic tanks and cesspools

- Water supplied to households.

There are limits to the changes the Government can make to the VAT treatment of these goods under the framework of European law. While the UK is in the transition period, all existing EU VAT rules will continue to apply. Although all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to change these reliefs at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to children's shoes.

There are no current plans to change the rate of VAT applied to:

- Magazines

- Renovating a dwelling that has been empty for at least two years

- Smoking cessation products

- Installation of mobility aids for the elderly for use in domestic accommodation

- Supplies of magnetic tape adapted for recording speech for blind people

- Motorcycle helmets that meet safety standards

- Cycle helmets marked CE

- Maps and charts

- Printed music

- Newspapers

- Books

- Food of a kind used for human consumption

- Children’s clothes

- Children’s shoes

- Clothes for babies

- Equipment for blind or partially sighted people

- Incontinence products

- Low Vision aids

- Emptying domestic septic tanks and cesspools

- Water supplied to households.

There are limits to the changes the Government can make to the VAT treatment of these goods under the framework of European law. While the UK is in the transition period, all existing EU VAT rules will continue to apply. Although all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to change these reliefs at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to clothes for babies.

There are no current plans to change the rate of VAT applied to:

- Magazines

- Renovating a dwelling that has been empty for at least two years

- Smoking cessation products

- Installation of mobility aids for the elderly for use in domestic accommodation

- Supplies of magnetic tape adapted for recording speech for blind people

- Motorcycle helmets that meet safety standards

- Cycle helmets marked CE

- Maps and charts

- Printed music

- Newspapers

- Books

- Food of a kind used for human consumption

- Children’s clothes

- Children’s shoes

- Clothes for babies

- Equipment for blind or partially sighted people

- Incontinence products

- Low Vision aids

- Emptying domestic septic tanks and cesspools

- Water supplied to households.

There are limits to the changes the Government can make to the VAT treatment of these goods under the framework of European law. While the UK is in the transition period, all existing EU VAT rules will continue to apply. Although all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to change these reliefs at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to equipment for blind or partially sighted people.

There are no current plans to change the rate of VAT applied to:

- Magazines

- Renovating a dwelling that has been empty for at least two years

- Smoking cessation products

- Installation of mobility aids for the elderly for use in domestic accommodation

- Supplies of magnetic tape adapted for recording speech for blind people

- Motorcycle helmets that meet safety standards

- Cycle helmets marked CE

- Maps and charts

- Printed music

- Newspapers

- Books

- Food of a kind used for human consumption

- Children’s clothes

- Children’s shoes

- Clothes for babies

- Equipment for blind or partially sighted people

- Incontinence products

- Low Vision aids

- Emptying domestic septic tanks and cesspools

- Water supplied to households.

There are limits to the changes the Government can make to the VAT treatment of these goods under the framework of European law. While the UK is in the transition period, all existing EU VAT rules will continue to apply. Although all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to change these reliefs at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to incontinence products.

There are no current plans to change the rate of VAT applied to:

- Magazines

- Renovating a dwelling that has been empty for at least two years

- Smoking cessation products

- Installation of mobility aids for the elderly for use in domestic accommodation

- Supplies of magnetic tape adapted for recording speech for blind people

- Motorcycle helmets that meet safety standards

- Cycle helmets marked CE

- Maps and charts

- Printed music

- Newspapers

- Books

- Food of a kind used for human consumption

- Children’s clothes

- Children’s shoes

- Clothes for babies

- Equipment for blind or partially sighted people

- Incontinence products

- Low Vision aids

- Emptying domestic septic tanks and cesspools

- Water supplied to households.

There are limits to the changes the Government can make to the VAT treatment of these goods under the framework of European law. While the UK is in the transition period, all existing EU VAT rules will continue to apply. Although all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to change these reliefs at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to low vision aids.

There are no current plans to change the rate of VAT applied to:

- Magazines

- Renovating a dwelling that has been empty for at least two years

- Smoking cessation products

- Installation of mobility aids for the elderly for use in domestic accommodation

- Supplies of magnetic tape adapted for recording speech for blind people

- Motorcycle helmets that meet safety standards

- Cycle helmets marked CE

- Maps and charts

- Printed music

- Newspapers

- Books

- Food of a kind used for human consumption

- Children’s clothes

- Children’s shoes

- Clothes for babies

- Equipment for blind or partially sighted people

- Incontinence products

- Low Vision aids

- Emptying domestic septic tanks and cesspools

- Water supplied to households.

There are limits to the changes the Government can make to the VAT treatment of these goods under the framework of European law. While the UK is in the transition period, all existing EU VAT rules will continue to apply. Although all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to change these reliefs at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to emptying domestic septic tanks and cesspools.

There are no current plans to change the rate of VAT applied to:

- Magazines

- Renovating a dwelling that has been empty for at least two years

- Smoking cessation products

- Installation of mobility aids for the elderly for use in domestic accommodation

- Supplies of magnetic tape adapted for recording speech for blind people

- Motorcycle helmets that meet safety standards

- Cycle helmets marked CE

- Maps and charts

- Printed music

- Newspapers

- Books

- Food of a kind used for human consumption

- Children’s clothes

- Children’s shoes

- Clothes for babies

- Equipment for blind or partially sighted people

- Incontinence products

- Low Vision aids

- Emptying domestic septic tanks and cesspools

- Water supplied to households.

There are limits to the changes the Government can make to the VAT treatment of these goods under the framework of European law. While the UK is in the transition period, all existing EU VAT rules will continue to apply. Although all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to change these reliefs at this time.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to change the rate of VAT applied to water supplied to households.

There are no current plans to change the rate of VAT applied to:

- Magazines

- Renovating a dwelling that has been empty for at least two years

- Smoking cessation products

- Installation of mobility aids for the elderly for use in domestic accommodation

- Supplies of magnetic tape adapted for recording speech for blind people

- Motorcycle helmets that meet safety standards

- Cycle helmets marked CE

- Maps and charts

- Printed music

- Newspapers

- Books

- Food of a kind used for human consumption

- Children’s clothes

- Children’s shoes

- Clothes for babies

- Equipment for blind or partially sighted people

- Incontinence products

- Low Vision aids

- Emptying domestic septic tanks and cesspools

- Water supplied to households.

There are limits to the changes the Government can make to the VAT treatment of these goods under the framework of European law. While the UK is in the transition period, all existing EU VAT rules will continue to apply. Although all taxes are kept under review, there are no plans to change these reliefs at this time.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish a table of the organisations receiving public funds through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, showing for each month of operation and for each company in receipt of public funds the (a) company or charity number (as applicable), (b) the organisation's name, (c) in what sector of the economy it operates, (d) the postcode or (if overseas) the country in which it is based, (e) the total number of staff in each organisation whose employment is being supported by that scheme in that month, (f) the total amount paid to that organisation in that month as a result of that scheme; and if he will make statement.

In order to protect the confidentiality of individual organisations’ tax affairs, HMRC are unable to provide information on individual companies and charities.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish aggregate data, in respect of public funding for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, showing for each month of that scheme's operation for each (a) Government office region of the UK, (b) district council area, (c) Westminster Parliamentary constituency, (d) Scottish Parliament constituency, and (e) Senedd constituency (i) how many organisations based in that area have received support, (ii) in what sector of the economy those organisations operate, (iii) the total number of staff in each organisation whose employment is being supported by that scheme in that month and (iv) the total amount of funding allocated.

Statistics on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme are published on GOV.UK. The latest publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/coronavirus-job-retention-scheme-statistics-july-2020. This includes breakdowns of the total number of employments furloughed by industry sector, country, English region, local authority and by Westminster Parliamentary constituency. The publication also includes breakdowns of the total number of employments furloughed by the number of employees within each claiming PAYE scheme.

It is not possible to provide the further breakdowns requested in the time available. Furthermore, there are likely to be statistical disclosure issues at this level of disaggregation.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish aggregate data on public funding for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme this year, showing, for each month of that scheme's operation for (a) each government office region of the United Kingdom, (b) each district council area in England, and each council area in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, (c) each Westminster Parliamentary constituency, (d) each Scottish Parliament constituency and (e) each Senedd constituency and for companies in which (i) 5 or fewer, (ii) six-19, (iii) 20-39, (iv) 50-99, (v) 100-499, (vi) 500-999, (vii) 1000-4999, (vii) 5000 or more employees are receiving support through the scheme, (A) how many organisations of that size based in that area have received support, (B) the total number of staff in such organisations of that size in that area whose employment is being supported by that scheme in that month, and (C) the total amount of funding allocated to support such organisations of that size in that area.

Statistics on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme are published on GOV.UK. The latest publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/coronavirus-job-retention-scheme-statistics-july-2020. This includes breakdowns of the total number of employments furloughed by industry sector, country, English region, local authority and by Westminster Parliamentary constituency. The publication also includes breakdowns of the total number of employments furloughed by the number of employees within each claiming PAYE scheme.

It is not possible to provide the further breakdowns requested in the time available. Furthermore, there are likely to be statistical disclosure issues at this level of disaggregation.

6th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether public sector organisations are able to furlough former employees who left their employment or after 28 February 2020 and who are unable to commence employment with their new employer due to the covid-19 oubreak.

If an individual was made redundant or stopped working for their employer after 28 February, the employer can agree to re-employ that individual and place them on furlough.

In line with the private sector, public sector employers can re-employ an eligible individual, furlough them and access the CJRS, on condition that the individual is not already on furlough from another organisation; there are no options for the individual to be re-employed and redeployed elsewhere in the public sector; and the organisation has already met the eligibility criteria for publicly funded bodies to furlough staff.

The eligibility criteria for publicly funded bodies to furlough staff are that the organisation has experienced a reduction in funding (in the form of commercial revenue or public grants) due to the economic disruption of COVID-19; the organisation has exhausted all reasonable options for redeployment across the public sector; and the employee considered for furloughing would otherwise be made redundant.

The employer is under no obligation to re-employ and furlough staff.

25th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to provide emergency funding to charities supporting the response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Chancellor set on April 8 a £750 million package of support for charities providing key services and supporting vulnerable people during the Covid-19 crisis. This will help charities providing essential services to continue their operations and to weather the storm until we return to more normal times. Funding for charities will be made available in the coming weeks and the most up to date information will be on Gov.uk. Our aim is to get funding to those in greatest need as soon as possible.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the provisions of the Equality Act 2010 in protecting the rights of people with mental health conditions in the work place.

The Equality Act 2010 contains strong protections against discrimination on grounds of disability and many mental health conditions will meet the Act’s definition of disability, meaning people with those conditions are protected from direct and indirect discrimination and harassment arising from their disability; and the victimisation provisions ensure that complaints can be brought without fear of adverse repercussion. This protection applies in the workplace and covers both employees and job applicants.

Beyond these core protections, tackling mental health issues in the workplace is a priority for the Government, and we are committed to legislate so that patients suffering from mental health conditions, including anxiety or depression, have greater control over their treatment and receive the dignity and respect they deserve.

Legislation is not the only solution however. It is important that employers make efforts to understand the issue of mental health and how they can help their staff manage such problems while doing their jobs. In November 2018, the Health and Safety Executive published updated guidance in this regard, which is available at: http://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/mental-health

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of HMRC staffing at UK ports to ensure efficient throughput of goods in the weeks leading up to Christmas.

Border Force has implemented a sustained recruitment campaign to uplift the number of permanent Border Force staff, including 2,000 staff specifically for EU Exit, alongside recruitment for other ‘business as usual’ operational requirements. It maintains a flexible and dynamic approach to recruitment, that takes account of expected staff attrition and churn within the organisation.

Furthermore, Border Force regularly reviews its capacity plans and resources, redeploying and recruiting staff where necessary to help meet and maintain service standards for individual services. There is an established and dedicated internal operation to ensure additional contingency resources are available to deploy in support of short-term operational pressures at the border.

Border Force is confident that resources to meet anticipated overall operational requirements are in place; recruiting sufficient additional frontline staff and continuing to build staffing levels during 2021/2022.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what value of excise goods have been seized by HMRC in Northern Ireland in each week of 2021 so far, having been imported to Northern Ireland from the rest of the EU at a price not including UK excise duty; and if she will make a statement.

Border Force does not routinely publish this level of data on the value of excise goods seized at the border at specific ports.

Seizures relating to products related to the Tax revenue that is protected through detecting goods where excise duty has not been declared, including are published quarterly on the.gov.uk website. The latest information can be found at:

Transparency Data Feb 2021

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of social distancing on (a) victims of domestic abuse and (b) the children of those people.

Domestic abuse is a devastating crime. We fully recognise the severe impact it has on both victims and their children, and that many of them may feel even more vulnerable during social distancing and self-isolation.

The Government is liaising with specialist domestic abuse service providers and local authorities to monitor and assess the impact of social distancing on victims of domestic abuse and their children, and to ensure that sources of advice and support continue to be available to them.

Ensuring that vulnerable children remain protected is our top priority. Local authorities have the key day-to-day responsibility for delivery of children’s social care but we are considering all options to ensure that they are able to continue to deliver services effectively. Local authorities know their children, families and communities well and are best placed to make decisions about how to best manage children’s social care services during the current national emergency.

Attending education settings is known as a protective factor for children receiving the support of a social worker. We have therefore asked schools to remain open for children who are vulnerable, as well as for those children of workers critical to the COVID-19 response who absolutely need to attend. Vulnerable children include those who have a social worker, and those children and young people up to the age of 25 with education, health and care (EHC) plans.

There is an expectation that vulnerable children who have a social worker will attend provision, so long as they do not have underlying health conditions that put them at risk. In circumstances where a parent does not want to bring their child to an education setting, and their child is considered vulnerable, the social worker and education provider should explore the reasons for this directly with the parent.

The Home Office has provided £3.1 million this year for specialist support for children affected by domestic abuse, as a continuation of the Children Affected by Domestic Abuse fund.

The Government has also supported local authorities with a total of £3.2bn in additional funding, which will support local authorities in meeting additional demands, including on their children’s services, at this time.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make it her policy to process all EEA registration applicants within one month.

Under the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016, any application received from EEA citizens for residence documentation under those Regulations must be decided immediately upon application provided that application meets the relevant validity requirements.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make it her policy to permit unaccompanied refugees the right to family reunion in the UK.

The Government already provides a safe and legal route to bring refugee families together through its family reunion policy. This allows a partner and children under 18 of those granted protection in the UK to join them here, if they formed part of the family unit before the sponsor fled their country.

Refugees can also sponsor adult dependent relatives living overseas to join them where, due to age, illness or disability, that person requires long-term personal care that can only be provided by relatives in the UK. Further, there is discretion to grant visas outside the Immigration Rules, which caters for extended family members in exceptional circumstances – including young adult sons or daughters who are dependent on family here and living in dangerous situations.

These routes will not be affected by the UK’s departure from the EU.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his Answer of 16 June to Question 10178 on Royal Yacht: Procurement, whether the procurement framework for the new national flagship will provide for its construction using British steel.

Procurement of the National Flagship will be conducted strictly in accordance with Government procurement policy, including that on the procurement of steel as set out in Procurement Policy Note 11/16. Responsibility for sourcing steel for Government procured vessels rests with prime contractors and, in line with Procurement Policy Note 11/16, it will be for the prime contractor to make its steel requirements known to the UK steel industry in order that they may consider bidding.

The joint industry and Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Steel Procurement Taskforce was launched in March 2021, with the aim of working with the sector to promote the unique selling points of UK steel and explore how best to support and position the industry for success in forthcoming major public contracts.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 16 June 2021 on Royal Yacht Procurement on the use of British steel in the National Flagship, what classes of vessels procured by his Department have not required steel in their construction.

All classes of ship procured by the Ministry of Defence have required the use of steel in their construction. Small patrol boats and Mine Counter-Measures vessels are principally constructed from glass-reinforced plastic, but steel is used in propulsion and other machinery.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 16 June 2021 to Question 11489, on Royal Yacht: Procurement, when he plans to announce the estimated cost of (a) constructing and (b) operating a new National Flagship.

Estimated costs for the National Flagship will be tested and honed during market engagement. These figures are being withheld as release would prejudice the commercial interests of the Ministry of Defence.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 16 June 2021 to Question 11489 on Royal Yacht: Procurement, if he will list the merits of (a) constructing and (b) operating a National Flagship as identified by cross Government discussions conducted by the Cabinet Office.

The National Flagship will showcase cutting-edge British shipbuilding, engineering and green technology, giving British business a new global platform to promote their products and technology. The National Flagship will have wide utility including supporting trade and investment in the UK.

The construction of the vessel will create jobs and upskilling opportunities, help drive a renaissance in the UK's shipbuilding industry and promote the best of British shipbuilding and ingenuity around the world.

The National Flagship will promote the UK's diplomatic and trading interests. It will provide a unique convening power to British exporters and a secure sovereign hub for diplomatic events. The operation of the vessel will support the UK's soft power capability and provide at sea training capabilities to the Royal Navy.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 16 June 2021 to Question 11489 on Royal Yacht: Procurement, what assessment his Department made of the potential defence benefits to be delivered (a) economically, (b) effectively and (c) efficiently by the (i) construction and (ii) operation of a National Flagship.

As set out in the Defence Command Plan, Defence plays a unique role in protecting and promoting the three fundamental national interests identified by the Integrated Review: sovereignty, security and prosperity. The National Flagship will support these national interests including by boosting trade and promoting the nation's economic security.

The National Flagship will be built in UK shipyards. It will create jobs and upskilling opportunities; help drive a renaissance in the UK's shipbuilding industry; and showcase the best of British shipbuilding and ingenuity around the world. The Flagship will also complement the vision we will set out in the refresh of the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

The operation of the vessel will provide valuable experience for our personnel and promote wider opportunities outside of Defence. It will also support other high-profile Defence Engagement tasking which our ships undertake in support of wider government objectives.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2021 to Question 29805 on Local Government: Coronavirus, what budget has been made available for enforcement activities in respect of ventilation of council-managed buildings in each of the last ten years; what enforcement action has been taken in respect of ventilation of council-managed buildings in each of the last ten years; and when he most recently discussed the ventilation of council-managed buildings with (a) the Local Government Association, (b) other local government representative bodies and (c) trade unions recognised in English local government.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is responsible for enforcing health and safety law in council operated buildings.

HSE allocates resources based on planned levels of activity to deliver it's published strategy and plans. It does not allocate budgets by specific risk areas such as business premises ventilation, but inspectors will take action to respond to poor ventilation if identified during regulatory activity.

During the coronavirus pandemic, the risks associated with poor general ventilation in a workplace increased due to the risk of transmitting coronavirus. HSE has carried out more than 300,000 interventions since the start of the pandemic, to check how employers are implementing measures to reduce transmission of coronavirus at their sites, including whether employees are working in poorly ventilated spaces. Where contraventions are identified, HSE inspectors will take action to secure compliance by providing verbal advice, written correspondence or serving enforcement notices.

HSE has also updated their guidance to support employers in addressing the issue of ventilation- www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/index.htm.

HSE does not collate information about enforcement action taken specifically in respect of ventilation in council managed buildings.

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) continues to lead the Government's significant and regular engagement with councils and local government sector bodies including the Local Government Association to ensure information is getting to councils and that we are made aware of any areas of concern:

  • Ministers host regular teleconferences for local government leaders, chief executives and local resilience forums, with other Ministers from across government also present to give updates and answer questions.
  • MHCLG continues to discuss priorities and support measures with councils in each of the nine English regions.
  • MHCLG hosts regular engagement with local government sector bodies.
  • MHCLG's Local Government Bulletin - a daily email sent to over 5,500 local government stakeholders.
  • Ministers from MHCLG regularly speak to and meet with Mayors, both bilaterally and as part of the M9 Group of Mayors.

Ministerial meetings with external organisations are published on gov.uk.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Governement, what plans he has to make a submission to the consultation by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy on proposed changes to the Prudential code for capital finance in local authorities which closes on 12 April 2021.

Government is committed to promoting prudent financial management within local authorities and appreciates the important role that CIPFA has in helping ensure this. The Prudential Code forms an important part of the capital framework and officials have worked closely with CIPFA and other stakeholders as the revised Code has been developed and will continue to do so. Alongside this, the department is taking forward measures to strengthen the capital framework including by reducing excessive risk, while allowing authorities to invest sensibly for service delivery, local regeneration and housing, and is working closely with CIPFA and the sector to implement these.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether each of the eight successful freeport bids had been submitted in full by the 12.00 noon on 5 February 2021 deadline published in the Freeports Bidding Prospectus.

Site operator contact details were sought from all bidders to assist HMG in checking customs site authorisations. No other information was requested or encouraged from bidders as part of the bid assessment. All information that was assessed as part of the Freeport selection process was received by 12 noon on February 5 2021 or within a grace period of a few minutes after this deadline to allow for technical issues.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the maximum distance between two sites within the freeports announced in Budget 2021 is greater than 45 km; what assessment his Department made of the extent to which each of those Freeports meets the requirement for a clear economic rationale under section 3.1.6 of the Freeports bidding prospectus; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has led a fair, open and transparent selection process to determine successful Freeport locations in England.

We were clear in the Freeports Bidding Prospectus that the Government would consider bids for exceptional additional customs subzones and tax sites outside the Outer Boundary where this could be supported by a clear economic rationale.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made, for each of the port operators involved in the eight successful Freeport bids, in view of the responsibilities they will exercise for ensuring goods on site follow the correct customs processes, as to whether those companies are fit and proper to exercise such responsibilities in the context of (a) their corporate record and (b) their beneficial owners; and if he will make a statement.

Freeport customs sites will be authorised by the UK Government. There are a number of requirements, including robust security requirements and ensuring goods remain under customs control, that both operators and businesses will have to demonstrate as part of the authorisation. Additionally, to protect the UK’s customs compliance regime, HMRC and Border Force will continue to conduct compliance checks on goods within the Freeport customs site.

Work is ongoing to develop the HMRC operational processes that are required to support the introduction of Freeports. Once completed, this work will inform the resources required for HMRC to authorise customs sites.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many of the organisations that submitted a bid for proposed freeports were (a) asked for, permitted to submit and (c) encouraged to submit additional submissions in relation to their bid between the deadline for bids on 5 February 2021 and 3 March 2021.

Site operator contact details were sought from all bidders to assist HMG in checking customs site authorisations. No other information was requested or encouraged from bidders as part of the bid assessment. All information that was assessed as part of the Freeport selection process was received by 12 noon on February 5 2021 or within a grace period of a few minutes after this deadline to allow for technical issues.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the requirement that freeport operators meet obligations under the OECD Code of Conduct for Clean Free Trade Zones and the anti-illicit trade and security measures therein, what plans he has to ensure that (a) those operators are able to do so when the Freeport starts operating, (b) those operators continue to do so once the Freeport starts operating, (c) he is aware of any change in the effectiveness with which such responsibilities are discharged; how he plans to resource his approach to those issues; and if he will make a statement.

The UK plays a key role in tackling cross-border illegal activity and this is not going to change. Freeports are commonly used across the globe, and we have learned from these examples to build upon our current expertise.

Freeports will have to adhere to the OECD Code of Conduct for clean Free Trade Zones and must maintain the current obligations on Freeports set out in the UK’s Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing and Transfer of Funds (Information on the Payer) Regulations 2017.

Freeport customs sites will be authorised by the UK Government and must meet robust security requirements to mitigate risks. These bodies will be able to withhold or withdraw authorisation if individual sites have not met the required standards. HMRC and Border Force will continue to conduct compliance checks on goods within the Freeport customs site.

Each Freeport Governance Body will need to maintain a record of all the businesses operating, or applying to operate, within the tax site. This record will need to be readily accessible by HMRC, the NCA, and Border Force operatives. It will also need to be kept up to date and contain information about the beneficial owner of the business.

It will also need to actively manage security risks across physical, personnel, and cyber domains, and work with MHCLG, HMRC, Border Force, the NCA, and Home Office to conduct an annual audit of the security measures in place and any breaches.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the requirement that freeport operators maintain current obligations under the Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing and Transfer of Funds (Information on the Payer) Regulations 2017, how he plans to ensure that (a) those operators are able to do so when the Freeport starts operating, (b) those operators continue to do so once the Freeport starts operating, (c) he is aware of any change in the competence and propriety with which such responsibilities are discharged; how he plans to resource his policies on those matters; and if he will make a statement.

The UK plays a key role in tackling cross-border illegal activity and this is not going to change. Freeports are commonly used across the globe, and we have learned from these examples to build upon our current expertise.

Freeports will have to adhere to the OECD Code of Conduct for clean Free Trade Zones and must maintain the current obligations on Freeports set out in the UK’s Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing and Transfer of Funds (Information on the Payer) Regulations 2017.

Freeport customs sites will be authorised by the UK Government and must meet robust security requirements to mitigate risks. These bodies will be able to withhold or withdraw authorisation if individual sites have not met the required standards. HMRC and Border Force will continue to conduct compliance checks on goods within the Freeport customs site.

Each Freeport Governance Body will need to maintain a record of all the businesses operating, or applying to operate, within the tax site. This record will need to be readily accessible by HMRC, the NCA, and Border Force operatives. It will also need to be kept up to date and contain information about the beneficial owner of the business.

It will also need to actively manage security risks across physical, personnel, and cyber domains, and work with MHCLG, HMRC, Border Force, the NCA, and Home Office to conduct an annual audit of the security measures in place and any breaches.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the requirement that freeport operators are fit and proper persons to allow excise goods to enter and be processed in the Freeport customs site in line with the existing excise rules and conditions, how he plans to assess that requirement; if he will publish the criteria by which that assessment is made; how he plans to ensure that approved operators continue to meet that standard after initially being found to do so; how he plans to ensure that he is aware of any change in the fitness and propriety with which such responsibilities are discharged; and what assessment he has made of the implications for the freeport designation in the event that an operator is found not to be a fit and proper person to exercise such responsibilities (a) before and (b) after the Freeport commences operation.

Freeport customs sites will be authorised by the UK Government. There are a number of requirements, including robust security requirements and ensuring goods remain under customs control, that both operators and businesses will have to demonstrate as part of the authorisation. Additionally, to protect the UK’s customs compliance regime, HMRC and Border Force will continue to conduct compliance checks on goods within the Freeport customs site.

Work is ongoing to develop the HMRC operational processes that are required to support the introduction of Freeports. Once completed, this work will inform the resources required for HMRC to authorise customs sites.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made, for each of the port operators involved in the eight successful Freeport bids, in view of the responsibilities they will be required to be authorised to exercise for ensuring goods on site follow the correct customs processes, of the resources that will be necessary for HMRC to deploy in order for it to exercise appropriate due diligence in terms of (a) evaluating and assessing their application for authorisation to exercise these responsibilities and (b) monitoring and inspecting their exercise of these responsibilities, and if he will make a statement.

Freeport customs sites will be authorised by the UK Government. There are a number of requirements, including robust security requirements and ensuring goods remain under customs control, that both operators and businesses will have to demonstrate as part of the authorisation. Additionally, to protect the UK’s customs compliance regime, HMRC and Border Force will continue to conduct compliance checks on goods within the Freeport customs site.

Work is ongoing to develop the HMRC operational processes that are required to support the introduction of Freeports. Once completed, this work will inform the resources required for HMRC to authorise customs sites.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of approved bids for Freeport bids were (a) led by and (b) involved companies with overseas (i) registration and (ii) beneficial ownership.

My Department led the fair, open and transparent selection process to determine successful Freeport locations in England. As part of that process, officials evaluated the memberships of bidding coalitions and proposed governance structures with respect to the requirements set out in the Bidding Prospectus

Freeports will be hubs for international trade and investment, attracting new businesses to the UK and bringing jobs and opportunity to some of our most deprived communities. They will unite ports, local authorities, businesses and other key local stakeholders in service of the common goal of boosting prosperity in their regions.

18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the English Freeports selection decision-making note, updated 17 March 2021, which aspects of the Teesside Freeport bid's alignment with Government policy, in respect of (i) the Net Zero agenda and (ii) the Prime Minister’s recently published 10 Point Plan, (a) formed part of the decision-making process, and (b) how that alignment was quantified; and whether he will make a statement.

The Freeports Bidding Prospectus set out a fair, open and transparent assessment process to select Freeport locations in England, informed by relevant experts across Government to ensure objective and robust assessment. The English Freeport Selection Decision-Making Note clearly outlines how decisions on the successful freeport locations, announced at Budget, were made. Unsuccessful bidders were offered feedback calls with officials to discuss the assessment of bids in more depth.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the English Freeports selection decision note, published 17 March, whether he will publish the criteria and process used to evaluate which Freeport bids had greater alignment with Government policy.

The Freeports Bidding Prospectus set out a fair, open and transparent assessment process to select Freeport locations in England, informed by relevant experts across Government to ensure objective and robust assessment. The English Freeport Selection Decision-Making Note clearly outlines how decisions on the successful freeport locations, announced at Budget, were made. Unsuccessful bidders were offered feedback calls with officials to discuss the assessment of bids in more depth.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Government's policy paper, entitled English Freeports selection decision-making note, updated on 17 March 2021, how alignment with Government policy was (a) assessed and (b) quantified.

The Freeports Bidding Prospectus set out a fair, open and transparent assessment process to select Freeport locations in England, informed by relevant experts across Government to ensure objective and robust assessment. The English Freeport Selection Decision-Making Note clearly outlines how decisions on the successful freeport locations, announced at Budget, were made. Unsuccessful bidders were offered feedback calls with officials to discuss the assessment of bids in more depth.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Government's policy paper, entitled English Freeports selection decision-making note, updated 17 March 2021, which states that Teesside bid’s stronger alignment with government policy (in particular the Net Zero agenda and the Prime Minister’s recently published 10 Point Plan) resulted in a decision to select that as the Freeport bid within the region, which aspects of that bid's alignment with Government policy formed part of the decision-making process; and how that alignment was quantified.

The Freeports Bidding Prospectus set out a fair, open and transparent assessment process to select Freeport locations in England, informed by relevant experts across Government to ensure objective and robust assessment. The English Freeport Selection Decision-Making Note clearly outlines how decisions on the successful freeport locations, announced at Budget, were made. Unsuccessful bidders were offered feedback calls with officials to discuss the assessment of bids in more depth.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the English Freeports selection decision, whether any additional information was (a) sought, or (b) received from the (i) Teesside or (ii) North East Freeport bid during the assessment process.

All bidders were contacted to provide contact details for the operators of their proposed customs sites. No other information that was assessed as part of the selection process for the English Freeports competition was received from, or sought for, the Teesside or North East Freeport bids following the competition deadline of 12 noon 5 February 2021.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to English Freeports selection decision-making note, updated 17 March 2021, what assessment he has made of the effect on skills and jobs, (a) within each of the eight regions in which a freeport was designated and (b) on (i) towns, (ii) cities, and (iii) other employment centres within that region which were not included within the successful Freeport bid.

Freeports will be national hubs for international trade, innovation and commerce, regenerating communities across the UK by attracting new businesses, spreading jobs, investment and opportunity to towns and cities up and down the country.

They will bring together ports, local authorities, businesses and other key local stakeholders to achieve a common goal of shared prosperity and opportunity for their regions. Our focus is on encouraging new investment to create new businesses and new economic activity. This will create jobs in deprived communities across the country.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the essential information required from bidders set out in his Department’s document entitled, Freeports: bidding prospectus, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the 500 word limit for bidders to set out how they will meet the minimum standard of security and infrastructure required in customs and tax sites before being able to operate as a Freeport.

The word limits set out in Section 5 of the Freeports Bidding Prospectus have been carefully calibrated to give bidders the best chance to show the strengths of their proposals. We have given bidders the room to convey the key information we need to assess bids robustly, whilst ensuring that submitting a bid is feasible within the 12-week bidding period.

Successful bidders will then be invited to develop a business case for regeneration funding, to work with HMT and HMRC to review and confirm the boundaries of their proposed tax sites, and to begin the HMRC-run authorisation process for customs site operators, ensuring proposals remain of a high standard as they move into implementation.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, on what evidential basis the limit of 500 words was set for freeport bids regarding the economic rationale for tax site choice.

I refer the Hon Member to the answer I gave to Question UIN 131242 answered on 11 January.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the funding being made available for freeports announced in the Spending Review 2020 CP 330: section 6.60, how much of the funding originally allocated to the Towns Fund will be allocated to capital spending on freeports in England.

Successful Freeports bidders will have the opportunity to access a share of £175 million of seed capital funding. Allocations are subject to the submission and quality of successful business cases, but will be partly funded through the Towns Fund.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will place in the Library the (a) current round of bid submissions for possible sites for Freeports, (b) criteria used to assess each of the free text fields in the submitted bids and (c) weightings used for each of those criteria in respect of every text field.

We are committed to following a robust and transparent process for assessing Freeport bids, as published in the Freeports Bidding Prospectus. Those bids will be assessed using the criteria, weightings, and mark scheme outlined in that Prospectus. We will not publish Freeport bids whilst they are being assessed as part of a live competition; we need to have regard to any commercially sensitive information within them.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to improve the bid assessment proposals for freeports in response to the findings of the Public Accounts Committee on the towns fund selection process in its report Selecting towns for the Towns Fund, published 11 November 2020.

My Department and the Treasury have developed a robust approach to assessing Freeport bids. We consulted publicly on the objectives of the Freeports policy and have set out clearly in the Freeports Bidding Prospectus what these are and how bids will be assessed against them. This includes explicitly stating (in Section 5) how information requested from bidders will be marked, how these marks will be weighted, and how bids will qualify for the appointable list. Finally, we have published (also in Section 5 of the Bidding Prospectus) the factors Ministers will consider when assessing this list and have committed to publishing the rationales for successful bids’ selection.

2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect of Local Housing Rates on the availability of private sector rented accommodation to homeless people.

We know that there are varied and complex reasons behind a person’s homelessness, including the availability of private rented sector accommodation, which this Government is taking steps to address.

Following the 4 year freeze to?Local?Housing Allowance (LHA)?rates this Government?is now delivering on the manifesto commitment to?end the?benefit?freeze.??From April?2020?LHA?rates will?be uprated by CPI –?an increase of?1.7 per cent in?line with wider benefit uprating.

In addition, since 2011 we have provided over £1 billion in Discretionary Housing Payment funding, enabling?local?authorities to protect the most vulnerable claimants and supporting?households?to adapt to housing support?reforms.

We recently announced an extra £40 million in Discretionary Housing Payments for 2020/21, helping to tackle?the most acute?affordability?pressures?in the private rented sector.

The increase will?mean?the majority of?people in receipt of housing support in the Private Rented Sector will?see their housing support increase on average by around £10 per month.

25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to repeal the provisions relating to rough sleeping under the Vagrancy Act 1824.

The Government is clear that no-one should be criminalised simply for having nowhere to live and we are committed to reviewing the Vagrancy Act.

This is a complex issue and we know from our engagement with stakeholders that there are diverging views about the necessity and relevance of the Vagrancy Act. That is why the Government believes that a review, rather than wholesale immediate repeal, is the right course of action and we are looking at all options including retention, repeal, replacement or amendment.

At the heart of the review will be the experiences and perceptions of a range of relevant stakeholders including the homelessness sector, the police, local authorities, business representatives, community groups and individuals with lived experience.

5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will increase funding to create additional capacity in local authority supported housing facilities for elderly people.

The Government values the vital role that supported and sheltered housing plays in the lives of many older people with support needs across the country. We are committed to ensuring that we have a sustainable supported housing sector and to boosting supply. We have abolished the Housing Revenue Account borrowing cap to support councils to deliver more council housing to address local need and circumstances, including supported and sheltered housing. We are also reviewing local housing support services across England to get a better understanding of how housing and support services are working together.

19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2021 to Question 30344 on Prisons: Ventilation, what budget has been made available for enforcement activities in respect of ventilation in prisons in each of the last ten years; what enforcement action has been taken in respect of ventilation in prisons in each of the last ten years; and when he last met (a) prison governors and (b) representatives of the Prison Officers’ Association to discuss ventilation in prisons.

The Ministry of Justice is not an enforcing authority and does not engage in enforcement activity. We are not aware of any enforcement action against HMPPS in relation to ventilation.

While there is regular engagement with prison governors and representatives of the Prison Officers’ Association on issues relating to health and safety in prisons, there have been no meetings to discuss ventilation specifically.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the adequacy of ventilation in prisons and management of the risk of covid-19 infection, what guidance he has issued or plans to issue to prison governors on that matter; to what standards prison governors should plan and measure such ventilation; what enforcement activity he plans to undertake to ensure such guidance is followed; and whether he proposes to make funds available to improve standards of ventilation.

Updated guidance “Ventilation in Prisons and Approved Premises during COVID-19 Operating Conditions Guidance (Version 2)” was issued to all prison governors in March 2021. MoJ Property Directorate, working with facilities management providers, is responsible for the management of the ventilation systems. They continuously monitor these systems and identify where any improvements may be needed which would normally be funded from within existing budgets.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of (a) psychological and (b) financial support available to the families of prisoners serving IPP sentences.

Families and significant relationships can play an important role in supporting both men and women in custody and on release and reducing reoffending.

Prisons commission a range of family support services based on the needs of their local populations and their families and significant others.

HMPPS fund the Prisoner's Families Helpline to provide information, advice and guidance to the families of all prisoners irrespective of sentence or offence type. This may include signposting to other services available from public and voluntary sector organisations.

In addition specific guidance is being developed by HMPPS for the families and significant others of IPP prisoners that will help them to understand some of the key processes involved in progression, and how they can help.

The Help with Prison Visits Scheme (formerly known as Assisted Prison Visits Scheme) operated by HMPPS Family Services can help provide financial assistance for close relative, partners or sole visitor to visit people in prison. Support is based on the eligibility of the applicant not the sentence or offence type of the person they are visiting.

Family initiatives and schemes are routinely monitored and reviewed.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what assessment he has made of the work of the Parades Commission of Northern Ireland on normalising public processions.

The Parades Commission continues to have the full support of the UK Government in fulfilling its role on the adjudication of Public Processions in Northern Ireland.

The Commission, which is the lawfully constituted body for making determinations on parading in Northern Ireland, operates independently of the Government in line with the provisions contained in the Public Processions (NI) Act 1998.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)