Bridget Phillipson Portrait

Bridget Phillipson

Labour - Houghton and Sunderland South

Shadow Secretary of State for Education

(since November 2021)
Bridget Phillipson is not a member of any APPGs
1 Former APPG membership
Medicines and Medical Devices
Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury
6th Apr 2020 - 29th Nov 2021
Public Accounts Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 21st Sep 2020
Committee on Standards
2nd Mar 2020 - 13th May 2020
Committee of Privileges
2nd Mar 2020 - 13th May 2020
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
21st Jan 2020 - 11th May 2020
European Statutory Instruments
18th Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Privileges
26th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Standards
26th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Accounts Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
10th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
European Statutory Instruments Committee
18th Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee of Privileges
26th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Accounts Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
11th Oct 2010 - 3rd May 2017
Opposition Whip (Commons)
7th Oct 2013 - 18th Sep 2015
Home Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 4th Nov 2013
Procedure Committee
26th Jul 2010 - 11th Oct 2011


Department Event
Monday 23rd May 2022
14:30
Department for Education
Oral questions - Main Chamber
23 May 2022, 2:30 p.m.
Education (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Monday 4th July 2022
09:30
Department for Education
Oral questions - Main Chamber
4 Jul 2022, 9:30 a.m.
Education (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 27th April 2022
Elections Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 153 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 306 Noes - 215
Speeches
Monday 16th May 2022
Making Britain the Best Place to Grow Up and Grow Old
The last Labour Government transformed the life chances of people across our country—child poverty down, investment in our schools, schools …
Written Answers
Monday 25th April 2022
Department for Education: Parliamentary Questions
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average number of working days is that it has taken …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Tuesday 19th April 2022
2. (a) Support linked to an MP but received by a local party organisation or indirectly via a central party organisation
Name of donor: David Rowntree
Address of donor: private
Amount of donation or nature and value if donation in kind: …
EDM signed
Thursday 12th March 2015
BETTING, GAMING AND LOTTERIES
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Gaming Machine (Circumstances of Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2015 …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Bridget Phillipson has voted in 352 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jesse Norman (Conservative)
(39 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Chancellor of the Exchequer
(13 debate interactions)
Steve Barclay (Conservative)
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(95 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(31 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(2 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Bridget Phillipson's debates

Houghton and Sunderland South Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Houghton and Sunderland South signature proportion
Petitions with most Houghton and Sunderland South signatures
Bridget Phillipson has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Bridget Phillipson

10th February 2015
Bridget Phillipson signed this EDM on Thursday 12th March 2015

BETTING, GAMING AND LOTTERIES

Tabled by: Edward Miliband (Labour - Doncaster North)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Gaming Machine (Circumstances of Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2015 (S.I., 2015, No. 121), dated 2 February 2015, a copy of which was laid before this House on 4 February, be annulled.
60 signatures
(Most recent: 25 Mar 2015)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 32
Independent: 3
The Independent Group for Change: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Bridget Phillipson's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Bridget Phillipson, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Bridget Phillipson

Tuesday 26th October 2021

Bridget Phillipson has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Bridget Phillipson has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Bridget Phillipson has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


628 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3 Other Department Questions
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, pursuant to the Answer of 11 January 2022 to Question 96862, when his Department plans to put in place the appropriate governance to allow the North East to access funding through the City Region Sustainable Transport Settlements programme.

It is for the relevant local authorities to propose new governance structures in order to access the funds available in the City Region Sustainable Transport Settlements. The Department is continuing its engagement with local authorities, and the North of Tyne Mayoral Combined Authority, on these plans.

Neil O'Brien
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what discussions officials in his Department have had with their counterparts in the Department for Transport on plans for a future city region settlement in north east England to allow access to funding through the City Region Sustainable Transport Settlements programme.

CRSTS funding is available for the North East subject to the appropriate governance structures being in place as set out in Baroness Vere’s letter to regional leaders on 22 October 2021. It is for the relevant local authorities to propose new governance structures in order to access the funds available. The department is continuing its engagement with local authorities, and the North of Tyne Mayoral Combined Authority, on these plans and continue to update colleagues in DfT as the engagement progresses.

Neil O'Brien
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, on which date each of the freeports announced in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021 (a) came into or (b) is planned to come into operation.

At Budget, on 27 October 2021, it was announced that the first Freeport tax sites would be in Humber, Teesside and Thames. Eligible businesses that base themselves in tax sites at these Freeports can benefit from several tax incentives. On 19 November, these tax sites and a customs site in Teesside were designated meaning that businesses are able to benefit from the tax benefits and customs facilitations from that date.

The Government is working hard to support all Freeports. Subject to agreeing their business cases, we expect the next set of Freeports to begin operations in 2022.

Neil O'Brien
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many apprentices were employed in each Government department in the financial year 2021-22; and what proportion of the total workforce were apprentices in each Government department in 2021-2022.

Cabinet Office is currently collating and quality assuring data on apprenticeships for 2021/22; final figures are not yet available. Based on indicative figures, Cabinet Office employed 224 apprentices in 2021/22, which is equivalent to 2.34% of the 2021/22 target headcount.

As at 1 April 2022, the number of Cabinet Office apprentices actively completing a programme (regardless of which financial year they started) equates to 3.23% of the total workforce.

The Cabinet Office, on behalf of the Civil Service, will be publishing a full breakdown of departmental performance on apprenticeships in the Autumn in line with previous years.

Data for all departments between 2017 and 2021 is available on gov.uk.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Public Sector Apprenticeships Target, how many apprentices were employed in each participating department in the financial year 2021-22; what proportion of the total workforce in each participating department in 2021-22 were apprentices; what the return to his Department was in respect of the target for each participating department; and for each department, whether the Public Sector Apprenticeships Target was met.

Cabinet Office is currently collating and quality assuring data on apprenticeships for 2021/22; final figures are not yet available. Based on indicative figures, Cabinet Office employed 224 apprentices in 2021/22, which is equivalent to 2.34% of the 2021/22 target headcount.

As at 1 April 2022, the number of Cabinet Office apprentices actively completing a programme (regardless of which financial year they started) equates to 3.23% of the total workforce.

The Cabinet Office, on behalf of the Civil Service, will be publishing a full breakdown of departmental performance on apprenticeships in the Autumn in line with previous years.

Data for all departments between 2017 and 2021 is available on gov.uk.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has issued any guidance, internally or to other Departments on the risks or benefits of contracting companies to provide payroll finance solutions to staff delivering public services, in the last 10 years.

A joint communication from the Chief People Officer, Director General of Public Spending (HMT) and Government Chief Commercial Officer was issued in December 2020. This communication related to early payroll schemes, advising departments to ensure they were making full use of all options already available, including salary advances and loan schemes before considering proposals from third party finance providers. It further reminded departments that if they did want to introduce a new type of finance arrangement, they were required to seek internal sign off from their departmental Accounting Officer before approaching HM Treasury for final approval.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing further funding in port infrastructure following the Ports Infrastructure Fund.

Ports are commercial enterprises and would normally be expected to fund any infrastructure required to comply with legislation on border controls.

However, in recognition of the unique circumstances of EU Exit, the UK Government made £705 million of funding available to support border readiness.

This included the £200 million Port Infrastructure Fund which has been allocated; there are no plans to invite further applications.

Going forward, as commercial enterprises, it is for ports to make business decisions about which services they provide and how these are financed.



Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion in cost terms of the (a) furniture, including desks and chairs, (b) IT hardware and (c) programming for new visualizations and data outputs in respect of the operations room constructed in 70 Whitehall in the financial year 2020-21 is capable of being reused in other government buildings.

  1. Total £3,710,000.00

  1. Furniture £ 36,000.00

  2. IT/AV costs £ 450,000.00

  3. Visualisation & Programming £2,440,000.00

All furniture and systems are potentially capable of being reused in other Cabinet Office secure environments.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the eight successful Freeport bids, (a) how many and (b) which of those bids stated that they would benefit from the funding available through the Port Infrastructure Fund.

All of the Freeport locations have received funding from the Port Infrastructure Fund. The Freeport process was designed to align with other government funding. One of the bidders out of the eight successful locations made specific reference to the Port Infrastructure Fund in its bid.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to make further funds available through the Ports Infrastructure Fund in the context of the completion of Freeport designation in England.

The allocation of the Port Infrastructure Fund was announced on 15 December 2020. This funding provides assistance to the building of infrastructure to better facilitate the flow of trade into the UK from the EU. It is separate funding from the new Freeports which will create new national hubs for trade, innovation and commerce.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Treasury's publication entitled Build Back Better: our plan for growth, dated March 2021, and the target set out on page 14 of that publication to relocate 22,000 civil servants out of London by 2030, whether that target is to relocate those civil servants out of (a) London or (b) London and the South East; and if he will confirm the exact boundaries of the areas he would denote by the terms (i) London, (ii) the South East and (iii) London and the South East.

At Budget 2020, the Government committed to relocating a minimum of 22,000 civil service roles out of central London, the vast majority to the other regions and nations of the UK.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much money from the public purse has been spent on digital advertising on (a) the transition period and (b) public health advice on Covid-19 in (i) February 2020 and (ii) since the beginning of March 2020.

Cabinet Office publishes expenditure, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling monthly basis on gov.uk as part of routine government transparency arrangements.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of civil?servants' (a) parents and (b) guardians are also civil servants.

The information requested is not routinely collected.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of interns each Government Department accepted to the (a) Summer Diversity Internship Programme and (b) Civil Service graduate fast stream in each year since 2015 were (a) female, (b) male or (c) identified as neither.

As both the Summer Diversity Internship Programme and the Civil Service graduate fast stream are cross-Civil Service programmes, the information requested is not broken down by department.

Information relating to gender for those recommended for appointment to the Summer Diversity Internship Programme and Civil Service graduate Fast Stream in each year since 2015 is available in the relevant Civil Service Fast Stream annual reports.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average hourly pay is of employees identified as (a) male, (b) female and (c) other gender identity at each grade in the Prime Minister's Office.

The Prime Minister’s Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office and is included in this reply.

The Cabinet Office, along with other Government Departments, has published information about the gender pay gap in its workforce annually since 2017. The report for 2019 is available at https://gender-pay-gap.service.gov.uk/Employer/FukQqlAW.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many senior?civil?servants appointed to positions in his private office had previously been (a) political appointees in the Cabinet Office and (b) employed by a political party since 2015.

Information on Government Special Advisers is published regularly. Other Civil Servants are recruited in accordance with civil service recruitment principles.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of civil servants are employed on flexible working arrangements.

The Civil Service supports flexible working, recognising that flexible working patterns can be mutually beneficial, helping to attract and retain workforce, increasing productivity and reducing costs.

Arrangements are made departmentally and locally. Working patterns are agreed subject to business need depending on circumstances.

We do not hold information centrally about overall numbers of civil servants across all flexible working patterns. However, some information on civil servants working part-time is reported each quarter by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) as part of their quarterly public sector employment statistics.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what university each intern on the Summer Diversity Internship Programme attended in each year since 2015.

We do not currently cross-tabulate the information relating to university and the Summer Diversity Internship Programme. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average hourly pay is of (a) White or White British and (b) black, Asian or other minority ethnic group employees at each grade in the Prime Minister's Office.

Cabinet Office staff are not required to declare their ethnic origin and therefore a complete breakdown of all staff by grade; salary and ethnicity is not held.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether individuals who own more than one business can receive a covid-19 Bounce Back Loan for each of their businesses which requires such a loan.

A single business will not be eligible for multiple Bounce Back Loans; however, an individual who owns a number of separate businesses which do not fall under the same group, may apply for a Bounce Back Loan for each separate business entity.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent meetings he has had with representatives of (a) the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders and (b) Nissan to discuss the health of the UK automotive industry.

Ministers in the Department have been regularly engaging with with key industry bodies, to understand how we can support the continued resilience and competitiveness of UK manufacturing during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Organisations include the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) and Nissan, which has been a critical part of the UK’s automotive industry and the North East’s manufacturing landscape for the past 30 years.

In order to support UK business and industry during the Covid-19 outbreak, the Chancellor has announced an unprecedented package including government-backed and guaranteed loans. We have made an initial £330 billion of guarantees available, alongside the Coronavirus Job Retention and VAT deferral schemes.

The Government also has a long-standing programme of support to maintain the competitiveness of the UK automotive sector. Through our landmark Automotive Sector Deal, we have secured joint investment and long-term commitments to develop world-leading battery technologies, positioning the UK as the location of choice for the development and deployment of connected and autonomous vehicle technologies.

The Government, alongside industry, have jointly committed almost £1.5 billion through the Advanced Propulsion Centre and Faraday Battery Challenge to research, develop, and commercialise low carbon automotive innovations. In October last year, we announced up to £1 billion of new money to support research and development, including within supply chains, to support electric vehicle manufacture.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 February 2020 to Question 13518 on Unemployment: Ethnic Groups, what estimate he has made of the average wage of workers from BAME backgrounds.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has published estimates of the earnings for different ethnic groups in Great Britain.

In 2018, on average, the median gross hourly pay for people from an ethnic minority background was £11.54.

The full analysis can be found in the link below:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/articles/ethnicitypaygapsingreatbritain/2018

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps she is taking to amend Ofgem’s remit to incorporate the Government’s Net Zero target.

Ofgem will have an important role in the transition to net zero and already has various powers and duties in relation to decarbonisation, including a duty to consider reductions in targeted greenhouse gas emissions. The regulator is planning to publish a decarbonisation "action plan" in February and we look forward to working closely with Ofgem to help them to implement the contents of the plan.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what fiscal steps the Government plans to take to ensure that the creative industries can start growing again as the economy recovers from the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government is committed to working with the creative industries to support their recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Government’s response to Covid-19 has been one of the most generous and comprehensive in the world. This includes the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, both of which have been extended until April 2021.The Chancellor has announced a further £4.6 billion in new lockdown grants to support businesses and protect jobs through the current national lockdown.

In addition to an extensive package of economy-wide support, last year the Government announced the unprecedented £1.57 billion support package for the culture sector and, as of 11 December 2020, over £1 billion has been allocated across all four nations of the UK. This funding is supporting the arts and culture sector to survive the pandemic.

In July 2020, the Government announced a UK-wide £500 million Restart scheme to support film and TV production companies that have been unable to film due to the lack of insurance covering Covid-related risks. As of 20 January, the scheme is supporting over 16,000 jobs and over £470 million of production spend across the UK.

20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the economic effect on UK exports of musicians being unable to tour as freely in the EU after 1 January 2021 as they used to.

The Government recognises the importance of international touring for UK cultural and creative practitioners, and their support staff.

We know that while leaving the EU will bring changes and new processes to touring and working in the EU, it will also bring new opportunities. In all circumstances, we expect the UK’s creative output to continue to be an export that is as highly valued in the European Union as it is across the world.

Leaving the EU has always meant that there would be changes to how practitioners operate in the EU. DCMS has engaged with the sector extensively throughout negotiations and since the announcement of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement to understand the diverse circumstances of companies, organisations and individual practitioners and how they may need to adapt as they plan activity across the European Union.

Going forward we will continue to work closely with the sector, including with representative organisations, to assess impact and to ensure businesses and individuals have the advice and guidance they need to meet new requirements.

20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the Government’s policy position is on supporting job creation in the creative industries as part of its covid-19 recovery plan.

The Government’s response to Covid-19 impacts on workers has been one of the most generous and comprehensive in the world. This includes the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, both of which have been extended until April 2021. The £2 billion Kickstart Scheme is creating job placements for 16 to 24 year olds on Universal Credit.

In addition, the £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund is providing further targeted support to critical cultural, arts and heritage organisations to help them, and the skilled workers that work in them, survive and recover from the Covid-19 pandemic. As of 11 December 2020, over £1 billion of the fund has been allocated across all four nations of the UK.

In July 2020, the Government also announced a UK-wide £500 million Restart scheme to support film and TV production companies and their workforce. As of 20 January, the scheme is supporting over 16,000 jobs and over £470 million of production spend across the UK.

20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent economic assessment the Government has made of the effect on UK-based creative workers not being able to travel freely within the EU after 1 January 2021.

The Government recognises the importance of international touring for UK cultural and creative practitioners, and their support staff.

We know that while leaving the EU will bring changes and new processes to touring and working in the EU, it will also bring new opportunities. In all circumstances, we expect the UK’s creative output to continue to be an export that is as highly valued in the European Union as it is across the world.

Leaving the EU has always meant that there would be changes to how practitioners operate in the EU. DCMS has engaged with the sector extensively throughout negotiations and since the announcement of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement to understand the diverse circumstances of companies, organisations and individual practitioners and how they may need to adapt as they plan activity across the European Union.

Going forward we will continue to work closely with the sector, including with representative organisations, to assess impact and to ensure businesses and individuals have the advice and guidance they need to meet new requirements.

2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of youth club closures on the rate of crime committed by young people.

The Government recognises that there are a range of complex causes of youth crime and that these are often tied to local factors. However, it is the local authorities’ role to allocate funding and deliver youth services in line with local need. We are not aware of any conclusive evidence of a direct link between the closure of youth clubs and crimes committed by young people.

This government is committed to young people and levelling up opportunities. We are investing £500 million over five years through the new Youth Investment Fund to build new youth centres, refurbish existing youth facilities, provide mobile facilities for harder to reach areas, and to invest in the youth work profession and frontline services.

Government is also funding up to £7 million this financial year through the Youth Accelerator Fund, expanding existing successful projects that are delivering positive activities for young people, and to address urgent needs in the youth sector. UK Youth is distributing over £1 million of this funding to grassroots youth organisations across the country.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Government’s loneliness strategy in helping to tackle loneliness.

Government is committed to understanding the impact of its activity on loneliness and will use this insight to inform future decision-making. The 60 commitments made in the loneliness strategy vary widely and so learning is captured in different ways. Many of these commitments are still in progress and findings will emerge over time. For example, an independent evaluation of the £11.5m Building Connections Fund is underway, and findings will be published from mid-2020 onwards.

The first annual report on government’s work on tackling loneliness was published on 20th January 2020. It highlighted the progress made so far, including action by frontline workers across the public sector to recognise and act on loneliness, the launch of the Let’s Talk Loneliness campaign, the commitment to include measures in the Public Health Outcomes Framework so we can understand local rates of loneliness, and the announcement of an additional £2m of grant-funding to help frontline grassroots organisations that bring people together.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Written Ministerial Statement of 19 April 2022 on the Further Education Capital Transformation Fund, HCWS769, for each college listed as being in receipt of funds which (a) Parliamentary constituency and (b) lower tier local authority that college or facility is located in; and for what reason that information was not supplied as part of the statement.

The written ministerial statement of 19 April 2022 announced the outcomes of the bidding round for the Further Education Capital Transformation Programme and listed the 62 further education colleges that were successful.

The table attached sets out the lower tier local authority and the parliamentary constituency that each of the projects for the 62 successful colleges are located in.

For the purposes of announcing the outcomes in a written ministerial statement, it was considered sufficient to list the 62 colleges along with the region they are located in.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of the total number of children eligible for the early years pupil premium are accessing the 15 hours free childcare entitlement; and if he will provide a breakdown of each of those figures by (i) two, (ii) three and (iii) four year olds.

There were 74,488 children aged three and 33,353 children aged four, who were registered to receive the 15 hours free childcare entitlements and who were also in receipt of Early Years Pupil Premium (EYPP) funding in January 2021. Children are only eligible for EYPP funding if they are aged three or four and are also registered to receive the 15 hours free childcare entitlement; as such all children eligible for EYPP will also be registered to receive 15 hours free childcare.

Children aged two are not eligible for EYPP. However, some of the same criteria are used to determine whether two-year-olds are eligible to access 15 hours of free childcare. There were 124,543 children aged two who were registered to receive this entitlement in January 2021. This figure includes children eligible because of high level special educational needs or disability, being looked after or adopted from care, or having no recourse to public funds, in addition to those meeting economic criteria similar to those used for EYPP eligibility. The percentage of eligible two year olds registered to receive 15 hours free childcare was 62% in January 2021.

All figures above refer to England only and are derived from January 2021 data published in the Education provision: children under 5 years of age publication, available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/education-provision-children-under-5. The next release containing January 2022 data is scheduled to be published at the end of June 2022.

With regard to figures on the number of three and four year olds registered to receive the 30 hours free childcare entitlements and who are also in receipt of the EYPP are not readily available.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of the total number of children eligible for the early years pupil premium qualify for the 30 hours free childcare entitlement; and if he will provide a breakdown of each of those figures by (i) three and (ii) four year olds.

There were 74,488 children aged three and 33,353 children aged four, who were registered to receive the 15 hours free childcare entitlements and who were also in receipt of Early Years Pupil Premium (EYPP) funding in January 2021. Children are only eligible for EYPP funding if they are aged three or four and are also registered to receive the 15 hours free childcare entitlement; as such all children eligible for EYPP will also be registered to receive 15 hours free childcare.

Children aged two are not eligible for EYPP. However, some of the same criteria are used to determine whether two-year-olds are eligible to access 15 hours of free childcare. There were 124,543 children aged two who were registered to receive this entitlement in January 2021. This figure includes children eligible because of high level special educational needs or disability, being looked after or adopted from care, or having no recourse to public funds, in addition to those meeting economic criteria similar to those used for EYPP eligibility. The percentage of eligible two year olds registered to receive 15 hours free childcare was 62% in January 2021.

All figures above refer to England only and are derived from January 2021 data published in the Education provision: children under 5 years of age publication, available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/education-provision-children-under-5. The next release containing January 2022 data is scheduled to be published at the end of June 2022.

With regard to figures on the number of three and four year olds registered to receive the 30 hours free childcare entitlements and who are also in receipt of the EYPP are not readily available.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of the total number of children eligible for the early years pupil premium are accessing (a) all of and (b) part of the 30 hours free childcare entitlement; and if he will provide a breakdown of each of those four figures by (i) three and (ii) four year olds.

There were 74,488 children aged three and 33,353 children aged four, who were registered to receive the 15 hours free childcare entitlements and who were also in receipt of Early Years Pupil Premium (EYPP) funding in January 2021. Children are only eligible for EYPP funding if they are aged three or four and are also registered to receive the 15 hours free childcare entitlement; as such all children eligible for EYPP will also be registered to receive 15 hours free childcare.

Children aged two are not eligible for EYPP. However, some of the same criteria are used to determine whether two-year-olds are eligible to access 15 hours of free childcare. There were 124,543 children aged two who were registered to receive this entitlement in January 2021. This figure includes children eligible because of high level special educational needs or disability, being looked after or adopted from care, or having no recourse to public funds, in addition to those meeting economic criteria similar to those used for EYPP eligibility. The percentage of eligible two year olds registered to receive 15 hours free childcare was 62% in January 2021.

All figures above refer to England only and are derived from January 2021 data published in the Education provision: children under 5 years of age publication, available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/education-provision-children-under-5. The next release containing January 2022 data is scheduled to be published at the end of June 2022.

With regard to figures on the number of three and four year olds registered to receive the 30 hours free childcare entitlements and who are also in receipt of the EYPP are not readily available.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of tutors employed through the funding provided to the National Tutoring Programme; and how many of those tutors are qualified teachers.

As of 13 March 2022, the National Tutoring Programme has delivered just under 1.2 million tuition course starts. This has been driven by the successful introduction of school-led tutoring, which is proving popular among schools. The latest statistical release on 31 March 2022 showed that 76% of tutoring in the 2021/22 academic year is being delivered through this route.

The department has concluded that a new approach is required for next year. This is based on government learning from school-led tutoring and wider feedback from schools asking for more freedom and flexibility to deliver tutoring.

On 31 March 2022, the department announced that all tutoring funding for the 2022/23 academic year will go directly to schools. This will simplify the system and increase flexibility for schools to decide how best to provide tutoring for their children. The department announced the launch of procurement activity in mid-April to appoint one or more delivery partners for the 2022/23 academic year and the 2023/24 academic year. The delivery partner(s) will be responsible for quality assurance of tuition partners, recruiting and deploying Academic Mentors, and offering training.

Independent evaluations are being conducted by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) for both year one and two of the programme’s Tuition partner and Academic Mentor routes. The department expects results from the year one evaluation to be published in Autumn 2022.This will include insights into how the programme has been implemented and the impact on pupil progress. Interim findings are being shared with the department so that ongoing evaluation can inform policy making. The year two evaluation of the Tuition partner and Academic Mentor routes focuses on pupil progress, school and teacher impacts, and reasons for non-participation.

In addition to the evaluation of the Tuition partner and Academic Mentor routes, school-led tutoring is being evaluated by the NFER. It is looking at the impact of school-led tutoring on pupil attainment outcomes. Its report will also look at how schools have chosen to spend the grant, how successfully training has supported tutoring, the perceived benefits of the school-led tutoring grant and how it could be improved in the future. The year two reports will be published in 2023. These will include an estimate of the number of tutors participating in school-led tutoring and the proportion of those with qualified teacher status.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the impact of the National Tutoring Programme on pupil attainment.

As of 13 March 2022, the National Tutoring Programme has delivered just under 1.2 million tuition course starts. This has been driven by the successful introduction of school-led tutoring, which is proving popular among schools. The latest statistical release on 31 March 2022 showed that 76% of tutoring in the 2021/22 academic year is being delivered through this route.

The department has concluded that a new approach is required for next year. This is based on government learning from school-led tutoring and wider feedback from schools asking for more freedom and flexibility to deliver tutoring.

On 31 March 2022, the department announced that all tutoring funding for the 2022/23 academic year will go directly to schools. This will simplify the system and increase flexibility for schools to decide how best to provide tutoring for their children. The department announced the launch of procurement activity in mid-April to appoint one or more delivery partners for the 2022/23 academic year and the 2023/24 academic year. The delivery partner(s) will be responsible for quality assurance of tuition partners, recruiting and deploying Academic Mentors, and offering training.

Independent evaluations are being conducted by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) for both year one and two of the programme’s Tuition partner and Academic Mentor routes. The department expects results from the year one evaluation to be published in Autumn 2022.This will include insights into how the programme has been implemented and the impact on pupil progress. Interim findings are being shared with the department so that ongoing evaluation can inform policy making. The year two evaluation of the Tuition partner and Academic Mentor routes focuses on pupil progress, school and teacher impacts, and reasons for non-participation.

In addition to the evaluation of the Tuition partner and Academic Mentor routes, school-led tutoring is being evaluated by the NFER. It is looking at the impact of school-led tutoring on pupil attainment outcomes. Its report will also look at how schools have chosen to spend the grant, how successfully training has supported tutoring, the perceived benefits of the school-led tutoring grant and how it could be improved in the future. The year two reports will be published in 2023. These will include an estimate of the number of tutors participating in school-led tutoring and the proportion of those with qualified teacher status.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Written Statement of 31 March 2022, HCWS755 on Education Update, on what date the decision was taken not to renew the contract held with Randstad beyond its initial contract term.

As of 13 March 2022, the National Tutoring Programme has delivered just under 1.2 million tuition course starts. This has been driven by the successful introduction of school-led tutoring, which is proving popular among schools. The latest statistical release on 31 March 2022 showed that 76% of tutoring in the 2021/22 academic year is being delivered through this route.

The department has concluded that a new approach is required for next year. This is based on government learning from school-led tutoring and wider feedback from schools asking for more freedom and flexibility to deliver tutoring.

On 31 March 2022, the department announced that all tutoring funding for the 2022/23 academic year will go directly to schools. This will simplify the system and increase flexibility for schools to decide how best to provide tutoring for their children. The department announced the launch of procurement activity in mid-April to appoint one or more delivery partners for the 2022/23 academic year and the 2023/24 academic year. The delivery partner(s) will be responsible for quality assurance of tuition partners, recruiting and deploying Academic Mentors, and offering training.

Independent evaluations are being conducted by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) for both year one and two of the programme’s Tuition partner and Academic Mentor routes. The department expects results from the year one evaluation to be published in Autumn 2022.This will include insights into how the programme has been implemented and the impact on pupil progress. Interim findings are being shared with the department so that ongoing evaluation can inform policy making. The year two evaluation of the Tuition partner and Academic Mentor routes focuses on pupil progress, school and teacher impacts, and reasons for non-participation.

In addition to the evaluation of the Tuition partner and Academic Mentor routes, school-led tutoring is being evaluated by the NFER. It is looking at the impact of school-led tutoring on pupil attainment outcomes. Its report will also look at how schools have chosen to spend the grant, how successfully training has supported tutoring, the perceived benefits of the school-led tutoring grant and how it could be improved in the future. The year two reports will be published in 2023. These will include an estimate of the number of tutors participating in school-led tutoring and the proportion of those with qualified teacher status.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to his answer on teaching materials for Ukrainian-speaking and Russian-speaking children (question 145854), what steps he has taken to assure the precision, accuracy, usability, and suitability for children of the automatic translations he has prepared for children through Oak National Academy, in respect of (i) Ukrainian, and (ii) Russian.

Oak National Academy has enabled users to auto-translate its 10,000 lessons into a variety of languages, including Ukrainian and Russian. This is enabled through automatic translations services offered by major internet browsers, as well as through the integration of online translation tools into its lesson resources.

As an automated online service, while 100% accuracy cannot be guaranteed, these tools are of high quality and high accuracy. The service is designed as a rapid, temporary measure to support families fleeing the war with access to educational content, helping their transition to some routine and stability within the safety of the UK.

As part of its standard working practice, Oak National Academy responds to user feedback (including from teachers and parents as well as pupils) to ensure content remains high-quality and any questions are addressed as soon as possible.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the amount of money disbursed by companies and other employers in the UK on childcare during hours in which parents are working, including on (a) children too young to go to school, (b) before-school activities, (c) after-school activities, (d) and holiday activities (i) in total and (ii) for children aged (A) one, (B) two, (C) three, (D) four, (E) five, (F) six, (G) seven, (H) eight, (I) nine, (J) 10 and (K) 11 in each of the last 15 years.

The department does not hold all of the requested information. However, the department does hold the data in the two attached tables:

  1. Payments made to local authorities for government-funded childcare for 2, 3, and 4-year-olds, as part of the dedicated schools grant since the 2013/14 financial year (tab 1 in the spreadsheet).
  2. Mean child-level weekly payments for childcare for 0 to 2-year-olds, 3 to 4-year-olds, 5 to 7-year-olds, 8 to 11-year-olds, and 12 to 14-year-olds. This is taken from the department’s childcare and early years survey of parents. It should be noted that the department only holds this data back to 2014. For the 2019 survey, the focus shifted to preschool children following a user consultation in 2018. As such, the data only covers 0 to-4-year-olds (tab 2 in the spreadsheet).

In addition, the holiday activities and food programme was expanded to all local authorities in England in 2021. This programme provides free holiday club places with healthy meals and enriching activities to school-aged children who receive benefits-related free school meals.

A breakdown of expenditure is not available for the age groups specified in the question. However, the department is investing over £200 million a year in this programme. Allocations at local authority level for the 2022/23 financial year are in the department’s grant determination letter, available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1042274/Grant_determination_letter_-_HAF_2022_Final.pdf.

The government’s range of childcare support includes 15 hours free early education for all 3- and 4-year-olds, which can help save parents over £3,000 per year. In 2013, this was extended to the most disadvantaged 2-year-olds.

In 2017, the department introduced an additional 15 hours free childcare for working parents of 3- and 4-year-olds, bringing the total amount of available childcare to eligible parents to 30 hours. This can save parents over £6,000 per year. To be eligible for this, a lone parent must earn from just over £7,900 a year, and a couple (where both are working) from just over £15,800 per year.

The government has also introduced Tax-Free Childcare, available for working parents of children aged 0-11 (or up to 16 if their child is disabled) with the same income thresholds as 30 hours free childcare. This scheme can save parents up to £2,000 per year (or up to £4,000 for children with disabilities) and can be used alongside 30 hours free childcare.

Working parents on a low income may also be eligible for help with up to 85% of their childcare costs through the childcare element of Universal Credit. This is subject to a monthly limit of £646 for one child or £1,108 for two or more children aged 0-16.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the amount of money disbursed from public funds on childcare, including on (a) children too young to go to school, (b) before-school activities, (c) after-school activities and (d) school holiday activities (i) in total and (ii) for children aged (A) one, (B) two, (C) three, (D) four, (E) five, (F) six, (G) seven, (H) eight, (I) nine, (J) ten and (K) 11 in each of the last fifteen years.

The department does not hold all of the requested information. However, the department does hold the data in the two attached tables:

  1. Payments made to local authorities for government-funded childcare for 2, 3, and 4-year-olds, as part of the dedicated schools grant since the 2013/14 financial year (tab 1 in the spreadsheet).
  2. Mean child-level weekly payments for childcare for 0 to 2-year-olds, 3 to 4-year-olds, 5 to 7-year-olds, 8 to 11-year-olds, and 12 to 14-year-olds. This is taken from the department’s childcare and early years survey of parents. It should be noted that the department only holds this data back to 2014. For the 2019 survey, the focus shifted to preschool children following a user consultation in 2018. As such, the data only covers 0 to-4-year-olds (tab 2 in the spreadsheet).

In addition, the holiday activities and food programme was expanded to all local authorities in England in 2021. This programme provides free holiday club places with healthy meals and enriching activities to school-aged children who receive benefits-related free school meals.

A breakdown of expenditure is not available for the age groups specified in the question. However, the department is investing over £200 million a year in this programme. Allocations at local authority level for the 2022/23 financial year are in the department’s grant determination letter, available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1042274/Grant_determination_letter_-_HAF_2022_Final.pdf.

The government’s range of childcare support includes 15 hours free early education for all 3- and 4-year-olds, which can help save parents over £3,000 per year. In 2013, this was extended to the most disadvantaged 2-year-olds.

In 2017, the department introduced an additional 15 hours free childcare for working parents of 3- and 4-year-olds, bringing the total amount of available childcare to eligible parents to 30 hours. This can save parents over £6,000 per year. To be eligible for this, a lone parent must earn from just over £7,900 a year, and a couple (where both are working) from just over £15,800 per year.

The government has also introduced Tax-Free Childcare, available for working parents of children aged 0-11 (or up to 16 if their child is disabled) with the same income thresholds as 30 hours free childcare. This scheme can save parents up to £2,000 per year (or up to £4,000 for children with disabilities) and can be used alongside 30 hours free childcare.

Working parents on a low income may also be eligible for help with up to 85% of their childcare costs through the childcare element of Universal Credit. This is subject to a monthly limit of £646 for one child or £1,108 for two or more children aged 0-16.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the amount of money disbursed privately by people and families each year during parents' working hours on (a) childcare for children who too young to go to school, (b) before school activities, (c) after school activities and (c) holiday activities (i) in total and (ii) for children aged (A) one, (B) two, (C) three, (D) four, (E) five, (F) six, (G) seven, (H) eight, (I) nine, (J) ten and (K) 11 in each of the last fifteen years.

The department does not hold all of the requested information. However, the department does hold the data in the two attached tables:

  1. Payments made to local authorities for government-funded childcare for 2, 3, and 4-year-olds, as part of the dedicated schools grant since the 2013/14 financial year (tab 1 in the spreadsheet).
  2. Mean child-level weekly payments for childcare for 0 to 2-year-olds, 3 to 4-year-olds, 5 to 7-year-olds, 8 to 11-year-olds, and 12 to 14-year-olds. This is taken from the department’s childcare and early years survey of parents. It should be noted that the department only holds this data back to 2014. For the 2019 survey, the focus shifted to preschool children following a user consultation in 2018. As such, the data only covers 0 to-4-year-olds (tab 2 in the spreadsheet).

In addition, the holiday activities and food programme was expanded to all local authorities in England in 2021. This programme provides free holiday club places with healthy meals and enriching activities to school-aged children who receive benefits-related free school meals.

A breakdown of expenditure is not available for the age groups specified in the question. However, the department is investing over £200 million a year in this programme. Allocations at local authority level for the 2022/23 financial year are in the department’s grant determination letter, available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1042274/Grant_determination_letter_-_HAF_2022_Final.pdf.

The government’s range of childcare support includes 15 hours free early education for all 3- and 4-year-olds, which can help save parents over £3,000 per year. In 2013, this was extended to the most disadvantaged 2-year-olds.

In 2017, the department introduced an additional 15 hours free childcare for working parents of 3- and 4-year-olds, bringing the total amount of available childcare to eligible parents to 30 hours. This can save parents over £6,000 per year. To be eligible for this, a lone parent must earn from just over £7,900 a year, and a couple (where both are working) from just over £15,800 per year.

The government has also introduced Tax-Free Childcare, available for working parents of children aged 0-11 (or up to 16 if their child is disabled) with the same income thresholds as 30 hours free childcare. This scheme can save parents up to £2,000 per year (or up to £4,000 for children with disabilities) and can be used alongside 30 hours free childcare.

Working parents on a low income may also be eligible for help with up to 85% of their childcare costs through the childcare element of Universal Credit. This is subject to a monthly limit of £646 for one child or £1,108 for two or more children aged 0-16.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Public Sector Apprenticeships Target, how many apprentices were employed in his Department in the financial year 2021-22; what proportion of the total workforce in 2021-22 were apprentices; and what his Department's return in respect of the Public Sector Apprenticeships Target was.

The department is currently collating and quality assuring data on apprenticeships for the 2021/22 financial year. Final figures are not yet available. The Cabinet Office, on behalf of the Civil Service, will be publishing a full breakdown of departmental performance on apprenticeships in the autumn in line with previous years. We are not yet able to say what proportion of the workforce were apprentices during the 2020/21 financial year.

Over the four years of the target 2017-2020, the department exceeded the target with 2.6% of the workforce starting an apprenticeship during this period. We have taken steps to increase our apprenticeship starts through advertising the majority of external vacancies at junior grades as apprenticeships since September 2020 and we are therefore on track to exceed the target during the 2021/22 academic year.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the comments made by the Director of GCHQ on 31 March 2022 on the standard of the UK's cybersecurity, whether he has made a recent assessment of the cybersecurity and resilience to cyber attack of (a) his Department, (b) Ofqual and Ofsted and (c) the (i) executive agencies, (ii) the executive non-departmental public bodies, (iii) advisory non-departmental public bodies and (iv) other public bodies for which he is responsible; and if he will make a statement.

The department follows standard government security assessments to review and monitor cyber security and resilience. Departmental health security checks are carried out annually to track actions and progress.

We do not directly assess the cyber security resilience of agencies and arm’s length bodies (ALBs). The department’s agencies and ALBs are responsible for maintaining their IT systems and cyber security, and are supported by the Cyber Security Division to provide advice, guidance and support to adhere to and maintain good cyber security standards. The Cyber Security Division has a dedicated team who are responsible for the ongoing relationship with the department’s agencies and ALBs, and for providing regular targeted communications to raise awareness for any identified emerging threats and provide guidance to address and mitigate.

The department also works closely with partners such as Jisc to ensure that the same guidance, standards and support are available for higher and further education establishments.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 29 March 2022 to Question 146609 on British Students Abroad: Russia and Ukraine, what assessment he has made of the capacity in UK universities to enable students who were in Ukraine and Russia to transfer to courses in the UK in accordance with the approach outlined in that Answer; and if he will make it his policy to issue updates on that matter through regular Ministerial Statements.

Universities in Ukraine are striving to maintain the education of their students under extremely challenging conditions. The department is working closely with the Medical Schools Council and the Council of Deans of Health who are liaising with universities in Ukraine. This is to help ensure online learning materials are available to medical students to continue their education remotely.

Universities in England are autonomous and responsible for their own admissions. However, I have urged higher education (HE) providers to look at how they can support students returning from Ukraine to continue their studies in the UK and show as much flexibility as possible.

Individuals will need to consider their own circumstances and what is right for them. Students who wish to explore their options with HE providers in England should engage in conversations with their preferred provider to understand the full range of options available specifically to them. This may include studying related courses in the biological sciences or subjects allied to medicine.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much revenue his Department has raised by charging staff for car parking spaces at each of the office premises operated by (a) his Department, (b) Ofqual and Ofsted, (c) his executive agencies, (d) his executive non-departmental public bodies, (e) his advisory non-departmental public bodies and (f) other public bodies for which he is responsible; and if he will make a statement.

The attached table includes data to support the response relating to the Department for Education and arm’s length bodies.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many car parking spaces have been made available to staff (a) free of charge and (b) at a charge at each of the office premises operated by (a) his Department, (b) Ofqual and Ofsted, (c) his executive agencies, (d) his executive non-departmental public bodies, (e) his advisory non-departmental public bodies and (f) other public bodies for which he is responsible; and if he will make a statement.

The attached table includes data to support the response relating to the Department for Education and arm’s length bodies.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking in respect of each public body for which he is responsible to encourage (a) active travel by staff, (b) the use of public transport by staff and (c) a reduction in the carbon emissions associated with staff commuting.

Where staff are required to travel on official business, the departmental policy encourages the use of sustainable modes of transport. Public transport should always be considered first whilst value for money must be a priority. Staff are encouraged to use the cycle to work scheme and can also be reimbursed for using their own bicycles.

The department and responsible public bodies are committed to reducing the overall greenhouse gas emissions. This is progressed as part of our committed targets under the Greening Government Commitments.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which (a) Government departments and (b) other public sector organisations have used the Apprenticeship Levy to fund (i) MBAs and (ii) other academic masters qualifications for staff in each of the last three years; and how many staff have been supported in that way for those qualifications by (i) Government departments and (ii) other public sector organisations in those years.

The data the department publishes on public sector apprenticeships can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships/2021-22. This shows the average public sector starts between 2017/18 and 2020/21 as a percentage of headcount by sector. Public bodies in scope of the target are required to submit an annual return to the department by the end of September. The information collected is limited to employee headcounts and overall apprentice numbers. The department expects to publish data for the 2021/22 public sector target in our apprenticeships and traineeships full 2021/22 academic year release in November. The department does not hold data in the format requested on whether public sector organisations, including other government departments, have utilised government funding for apprenticeships that include either an MBA or other academic masters qualification. The data reported by public sector organisations does not include a breakdown by level or standard.

An MBA is not a mandatory qualification in any current apprenticeship standard. A mandatory master’s level qualification, which could have included an MBA, was previously included in the Level 7 Senior Leader standard but was removed in March 2021. This followed a request to the Institute of Apprenticeships and Technical Education by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, to review the standard to make sure all apprenticeships represent value for money and that government funding supports those who can benefit the most from our high-quality apprenticeships.

Of the 647 apprenticeship standards developed by employers, 56 are at Level 7, which is equivalent to master’s level, and 27 of these have a mandatory degree qualification. Details of apprenticeship standards can be found here: https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/apprenticeship-standards/?includeApprovedForDelivery=true.

In the 2020/21 academic year there were 19,570 apprenticeship starts at Level 7 which represented 6% of total starts for the year.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average number of working days is that it has taken him in the (a) 2021-22 Parliamentary Session as a whole and (b) in the 2021-22 Parliamentary Session (i) up to 15 September 2021 and (ii) from 16 September 2021 to 31 March 2022 to respond to (A) named day Parliamentary Questions and (B) all other Parliamentary Questions; and how many questions of each type he received in each of those periods.

The department attaches great importance to the effective and timely handling of correspondence from members of parliament, including written parliamentary questions. Performance for the 2021/22 parliamentary session is above the Procedure Committee target of 85% throughout the period.

The below table provides the average number of working days that it has taken for the department to respond to ‘Named Day’ and ‘Ordinary’ written parliamentary questions (WPQ) during the 2021/22 Parliamentary Session to the 31 March 2022. It also includes the totals received and the percentage of questions answered within their respective parliamentary deadlines.

PQ type

WPQ received & due for answer

% answered on time

Average working days to respond

2021/22 Parliamentary Session

Named Day WPQs

1,181

86.6%

3.8

Ordinary WPQs

1,914

88.2%

5.7

Total

3,095

87.6%

-

WPQs received 11/05/21 - 15/09/21

Named Day WPQs

388

90.5%

4.1

Ordinary WPQs

603

85.4%

5.9

Total

991

87.4%

-

WPQs received 16/09/21 - 31/03/22

Named Day WPQs

793

84.7%

3.6

Ordinary WPQs

1,311

89.5%

5.6

Total

2,104

87.7%

-

Footnotes:

1. Data is based on the number of written parliamentary questions (WPQs) received and answered by the Department for Education as at 07/04/22.

2. MPs may table questions, specifying the date on which they should receive an answer (a Named Day WPQ). MPs must give a minimum of two days notice. However, they may also pick a date further in the future. This can impact the average number of working days to respond.

3. Recess periods can impact the due date for answering WPQs, this will also have an impact on the average number of working days to respond.

4. An average length of time to respond is not given for the overall totals.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to change the current framework governing the opening of new schools.

The Schools White Paper, published on 28 March 2022, set out our intention to open new mainstream free schools in the areas where they are most needed, prioritising proposals located in Education Investment Areas. The department is currently reviewing the process for approving new free schools and will publish more details in due course. We will keep the wider framework for opening schools under review as part of our discussions on the proposals put forward in the White Paper.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the comments of the Director of GCHQ on 31 March 2022 on the standard of the UK's cyber security, whether he has made a recent assessment of the cybersecurity and resilience to cyber attack of (a) schools, (b) further education colleges, (c) universities and (d) contexts for early years provision; and if he will make a statement.

The department does not directly assess the cyber security status or resilience of educational establishments. However, it does engage with the sector by collating information from past incidents. This information enables us to gain an insight into the issues faced following a cyber-attack so that we can broadly understand the landscape.

Educational providers in England are responsible for maintaining their information technology systems and cyber security. The department has a dedicated sector cyber security team to support this activity. This team provides appropriate guidance and advice via regular targeted and broad communications to help schools adhere to and maintain good cyber security standards. The sector cyber security team also manages incoming cyber incident reports from educational institutions. Upon report of an incident, the team will provide recovery advice and ongoing support as required.

The department works closely with partners such as National Cyber Security Centre and Jisc to ensure that the same up-to-date guidance, standards, and support are available for higher and further education establishments.

The department has also developed a self-assessment tool that is due for release this year. This tool will help schools assess vulnerabilities in their cyber resilience, highlight areas for improvement, and give direction on how this can be achieved.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) companies and limited liability partnerships, (b) charities and (c) other organisations that have used the Apprenticeships Levy to fund MBAs for staff in each of the last three years.

A Master of Business Administration (MBA) is not a mandatory qualification in any current apprenticeship standard.

A mandatory master’s level qualification, which could have included an MBA, was previously included in the Level 7 Senior Leader standard, however, it was removed in March 2021. This followed a request to the Institute of Apprenticeships and Technical Education by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education. The request was to review the standard to ensure all apprenticeships represent value for money and that government funding supports those who can benefit the most from our high-quality apprenticeships.

We do not have data on the number of apprentices on the level 7 senior leader standard who undertook an MBA as part of their apprenticeship. We therefore cannot provide figures on the cost of government funding provided or the number or type of employers that have received government funding for MBA qualifications as part of an apprenticeship.


Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the total cost of MBAs funded through the Apprenticeships Levy in each of the last three years.

A Master of Business Administration (MBA) is not a mandatory qualification in any current apprenticeship standard.

A mandatory master’s level qualification, which could have included an MBA, was previously included in the Level 7 Senior Leader standard, however, it was removed in March 2021. This followed a request to the Institute of Apprenticeships and Technical Education by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education. The request was to review the standard to ensure all apprenticeships represent value for money and that government funding supports those who can benefit the most from our high-quality apprenticeships.

We do not have data on the number of apprentices on the level 7 senior leader standard who undertook an MBA as part of their apprenticeship. We therefore cannot provide figures on the cost of government funding provided or the number or type of employers that have received government funding for MBA qualifications as part of an apprenticeship.


Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people have (a) commenced and (b) completed an MBA using funds raised by the Apprenticeship Levy in each of the last three years.

A Master of Business Administration (MBA) is not a mandatory qualification in any current apprenticeship standard.

A mandatory master’s level qualification, which could have included an MBA, was previously included in the Level 7 Senior Leader standard, however, it was removed in March 2021. This followed a request to the Institute of Apprenticeships and Technical Education by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education. The request was to review the standard to ensure all apprenticeships represent value for money and that government funding supports those who can benefit the most from our high-quality apprenticeships.

We do not have data on the number of apprentices on the level 7 senior leader standard who undertook an MBA as part of their apprenticeship. We therefore cannot provide figures on the cost of government funding provided or the number or type of employers that have received government funding for MBA qualifications as part of an apprenticeship.


Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much (a) public money has been made available to fund SEND provision in English (i) mainstream and (ii) special schools in each of the last fifteen years and (b) he has budgeted to provide for each of those purposes in each of the next three financial years.

The department makes available funding for special educational needs and disability (SEND) provision though the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) to local authorities. Within the DSG, the majority of funding is for mainstream schools. When allocating funding to mainstream schools, local authorities indicate a notional amount that is for pupils with special educational needs, but schools decide how much of their overall budgets to spend supporting those pupils. The department does not collect that information from schools.

The DSG also includes high needs funding for children and young people with more complex SEND. Local authorities use their high needs budgets to provide additional funding to mainstream schools, for these pupils, and to fund special schools.

Table 1 below shows the amounts of high needs funding the department has made available to local authorities. This table goes back to the 2015/16 financial year. Figures for earlier years are either not comparable or not available because of the way that the DSG was allocated prior to 2015/16.

Table 1

Financial year

Total high needs block funding (£ million)

2015-16

5,247

2016-17

5,300

2017-18

5,827

2018-19

6,115

2019-20

6,279

2020-21

7,063

2021-22

7,906

2022-23 (Provisional, including supplementary funding)

8,981

Of the above amounts of high needs funding, local authorities have told us how much they have made available to mainstream schools and special schools in budget statements provided to the department under section 251 of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Act 2009. These amounts are set out in table 2 below. Table 2 does not include high needs funding that local authorities have made available for under 5 year olds, and for young people in further education and alternative provision: these categories of planned expenditure are included in the amounts in table 1.

Table 2

Financial year

Mainstream primary and secondary schools (£ million)

Special schools (£ million)

2015/16

1,254

2,912

2016/17

1,308

2,978

2017/18

1,348

3,126

2018/19

1,443

3,448

2019/20

1,483

3,788

2020/21

N/A

N/A

2021/22

2,063

4,517

Due to some categories of expenditure changed from year to year, the amounts in the table above are not on a precise like-for-like basis. In view of the COVID-19 pandemic, the department did not collect this information from local authorities in the 2020/21 financial year.

Local authorities have not yet advised the department of their planned high needs expenditure in the 2022/23 financial year. Neither the department nor local authorities have yet budgeted for high needs spending in the 2023/24 and 2024/25 financial years.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the example of Daniella on page 40 of the SEND review he presented to Parliament on 29 March 2022 (CP 624); how many children aged four are educated at a nursery; what proportion of four year olds in England are so educated; what proportion of four year olds does he estimate to have special educational needs or disabilities (SEND); what number of four year olds have been assessed to have SEND; how many four years olds have an Education and Health Care Plan, and what proportion of the total population of four year olds in England does that constitute; and how much has been spent in each of the last 12 financial years by the Government on SEND specific CPD for nursery staff.

There were 10,778 pupils with an education, health and care (EHC) plan aged five or under and in attendance at a special school in January 2021. This constitutes 2.5% of all EHC plans in January 2021.

There were 11,662 pupils aged five or under attending a special school in January 2021. 34% of children aged five or under with an EHC plan were attending a special school in January 2021.

The figures above are derived from data published in the Special Educational Needs in England publication, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/ef0839de-baad-422d-86a5-e25ea50cd63b.

A table is attached providing the number of four-year-olds by provider type and the proportion of four-year-old children registered at each provider type.

The number and percentage of pupils receiving funded early education who have special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) for three and four-year-olds combined are available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/18857e7f-46db-4c02-af16-939bd652c6e0.

The total number of four-year-olds with an EHC plan specifically is not available. The number of children aged 0-4 with an EHC plan was 16,536. This includes all children with an EHC plan, whether attending a school or not.

The amount spent in each of the last 12 financial years by the government on SEND-specific continuous professional development for nursery staff is not held by the department.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the example of Sophie on page 50 of the SEND review he presented to Parliament on 29 March 2022 (CP 624), how many children both (a) five or under and (b) educated in a special school, have an Education and Health Care Plan; what proportion that number constitutes of all children with an EHCP; how many children aged five or under are educated in special schools; and what proportion of children aged five or under with an EHCP are educated in a special school.

There were 10,778 pupils with an education, health and care (EHC) plan aged five or under and in attendance at a special school in January 2021. This constitutes 2.5% of all EHC plans in January 2021.

There were 11,662 pupils aged five or under attending a special school in January 2021. 34% of children aged five or under with an EHC plan were attending a special school in January 2021.

The figures above are derived from data published in the Special Educational Needs in England publication, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/ef0839de-baad-422d-86a5-e25ea50cd63b.

A table is attached providing the number of four-year-olds by provider type and the proportion of four-year-old children registered at each provider type.

The number and percentage of pupils receiving funded early education who have special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) for three and four-year-olds combined are available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/18857e7f-46db-4c02-af16-939bd652c6e0.

The total number of four-year-olds with an EHC plan specifically is not available. The number of children aged 0-4 with an EHC plan was 16,536. This includes all children with an EHC plan, whether attending a school or not.

The amount spent in each of the last 12 financial years by the government on SEND-specific continuous professional development for nursery staff is not held by the department.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has plans to bring forward legislative proposals on changing the framework governing the opening of new schools.

On 28 March 2022, we published the Schools White Paper, which set out our vision for the school system by 2030. There are currently no plans to bring forward legislative changes to the framework for opening schools, but we will keep this under review as part of our discussions on the proposals set out in the White Paper.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much his Department proposes to spend on (a) focus group research, (b) opinion polling and (c) other forms of opinion research in each of the next three financial years.

Annual spend on research and development by government departments is collected by ONS. The survey results are published here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/governmentpublicsectorandtaxes/researchanddevelopmentexpenditure/datasets/scienceengineeringandtechnologystatisticsreferencetables). Table 3 provides information by department. This data collection goes back to 2008 and will be updated in April 2022.

Future spend on all forms of educational research, other than on focus group research and opinion polling (social and economic research) is expected to be similar to the previously published figures. This budget covers large scale statistical collections and participation in a number of international studies. These large-scale studies account for the majority of the department’s spend on social and economic research. Current and available historical information on previous contracts for government research is published on: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

In line with the professional standards for government communicators, research is conducted to understand audiences so that government communication can be relevant, meaningful and effective, and as part of evaluation to assess performance in delivering on objectives such as changing behaviour, improving operational effectiveness, building the reputation of the UK and explaining government policies and programmes.

This research activity draws on the full range of quantitative and qualitative methods, including focus groups, opinion polling and other forms of opinion research appropriate to the requirement but spend is not recorded by research method.

Communications spend, including communications research, is approved as part of the government advertising, marketing and communications spend controls process and spend over £25,000 since 2010 is published and available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-department-and-executive-agency-spend-over-25-000.

Future spend on communications research is not committed in advance but allocated as part of overall business planning processes in line with department finance and commercial processes, and subject to government advertising, marketing and communications spend controls process.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department made of its spending on all forms of educational research, other than on focus group research and opinion polling, in each of the next three financial years.

Annual spend on research and development by government departments is collected by ONS. The survey results are published here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/governmentpublicsectorandtaxes/researchanddevelopmentexpenditure/datasets/scienceengineeringandtechnologystatisticsreferencetables). Table 3 provides information by department. This data collection goes back to 2008 and will be updated in April 2022.

Future spend on all forms of educational research, other than on focus group research and opinion polling (social and economic research) is expected to be similar to the previously published figures. This budget covers large scale statistical collections and participation in a number of international studies. These large-scale studies account for the majority of the department’s spend on social and economic research. Current and available historical information on previous contracts for government research is published on: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

In line with the professional standards for government communicators, research is conducted to understand audiences so that government communication can be relevant, meaningful and effective, and as part of evaluation to assess performance in delivering on objectives such as changing behaviour, improving operational effectiveness, building the reputation of the UK and explaining government policies and programmes.

This research activity draws on the full range of quantitative and qualitative methods, including focus groups, opinion polling and other forms of opinion research appropriate to the requirement but spend is not recorded by research method.

Communications spend, including communications research, is approved as part of the government advertising, marketing and communications spend controls process and spend over £25,000 since 2010 is published and available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-department-and-executive-agency-spend-over-25-000.

Future spend on communications research is not committed in advance but allocated as part of overall business planning processes in line with department finance and commercial processes, and subject to government advertising, marketing and communications spend controls process.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much his Department has spent on all forms of educational research other than opinion research, such as focus group research and opinion polling, in each of the last 15 years.

Annual spend on research and development by government departments is collected by ONS. The survey results are published here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/governmentpublicsectorandtaxes/researchanddevelopmentexpenditure/datasets/scienceengineeringandtechnologystatisticsreferencetables). Table 3 provides information by department. This data collection goes back to 2008 and will be updated in April 2022.

Future spend on all forms of educational research, other than on focus group research and opinion polling (social and economic research) is expected to be similar to the previously published figures. This budget covers large scale statistical collections and participation in a number of international studies. These large-scale studies account for the majority of the department’s spend on social and economic research. Current and available historical information on previous contracts for government research is published on: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

In line with the professional standards for government communicators, research is conducted to understand audiences so that government communication can be relevant, meaningful and effective, and as part of evaluation to assess performance in delivering on objectives such as changing behaviour, improving operational effectiveness, building the reputation of the UK and explaining government policies and programmes.

This research activity draws on the full range of quantitative and qualitative methods, including focus groups, opinion polling and other forms of opinion research appropriate to the requirement but spend is not recorded by research method.

Communications spend, including communications research, is approved as part of the government advertising, marketing and communications spend controls process and spend over £25,000 since 2010 is published and available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-department-and-executive-agency-spend-over-25-000.

Future spend on communications research is not committed in advance but allocated as part of overall business planning processes in line with department finance and commercial processes, and subject to government advertising, marketing and communications spend controls process.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much his Department has spent on (a) focus group research, (b) opinion polling and (c) other forms of opinion research in each of the last 20 years.

Annual spend on research and development by government departments is collected by ONS. The survey results are published here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/governmentpublicsectorandtaxes/researchanddevelopmentexpenditure/datasets/scienceengineeringandtechnologystatisticsreferencetables). Table 3 provides information by department. This data collection goes back to 2008 and will be updated in April 2022.

Future spend on all forms of educational research, other than on focus group research and opinion polling (social and economic research) is expected to be similar to the previously published figures. This budget covers large scale statistical collections and participation in a number of international studies. These large-scale studies account for the majority of the department’s spend on social and economic research. Current and available historical information on previous contracts for government research is published on: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

In line with the professional standards for government communicators, research is conducted to understand audiences so that government communication can be relevant, meaningful and effective, and as part of evaluation to assess performance in delivering on objectives such as changing behaviour, improving operational effectiveness, building the reputation of the UK and explaining government policies and programmes.

This research activity draws on the full range of quantitative and qualitative methods, including focus groups, opinion polling and other forms of opinion research appropriate to the requirement but spend is not recorded by research method.

Communications spend, including communications research, is approved as part of the government advertising, marketing and communications spend controls process and spend over £25,000 since 2010 is published and available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-department-and-executive-agency-spend-over-25-000.

Future spend on communications research is not committed in advance but allocated as part of overall business planning processes in line with department finance and commercial processes, and subject to government advertising, marketing and communications spend controls process.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND Review published on 29 March 2022 and his associated statement to the House of the same date, what his planned timetable is for additional educational psychologists to be in place supporting children and schools; and if he will make it his policy to provide hon. Members with regular updates on the number of educational psychologists in England who are working to support children and schools in the state sector.

The department has provided a further £10.3 million of funding to train over 200 more educational psychologists. Recruitment of the trainees will begin in September 2022, ready for the course to commence in September 2023, and trainees will graduate in 2026. Since 2020, the department has increased the number of educational psychologists whose training we fund from 160 to over 200 per academic year.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the amount of money (a) raised by the Apprenticeships Levy and (b) spent on apprenticeships from those funds in each of the last three financial years.

The apprenticeship levy is an important part of our reforms to create a high quality, employer-led apprenticeships system, and it supports employers of all sizes to invest in high-quality apprenticeship training.

Monthly receipts data for the Apprenticeship Levy is published by HM Revenue & Customs in their Tax & NIC Receipts publication which can be found online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmrc-tax-and-nics-receipts-for-the-uk.

The table below shows the total value of funds spent by the Education and Skills Funding Agency on apprenticeships from the last three full financial years (2018/19, 2019/20 and 2020/21):

Financial Year

Spend (£ million)

2018/19

£1,738

2019/20

£1,919

2020/21

£1,863

* Includes levy, non levy, additional payments and funding to support the apprenticeships programme.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what funding he (a) has made available in (i) each of the last five financial years and (ii) the 2021-22 financial year and (b) plans to make available in the (A) next financial year and (B) subsequent three financial years for the purpose of ensuring a successful transition between BTECs and T-Levels.

The department recognises that significant additional funding will be needed for the successful introduction and delivery of T Levels. We announced in 2017 that T Level programmes would be backed by up to an additional £500 million of investment every year when fully rolled out. Some of this additional £500 million is included in the £1.6 billion extra announced for 16-19 funding by the 2024/25 financial year, compared with the 2021/22 financial year, in the recent Spending Review.

We have made available £268 million in capital funding for the first three waves of T Level delivery, starting in September 2020, 2021, and 2022. This funding is being used to improve the quality of facilities and equipment that will be used to deliver T Levels. Eligible providers will also be able to access training to help prepare their teachers and leaders.

As set out in the table below, we have also allocated £207.6 million to help the sector build capacity for T Level industry placements and deliver placements to students on existing programmes. From the 2020/21 academic year, we have allocated £3.2 million in industry placement funding for those on T Level programmes. In addition, T Levels include more teaching hours and are more prescriptive in the content than general 16-19 study programmes. Therefore, four larger bands have been added to the 16-19 funding bands to ensure T level providers receive the additional funding required.

Academic Years

Funding stream

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Totals to date

Capacity and delivery funding

£0

£57.4m

£53.6m

£52.2m

£44.4m

£207.6m

Industry placement funding

£0

£0

£0

£0.5m

£2.7m

£3.2m

The funding data for the financial years 2022/23, 2023/24 and 2024/25 is not yet available.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his oral contribution of 28 March 2022 on the introduction of family hubs in half of England's local authorities, what criteria he has or plans to use to determine which local authorities will receive a family hub; and if he will place a copy of the list of those local authorities that will receive a family hub in the Library.

In the 2021 Autumn Budget, the government announced a further £82 million to create a network of family hubs. This is part of a wider £300 million package to transform services for parents, carers, babies, and children in half of council areas across England.

The Department for Education and Department for Health and Social Care are working together to determine the best approach for selecting local authorities and distributing the funding. The department will set out more detail in due course.

The department will place in the libraries of both Houses a copy of the list of those local authorities eligible to receive funding for family hubs from the Spending Review 2021 package.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish a list of every (a) school, (b) college and (c) university outside Stratford-upon-Avon constituency which he has visited since 15 September 2021.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has visited the following schools, colleges and universities outside of his constituency, Stratford-upon-Avon, since 15 September 2021. This list reflects visits undertaken in his capacity as Secretary of State for Education only:

  • 17 September 2021 to Barnet and Southgate College
  • 20 September 2021 to Harris Academy Westminster
  • 23 September 2021 to West Coventry Academy
  • 15 October 2021 to Westbury-on-Trym Church of England Academy
  • 21 October 2021 to Barnsley College
  • 17 November 2021 to Aston University
  • 18 November 2021 to St Mary’s Catholic Academy
  • 25 November 2021 to Brunel University
  • 06 January 2022 to Hammersmith Academy
  • 10 March 2022 to Sheffield Park Academy
  • 18 March 2022 to Aspire Academy Blackpool
  • 18 March 2022 to Highfurlong School
  • 24 March 2022 to The Totteridge Academy
  • 28 March 2022 to Monega Primary School

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the change in the level of funding spent on skills, across all sectors of the economy, since 2010.

Spend by the Department for Education (and previously the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) on skills is reported through publication of the Annual Report and Accounts. These are available for each financial year since 2010/11.

The Department for Education (DfE) reports are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-annual-reports.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) reports are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/bis-annual-reports-and-accounts.

Responsibility for higher and further education policy, apprenticeships and skills moved from BIS to DfE in 2016.

In the 2021 Spending Review, the government set out its plan to invest £3.8 billion more in skills over the Parliament as a whole, equivalent to a cash increase of 42% compared to the 2019/20 financial year. This will ensure people can access high-quality training and education that leads to good jobs, addresses skills gaps, boosts productivity, and supports levelling up. This will support the sector to reform and deliver the technical, skilled education employers want and our economy needs.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the capacity of British universities to support the continuing education of British (a) students and (b) medical students who had been studying in Ukraine or Russia and whose education has been disrupted as a result of the Russian invasion of Ukraine or subsequent international sanctions on Russia.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office travel advice is that British nationals should leave Ukraine immediately if they judge it is safe to do so. The government does not track the location of British nationals when they travel. However, we are pleased that the majority of these students have now returned to the UK.

The government is very sympathetic to those students that have had their studies disrupted and will look to support UK students returning from Russia and Ukraine as they reassess their options in the UK. The department has asked universities to treat these students sensitively.

I have convened the Higher Education (HE) Taskforce, bringing together representatives from across the sector to discuss how we can work together to facilitate the progression of Ukrainian students to HE. There are still many courses available through UCAS that students can apply for, and we would encourage them to engage in conversations with their preferred HE providers to understand the full range of options available specifically to them.

The department recognises that, for a variety of reasons, many students that were studying medicine in Ukraine cannot be accommodated on medicine courses. Therefore, we are encouraging universities to consider alternative options to allow these students to continue their studies. These include related courses in the biological sciences or subjects allied to medicine.

The department is also looking into how the HE sector can support Ukrainian HE providers should it be appropriate or feasible for elements of the course or exams to be delivered remotely and I have recently written to the HE sector asking them to be flexible and sensitive when considering applications for entry onto courses.

Whilst HE providers are autonomous and independent from government, we are encouraging them to be as flexible as possible for all students impacted by the situation in Ukraine and where they are facing challenges, to ensure support is given where it is most needed.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
24th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of British (a) students and (b) medical students studying in Russia whose education has been disrupted as a result of the Russian invasion of Ukraine or subsequent international sanctions on Russia.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office travel advice is that British nationals should leave Ukraine immediately if they judge it is safe to do so. The government does not track the location of British nationals when they travel. However, we are pleased that the majority of these students have now returned to the UK.

The government is very sympathetic to those students that have had their studies disrupted and will look to support UK students returning from Russia and Ukraine as they reassess their options in the UK. The department has asked universities to treat these students sensitively.

I have convened the Higher Education (HE) Taskforce, bringing together representatives from across the sector to discuss how we can work together to facilitate the progression of Ukrainian students to HE. There are still many courses available through UCAS that students can apply for, and we would encourage them to engage in conversations with their preferred HE providers to understand the full range of options available specifically to them.

The department recognises that, for a variety of reasons, many students that were studying medicine in Ukraine cannot be accommodated on medicine courses. Therefore, we are encouraging universities to consider alternative options to allow these students to continue their studies. These include related courses in the biological sciences or subjects allied to medicine.

The department is also looking into how the HE sector can support Ukrainian HE providers should it be appropriate or feasible for elements of the course or exams to be delivered remotely and I have recently written to the HE sector asking them to be flexible and sensitive when considering applications for entry onto courses.

Whilst HE providers are autonomous and independent from government, we are encouraging them to be as flexible as possible for all students impacted by the situation in Ukraine and where they are facing challenges, to ensure support is given where it is most needed.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
24th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of British (a) students and (b) medical students studying in Ukraine whose education has been disrupted as a result of the Russian invasion of that country.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office travel advice is that British nationals should leave Ukraine immediately if they judge it is safe to do so. The government does not track the location of British nationals when they travel. However, we are pleased that the majority of these students have now returned to the UK.

The government is very sympathetic to those students that have had their studies disrupted and will look to support UK students returning from Russia and Ukraine as they reassess their options in the UK. The department has asked universities to treat these students sensitively.

I have convened the Higher Education (HE) Taskforce, bringing together representatives from across the sector to discuss how we can work together to facilitate the progression of Ukrainian students to HE. There are still many courses available through UCAS that students can apply for, and we would encourage them to engage in conversations with their preferred HE providers to understand the full range of options available specifically to them.

The department recognises that, for a variety of reasons, many students that were studying medicine in Ukraine cannot be accommodated on medicine courses. Therefore, we are encouraging universities to consider alternative options to allow these students to continue their studies. These include related courses in the biological sciences or subjects allied to medicine.

The department is also looking into how the HE sector can support Ukrainian HE providers should it be appropriate or feasible for elements of the course or exams to be delivered remotely and I have recently written to the HE sector asking them to be flexible and sensitive when considering applications for entry onto courses.

Whilst HE providers are autonomous and independent from government, we are encouraging them to be as flexible as possible for all students impacted by the situation in Ukraine and where they are facing challenges, to ensure support is given where it is most needed.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
24th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant the Answer of 17 March 2022 to Question 141972 on Teachers: Re-employment, whether he has made an assessment of the overall success of the initial call for volunteers to re-enter the teaching profession.

The department’s priority continues to be to maintain high-quality, face-to-face education for all children and young people. Temporary staff, including supply teachers, have played a key role in this as schools have faced higher workforce absence rates, particularly over Winter, due to the Omicron variant. We remain hugely grateful to all school and college staff for their work, which has consistently kept over 99.9% of schools open this term.

The department is extremely grateful to all the teachers who responded to the campaign. Our ambition was for as many teachers as possible to make themselves available and return to the classroom as supply teachers, supporting schools to maintain face-to-face education. Each one is making a difference to the education of their pupils and makes a valuable contribution to our aim of maintaining face-to-face education in schools.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
24th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the National Tutoring Programme advert published on Twitter on 2 March 2022, if he will publish the (a) CPM and (b) cost per result of (i) that tweet, (ii) all other tweets within the same advertising campaign and (iii) all other tweets being promoted by, for, or on behalf of his Department as of 24 March 2022.

Since the National Tutoring Programme (NTP) began in November 2020, over one million courses have started, and the programme remains on track to achieve the ambitious target of delivering two million high-quality tuition courses this academic year.

All programme costs are included as part of the £1.1 billion investment in the NTP. All key information about the programme is communicated to schools and the public using a range of medium, including social media.

£150,000 is allocated for year two of the NTP on all communications activities. Paid-for marketing includes a mixture of digital advertising, social media, public relations and events. £95,000 of the £150,000 has been spent to date.

Communication and marketing undertaken by the department for the NTP does not have any additional costs.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness and value for money achieved by social media advertising by, for, or on behalf of the National Tutoring Programme; and whether that assessment includes evaluation relative to (a) other forms of advertising by, for, or on behalf of the National Tutoring Programme, and (b) other social media advertising conducted by, for, or on behalf of programmes which are run by, for, or on behalf of his Department.

Since the National Tutoring Programme began in November 2020, over one million courses have started, and the programme remains on track to achieve the ambitious target of delivering two million high quality tuition courses this academic year.

All programme costs are included as part of the £1.1 billion investment in the National Tutoring Programme. All key information about the programme is communicated to schools and the public using a range of media, including social media.

£150,000 is allocated for year 2 of the National Tutoring Programme on all communications activities. Paid-for marketing includes a mixture of digital advertising, social media, public relations and events. £95,000 of the £150,000 has been spent to date.

Independent evaluations of the programme are being carried out, which will focus on pupil progress and also look at school and teacher impacts and explore reasons for non-participation. Separately, we regularly evaluate the awareness of the programme with teachers and parents.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much money his Department (a) budgeted for this financial year and (b) has spent to date on social media advertising for the National Tutoring Programme; on what date that advertising expenditure commenced; and if he will make an estimate of the (i) average spend per day and (ii) daily cost per click of that advertising expenditure.

Since the National Tutoring Programme began in November 2020, over one million courses have started, and the programme remains on track to achieve the ambitious target of delivering two million high quality tuition courses this academic year.

All programme costs are included as part of the £1.1 billion investment in the National Tutoring Programme. All key information about the programme is communicated to schools and the public using a range of media, including social media.

£150,000 is allocated for year 2 of the National Tutoring Programme on all communications activities. Paid-for marketing includes a mixture of digital advertising, social media, public relations and events. £95,000 of the £150,000 has been spent to date.

Independent evaluations of the programme are being carried out, which will focus on pupil progress and also look at school and teacher impacts and explore reasons for non-participation. Separately, we regularly evaluate the awareness of the programme with teachers and parents.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the sufficiency of teachers qualified to teach English as a second language to Ukrainian speakers.

The department is preparing to make sure all school-age children who resettle from Ukraine are able to access education. We are working across government on this and will set out more details when available.

Just like any other children living in the UK, Ukrainian children have a right to attend school in England. Local authorities are obliged to offer suitable schooling. All school-age children arriving from Ukraine will be eligible.

Schools are responsible for ensuring that all their pupils, including those who have a first language other than English, develop the English language skills they require to access the curriculum and achieve their potential. Schools are experienced in supporting children with English as an additional language. The expectation that they should do so is set out in the Teachers’ Standards. It is also covered in initial teacher training (ITT) courses.

All ITT courses must be designed to allow trainees to meet the teachers’ standards, including standard 5. This states that teachers adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils. Standard 5 is clear that all teachers must have a clear understanding of the needs of all pupils, including those with English as an additional language. The Teachers’ Standards are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teachers-standards.

Ukrainians aged 19+ and their family members settled under the Ukraine Family Scheme, and the Ukraine Sponsorship Scheme (Homes for Ukraine) in the UK, can access training to gain the skills they need to move on with their lives. This includes provision funded through the Adult Education Budget, including ESOL, and level 3 free courses for job offer.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has given directions to his Department to assess or improve capacity for translating educational materials into (a) Ukrainian and (b) Russian.

10,000 lessons can now be auto-translated into Ukrainian, Russian, and other languages through remote education resource Oak National Academy, serving millions of children through the COVID-19 pandemic. This will help schools who support many pupils for whom English is a second language.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 22 March 2022, on Teachers: Re-employment, what steps he has taken to improve operational planning and the collection of statistical information about the re-employment of teachers while minimising the burden on contractors.

Given the important role that organisations such as supply agencies play in supporting schools to maintain face to face education, it is right that we minimise data collection burdens, as this allows them to focus on their core functions.

There is no routine collection of statistical information about supply staff. Supply staff can find work through several channels and are not restricted to using supply agencies. Schools can engage supply teachers directly, and school leaders have autonomy over how they staff their schools and access temporary staff.

We maintain regular contact with a range of supply agencies, key trade bodies, and trade unions to monitor the supply market.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
18th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made for children aged (a) 0-two, (b) two to four and (c) four or over, of the proportion of (i) children receiving some childcare from their grandparents and (ii) grandparents providing some childcare for their grandchildren, in each of the last ten years.

Information on the proportion of children receiving childcare from grandparents is collected in the annual childcare and early years survey of parents. Data from each of the past ten years can be found in the attached table.

In surveys taking place up to 2018, interviews were conducted with parents of children aged 0 to 14-years-old. For the 2019 survey, interviews were conducted with parents of children aged 0 to 4-years-old.

The 2020 survey did not take place because the COVID-19 outbreak restricted the survey methodology, as it is conducted using face-to-face interviews. Fieldwork for the 2021 childcare and early years survey of parents is currently underway with parents of children aged 0 to 14-years-old. The latest published data is for the 2019 survey.

The department does not hold information on the proportion of grandparents providing childcare.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding has been allocated to teaching English for Speakers of Other Languages for (a) adults, (b) children (c) refugees and (d) asylum seekers in each financial year since 1997.

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) is funded within the adult education budget (AEB). We publish provider allocations for the AEB on gov.uk at 19+ funding allocations here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/19-funding-allocations#published-allocations. We do not allocate funding for ESOL separately within that budget.

From academic year 2019/20 part of the AEB was devolved to mayoral combined authorities and the Greater London Authority and so is not included in these published figures.

The government is also providing funding for those in the Homes for Ukraine Scheme at a rate of £10,500 per person to councils to enable them to provide support to Ukrainian families to rebuild their lives and fully integrate into communities, which is unringfenced and therefore can also be spent on ESOL. The £10,500 for Ukrainian nationals is for the first year. We will review funding for future years in due course.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
17th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has plans to restart the Childcare and early years survey of parents run by his Department.

Fieldwork for the childcare and early years survey of parents (2021) is currently underway. The official statistics have a provisional release date of July 2022.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's press release, Education Secretary calls for ex-teachers to return to classrooms, published on 20 December 2021, and pursuant to the Answers of 22 January 2022 to Questions 102608 and 102595, how many ex-teachers have volunteered to return to the classroom in (a) England, (b) each region of England, (c) each upper tier local authority in England, (d) each lower tier local authority in England, and (e) each parliamentary constituency in England.

The department’s priority has, and continues to be, to maintain high-quality, face-to-face education for all children and young people.

The call for ex-teachers was one of a series of measures the department put in place to help break the chains of COVID-19 transmission, minimising disruption to education and limiting absences during the winter. These measures included regular testing, improving ventilation in classrooms and publishing sector-led case studies that illustrate best practice in delivering hybrid lessons, remote teaching and combined classes. They also included continuing the booster rollout for adults and vaccinations for secondary age pupils.

The department also reintroduced the COVID-19 workforce fund to provide financial support to eligible schools and colleges for additional staff absence costs incurred from 22 November 2021 and extended that fund until 8 April 2022. The fund supports schools and colleges facing the greatest staffing and funding pressures to continue to deliver face-to-face, high-quality education to all pupils.

On 12 January 2022, the department published a one-off data release from an ad-hoc survey of a sample of supply agencies gathered between 20 December 2021 and 7 January 2022.

The department is always mindful of balancing the need for data collections with the burdens we place on those collating it, particularly given the key role supply agencies play in supporting schools to maintain face-to-face education. The department regularly engages with the sector to monitor interest in the campaign, but restricted further data collections to allow them to focus on their core functions and consequently have not collected additional data.

The department is extremely grateful to all the teachers who responded to our campaign to temporarily return to the classroom. Each one is making a difference to the education of the pupils they are teaching and makes a valuable contribution to our aim of maintaining face-to-face education in our schools.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
17th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children have been permanently excluded from schools in each (a) region of and (b) local authority area in England in each of the last fifteen years.

The requested information is available in the Office for National Statistics’ release of data concerning permanent exclusions and suspensions in England from the 2006/07 academic year onwards. It is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england.

In the explore data and files section, under open data, the file on permanent exclusions and suspensions by geography includes the numbers and rates of permanent exclusions at national, regional, and local authority levels.


Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
17th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children have been permanently excluded from schools in each of the last fifteen years.

The requested information is available in the Office for National Statistics’ release of data concerning permanent exclusions and suspensions in England from the 2006/07 academic year onwards. It is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england.

In the explore data and files section, under open data, the file on permanent exclusions and suspensions by geography includes the numbers and rates of permanent exclusions at national, regional, and local authority levels.


Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
17th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding he has made available for specific interventions designed to improve behaviour in (a) England, (b) each region of England and (c) each local authority area in England in each of the last fifteen years.

We do not hold the information in the format requested. Schools and local authority areas in England are not allocated funding specifically for behaviour as part of the schools grant. There have, however, been several individual programmes to fund behaviour interventions over the last fifteen years.

Up until financial year 2007/08, there was funding to support local authorities in integrating behaviour and attendance into the Secondary National Strategy. After 2007/08, this was merged into local government funding and became un-ringfenced. In financial year 2006/07, 130 local authorities received funding allocations between £40,980 and £183,300, with a total for England of £12,244,181. In financial year 2007/08, 148 local authorities received funding allocations between £40,980 and £183,300, with a total for England of £13,761,080. Further information on behaviour funding allocations per local authority between 2006 and 2008 is available in the attached table.

There was a Lead Behaviour School project in financial year 2010/11, through which several local authorities received £40,000 each for one year only. These local authorities were Wigan, North Yorkshire, Northumberland, Wiltshire, Somerset, Cornwall, Gloucestershire, South Gloucestershire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Essex, Leicester City, Coventry, Hammersmith and Fulham, Brent, Hampshire, Kent and Devon.

In April 2021, we launched the three year Behaviour Hubs programme, representing a £10 million investment in improving behaviour in schools. The programme enables schools with exemplary positive behaviour cultures to work closely with schools that want and need to turn around their behaviour, alongside a central offer of support and a taskforce of advisers. The aim is to improve their culture and spread good practice across the country.

There are currently 22 lead schools and 2 lead multi-academy trusts (MATs) across the country on the programme, representing 21 unique local authorities. In April 2022, a further 28 lead schools and 8 lead MATs, representing 25 different local authorities, will join the programme. When combined, this will mean that 43 unique local authorities will be the location of at least one Behaviour Hubs lead school and that all regions in England will be represented as part of the programme. We anticipate that, over the life of the programme, up to 700 partner schools will receive support from the Behaviour Hubs programme.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
17th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the trends in the level of permanent exclusions of children from schools in the last fifteen years; and whether he has made a statistical analysis of the variations of those reasons by (a) local authority and (b) region of England.

The department agrees with the Timpson Review’s conclusion that there is no ‘right’ number of exclusions. We are clear that permanent exclusion should only be used when necessary, as a last resort and this should not mean exclusion from education.

The Timpson Review explored how headteachers use exclusion, and why pupils with particular characteristics are more likely to be excluded from school. This review can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/school-exclusions-review-call-for-evidence.

Statistics on permanent exclusions from the 2006/07 academic year onwards are available in the national statistics release 'Permanent exclusions and suspensions in England'. This can be accessed here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england.

The national trend can be accessed here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/0ed81d36-3d56-4f12-9a33-9acd2058a403.

In the Explore data and files section of the publication, under open data, the file on permanent exclusions and suspensions by geography includes the numbers and rates of permanent exclusions at national, regional and local authority level. The file on permanent exclusions and suspensions by reason includes data by reason for exclusion at national, regional, and local authority level. Consistent data is available from 2006/07.

A technical note that included further statistical analysis into the association between probability of being excluded and various pupil and school characteristics was published alongside the Timpson Review. This can be accessed here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/799910/Technical_note.pdf.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will issue guidance to (a) nurseries and other childcare contexts, (b) schools, (c) colleges, and (d) universities, on welcoming and supporting children and young people who are refugees and asylum seekers from Ukraine.

The government has a long and proud history of supporting refugees in their time of need, and we want to be as generous as we possibly can. Work is underway across government departments, and with charities and local authorities to ensure refugees and asylum seekers from Ukraine are properly supported so they can rebuild their lives.

On 25 February, the department posted on our Education Hub directing teachers and families who are seeking advice to resources on Educate Against Hate that could be of use in the classroom or for families and young people themselves: https://educationhub.blog.gov.uk/2022/02/25/help-for-teachers-and-families-to-talk-to-pupils-about-russias-invasion-of-ukraine-and-how-to-help-them-avoid-misinformation/?utm_source=1%20March%202022%20C19&utm_medium=Daily%20Email%20C19&utm_campaign=DfE%20C19.

Further detail on the support we provide to those we bring to the UK, will be made available in due course.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for each of the last fifteen years how many young men (a) turned 18, (b) aged between 18 and 21 entered university, (c) commenced a level 6 qualification in higher education and (d) completed a level 6 qualification in higher education; and what proportion of those who (i) commenced and (ii) completed a level 6 qualification in higher education did so in STEM subjects.

The department’s annual publication ‘Participation measures in higher education’ provides a time series of the initial participation of students in higher education (HE), available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/participation-measures-in-higher-education. This release includes age-specific data showing the number of English domiciled entrants to higher education in the UK who participate for a minimum period of six months for the first time. It also includes age-specific population estimates for England, which were calculated from Office for National Statistics population data, available here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/populationestimates/datasets/analysisofpopulationestimatestoolforuk.

These two sources are combined to derive the Higher Education Initial Participation measure, calculated as the sum of age specific participation rates for 17 to 30-year-olds in England. Statistics are published for the 2006/07 to 2019/20 academic years.

The bespoke table below has been generated from the publication containing age and gender breakdowns for initial entrants to higher education, as well as the associated population estimates for England. The table is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/debf7f5f-9481-40d7-8f7e-0e915c21c7c6.

This shows, for example, that the 18-year-old population estimates for England in 2019/20 were 301,745 for females and 318,390 for males. There were 163,370 female initial entrants and 134,285 male initial entrants aged 18-21 in the 2019/20 academic year.

The other breakdowns requested are not available on the same basis as the figures stated above. However, detailed statistics on entry and qualification in higher education have been published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) as far back as 1994/95.

HESA statistics refer to HE students at UK higher education providers only[1]. Explicit data mapped to National Qualifications Framework level 6 are not published by HESA, however first degrees can be selected as an indicative estimate to observe trends over time. Further details on the qualifications are available here: https://www.gov.uk/what-different-qualification-levels-mean/list-of-qualification-levels.

Counts of student entrants and enrolments are available by subject (including science subject areas) and sex for the academic years 2019/20 to 2020/21 in Figure 13 of HESA’s Higher Education Student Data pages, available here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb262/figure-13.

Counts for the academic years 2014/15 to 2018/19[2] are available in Table 9 of HESA’s Higher Education Student Data pages: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/students/table-9.[3]

Counts of student qualifiers are available by subject (including science subject areas) and sex for the academic years 2019/20 to 2020/21 in Figure 17 of HESA’s Higher Education Student Data pages: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb262/figure-17.

Counts for the academic years 2014/15 to 2018/19[4] are available in Figure 17 of HESA’s Higher Education Student Statistics: UK, 2018/19 publication: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb255/figure-17.[5]

HESA’s publication archive for academic years prior to 2014/15 can be found here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/publications#students-higher-education.

[1] This does not include students studying higher education qualifications at further education colleges.

[2] Figures prior to the academic year 2019/20 exclude a small minority registered at Alternative Providers.

[3] A new subject classification system, the Higher Education Classification of Subjects (HECoS) was introduced in the academic year 2019/20, hence figures for 2018/19 and earlier are not directly comparable with the following years.

[4] Figures prior to the academic year 2019/20 exclude a small minority registered at Alternative Providers.

[5] A new subject classification system, the Higher Education Classification of Subjects (HECoS) was introduced in the academic year 2019/20, hence figures for 2018/19 and earlier are not directly comparable with the following years.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for each of the last fifteen years, how many young women (a) turned 18, (b) aged between 18 and 21 entered university, (c) commenced a level 6 qualification in higher education and (d) completed a level 6 qualification in higher education; and what proportion of those who (i) commenced and (ii) completed a level 6 qualification in higher education did so in STEM subjects.

The department’s annual publication ‘Participation measures in higher education’ provides a time series of the initial participation of students in higher education (HE), available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/participation-measures-in-higher-education. This release includes age-specific data showing the number of English domiciled entrants to higher education in the UK who participate for a minimum period of six months for the first time. It also includes age-specific population estimates for England, which were calculated from Office for National Statistics population data, available here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/populationestimates/datasets/analysisofpopulationestimatestoolforuk.

These two sources are combined to derive the Higher Education Initial Participation measure, calculated as the sum of age specific participation rates for 17 to 30-year-olds in England. Statistics are published for the 2006/07 to 2019/20 academic years.

The bespoke table below has been generated from the publication containing age and gender breakdowns for initial entrants to higher education, as well as the associated population estimates for England. The table is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/debf7f5f-9481-40d7-8f7e-0e915c21c7c6.

This shows, for example, that the 18-year-old population estimates for England in 2019/20 were 301,745 for females and 318,390 for males. There were 163,370 female initial entrants and 134,285 male initial entrants aged 18-21 in the 2019/20 academic year.

The other breakdowns requested are not available on the same basis as the figures stated above. However, detailed statistics on entry and qualification in higher education have been published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) as far back as 1994/95.

HESA statistics refer to HE students at UK higher education providers only[1]. Explicit data mapped to National Qualifications Framework level 6 are not published by HESA, however first degrees can be selected as an indicative estimate to observe trends over time. Further details on the qualifications are available here: https://www.gov.uk/what-different-qualification-levels-mean/list-of-qualification-levels.

Counts of student entrants and enrolments are available by subject (including science subject areas) and sex for the academic years 2019/20 to 2020/21 in Figure 13 of HESA’s Higher Education Student Data pages, available here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb262/figure-13.

Counts for the academic years 2014/15 to 2018/19[2] are available in Table 9 of HESA’s Higher Education Student Data pages: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/students/table-9.[3]

Counts of student qualifiers are available by subject (including science subject areas) and sex for the academic years 2019/20 to 2020/21 in Figure 17 of HESA’s Higher Education Student Data pages: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb262/figure-17.

Counts for the academic years 2014/15 to 2018/19[4] are available in Figure 17 of HESA’s Higher Education Student Statistics: UK, 2018/19 publication: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb255/figure-17.[5]

HESA’s publication archive for academic years prior to 2014/15 can be found here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/publications#students-higher-education.

[1] This does not include students studying higher education qualifications at further education colleges.

[2] Figures prior to the academic year 2019/20 exclude a small minority registered at Alternative Providers.

[3] A new subject classification system, the Higher Education Classification of Subjects (HECoS) was introduced in the academic year 2019/20, hence figures for 2018/19 and earlier are not directly comparable with the following years.

[4] Figures prior to the academic year 2019/20 exclude a small minority registered at Alternative Providers.

[5] A new subject classification system, the Higher Education Classification of Subjects (HECoS) was introduced in the academic year 2019/20, hence figures for 2018/19 and earlier are not directly comparable with the following years.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his policy is on Russia’s continuing membership of international educational bodies of which the UK is also a member; and if he will make a statement.

The United Kingdom stands united with partners in condemning President Putin’s outrageous attack on Ukraine as a clear breach of international law and the United Nations Charter. President Putin must urgently de-escalate and withdraw his troops. He must be held accountable and stop undermining democracy, global stability, and international law.

While President Putin continues to violate international law, human rights and multiple commitments to peace and security, the government will, together with its allies, work to isolate on the international stage. Action has already been taken in some bodies. For example, the Council of Europe voted on 25 February to suspend Russia. The UK and over 50 countries staged a walk out of the UN Human Rights Council as Russia’s Foreign Minister started speaking on 1 March 2022. Given the varied nature of the multilateral system, even within a specific sector such as education, the government will need to approach this on a case-by-case basis, while being consistently clear that it condemns President Putin’s appalling actions.

The government continues to stand ready for dialogue with Russia within the multilateral system if it serves the purpose of ending bloodshed in Ukraine, defending the sovereignty of Ukraine and upholding international law.

The department is aware of a number of international education organisations that have taken the step of suspending Russia’s activities and we stand united with this approach.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Government’s contract with Randstad for the National Tutoring Programme, what steps his Department is taking to procure a new supplier for the scheme from 1 September 2022.

The delivery and performance of the National Tutoring Programme is monitored closely through ongoing performance reviews, governance boards and senior level meetings.

The department is unable to provide detailed information regarding the contract with Randstad as it is commercially sensitive. We continue to review the delivery of the programme and will set out our future plans in due course.

A full independent evaluation of the programme will be published in summer 2023.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he has taken in the last six months to ensure statistical information scheduled to be released by the Department is published on the Department's website in a timely and effective way.

The department is committed to the transparent release of statistics, publishing in line with the Code of Practice for Statistics. Public releases by the department are made in line with its scheduled release calendar and publication dates are pre-announced via the GOV.UK portal for transparency.

Decisions on timing are made by our Chief Statistician who works closely with statistics producers, relevant parties, and the Office for Statistics Regulation to ensure the availability of our data in the public interest. The accurate publication of statistics requires appropriate preparation and quality assessment, and decisions on timescales must account for the time required for these processes to take place reliably.

To support the timely publication of statistics, the department has an ongoing programme of work to improve the efficiency of our statistics publication processes, whilst simultaneously working to enhance reliability and accessibility.

As part of this programme of work, the department have built (and continue to develop in an agile way) the ‘Explore Education Statistics’ platform. The department have worked closely with users to provide a system that meets accessibility and usability requirements as effectively as possible, whilst helping our statistics producers create publications in a more efficient and timely way. This platform can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 21 February 2022 to Question 121732, on National Tutoring programme, whether he has encountered practical barriers to publishing regional data on the operational aspects of participation in the National Tutoring programme.

The National Tutoring Programme is due to reach hundreds of thousands more pupils this year, as part of a significant expansion to give schools more flexibility to deliver tutoring that works for them, and ensure no child is left behind. The department is continuing to review the practicalities of publishing regional data.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the (a) make and (b) model are of the air filtration devices which his Department has (a) supplied and (b) plans to supply directly to schools and other educational establishments for the protection of children and young people against covid-19.

The air cleaning units being provided by the department are the same make and model as those available via the online marketplace. Further information, including the make and model of the air cleaning units, is available here: https://s107t01-webapp-v2-01.azurewebsites.net/list/air-cleaning. In future, we may review this list, and as more products which meet our specification become available, these will be added.

All air cleaning units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed through a rigorous consultation with industry wide experts in both air cleaning and ventilation, from academia, professional bodies and industry, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. Through this consultation, we have developed a specification specific to education, focusing on key drivers including classroom size, acoustics, clean air delivery and filtration, as well as requiring strong evidence to verify manufacturer's claims.

All procurement activity was undertaken with full compliance with the Public Contract Regulations 2015. The procurement of the air cleaning devices was undertaken using the Crown Commercial Service (CCS) Framework (RM6157), which can be accessed by central government departments, including the Department for Education, and the wider public sector. We have selected products which meet our specification criteria, to equip education and childcare providers with high quality air cleaning units of a suitable specification.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance he has provided to (a) schools, (b) colleges and (c) other educational settings on unused lateral flow test kits; and whether he will make a statement.

We are moving to a different phase in managing COVID-19, where we learn to live with the virus. From 21 February 2022, staff, children and young people in mainstream education and childcare are no longer asked to test twice per week. Staff, secondary school aged pupils and above in special schools, alternative provision, specialist special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) units within schools and colleges, and open and secure children’s homes, are advised to continue with twice weekly testing.

In mainstream education providers with a specialist SEND unit or further education (FE) equivalent, pupils in year 7 and above, and staff within the unit, should continue to be encouraged to test twice per week. These pupils are more likely to be vulnerable and at a higher risk of poor clinical outcomes because of COVID-19. Providers should supply them with test kits from their existing stocks to enable them to do this. The ordering process for SEND and alternative provision will not be changing.

Updated guidance on asymptomatic testing for education providers has been published, and requests that mainstream providers that have unused and unopened test kit boxes, should retain these for the time being. This stock of self-test kits is to ensure that mainstream providers can commence outbreak testing quickly, if required. We have consistently communicated that orders should only be placed if stock has run out, so we do not expect providers to have a large stock of test kits. The department continues to work closely with the UK Health Security Agency and will be considering how any remaining test kit stocks should be treated. Further details will be made available in due course.

The education ordering channel remains open for providers to obtain test kits if needed, in line with any testing measures agreed by Directors of Public Health or Health Protection Teams, in the event of an outbreak. Providers should not distribute test kits for any staff or pupils who wish to continue regular testing, but advise them to get tests from GOV.UK and local pharmacies.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the number of unused lateral flow test kits currently in (a) schools, (b) colleges and (c) other educational contexts; and if will make a statement.

We are moving to a different phase in managing COVID-19, where we learn to live with the virus. From 21 February 2022, staff, children and young people in mainstream education and childcare are no longer asked to test twice per week. Staff, secondary school aged pupils and above in special schools, alternative provision, specialist special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) units within schools and colleges, and open and secure children’s homes, are advised to continue with twice weekly testing.

In mainstream education providers with a specialist SEND unit or further education (FE) equivalent, pupils in year 7 and above, and staff within the unit, should continue to be encouraged to test twice per week. These pupils are more likely to be vulnerable and at a higher risk of poor clinical outcomes because of COVID-19. Providers should supply them with test kits from their existing stocks to enable them to do this. The ordering process for SEND and alternative provision will not be changing.

Updated guidance on asymptomatic testing for education providers has been published, and requests that mainstream providers that have unused and unopened test kit boxes, should retain these for the time being. This stock of self-test kits is to ensure that mainstream providers can commence outbreak testing quickly, if required. We have consistently communicated that orders should only be placed if stock has run out, so we do not expect providers to have a large stock of test kits. The department continues to work closely with the UK Health Security Agency and will be considering how any remaining test kit stocks should be treated. Further details will be made available in due course.

The education ordering channel remains open for providers to obtain test kits if needed, in line with any testing measures agreed by Directors of Public Health or Health Protection Teams, in the event of an outbreak. Providers should not distribute test kits for any staff or pupils who wish to continue regular testing, but advise them to get tests from GOV.UK and local pharmacies.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he will stop funding (a) universities and (b) colleges through the Coronavirus Workforce Fund; and if he will make a statement.

The COVID-19 workforce fund will provide financial support to eligible schools and colleges for costs incurred due to staff absences from Monday 22 November 2021 until Friday 8 April 2022.

The fund is planned to end on 8 April and the claims portal will open in the spring for absence costs incurred across the current duration of the fund.

Universities are not in scope to receive funding from the COVID-19 workforce fund.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what training his Department has provided to its staff on contract design in each of the last ten years; how many hours of that training has been delivered in each of those years; and if will make a statement.

The department does not provide specific contract design training. Aspects of contract design is covered in training on the procurement process or contract lifecycle.

We do not hold the information on the total amount of hours spent specifically on contract design in each of the last ten years.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 21 February 2022 to Question 121732 on the National Tutoring Programme, what increase in the number of (a) tutors and (b) tutor hours in the North East of England is represented by the increase from three accredited tutoring organisations in the region to six; and if he will make a statement.

The department previously understood that the Open Access second round had added three tuition partners covering the north-east, bringing the total to six. However, the latest data from the department’s supplier indicates that six were added, meaning nine accredited tuition organisations are operating in the area. This means there is increased capacity to offer face-to-face and online tuition in the north-east.

The department does not currently have figures on the increase in number of tutors. The department is unable to confirm how many tutoring hours will be added by its new tutoring partners to the north-east as they operate across multiple regions. However, each tutoring organisation commits to delivering high quality tuition to at least 500 pupils. The department will continue to monitor regional data and tutoring partner capacity to ensure it has sufficient coverage of all regions, including the north-east.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which websites that are wholly or partly under the control of his Department or used to deliver services under contract to the Government and are (a) managed directly by his Department, (b) managed for his Department by other arms of Government and or (c) managed under contract by private companies or other non-governmental organizations have been available during school hours for (i) 99.9 per cent of the time or more, (ii) 99.0 to 99.9 per cent of the time, (c) 98.0 to 98.9 per cent of the time, (d) 97.0 to 97.9 per cent of the time and (e) less than 97.0 per cent of the time in each of the last twelve months; and if he will publish full details of his Department's web service availability.

The department manages more than 400 services and transactions used by the education and care sector, as well as supporting internal departmental operations.

The department is responsible for the standard and availability of these services. This includes formalising obligations commercially where services are outsourced.

Over the last twelve months, the department’s service availability average across monitored services was 99.96%. Its service commitment targets, all of which encompass school hours, range from a minimum standard of 98% Monday to Friday (08:00 to 17:00), up to 99.95% 24 hours per day, 7 days a week, dependent on the service.

Government departments are required to publish a standard set of performance metrics on their live services as part of the Service Standard. Service availability is not required. The department has no plans to publish availability data at present.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the School Aged Immunisation Service will be involved in the vaccination of five to 11 year olds against covid-19; and what additional resources he plans to provide to ensure the effectiveness of the programme.

On 16 February 2022, the government accepted advice from the independent Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) to make a non-urgent offer of COVID-19 vaccinations to all children aged 5 to 11 in England. The NHS will prepare to extend the non-urgent offer of COVID-19 vaccination to children aged 5 to 11 during April so parents can, if they want, take up the offer to increase protection against potential future waves of COVID-19 as we learn to live with this virus.

The system letter, published on 18 February by the NHS, confirms that community pharmacy-led local vaccination services and centres should be the primary delivery models for this cohort. This letter can be found here: https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/publication/updated-jcvi-advice-for-vaccinating-5-to-11-year-olds/.

The NHS is also currently offering vaccinations to at-risk children and those who live with immunosuppressed people in this age group. Parents and guardians of at-risk children aged 5 to 11 should wait for the NHS to contact them, with local NHS teams already contacting those who are eligible.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of levels of vaccine hesitancy among parents of children aged (a) five to 11 and (b) 12 to 15.

Vaccinations help to increase protection against COVID-19. Being vaccinated minimises the need for children and young people to have time off from school or college, and helps them to continue to carry out their hobbies, attend social events and live their lives to the full.

As of 19 February 2022, the UK COVID-19 dashboard reports that 55.9% of 12 to 15 year olds have received the vaccination since September, and we continue to see vaccination rates increase.

To support the COVID-19 vaccination programme for young people, the NHS, Department of Health and Social Care and the Department for Education are working together to make it more efficient and increase the scale and pace of delivery. We are also working to target communications to parents, young people and the public to improve uptake and increase overall confidence in the programme. The department is continually working to support the NHS to better engage with parents and understand their needs and concerns regarding the vaccination programme. This includes identifying the preferred communication approaches, channels and content for parents to access reliable, impartial information and make informed decisions.

The NHS will prepare to extend the non-urgent offer of COVID-19 vaccination to children aged 5 to 11 during April so parents can, if they want, take up the offer to increase protection against potential future waves of COVID-19 as we learn to live with this virus. In all instances, the offer of vaccination will be accompanied by appropriate information to enable children, and those with parental responsibility, to provide informed consent prior to vaccination and encourage children to discuss the decision with their parents.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance was issued to schools on the discharge of child safeguarding responsibilities at a time of remote learning in (a) 2020 and (b) 2021.

During the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak, the department produced revised safeguarding guidance in a very short timescale, as a proportionate response intended to help schools and colleges with the discharge of their safeguarding responsibilities. The guidance included, amongst other things, matters such as the importance of schools and colleges reviewing and revising their child protection policies and the role and responsibilities of the designated safeguarding lead (and deputies).

We have always been clear throughout the COVID-19 outbreak that schools and colleges must continue to have regard to the statutory safeguarding guidance, Keeping Children Safe in Education (KCSIE), when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people, both online and offline. The revised KCSIE, which came into force on 1 September 2021 has been strengthened to give online safety greater prominence and provide extra support for schools and colleges to keep their students safe. It is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/keeping-children-safe-in-education--2.

It includes a dedicated collection of resources to support safe remote education, virtual lessons and live streaming, as well as signposting parents and carers to help on keeping their children and young people safe.

To support schools and colleges in meeting remote education expectations, our Get Help With Remote Education page provides a one-stop-shop for teachers and leaders, signposting the support package available. This is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/get-help-with-remote-education. This includes information on issues such as safeguarding, statutory duties and expectations. In particular the Safeguarding and remote education during COVID-19 guidance provides guidance on how to follow safeguarding procedures when planning remote education strategies and teaching remotely during the COVID-19 outbreak. It is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/safeguarding-and-remote-education-during-coronavirus-covid-19.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with what regularity staff in his Department meet with the National Police Chiefs’ Council lead for Child Protection; and if he will publish the agendas of their last five meetings.

The National Police Chief’s Council are members of both the Safeguarding Children Reform Implementation Board, which meets every quarter and the Vulnerable Children Young People National Board, which meets on an eight-weekly basis. Both forums meet to discuss safeguarding matters and the National Board also considers wider elements of the department’s response to protect vulnerable children during the COVID-19 outbreak.

The department does not routinely publish agendas for the National Board although records of the meetings can be provided upon request.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many times have ministers in his Department met with the National Police Chiefs’ Council lead for Child Protection in the last five years; and on what dates any such meetings took place.

The National Police Chiefs’ Council are members of the Vulnerable Children Young People Board and Safeguarding Children Reform Implementation Board, and thus share communication with the relevant bodies within the department. They have also attended roundtables with my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, to discuss issues such as online safeguarding.

With regards to the specific ask, information regarding the number of meetings is not readily available, although the former Minister for Children and Families, my hon. Friend for Chelmsford, met with the National Police Chiefs’ Council lead on 19 May 2021 and 10 June 2021. In addition, ministers will meet with the National Police Chiefs’ Council lead where necessary, and cross-government department links and working groups are strong, ensuring that relevant information and concerns are shared.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that improvements are made following Serious Case Reviews carried conducted by (a) his Department, (b) local authorities, (c) schools and (d) other relevant parties in England.

Responsibility for how the system learns lessons from serious child safeguarding incidents lies with the Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel (the Panel) at a national level, and with the safeguarding partners at a local level. Safeguarding partners consist of local authorities, police, and clinical commissioning groups, with schools identified as relevant agencies.

The Panel and the safeguarding partners have a shared aim in identifying improvements to practice and in protecting children from harm. All serious incidents that are notified to the department are reviewed by the Panel.

Where there are issues of national significance, these are picked up by the Panel. The Panel then considers if a national review is necessary. The government takes the recommendations of the Panel extremely seriously.

In the tragic case of Arthur Labinjo-Hughes, the department requested that Ofsted, along with the Care Quality Commission, HM Inspectorate of Constabulary, Fire & Rescue services, and HM Inspectorate of Probation assess the practice taking place in the local area, through a Joint Targeted Area Inspection (JTAI). Areas of Priority Action arising from this inspection are helping ensure lessons are learnt and service improvements are made across all relevant agencies.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what systems and processes are in place to ensure that lessons learnt from Serious Case Reviews carried out locally in England are reflected in the future training and qualifications of (a) teachers, (b) social workers, (c) police officers and (d) other professionals working with children.

Serious Case Reviews (SCRs) are locally led enquiries. Therefore, most recommendations are for local safeguarding partnerships to implement. Local safeguarding partnerships comprise the police, children's social services, health services and others. Schools are also "relevant agencies" of the partnerships as defined in ‘Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018’ and further emphasised by ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education 2021’. Many local recommendations will touch on development needs of local workforces and can, therefore, be used to inform the specific training offered for teachers, social workers, police offers and others in the local area.

The outcomes of Serious Case Reviews (SCRs) form part of the evidence used by those who deliver professional development programmes for social workers to inform and shape their content. They also inform the post-qualifying standards, and knowledge and skills statements for social workers published by the department.

The What Works Centre for Children's Social Care also draws on findings from SCRs. For example, it is currently building the evidence base on what works to equip school staff with the knowledge and tools to effectively support and respond to the needs of vulnerable children.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has made an assessment of the impact of covid-19 lockdowns on the ability of schools to safeguard vulnerable children in (a) England, (b) regions of England and (c) local authority areas.

The government recognises that attending school is a vital protective factor when it comes to safeguarding and supporting vulnerable children.

That is why we kept schools, colleges and nurseries open throughout the COVID-19 outbreak and prioritised the attendance of vulnerable children.

Additionally, we took steps to ensure that vulnerable children had access to wider support by ensuring that children's social care services and early help services continued to operate. We worked with local authorities, the police and charities to tackle hidden harms, and we established a Vulnerable Children and Young People survey of local authorities, to make sure that we had an accurate picture of contact between these pupils and social workers.

The Public Accounts Committee report into the Department for Education’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak can be found here: https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm5802/cmselect/cmpubacc/240/24006.htm#_idTextAnchor006.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department made prior to the closure of schools in March 2020 of the impact of closures on safeguarding vulnerable children.

The government recognises that attending school is a vital protective factor when it comes to safeguarding and supporting vulnerable children.

That is why we kept schools, colleges and nurseries open throughout the COVID-19 outbreak and prioritised the attendance of vulnerable children.

Additionally, we took steps to ensure that vulnerable children had access to wider support by ensuring that children's social care services and early help services continued to operate. We worked with local authorities, the police and charities to tackle hidden harms, and we established a Vulnerable Children and Young People survey of local authorities, to make sure that we had an accurate picture of contact between these pupils and social workers.

The Public Accounts Committee report into the Department for Education’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak can be found here: https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm5802/cmselect/cmpubacc/240/24006.htm#_idTextAnchor006.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what lessons his Department is seeking to learn for assessments in summer 2022 from the sharp rise in the proportion of A-level grades awarded at A* between 2019 and 2021 in private schools in England.

Parents and students can have confidence in the grades awarded in 2021. Overall results in 2021 showed success for those targeting the top grades from all types of schools and from all student backgrounds. The grades awarded reflected students’ hard work in what was a hugely challenging year.

Examination boards set out clear requirements for a robust yet proportionate quality assurance process that supported teachers to make judgements and ensured students received meaningful grades. There was a process for both internal and external quality assurance. Additionally, all centres, including independent schools, had their processes for awarding grades checked by examination boards to assure arrangements were appropriate.

All schools submitted a selection of student evidence to examination boards, which then scrutinised a sample of this work. Of the sample of 1,101 centres with examined submissions, 55% were secondary schools or academies, 18% were independent or selective centres, 13% were further education colleges, sixth forms or tertiary colleges, and 13% were other centre types, including free schools. This is broadly in line with the proportion of each centre type nationally.

Ofqual has published a readily accessible analysis of summer 2021 GCSE and A level results. Ofqual reported on the ways it monitored awarding organisations’ delivery and award of qualifications to students in 2021. The report is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1010044/6828-2_Summer_2021_results_analysis_and_quality_assurance_-_GCSE_and_A_level.pdf. In its report on equalities analysis, published in summer 2021, Ofqual reported examination boards found no evidence that teachers’ judgements were systemically biased in favour of any group of students. This report is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1010126/6828-3_Student-level_equalities_analysis_for_GCSE_and_A_level_summer_2021.pdf.

Ofqual’s findings show general stability in the differences in outcomes for students with different protected characteristics, compared to previous years and increases in outcomes for various groups. Ofqual has reported that this suggests changes to the assessment arrangements in 2021 have lessened the unevenness in outcomes otherwise observable. The government remains committed to providing world-class education and training for everyone, no matter their background or characteristics, and will continue to take the action needed to address disparities to help all pupils make up learning lost as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Teachers, schools and colleges did a good job in using their collective experience to assess students in 2021. However, the government is clear that exams remain the best and fairest form of assessment, which is why it is determined exams will take place this summer with adaptations to maximise fairness for young people.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the sharp rise in the proportion of A-level grades awarded at A* between 2019 and 2021 in private schools in England.

Parents and students can have confidence in the grades awarded in 2021. Overall results in 2021 showed success for those targeting the top grades from all types of schools and from all student backgrounds. The grades awarded reflected students’ hard work in what was a hugely challenging year.

Examination boards set out clear requirements for a robust yet proportionate quality assurance process that supported teachers to make judgements and ensured students received meaningful grades. There was a process for both internal and external quality assurance. Additionally, all centres, including independent schools, had their processes for awarding grades checked by examination boards to assure arrangements were appropriate.

All schools submitted a selection of student evidence to examination boards, which then scrutinised a sample of this work. Of the sample of 1,101 centres with examined submissions, 55% were secondary schools or academies, 18% were independent or selective centres, 13% were further education colleges, sixth forms or tertiary colleges, and 13% were other centre types, including free schools. This is broadly in line with the proportion of each centre type nationally.

Ofqual has published a readily accessible analysis of summer 2021 GCSE and A level results. Ofqual reported on the ways it monitored awarding organisations’ delivery and award of qualifications to students in 2021. The report is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1010044/6828-2_Summer_2021_results_analysis_and_quality_assurance_-_GCSE_and_A_level.pdf. In its report on equalities analysis, published in summer 2021, Ofqual reported examination boards found no evidence that teachers’ judgements were systemically biased in favour of any group of students. This report is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1010126/6828-3_Student-level_equalities_analysis_for_GCSE_and_A_level_summer_2021.pdf.

Ofqual’s findings show general stability in the differences in outcomes for students with different protected characteristics, compared to previous years and increases in outcomes for various groups. Ofqual has reported that this suggests changes to the assessment arrangements in 2021 have lessened the unevenness in outcomes otherwise observable. The government remains committed to providing world-class education and training for everyone, no matter their background or characteristics, and will continue to take the action needed to address disparities to help all pupils make up learning lost as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Teachers, schools and colleges did a good job in using their collective experience to assess students in 2021. However, the government is clear that exams remain the best and fairest form of assessment, which is why it is determined exams will take place this summer with adaptations to maximise fairness for young people.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of whether the administration of A-level assessment in private schools in England in summer 2021 was conducted in a manner which ensured a level playing field for all pupils in the UK.

Parents and students can have confidence in the grades awarded in 2021. Overall results in 2021 showed success for those targeting the top grades from all types of schools and from all student backgrounds. The grades awarded reflected students’ hard work in what was a hugely challenging year.

Examination boards set out clear requirements for a robust yet proportionate quality assurance process that supported teachers to make judgements and ensured students received meaningful grades. There was a process for both internal and external quality assurance. Additionally, all centres, including independent schools, had their processes for awarding grades checked by examination boards to assure arrangements were appropriate.

All schools submitted a selection of student evidence to examination boards, which then scrutinised a sample of this work. Of the sample of 1,101 centres with examined submissions, 55% were secondary schools or academies, 18% were independent or selective centres, 13% were further education colleges, sixth forms or tertiary colleges, and 13% were other centre types, including free schools. This is broadly in line with the proportion of each centre type nationally.

Ofqual has published a readily accessible analysis of summer 2021 GCSE and A level results. Ofqual reported on the ways it monitored awarding organisations’ delivery and award of qualifications to students in 2021. The report is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1010044/6828-2_Summer_2021_results_analysis_and_quality_assurance_-_GCSE_and_A_level.pdf. In its report on equalities analysis, published in summer 2021, Ofqual reported examination boards found no evidence that teachers’ judgements were systemically biased in favour of any group of students. This report is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1010126/6828-3_Student-level_equalities_analysis_for_GCSE_and_A_level_summer_2021.pdf.

Ofqual’s findings show general stability in the differences in outcomes for students with different protected characteristics, compared to previous years and increases in outcomes for various groups. Ofqual has reported that this suggests changes to the assessment arrangements in 2021 have lessened the unevenness in outcomes otherwise observable. The government remains committed to providing world-class education and training for everyone, no matter their background or characteristics, and will continue to take the action needed to address disparities to help all pupils make up learning lost as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Teachers, schools and colleges did a good job in using their collective experience to assess students in 2021. However, the government is clear that exams remain the best and fairest form of assessment, which is why it is determined exams will take place this summer with adaptations to maximise fairness for young people.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the National Tutoring Programme contract with Randstad, whether the current breakdown of tutoring packages reflects the minimum requirements in the contract for tutoring packages to be delivered as set out, that is (a) South East five per cent; (b) London eight per cent; (c) North West seven per cent; (d) East of England four per cent; (e) West Midlands six per cent; (f) South West three per cent; (g) Yorkshire & the Humber five per cent; (h) East Midlands four per cent and (i) North East 3 per cent.

The department will continue to monitor and take targeted action in areas with low levels of tutoring. A second application round for tutoring organisations in November was designed to increase capacity in these areas. These organisations are now in post and active, focused on increasing capacity and delivery in these areas from January 2022. For example, in the North East there were previously three accredited tutoring organisations, this has increased to nine , making tutoring far more accessible to schools and increasing capacity. Randstad has bespoke communication plans for each region, the department continues to refine these with Randstad so that all useful channels, including local press, are fully engaged.

National participation data has been published for the first term of this year; the department has committed to publish participation data on a regular basis to explain the programme's progress. Regional delivery is reviewed regularly for operational purposes and to ensure supply is available where it is needed, and the department is considering the practicalities of publishing regional data.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if his Department will exercise the right set out in the National Tutoring Programme contract with Randstad to require additional granularity in the breakdown of tutoring packages delivered by region; and if he will make a statement.

The department will continue to monitor and take targeted action in areas with low levels of tutoring. A second application round for tutoring organisations in November was designed to increase capacity in these areas. These organisations are now in post and active, focused on increasing capacity and delivery in these areas from January 2022. For example, in the North East there were previously three accredited tutoring organisations, this has increased to nine , making tutoring far more accessible to schools and increasing capacity. Randstad has bespoke communication plans for each region, the department continues to refine these with Randstad so that all useful channels, including local press, are fully engaged.

National participation data has been published for the first term of this year; the department has committed to publish participation data on a regular basis to explain the programme's progress. Regional delivery is reviewed regularly for operational purposes and to ensure supply is available where it is needed, and the department is considering the practicalities of publishing regional data.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department is continuing the Vulnerable Children and Young People Survey; and whether he has made an estimate of the number of children being referred to local authority children’s social care department since July 2021.

The vulnerable children and young people survey was set up in May 2020. It has been running regularly throughout the COVID-19 outbreak and will be continued as we emerge from the COVID-19 outbreak. The survey has provided the department with crucial data on the pressures faced by local authorities, allowing the department to support them through these challenging times. The department is conscious of the burden on local authorities and will continue the survey only as long as is necessary.

From the survey, the department estimates the number of referrals in September 2021 was around the same as an average of the same week in 2017-20 nationally. The number of referrals then fell to 8% lower in October, 6% lower in November, and 9% lower in December 2021.

These are estimates based on data from around 77% of local authorities and on data for one week within each month. The figure for December should be interpreted with additional caution due to the changing timings of the Christmas holidays each year.

As there may be multiple referrals per child within a month, the department cannot estimate the number of children referred to local authority children’s social care. A summary of all the vulnerable children and young people survey responses is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/vulnerable-children-and-young-people-survey.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of maintained school revenue balances in 2020-21 by share of FSM-eligible children in schools.

The department pays close attention to the financial health of the sector, analysing maintained schools’ consistent financial reporting returns and academies’ accounting returns. The latest published figures show both maintained schools and academy trusts have on average been able to add to their reserves in the latest reporting year.

The schools financial benchmarking website allows schools and trusts to compare their financial data with other schools that share similar characteristics, including similar levels of free school meal (FSM) eligibility. The website is available here: https://schools-financial-benchmarking.service.gov.uk/.

A full dataset used to produce this analysis for schools can be found here: https://schools-financial-benchmarking.service.gov.uk/Help/DataSources.

In financial year 2022-23, the National Funding Formula (NFF) will allocate £6.7 billion (17% of all funding allocated by the NFF) through additional needs factors, including pupils eligible for FSM. That includes an increase of £225 million, or 6.7%, in the amount distributed through deprivation factors. In addition, in financial year 2022-23, schools will receive a supplementary grant, which will provide significant further funding for deprivation: £85 for each primary pupil and £124 for each secondary pupil who have been eligible for free school meals at any point in the last six years (FSM6). Schools’ individual allocations from the supplementary grant will be finalised in the coming months.

On top of this core funding, pupil premium funding rates are increasing by 2.7% in financial year 2022-23, to £1,385 for each FSM6 primary pupil and £985 for each FSM6 secondary pupil. This means that the per pupil funding rate will be the highest, in cash terms, since the introduction of the pupil premium in 2011. Total pupil premium funding will increase to over £2.6 billion in 2022-23, from £2.5 billion this year.

All schools continue to be able to access a wide range of school resource management tools so they can more effectively invest their resources into areas that improve educational outcomes for all pupils. Schools in serious financial difficulty should contact their local authority or the Education and Skills Funding Agency.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what research he has commissioned on the extent and nature of children’s behavioural, social, and emotional recovery after the covid-19 pandemic.

The department collects information on children’s behaviour and emotional and social wellbeing through several surveys. We have used these alongside additional research to monitor the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak and recovery.

Our third annual State of the Nation Report, published 8 February 2022, brings together data from these and external research to identify trends in children and young people‘s mental health. It also documents wellbeing recovery over the course of the 2020/21 academic year, as well as their views about society and the future. The findings show that overall, children’s wellbeing has remained largely stable across previous years. However, increasing COVID-19 prevalence rates and changing restrictions and school closures have coincided with fluctuation in levels of wellbeing throughout the period covered by the report.

The full report can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/state-of-the-nation-2021-children-and-young-peoples-wellbeing.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the (a) extent and (b) nature of children’s behavioural, social, and emotional recovery from the covid-19 pandemic.

The department collects information on children’s behaviour and emotional and social wellbeing through several surveys. We have used these alongside additional research to monitor the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak and recovery.

Our third annual State of the Nation Report, published 8 February 2022, brings together data from these and external research to identify trends in children and young people‘s mental health. It also documents wellbeing recovery over the course of the 2020/21 academic year, as well as their views about society and the future. The findings show that overall, children’s wellbeing has remained largely stable across previous years. However, increasing COVID-19 prevalence rates and changing restrictions and school closures have coincided with fluctuation in levels of wellbeing throughout the period covered by the report.

The full report can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/state-of-the-nation-2021-children-and-young-peoples-wellbeing.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons of ineligibility he has turned down applications from schools for air purification units; how many schools and other contexts in which children receive education have been refused one or more air purification units for which they applied; and if he will make a statement.

Air cleaning units were allocated to providers based on need, using the eligibility criteria we have set out in our guidance here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj.

As of 24 January, we received applications from 1,550 providers. Of these, 1,265 were successful and 285 settings will not receive air cleaning units as they did not meet the eligibility criteria set out in our guidance. For example, the room applied for may not have reported sustained CO2 readings above 1,500ppm, or may have been an unsuitable space, such as a hall, corridor or dining room.

Natural ventilation is best where that is achievable and the department has robust evidence that, in most cases, teaching spaces and classrooms benefit from sufficient natural ventilation. That evidence includes the responses to our recent survey of providers using the CO2 monitors that the department published on 24 January 2022, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/co2-monitor-survey-and-applications-for-air-cleaning-units. This survey showed that only 3% of providers reported sustained high CO2 readings (above 1,500ppm) that could not be remedied through quick fixes or remedial building works.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's Press Release of 24 January 2022 entitled More support for schools and students as plan B comes to an end, whether he has plans to reimburse schools for the cost of air cleaning units where the school has already funded such units but he now assesses the relevant teaching space to require one.

State-funded education providers that purchased air cleaning units through the online marketplace prior to the announcement on 2 January that the department would make additional funded units available will be eligible for a reimbursement if they meet the eligibility criteria set out in our guidance here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj. Eligible providers have already been contacted directly.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's Press Release of 24 January 2022 entitled More support for schools and students as plan B comes to an end, what (a) amount and (b) form of support his Department is providing to support further ventilation in England's schools; by what criteria that support will be distributed; how schools can apply for such support; and by what date he estimates that support will have been implemented or disbursed.

During the autumn term, the department provided CO2 monitors to all state-funded education providers, including early years, schools, and further education providers, backed by £25 million in government funding. We have now delivered on our public commitment, with over 353,000 monitors delivered in the autumn term.

Based on the feedback we had from providers following the CO2 monitor programme, for the very few cases where maintaining good ventilation is not possible, on 2 January we announced that we are supplying up to a total of 8,000 air cleaning units to providers. Providers applied for units via an online form. Please note that applications closed at 9am on 17 January. On 24 January, the department committed to fulfil all eligible applications from education settings for air cleaning units and will make up to an additional 1,000 units available to do so. Air cleaning units were allocated to providers based on need, using the eligibility criteria we have set out in our guidance here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj.

As of 24 January, 1,265 providers that applied for department-funded air cleaning units were eligible. We are currently finalising the total number of units allocated to providers. This will depend on the needs identified by eligible providers, including the number of people using the room(s). Special schools and alternative provision have already received the air cleaning units they applied for in the autumn term. All other providers with eligible applications have now started to receive deliveries.

The total number of eligible providers mirrors published summary findings from the department’s survey of the use of CO2 monitors, which show that only 3% of providers using CO2 monitors reported sustained high CO2 readings that couldn’t otherwise be addressed. This survey is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/co2-monitor-survey-and-applications-for-air-cleaning-units. Natural ventilation is best where that is achievable, and this evidence supports that, in the vast majority of cases, teaching spaces and classrooms benefit from sufficient natural ventilation.

Providers can also purchase air cleaning units at a suitable specification and competitive price directly from suppliers at the online marketplace. The marketplace is available at: https://s107t01-webapp-v2-01.azurewebsites.net/list/air-cleaning.

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, we have emphasised the importance of ventilation and provided guidance to schools, colleges and universities on ventilation requirements. In addition to our existing guidance on ventilation, we have provided education providers with guidance on how to use the air cleaning units, as well as how to order a unit via the online marketplace.

The department will keep the provision of air cleaning units under review as part of our overall response to COVID-19 and will continue to work with the sector to understand ventilation needs across the education estate.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's Press Release of 24 January 2022 entitled More support for schools and students as plan B comes to an end, what estimate his Department has made of the number of air cleaning units needed in addition to the 8,000 to which he has already committed, in order to provide one such unit for all classrooms and teaching spaces that need them.

The total number of air cleaning units that providers have applied for was just over 8,000. Up to an additional 1,000 units have now been ordered, bringing the total number of units available up to 9,000, allowing all eligible applications to be fulfilled.

Air cleaning units were allocated to providers based on need, using the eligibility criteria we have set out in our guidance here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj. As of 24 January, 1,265 providers that applied for department-funded air cleaning units were eligible for air cleaning units.

We are currently finalising the total number of units allocated to providers. This will depend on the needs identified by eligible providers, including the number of people using the room(s).

The total number of eligible providers mirrors published summary findings from the department’s survey of the use of CO2 monitors, which show that only 3% of providers using CO2 monitors reported sustained high CO2 readings that could not otherwise be addressed. This is available to view here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/co2-monitor-survey-and-applications-for-air-cleaning-units. Natural ventilation is best where that is achievable, and the evidence supports that, in the vast majority of cases, teaching spaces and classrooms benefit from sufficient natural ventilation.

We will keep the provision of air cleaning units under review as part of our overall response to COVID-19 and we will continue to work with the sector to understand ventilation needs across the education estate.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
18th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) primary and (b) secondary pupils are receiving tutoring or academic mentoring from National Tutoring Programme tuition partners.

The national tutoring programme aims to deliver up to 2 million tuition courses this year, and up to 90 million tuition hours by the 2024/25 academic year across the programme’s 3 pillars.

The programme is currently on course to deliver its objectives. Schools know their pupils best and have the freedom to enrol those who will benefit most. So far, an estimated 230,000 courses have been started by pupils through the school-led tutoring pillar, an estimated 20,000 with academic mentors and an estimated 52,000 with tuition partners. As a course consists of 15 tuition hours, this means pupils who need it most will be receiving millions of hours of high quality support.

We do not currently publish statistics by school phase but will consider doing so going forward.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has additional plans to relocate civil service posts currently in central London to other parts of England.

The department has made positive and significant progress in reducing its presence in London. In 2016, 50% of our workforce was based in London but by 2022 this has shifted to just 30%. Our future plans as part of commitments to the Places for Growth agenda achieve the right balance between relocating roles while still providing opportunities to develop talent and expertise within our London workforce. This aligns with our aim to connect policy delivery with local stakeholders and delivery partners across England.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 22 December 2021 to Question 92909 on Department for Education: Staff, whether he has any plans to restructure staffing within his Department.

Like many organisations, having reflected on how the COVID-19 outbreak has changed us and our sectors, and at how we want to work in future, we are currently working with our staff to take a purposeful look at how we are organised to deliver. Doing this now allows us to work on this alongside the arm’s length body review of the Education and Skills Funding Agency.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to make any substantive changes to the National Funding Formula for the 2023-24 financial year.

The department updates the national funding formula (NFF) annually and publishes the confirmed formula in advance of the dedicated schools grant (DSG).

We have already announced one substantive change in 2023-24, which is to roll the schools supplementary funding, worth £1.2 billion in the 2022-23 financial year, into the NFF. The schools supplementary grant will be allocated in the form of a separate grant for 2022-23 only and will be subsequently rolled into the yearly DSG allocations for the remainder of the spending review period.

In addition, in our consultation on 'Fair School Funding for All: Completing the Reforms to the national funding formula', published in July 2021, we set out further proposals for developing the schools NFF to improve the premises factors in the NFF. These proposals include reforming the approach to funding for schools experiencing significant growth in pupil numbers and beginning the process of transition to a directly funded formula within the NFF in 2023-24.

We will announce the outcome of that consultation, including any changes to be introduced in 2023-24, in due course.

In December, schools, high needs and early years funding allocations for 2022-23 financial year have been published through the DSG: 2022 to 2023 guidance, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2022-to-2023, and the schools supplementary grant 2022 to 2023 guidance, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/schools-supplementary-grant-2022-to-2023.


Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the total capital budget was for schools in England in each year between 2002 and 2022.

The department provides annual capital funding to support the education sector. This includes funding to create sufficient school places and to maintain and improve the condition of the school estate. In addition, the department also delivers capital building programmes, including the free schools programme, Priority School Building Programme and the new School Rebuilding Programme. The department’s capital budget also supports providers other than schools. This includes post-16 and early years providers, as well as the department’s own estate. There is no separate capital budget for schools specifically.

For a breakdown of capital expenditure in each financial year since 2002-03 please see the table below:

Financial Year

Capital Departmental Expenditure Limits, £billion

2002-03

2.7

2003-04

3.5

2004-05

4.1

2005-06

4.4

2006-07

4.1

2007-08

5.2

2008-09

5.5

2009-10

7.4

2010-11

7.1

2011-12

5.0

2012-13

4.6

2013-14

4.1

2014-15

4.8

2015-16

5.1

2016-17

5.7

2017-18

4.9

2018-19

5.4

2019-20

4.9

2020-21

4.8

Note: Figures have been taken from the department accounts which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-annual-reports.

The department’s capital expenditure limit for the 2021-22 financial year is £5.6 billion. In addition to this, the 2021 Spending Review announced a total of £19.4 billion of capital funding to support the education sector between the 2022-23 and 2024-25 financial years, an average of £6.5 billion per annum.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has made to update the contingency plans and guidance for future health crises for (a) his Department, (b) schools, (c) nurseries and early years providers, (d) colleges, (e) further education institutions and (f) universities and the higher education sector.

The government developed its contingency framework for education and childcare providers to help them, and others who work with them, to manage the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, and have contingency plans in place for future COVID-19 outbreaks. This guidance is regularly updated, most recently on 21 January 2022, and is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-local-restrictions-in-education-and-childcare-settings/contingency-framework-education-and-childcare-settings

Education providers are required to prepare their own outbreak response plans, and then in December to refresh them before the end of term. Any measures providers are required to implement are supported by comprehensive national guidance. We work very closely across government to ensure our planning is in step with wider society and informed by the most up to date public health advice.

The department is considering how the changes made to respond to COVID-19 can support wider readiness for future potential public health scenarios. A contingency framework for any future health crisis would draw upon lessons learnt from COVID-19, but would need to be specific to the new circumstances and part of a coherent cross-government response.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff were directly employed by his Department to work on contingency planning guidance for educational institutions in (a) November 2019, (b) February 2020, (c) May 2020 and (d) August 2020.

Work on contingency planning guidance for educational institutions is undertaken by teams across the department with responsibility for various policy areas.

The information on staff working on these areas is not centrally held as the department’s HR system does not record the specific tasks that staff are employed on. Seeking the information across the department’s six main business areas could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the (i) name of each local authority in receipt of monies for the Wellbeing for Education Recovery Grant, (b) amount of money granted to each of those authorities in 2021-2022, (b) number of children of school age resident in the area of each of those authorities and (c) amount of money per school age child that grant represents for each of those authorities.

In May 2021, the government provided £7 million in Wellbeing for Education Recovery grants to local authorities, to further help to support education staff in local schools and colleges to promote and support the wellbeing and mental health of pupils and students during recovery from the impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak. This built on the £8 million support provided in the 2020-21 financial year under the Wellbeing for Education Return scheme.

A grant determination letter for 2021-22 was published on 10 June 2021, confirming the funding allocations for all local authorities in receipt of the grant. The funding allocations were based on the number of state-funded settings per upper tier local authority. The grant determination letter for 2021-22 can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/wellbeing-for-education-return-grant-s31-grant-determination-letter.

Wellbeing for Education Recovery grants are intended to be spent in the 2021-22 financial year by local authorities on:

  • helping local schools and colleges to navigate existing provision and available support for wellbeing and mental health
  • continuing to deliver or expand previous Wellbeing for Education Return training for education staff
  • providing ongoing support and advice for schools and colleges that need it
  • supporting schools and colleges to plan for, conduct or refresh local assessments of current and anticipated needs for mental health or wellbeing support.

The grants are not intended to be spent on interventions with children and young people, and consequently, providing a breakdown of funding on a per child basis would not be meaningful in this context and cannot be provided.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the number of (a) teachers and (b) ex-teachers who were (i) below and (ii) above the state pension age in December 2020.

Information on the school workforce in England, including the number of teachers and teacher retirements, is published in the annual ‘school workforce in England’ national statistic at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

As at November 2020 (latest information available) 1,656 (less than 1% of teachers) teachers working in state-funded schools in England were over the state pension age of 66 years old (Table 1). 316,688 ex-teachers (58% of ex-teachers) who no longer work within state-funded schools in England were under state pension age. This includes not only those teachers who left the profession, but also those who left to work in other countries, in further education, and in private schools. Many of these ex-teachers may now be employed in other sectors and occupations outside of education.

Table 1: Headcount of qualified teachers and teachers out of service1 in state-funded schools by age group2,3

November 2020

Age

Teachers

Teachers out of service

Total

Under 66

490,083

316,688

806,771

66 and over

1,656

231,675

233,331

Unknown age

2

534

536

Total

491,741

548,897

1,040,638

Source: School Workforce Census 2020 and Database of Teacher Records 2021

1 Please note that teachers who no longer work within state-funded schools in England are classed as teachers out of service (ex-teachers) in this response. This therefore includes not only those teachers who left the profession, but also those who left to work in other countries, in further education, and in private schools. This excludes people who are known to have died.

2 State pension age as at November 2020 was 66 years old.

3 Age as at November 2020 for teachers, and March 2021 for teachers out of service.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has had discussions with external stakeholders on the best means to evaluate his Department's Opportunity areas programme in the last two years.

The department has commissioned external contractors to carry out an evaluation of the Opportunity Area (OA) programme. The national process evaluation is being conducted by NatCen, whilst the intervention level evaluations, which focus on five specific OA projects, are being conducted by York Consulting.

Each evaluation has a steering group which helps to guide, and quality assure its design and delivery. Members include academic experts, OA partnership board chairs, delivery leads and education stakeholders.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department last changed the (a) guidance and (b) regulations on specifications for new school buildings to improve ventilation in future classrooms.

Schools should always create a healthy indoor environment for occupants, this includes keeping spaces ventilated to reduce the concentration of pathogens in the air, such as SARS-CoV-2. Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, the department has emphasised the importance of ventilation and provided guidance to schools, colleges and nurseries on ventilation requirements.

In 2018, the department published Building Bulletin 101 (BB101), guidance for school design on ventilation, thermal comfort and indoor air quality. This includes the World Health Organisation’s air quality guidelines and Air Quality Standards Regulation 2010 for indoor air quality.

Further, the department sets environmental standards for centrally delivered new schools and sets a minimum specification for ventilation to address healthy indoor air quality. The current version was updated recently and published in November 2021. It can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/output-specification-generic-design-brief-and-technical-annexes.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what changes his Department has made to (a) guidance and (b) regulations relating to specifications for new school buildings to improve ventilation in future classrooms.

Schools should always create a healthy indoor environment for occupants, this includes keeping spaces ventilated to reduce the concentration of pathogens in the air, such as SARS-CoV-2. Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, the department has emphasised the importance of ventilation and provided guidance to schools, colleges and nurseries on ventilation requirements.

In 2018, the department published Building Bulletin 101 (BB101), guidance for school design on ventilation, thermal comfort and indoor air quality. This includes the World Health Organisation’s air quality guidelines and Air Quality Standards Regulation 2010 for indoor air quality.

Further, the department sets environmental standards for centrally delivered new schools and sets a minimum specification for ventilation to address healthy indoor air quality. The current version was updated recently and published in November 2021. It can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/output-specification-generic-design-brief-and-technical-annexes.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 13 January 2022 to Question 100514 on Schools: Coronavirus, what date officials at his Department first discussed ventilation in schools with the Department for Health and Social Care in the context of the covid-19 outbreak.

I refer the hon. Member for Houghton and Sunderland South to the answer I gave on 13 January 2022 to Question 100514.

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, experts have been consulted and the evidence monitored. Engagement with the Department of Health and Social Care is part of this and has been ongoing relating to CO2 monitoring and air cleaning units, to assess whether this is a viable approach for schools in England based on the existing science and practical considerations.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of former teachers who responded to the Government's appeal for support on 16 December 2021 had left the profession (a) after 16 June 2021, (b) between 16 December 2020 and 15 June 2021, (c) between 16 December 2015 and 15 December 2020, (d) between 16 December 2010 and 15 December 2020 and (e) before 16 December 2010.

On 12 January 2022, the department published initial data from a sample of supply agencies gathered between 20 December 2021 and 7 January 2022. This showed that 485 former teachers have signed up with supply agencies, and over 100 Teach First alumni have also expressed interest in returning to the classroom.

Given the size of the sample, the true number of sign-ups since the call was launched will be larger. Full details of the data release can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/number-of-ex-teachers-joining-the-school-workforce-2021-to-2022.

The department directed the call for ex teachers through employment agencies as they are best placed to match the supply that is coming forward with the demand that is there from schools. Using employment agencies also reduces the administrative burden of temporary recruitment from our schools.

We need to balance the need for data with the burden we place on those collating it. Therefore, we have not asked agencies to collect data such as how long ago people worked in schools.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
13th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, in the context of former teachers who have returned to support schools put since 16 December 2021, if he will publish a list of the schools in which such former teachers were working on (a) 6 January 2022 and (b) 13 January 2022; if he will set out for each of those schools in which one or more such returned former teachers were working; and how many returned teachers were working in each of those schools.

On 12 January 2022, the department published initial data from a sample of supply agencies gathered between 20 December 2021 and 7 January 2022. This showed that 485 former teachers have signed up with supply agencies, and over 100 Teach First alumni have also expressed interest in returning to the classroom.

Given the size of the sample, the true number of sign-ups since the call was launched will be larger. Full details of the data release can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/number-of-ex-teachers-joining-the-school-workforce-2021-to-2022.

The department remains in close contact with supply agencies to monitor the interest they receive to help schools during this time. We will keep the need for further data collections under review.

The department needs to balance the need for data with the burden we place on those collating it, our focus has been on the numbers signing up to agencies. Every single teacher that responds to our call can make a vital difference to children and young people by keeping them in face-to-face education.

Even if the teachers who have already come forward between 20 December and 7 January only taught one lesson each, that could support more than 12,000 pupils[1], and if they signed up for one full week, that could equate to more than 13,000 teaching hours[2].

[1] based on an average secondary class size estimate taken from the latest School Workforce Census Survey: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/school-workforce-in-england-november-2020.

[2] Teaching hours is based on average teaching time for full time teachers and middle leaders from the 2019 Teacher Workload Survey: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teacher-workload-survey-2019.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he has made of the proportion of academy trusts with financial reserves in excess of (a) 10%, (b) 20% and (c) 30% of their annual budget.

At the end of 2019/20 academic year, the total cumulative surplus of trusts with positive reserves was £3.17 billion. This compares with the total cumulative surplus of schools with positive reserves in the local authority maintained sector of £2.27 billion at the end of financial year 2020/21. The proportion of academy trusts with financial reserves in excess of (a) 10%, (b) 20% and (c) 30% of their income is as follows:

Proportion of academy trusts in surplus bands

> 10% revenue reserves as a percentage of income

55.9%

> 20% revenue reserves as a percentage of income

21.8%

> 30% revenue reserves as a percentage of income

8.0%

This is derived from the latest published data on the schools financial benchmarking website and represents academy trusts’ financial position at the end of the 2019/20 academic year. This website is available at: https://schools-financial-benchmarking.service.gov.uk/Help/DataSources.

A sound reserves policy is essential for all academy trusts. Unlike local authority maintained schools, academies are subject to company law, and therefore cannot operate while being insolvent, so they often hold reserves to reduce this risk.

The amount of reserves each academy trust should set aside will depend on the type and size of the academy trust, as well as the particular risks that it faces (for instance, if they are part of a Private Finance Initiative contract).

This is in addition to any reserves that academy trustees wish to set aside to accommodate longer-term plans, such as capital developments and financial investment.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether, in respect of the devices being trialled by the Secretary of State for Health & Social Care in primary schools in Bradford, and pursuant to the Answer of 5 January to Question 94337 on the procurement of devices for the filtration device marketplace, whether (a) any, or (b) all the devices being tested in Bradford are also available for sale to schools through the filtration marketplace.

On 2 January, the department announced that up to 7,000 air cleaning units are being made available for mainstream state-funded providers for the very few cases where maintaining good ventilation is not possible. Deliveries will start in February. This is in addition to the 1,000 units made available for special and alternative provision providers that we announced in November. Deliveries of these units are already underway.

The department has also launched an online marketplace which provides schools, colleges and nurseries with a route to purchasing air cleaning units at a suitable specification and competitive price. This is available at: https://s107t01-webapp-v2-01.azurewebsites.net/list/air-cleaning. In future, we may review this list and, as more products which meet our specification become available, these will be added. All purchases through the marketplace are managed by the supplier, rather than by the department.

The department’s decision to make air cleaning units available for poorly ventilated spaces in education and care providers has been informed by Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and external consultation with specialists. When used properly, air cleaning units can help reduce airborne contaminants in a poorly ventilated space, including viruses like COVID-19.  Air cleaning units are not a substitute for ventilation and should never be used as a reason to reduce ventilation. They are not necessary in spaces that are adequately ventilated.

All air cleaning units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed through a rigorous consultation with industry-wide experts in both air cleaning and ventilation from academia, professional bodies, and industry, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. Through this consultation, we have developed a specification specific to education focusing on key drivers including classroom size, acoustics, clean air delivery and filtration, as well as requiring strong evidence to verify manufacturers' claims.

There were no requests received from ministers in the procurement process for air cleaning units and establishment of the online marketplace. This includes any requests to encourage the purchase of air cleaning units manufactured in the UK. Air cleaning units that met the approved technical specification were included on the marketplace, and units were only excluded if they failed to meet the technical specification. All the suppliers’ bids were subject to independent expert scrutiny to maintain objectivity and conformance to the specification.

Interim findings from the Bradford trial of air cleaning units in primary schools, which is a pilot run by the Department of Health and Social Care, were shared with the department as a part of the cross-government development of our specification. All discussions were supplier agnostic. The manufacturers involved in the Bradford trial did not gain any additional advantage or consideration for inclusion in the department marketplace, which followed its own compliant procurement process as outlined above. The products used in the Bradford trial were not presented as an offer from suppliers during the procurement process, they are therefore not available on the marketplace.

All procurement activity was undertaken with full compliance with the Public Contract Regulations (2015). The procurement of the air cleaning devices was undertaken using the Crown Commercial Service Framework (RM6157) which can be accessed by central government departments, including the department and the wider public sector. We have selected a range of products which meet our specification criteria to provide education and childcare providers with high quality air cleaning units of a suitable specification.

The department will publish details of the contracts for air cleaning units which will include the technical specification criteria on contracts finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2022 to Question 94337 on the procurement of devices for the filtration device marketplace, whether (a) any, or (b) all the devices available for sale to schools through that marketplace have been included in the trial being carried out in primary schools in Bradford by the Secretary of State for Health & Social Care.

On 2 January, the department announced that up to 7,000 air cleaning units are being made available for mainstream state-funded providers for the very few cases where maintaining good ventilation is not possible. Deliveries will start in February. This is in addition to the 1,000 units made available for special and alternative provision providers that we announced in November. Deliveries of these units are already underway.

The department has also launched an online marketplace which provides schools, colleges and nurseries with a route to purchasing air cleaning units at a suitable specification and competitive price. This is available at: https://s107t01-webapp-v2-01.azurewebsites.net/list/air-cleaning. In future, we may review this list and, as more products which meet our specification become available, these will be added. All purchases through the marketplace are managed by the supplier, rather than by the department.

The department’s decision to make air cleaning units available for poorly ventilated spaces in education and care providers has been informed by Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and external consultation with specialists. When used properly, air cleaning units can help reduce airborne contaminants in a poorly ventilated space, including viruses like COVID-19.  Air cleaning units are not a substitute for ventilation and should never be used as a reason to reduce ventilation. They are not necessary in spaces that are adequately ventilated.

All air cleaning units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed through a rigorous consultation with industry-wide experts in both air cleaning and ventilation from academia, professional bodies, and industry, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. Through this consultation, we have developed a specification specific to education focusing on key drivers including classroom size, acoustics, clean air delivery and filtration, as well as requiring strong evidence to verify manufacturers' claims.

There were no requests received from ministers in the procurement process for air cleaning units and establishment of the online marketplace. This includes any requests to encourage the purchase of air cleaning units manufactured in the UK. Air cleaning units that met the approved technical specification were included on the marketplace, and units were only excluded if they failed to meet the technical specification. All the suppliers’ bids were subject to independent expert scrutiny to maintain objectivity and conformance to the specification.

Interim findings from the Bradford trial of air cleaning units in primary schools, which is a pilot run by the Department of Health and Social Care, were shared with the department as a part of the cross-government development of our specification. All discussions were supplier agnostic. The manufacturers involved in the Bradford trial did not gain any additional advantage or consideration for inclusion in the department marketplace, which followed its own compliant procurement process as outlined above. The products used in the Bradford trial were not presented as an offer from suppliers during the procurement process, they are therefore not available on the marketplace.

All procurement activity was undertaken with full compliance with the Public Contract Regulations (2015). The procurement of the air cleaning devices was undertaken using the Crown Commercial Service Framework (RM6157) which can be accessed by central government departments, including the department and the wider public sector. We have selected a range of products which meet our specification criteria to provide education and childcare providers with high quality air cleaning units of a suitable specification.

The department will publish details of the contracts for air cleaning units which will include the technical specification criteria on contracts finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2022 to Question 94337 on Schools: Air Conditioning, whether he had discussions with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on the inclusion of the makes of air purification device being trialled in Bradford primary schools before launching the filtration device marketplace.

On 2 January, the department announced that up to 7,000 air cleaning units are being made available for mainstream state-funded providers for the very few cases where maintaining good ventilation is not possible. Deliveries will start in February. This is in addition to the 1,000 units made available for special and alternative provision providers that we announced in November. Deliveries of these units are already underway.

The department has also launched an online marketplace which provides schools, colleges and nurseries with a route to purchasing air cleaning units at a suitable specification and competitive price. This is available at: https://s107t01-webapp-v2-01.azurewebsites.net/list/air-cleaning. In future, we may review this list and, as more products which meet our specification become available, these will be added. All purchases through the marketplace are managed by the supplier, rather than by the department.

The department’s decision to make air cleaning units available for poorly ventilated spaces in education and care providers has been informed by Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and external consultation with specialists. When used properly, air cleaning units can help reduce airborne contaminants in a poorly ventilated space, including viruses like COVID-19.  Air cleaning units are not a substitute for ventilation and should never be used as a reason to reduce ventilation. They are not necessary in spaces that are adequately ventilated.

All air cleaning units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed through a rigorous consultation with industry-wide experts in both air cleaning and ventilation from academia, professional bodies, and industry, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. Through this consultation, we have developed a specification specific to education focusing on key drivers including classroom size, acoustics, clean air delivery and filtration, as well as requiring strong evidence to verify manufacturers' claims.

There were no requests received from ministers in the procurement process for air cleaning units and establishment of the online marketplace. This includes any requests to encourage the purchase of air cleaning units manufactured in the UK. Air cleaning units that met the approved technical specification were included on the marketplace, and units were only excluded if they failed to meet the technical specification. All the suppliers’ bids were subject to independent expert scrutiny to maintain objectivity and conformance to the specification.

Interim findings from the Bradford trial of air cleaning units in primary schools, which is a pilot run by the Department of Health and Social Care, were shared with the department as a part of the cross-government development of our specification. All discussions were supplier agnostic. The manufacturers involved in the Bradford trial did not gain any additional advantage or consideration for inclusion in the department marketplace, which followed its own compliant procurement process as outlined above. The products used in the Bradford trial were not presented as an offer from suppliers during the procurement process, they are therefore not available on the marketplace.

All procurement activity was undertaken with full compliance with the Public Contract Regulations (2015). The procurement of the air cleaning devices was undertaken using the Crown Commercial Service Framework (RM6157) which can be accessed by central government departments, including the department and the wider public sector. We have selected a range of products which meet our specification criteria to provide education and childcare providers with high quality air cleaning units of a suitable specification.

The department will publish details of the contracts for air cleaning units which will include the technical specification criteria on contracts finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2022 to Question 94337 on Schools: Air Conditioning, whether Ministers made any request to civil servants overseeing procurement for the filtration device marketplace in respect of encouraging the procurement of devices made in the UK at any stage during that process.

On 2 January, the department announced that up to 7,000 air cleaning units are being made available for mainstream state-funded providers for the very few cases where maintaining good ventilation is not possible. Deliveries will start in February. This is in addition to the 1,000 units made available for special and alternative provision providers that we announced in November. Deliveries of these units are already underway.

The department has also launched an online marketplace which provides schools, colleges and nurseries with a route to purchasing air cleaning units at a suitable specification and competitive price. This is available at: https://s107t01-webapp-v2-01.azurewebsites.net/list/air-cleaning. In future, we may review this list and, as more products which meet our specification become available, these will be added. All purchases through the marketplace are managed by the supplier, rather than by the department.

The department’s decision to make air cleaning units available for poorly ventilated spaces in education and care providers has been informed by Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice and external consultation with specialists. When used properly, air cleaning units can help reduce airborne contaminants in a poorly ventilated space, including viruses like COVID-19.  Air cleaning units are not a substitute for ventilation and should never be used as a reason to reduce ventilation. They are not necessary in spaces that are adequately ventilated.

All air cleaning units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed through a rigorous consultation with industry-wide experts in both air cleaning and ventilation from academia, professional bodies, and industry, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. Through this consultation, we have developed a specification specific to education focusing on key drivers including classroom size, acoustics, clean air delivery and filtration, as well as requiring strong evidence to verify manufacturers' claims.

There were no requests received from ministers in the procurement process for air cleaning units and establishment of the online marketplace. This includes any requests to encourage the purchase of air cleaning units manufactured in the UK. Air cleaning units that met the approved technical specification were included on the marketplace, and units were only excluded if they failed to meet the technical specification. All the suppliers’ bids were subject to independent expert scrutiny to maintain objectivity and conformance to the specification.

Interim findings from the Bradford trial of air cleaning units in primary schools, which is a pilot run by the Department of Health and Social Care, were shared with the department as a part of the cross-government development of our specification. All discussions were supplier agnostic. The manufacturers involved in the Bradford trial did not gain any additional advantage or consideration for inclusion in the department marketplace, which followed its own compliant procurement process as outlined above. The products used in the Bradford trial were not presented as an offer from suppliers during the procurement process, they are therefore not available on the marketplace.

All procurement activity was undertaken with full compliance with the Public Contract Regulations (2015). The procurement of the air cleaning devices was undertaken using the Crown Commercial Service Framework (RM6157) which can be accessed by central government departments, including the department and the wider public sector. We have selected a range of products which meet our specification criteria to provide education and childcare providers with high quality air cleaning units of a suitable specification.

The department will publish details of the contracts for air cleaning units which will include the technical specification criteria on contracts finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2022 to 94337 on Schools: Air Conditioning, whether Ministers made any request to civil servants overseeing procurement for the filtration device marketplace as to (a) companies and (b) devices to be (i) included in and (ii) excluded from that process.

There were no requests received from ministers in the procurement process and establishment of the online marketplace. Air cleaning devices that met the approved technical specification were included on the marketplace, and devices were only excluded if they failed to meet the technical specification. All the suppliers’ bids were subject to independent expert scrutiny to maintain objectivity and conformance to the specification.

The department’s specification was developed through a rigorous consultation with industry-wide experts in both air cleaning and ventilation from academia, professional bodies, and industry, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. Through this consultation the department has developed a specification specific to education, focusing on key drivers including classroom size, acoustics, clean air delivery and filtration as well as requiring strong evidence to verify manufacturers' claims.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the level of teacher absence (a) for any reason and (b) for reasons related to covid-19 by (i) region, (ii) upper tier local authority, (iii) lower tier local authority and (iv) parliamentary constituency in each of the last 100 weeks for which figures are available.

The department has published data on teacher absence for any reason and for reasons related to COVID-19 since the start of the academic year. This can be found on Explore Education Statistics. The lowest geographical level the data is split to is local authority level. We do not publish data at parliamentary constituency level.

The most recent published data at national level is 6 January 2022. For regional and local authority level data, the latest published data is 16 December 2021. The most recent national, regional and local authority data can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-pandemic-23-march-2020-to-6-january-2022.

The department also collects data on teacher absences in the annual school workforce census. To reduce burden on schools and local authorities during the COVID-19 outbreak, data on absences was not collected in 2020. Therefore, the latest data collected through the census is from 2019 and can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england/2019. Absence data was collected in the November 2021 school workforce census and will be published in the next national statistic release later this year.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has issued new guidance to schools on (a) coding and (b) recording a child's absence from school subsequent to a positive test for covid-19 since 1 December 2021.

‘Addendum: recording absence relating to coronavirus (COVID-19) during the 2021 to 2022 academic year’ was last updated on 6 January 2022 to reflect the changes on when a PCR test is needed and how this is recorded. The guidance is available to view here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-attendance/addendum-recording-attendance-in-relation-to-coronavirus-covid-19-during-the-2021-to-2022-academic-year.

We have advised schools throughout the COVID-19 outbreak to record pupils as Code I ‘illness’ where they have tested positive for COVID-19 because they have an infectious illness. This is in line with how schools would usually record absence because of infectious illness.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish data on the level of absence by children from schools for (a) any reason, (b) any reason of illness, including reasons related to covid-19 and (c) reasons related to covid-19 by (i) region, (ii) upper tier local authority, (iii) lower tier local authority and (iv) parliamentary constituency in each of the last 100 weeks for which figures are available.

The department publishes a fortnightly COVID-19 attendance publication based on the educational settings status form. This data is intended to monitor the impact of COVID-19 on the number of pupils attending school. In this collection we do not collect the total number of students absent from school due to any reason of illness.

Data on pupil absence due to COVID-19 since the start of the 2021/22 academic year can be found on Explore Education Statistics. This data is published at local authority level. We do not publish data at parliamentary constituency level.

The most recent published data at national level is 6 January. For regional and local authority level data, the latest published data is 16 December. The most recent national, regional and local authority data can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-pandemic-23-march-2020-to-6-january-2022.

We also publish more detailed termly data on pupil absence as part of the school census (including absence rates where pupils are ill, including COVID-19). The latest publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/pupil-absence-in-schools-in-england-autumn-2020-and-spring-2021.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to embed the learning from the Opportunity Areas projects into its policies and practices; and what targets he has set for the implementation of such learning by his Department.

One of the two key objectives of the Opportunity Areas (OA) programme is to identify what works in these areas, capturing which challenges all areas share and what is unique to a particular place; and spreading effective practice to other areas. As one of the key objectives, sharing learning is embedded within the programme, rather than having specific targets set against it.

Our sharing learning strategy has three main strands. Firstly, each of the 12 OAs has been twinned with one or more non-OA areas facing similar challenges and is delivering programmes in those areas, directly sharing effective practice from the OA programme. Secondly, the department has published a set of case studies from every OA, detailed effective practice, and is now publishing a series of thematic guides to share our learning from the OA programme on particular issues. These are available for national policy makers, local authorities and other stakeholders right across the country to draw on. The published guides so far include case studies to support teacher recruitment, careers advice and guidance, health and education, and early years. Thirdly, we are publishing a national process evaluation this summer which will identify key learning from the OA’s place-based approach to delivery. This will set out what has worked well on the programme as well as identifying the key barriers to effective delivery.

In addition to the above, the department's OAs team has worked with officials across government to share the lessons on place-based working learnt from the OA programme, particularly in regard to supporting and developing local leadership.

Details of the published thematic guides can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/opportunity-areas-insight-guides. Case studies from every OA can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/753695/DFE_-_Opportunity_Areas-One_Year_On_.PDF.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what changes his Department made to (a) guidance for schools, (b) Departmental practice and (c) funding decisions as a result of the independent evaluation of the implementation of Opportunity Areas published in October 2018.

The Implementation of Opportunity Areas independent evaluation, published in October 2018, looked at how the Opportunity Area (OA) programme was initially established. It highlighted the positive work carried out in setting up the OAs, including the collaboration between local stakeholders and the department's delivery teams, the development of clear delivery plans, and the commitment in each area to improving young people’s social mobility.

The evaluation’s recommendations influenced (a) the way thedepartment works with schools in those areas, for example in the way that schools are supported on teacher recruitment and retention; (b) the development of other departmental policies and practices, such as the setting up of Opportunity North East, which involved strong engagement with local stakeholders and the development of a clear, agreed delivery plan; and (c) funding decisions, such as the decision to allocate longer-term funding to the OAs, to allow the changes they are making to be embedded. The OA programme has continued to evolve and develop since that report. In particular, the departments close, on-going engagement with the schools in those areas has helped them to respond to the difficult issues emerging from the COVID-19 outbreak.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's press release entitled Education Secretary calls for ex-teachers to return to classrooms published on 20 December 2021, with what (a) frequency and (b) regularity does his Department plan to (i) receive and (ii) publish updates on the number of ex-teachers volunteering to return to the classroom.

The department is extremely grateful to all the teachers who are responding to our call to return temporarily to the classroom to support schools to remain open and deliver face to face education for pupils.

On 12 January 2022, the department published initial data from a sample of supply agencies gathered between 20 December 2021 and 7 January 2022. This showed that 485 former teachers have signed up with supply agencies, and over 100 Teach First alumni have also expressed interest in returning to the classroom.

Given the size of the sample, the true number of sign-ups since the call was launched will be larger. Full details of the data release can be found here; https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/number-of-ex-teachers-joining-the-school-workforce-2021-to-2022. We remain in close contact with supply agencies to monitor the interest they receive to help schools during this time.

We will keep the need for further data collections under review.

We directed the call for former teachers through employment agencies as they are best placed to match the supply that is coming forward with the demand that is there from schools. Using employment agencies also reduces the administrative burden of temporary recruitment from our schools.

We need to balance the need for data with the burden we place on those collating it, so we did not request information by region, upper/lower tier local authority or parliamentary constituency, and the employment agencies that are working with us have no reason to sort and organise their candidates in such a way. Where a specific supply teacher is prepared to work will differ from individual to individual for many different reasons.

Between 16 December 2021 and 4 January 2022, there were over 244,000 unique page impressions and over 86,000 unique visitors to the Get into Teaching website. There were over 41,000 unique impressions on the page containing the urgent call to qualified teachers up to 12 January 2022. In the same period last year, there were over 388,000 unique page impressions and over 108,000 unique visitors to the website, although the data is not directly comparable as the Get into Teaching website was relaunched on 8 April 2021.

The new site has condensed much of the information on the legacy website, meaning that year-on-year figures are not directly comparable. Engagement levels remain consistent, with users spending similar amounts of time on the new website. In addition, we saw increased interest in teaching during the first year of the COVID-19 outbreak, which was reflected in a particularly high number of visitors to the website.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) page impressions and (b) unique visitors there were to the GetintoTeaching website run by his Department from (i) 16 December 2021 to 4 January 2022 and (ii) 16 December 2020 to 4 January 2021.

The department is extremely grateful to all the teachers who are responding to our call to return temporarily to the classroom to support schools to remain open and deliver face to face education for pupils.

On 12 January 2022, the department published initial data from a sample of supply agencies gathered between 20 December 2021 and 7 January 2022. This showed that 485 former teachers have signed up with supply agencies, and over 100 Teach First alumni have also expressed interest in returning to the classroom.

Given the size of the sample, the true number of sign-ups since the call was launched will be larger. Full details of the data release can be found here; https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/number-of-ex-teachers-joining-the-school-workforce-2021-to-2022. We remain in close contact with supply agencies to monitor the interest they receive to help schools during this time.

We will keep the need for further data collections under review.

We directed the call for former teachers through employment agencies as they are best placed to match the supply that is coming forward with the demand that is there from schools. Using employment agencies also reduces the administrative burden of temporary recruitment from our schools.

We need to balance the need for data with the burden we place on those collating it, so we did not request information by region, upper/lower tier local authority or parliamentary constituency, and the employment agencies that are working with us have no reason to sort and organise their candidates in such a way. Where a specific supply teacher is prepared to work will differ from individual to individual for many different reasons.

Between 16 December 2021 and 4 January 2022, there were over 244,000 unique page impressions and over 86,000 unique visitors to the Get into Teaching website. There were over 41,000 unique impressions on the page containing the urgent call to qualified teachers up to 12 January 2022. In the same period last year, there were over 388,000 unique page impressions and over 108,000 unique visitors to the website, although the data is not directly comparable as the Get into Teaching website was relaunched on 8 April 2021.

The new site has condensed much of the information on the legacy website, meaning that year-on-year figures are not directly comparable. Engagement levels remain consistent, with users spending similar amounts of time on the new website. In addition, we saw increased interest in teaching during the first year of the COVID-19 outbreak, which was reflected in a particularly high number of visitors to the website.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the former teachers who have responded to his request that they return to teaching, how many such teachers were in classrooms in England as of 12 January 2022.

The department is extremely grateful to all the teachers who are responding to our call to return temporarily to the classroom to support schools to remain open and deliver face to face education for pupils.

On 12 January 2022, the department published initial data from a sample of supply agencies gathered between 20 December 2021 and 7 January 2022. This showed that 485 former teachers have signed up with supply agencies, and over 100 Teach First alumni have also expressed interest in returning to the classroom.

Given the size of the sample, the true number of sign-ups since the call was launched will be larger. Full details of the data release can be found here; https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/number-of-ex-teachers-joining-the-school-workforce-2021-to-2022. We remain in close contact with supply agencies to monitor the interest they receive to help schools during this time.

We will keep the need for further data collections under review.

We directed the call for former teachers through employment agencies as they are best placed to match the supply that is coming forward with the demand that is there from schools. Using employment agencies also reduces the administrative burden of temporary recruitment from our schools.

We need to balance the need for data with the burden we place on those collating it, so we did not request information by region, upper/lower tier local authority or parliamentary constituency, and the employment agencies that are working with us have no reason to sort and organise their candidates in such a way. Where a specific supply teacher is prepared to work will differ from individual to individual for many different reasons.

Between 16 December 2021 and 4 January 2022, there were over 244,000 unique page impressions and over 86,000 unique visitors to the Get into Teaching website. There were over 41,000 unique impressions on the page containing the urgent call to qualified teachers up to 12 January 2022. In the same period last year, there were over 388,000 unique page impressions and over 108,000 unique visitors to the website, although the data is not directly comparable as the Get into Teaching website was relaunched on 8 April 2021.

The new site has condensed much of the information on the legacy website, meaning that year-on-year figures are not directly comparable. Engagement levels remain consistent, with users spending similar amounts of time on the new website. In addition, we saw increased interest in teaching during the first year of the COVID-19 outbreak, which was reflected in a particularly high number of visitors to the website.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish by (a) region, (b) upper tier local authority, (c) lower tier local authority, and (d) parliamentary constituency the number of teachers that have volunteered to return to teaching following the Government's appeal to former teachers in December 2021.

The department is extremely grateful to all the teachers who are responding to our call to return temporarily to the classroom to support schools to remain open and deliver face to face education for pupils.

On 12 January 2022, the department published initial data from a sample of supply agencies gathered between 20 December 2021 and 7 January 2022. This showed that 485 former teachers have signed up with supply agencies, and over 100 Teach First alumni have also expressed interest in returning to the classroom.

Given the size of the sample, the true number of sign-ups since the call was launched will be larger. Full details of the data release can be found here; https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/number-of-ex-teachers-joining-the-school-workforce-2021-to-2022. We remain in close contact with supply agencies to monitor the interest they receive to help schools during this time.

We will keep the need for further data collections under review.

We directed the call for former teachers through employment agencies as they are best placed to match the supply that is coming forward with the demand that is there from schools. Using employment agencies also reduces the administrative burden of temporary recruitment from our schools.

We need to balance the need for data with the burden we place on those collating it, so we did not request information by region, upper/lower tier local authority or parliamentary constituency, and the employment agencies that are working with us have no reason to sort and organise their candidates in such a way. Where a specific supply teacher is prepared to work will differ from individual to individual for many different reasons.

Between 16 December 2021 and 4 January 2022, there were over 244,000 unique page impressions and over 86,000 unique visitors to the Get into Teaching website. There were over 41,000 unique impressions on the page containing the urgent call to qualified teachers up to 12 January 2022. In the same period last year, there were over 388,000 unique page impressions and over 108,000 unique visitors to the website, although the data is not directly comparable as the Get into Teaching website was relaunched on 8 April 2021.

The new site has condensed much of the information on the legacy website, meaning that year-on-year figures are not directly comparable. Engagement levels remain consistent, with users spending similar amounts of time on the new website. In addition, we saw increased interest in teaching during the first year of the COVID-19 outbreak, which was reflected in a particularly high number of visitors to the website.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2022 to Question 92905 on the date of introduction of the Department's anti-bribery policy, what anti-bribery policy was in force in his Department from 11 May 2010 to the date on which the current policy was introduced in 2018; and what rules were in force between those dates on the declaration of gifts and hospitality received by (a) officials and (b) Ministers.

Prior to the introduction of the Anti-Bribery & Corruption Policy in 2018, Department staff were subject to the provisions of the Civil Service Code: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-service-code/the-civil-service-code.

The Code specifies that:

“You must not:

  • accept gifts or hospitality or receive other benefits from anyone which might reasonably be seen to compromise your personal judgement or integrity.”

The department also maintained, and continues to maintain, a Gift and Hospitality register for staff to record any such incidents.

Under the Transparency Agenda Gift and Hospitality data for Special Advisers and Ministers is published on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dfe-special-advisers-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings-2020, https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ministers-quarterly-returns-2010.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 22 December 2021 to Question 92908 on Department for Education: Visits, on what dates any changes to the departmental guidance on in-person visitors were made, between 1 May 2021 and 31 December 2021; and if he will place copies of each iteration of that guidance in the Library.

Following Step 4 of the government’s roadmap, the department updated its guidance on in-person visitors from ‘No visitors to site are allowed.’ to ‘External visitors can visit the office and must sign in and out of reception.’ on all 11 of our “DfE Buildings” intranet pages. This was published on the department’s intranet on 15 July 2021, in preparation for Step 4 on 19 July 2021.

A copy of the guidance, both pre and post update to reflect Step 4 will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses. Please note that the guidance on visitors is the same across all of the department’s sites.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department made of the number of classrooms in use in each school before sending that school its allocation of carbon dioxide monitors in the autumn term of 2021.

During the autumn term, the department provided CO2 monitors to all state-funded education providers, including early years, schools and further education colleges, backed by £25 million in government funding. We have now delivered on our public commitment with over 353,000 monitors delivered. The programme provided schools and other providers with sufficient monitors to take representative readings from across their estate, assessing all spaces in a relatively short space of time. Providers received roughly one monitor for every two teaching rooms, precise numbers vary according to different provider types. The department knows from feedback following the rollout of CO2 monitors that for most providers, existing ventilation measures are sufficient.

Alongside the rollout, the department has also provided new information on how to use CO2 monitors to better manage ventilation. Our operational guidance includes details for the COVID-19 helpline, and providers are encouraged to contact us if they have any queries regarding their CO2 monitors. For any technical queries, providers should contact the supplier of their monitors directly.

All department-funded CO2 monitors are supplied with a one metre USB cable that can be plugged into a standard USB power source, such as mains adaptors or laptop. Providers can use any standard USB plug adaptor for the CO2 monitors, such as ones used to charge mobile phones or other electrical devices. This is the primary means of powering the devices; batteries are a back-up.  The life of the back-up battery is variable based on the refresh rate of the device and if providers wish to use the CO2 monitor battery powered. In most cases, they can extend battery life by changing the refresh rate on their CO2 monitors. We have provided schools, colleges, and nurseries with guidance on how to use their monitors effectively. Providers can also contact the supplier of their device if they have any technical queries.

All CO2 monitors units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed in consultation with industry wide experts in ventilation, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. The technical specification has been published along with the contract on Contracts Finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda. All CO2 monitors were manufactured in the UK and China. Further details of the models of CO2 monitors issued to schools can be found in the guidance here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether standards on (a) cable length and (b) minimum battery life were specified for the procurement of the carbon dioxide monitors issued to schools in the autumn term of 2021.

During the autumn term, the department provided CO2 monitors to all state-funded education providers, including early years, schools and further education colleges, backed by £25 million in government funding. We have now delivered on our public commitment with over 353,000 monitors delivered. The programme provided schools and other providers with sufficient monitors to take representative readings from across their estate, assessing all spaces in a relatively short space of time. Providers received roughly one monitor for every two teaching rooms, precise numbers vary according to different provider types. The department knows from feedback following the rollout of CO2 monitors that for most providers, existing ventilation measures are sufficient.

Alongside the rollout, the department has also provided new information on how to use CO2 monitors to better manage ventilation. Our operational guidance includes details for the COVID-19 helpline, and providers are encouraged to contact us if they have any queries regarding their CO2 monitors. For any technical queries, providers should contact the supplier of their monitors directly.

All department-funded CO2 monitors are supplied with a one metre USB cable that can be plugged into a standard USB power source, such as mains adaptors or laptop. Providers can use any standard USB plug adaptor for the CO2 monitors, such as ones used to charge mobile phones or other electrical devices. This is the primary means of powering the devices; batteries are a back-up.  The life of the back-up battery is variable based on the refresh rate of the device and if providers wish to use the CO2 monitor battery powered. In most cases, they can extend battery life by changing the refresh rate on their CO2 monitors. We have provided schools, colleges, and nurseries with guidance on how to use their monitors effectively. Providers can also contact the supplier of their device if they have any technical queries.

All CO2 monitors units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed in consultation with industry wide experts in ventilation, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. The technical specification has been published along with the contract on Contracts Finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda. All CO2 monitors were manufactured in the UK and China. Further details of the models of CO2 monitors issued to schools can be found in the guidance here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has received feedback from schools on the (a) installation, (b) operation and (c) interpretation of the carbon dioxide monitors issued in the autumn term of 2021.

During the autumn term, the department provided CO2 monitors to all state-funded education providers, including early years, schools and further education colleges, backed by £25 million in government funding. We have now delivered on our public commitment with over 353,000 monitors delivered. The programme provided schools and other providers with sufficient monitors to take representative readings from across their estate, assessing all spaces in a relatively short space of time. Providers received roughly one monitor for every two teaching rooms, precise numbers vary according to different provider types. The department knows from feedback following the rollout of CO2 monitors that for most providers, existing ventilation measures are sufficient.

Alongside the rollout, the department has also provided new information on how to use CO2 monitors to better manage ventilation. Our operational guidance includes details for the COVID-19 helpline, and providers are encouraged to contact us if they have any queries regarding their CO2 monitors. For any technical queries, providers should contact the supplier of their monitors directly.

All department-funded CO2 monitors are supplied with a one metre USB cable that can be plugged into a standard USB power source, such as mains adaptors or laptop. Providers can use any standard USB plug adaptor for the CO2 monitors, such as ones used to charge mobile phones or other electrical devices. This is the primary means of powering the devices; batteries are a back-up.  The life of the back-up battery is variable based on the refresh rate of the device and if providers wish to use the CO2 monitor battery powered. In most cases, they can extend battery life by changing the refresh rate on their CO2 monitors. We have provided schools, colleges, and nurseries with guidance on how to use their monitors effectively. Providers can also contact the supplier of their device if they have any technical queries.

All CO2 monitors units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed in consultation with industry wide experts in ventilation, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. The technical specification has been published along with the contract on Contracts Finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda. All CO2 monitors were manufactured in the UK and China. Further details of the models of CO2 monitors issued to schools can be found in the guidance here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, in what way schools were encouraged to report any technical difficulties they encountered with the carbon dioxide monitors issued to schools in the autumn term of 2021.

During the autumn term, the department provided CO2 monitors to all state-funded education providers, including early years, schools and further education colleges, backed by £25 million in government funding. We have now delivered on our public commitment with over 353,000 monitors delivered. The programme provided schools and other providers with sufficient monitors to take representative readings from across their estate, assessing all spaces in a relatively short space of time. Providers received roughly one monitor for every two teaching rooms, precise numbers vary according to different provider types. The department knows from feedback following the rollout of CO2 monitors that for most providers, existing ventilation measures are sufficient.

Alongside the rollout, the department has also provided new information on how to use CO2 monitors to better manage ventilation. Our operational guidance includes details for the COVID-19 helpline, and providers are encouraged to contact us if they have any queries regarding their CO2 monitors. For any technical queries, providers should contact the supplier of their monitors directly.

All department-funded CO2 monitors are supplied with a one metre USB cable that can be plugged into a standard USB power source, such as mains adaptors or laptop. Providers can use any standard USB plug adaptor for the CO2 monitors, such as ones used to charge mobile phones or other electrical devices. This is the primary means of powering the devices; batteries are a back-up.  The life of the back-up battery is variable based on the refresh rate of the device and if providers wish to use the CO2 monitor battery powered. In most cases, they can extend battery life by changing the refresh rate on their CO2 monitors. We have provided schools, colleges, and nurseries with guidance on how to use their monitors effectively. Providers can also contact the supplier of their device if they have any technical queries.

All CO2 monitors units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed in consultation with industry wide experts in ventilation, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. The technical specification has been published along with the contract on Contracts Finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda. All CO2 monitors were manufactured in the UK and China. Further details of the models of CO2 monitors issued to schools can be found in the guidance here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, in which countries the carbon dioxide monitors issued to schools in the autumn term of 2021 were manufactured.

During the autumn term, the department provided CO2 monitors to all state-funded education providers, including early years, schools and further education colleges, backed by £25 million in government funding. We have now delivered on our public commitment with over 353,000 monitors delivered. The programme provided schools and other providers with sufficient monitors to take representative readings from across their estate, assessing all spaces in a relatively short space of time. Providers received roughly one monitor for every two teaching rooms, precise numbers vary according to different provider types. The department knows from feedback following the rollout of CO2 monitors that for most providers, existing ventilation measures are sufficient.

Alongside the rollout, the department has also provided new information on how to use CO2 monitors to better manage ventilation. Our operational guidance includes details for the COVID-19 helpline, and providers are encouraged to contact us if they have any queries regarding their CO2 monitors. For any technical queries, providers should contact the supplier of their monitors directly.

All department-funded CO2 monitors are supplied with a one metre USB cable that can be plugged into a standard USB power source, such as mains adaptors or laptop. Providers can use any standard USB plug adaptor for the CO2 monitors, such as ones used to charge mobile phones or other electrical devices. This is the primary means of powering the devices; batteries are a back-up.  The life of the back-up battery is variable based on the refresh rate of the device and if providers wish to use the CO2 monitor battery powered. In most cases, they can extend battery life by changing the refresh rate on their CO2 monitors. We have provided schools, colleges, and nurseries with guidance on how to use their monitors effectively. Providers can also contact the supplier of their device if they have any technical queries.

All CO2 monitors units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed in consultation with industry wide experts in ventilation, including chartered engineers, scientists, and several government departments. The technical specification has been published along with the contract on Contracts Finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda. All CO2 monitors were manufactured in the UK and China. Further details of the models of CO2 monitors issued to schools can be found in the guidance here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff, by (a) full-time equivalent and (b) headcount, in his Department had a PRINCE2 (i) Foundation and (ii) Practitioner certification at the start of (A) 2018, (B) 2019, (C) 2020, (D) 2021 and (E) 2022.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2022 to Question 92912 on Department for Education: Telephone Services, for what reasons there was a more than 20-fold increase in the number of calls to that line which were abandoned by callers between (a) October 2021 and (b) November 2021.

There was a sevenfold increase in the waiting time, and more than a 20-fold increase in the abandonment rate to the COVID-19 helpline from October 2021 to November 2021 due to the emergence of the Omicron variant and my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister’s announcement on 28 November 2021 of new restrictions due to the variant’s transmissibility and prevalence.

Call levels during October were low, and for the majority of November a similar level of low call volumes was recorded, meaning that waiting time and abandonment rates were very low and sufficient resource was available to ensure this continued. However, once restrictions were introduced at the end of November, call levels significantly increased.

The previous data shared in relation to Question 92912 on 5 January 2022 gave a monthly average of call volumes, rather than a breakdown by date. The monthly average for November 2021 was impacted by a significant increase in calls at the end of the month over a short period of time, rather than a general increase in demand spread throughout the month. The attached table shows the daily call volumes during October, November and the first few days in December 2021 as context for this response.

The COVID-19 helpline is part of a wider outsourced customer engagement contract which provides other helplines for the department. Given that lower call volumes were maintained through the autumn, some of the COVID-19 helpline resource was released to support another of the department’s helplines during October and November which was experiencing high demand, as part of a flexible resourcing model. Following my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister’s announcement on 28 November and the increase in call volumes to the COVID-19 helpline, we recalled the agents to ensure that there was sufficient capacity on the COVID-19 helpline to minimise call wait times for our customers.

The data shows that the average call duration (call handling time) during this period also increased, which impacts the number of calls each agent can handle per hour. We assume that the higher abandonment rate was a result of the increases in the call wait time, as callers are informed of the likely call wait time when they join the queue. Callers may also have found the information they require on the department’s website or blog whilst waiting for their call to be answered.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2022 to Question 92912 on Department for Education: Telephone Services, for what reason there was a more than sevenfold increase in waiting time before calls were answered between (a) October 2021 and (b) November 2021.

There was a sevenfold increase in the waiting time, and more than a 20-fold increase in the abandonment rate to the COVID-19 helpline from October 2021 to November 2021 due to the emergence of the Omicron variant and my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister’s announcement on 28 November 2021 of new restrictions due to the variant’s transmissibility and prevalence.

Call levels during October were low, and for the majority of November a similar level of low call volumes was recorded, meaning that waiting time and abandonment rates were very low and sufficient resource was available to ensure this continued. However, once restrictions were introduced at the end of November, call levels significantly increased.

The previous data shared in relation to Question 92912 on 5 January 2022 gave a monthly average of call volumes, rather than a breakdown by date. The monthly average for November 2021 was impacted by a significant increase in calls at the end of the month over a short period of time, rather than a general increase in demand spread throughout the month. The attached table shows the daily call volumes during October, November and the first few days in December 2021 as context for this response.

The COVID-19 helpline is part of a wider outsourced customer engagement contract which provides other helplines for the department. Given that lower call volumes were maintained through the autumn, some of the COVID-19 helpline resource was released to support another of the department’s helplines during October and November which was experiencing high demand, as part of a flexible resourcing model. Following my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister’s announcement on 28 November and the increase in call volumes to the COVID-19 helpline, we recalled the agents to ensure that there was sufficient capacity on the COVID-19 helpline to minimise call wait times for our customers.

The data shows that the average call duration (call handling time) during this period also increased, which impacts the number of calls each agent can handle per hour. We assume that the higher abandonment rate was a result of the increases in the call wait time, as callers are informed of the likely call wait time when they join the queue. Callers may also have found the information they require on the department’s website or blog whilst waiting for their call to be answered.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2022 to Question 94337 on Schools: Air Conditioning, what steps he took to engage with existing British manufacturers of potentially suitable devices to (a) benefit from their operational experience of fitting and deploying similar technologies and (b) encourage them to produce suitable devices in the UK.

The department’s technical specification was created following significant participation and input from leading (UK) cross-industry and cross-governmental experts, including the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers and the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, in addition to engagement from manufacturers in this process.

As part of the procurement and selection process, suppliers on the Crown Commercial Services Framework RM6157 Lot 3 were assessed on multiple criteria which included their conformance to the technical specification, as well as their ability to satisfy the delivery timescales at the volumes required by the department. The volume required was significantly higher than stock available in the UK so not all manufacturers could meet either the technical threshold of the specification, the volumes, or the delivery timescales, or all 3.

To increase the selection of products available on the marketplace for schools, colleges and universities, we are continuing to work with suppliers and manufacturers within their supply chain both in the UK and wider to ensure that their products conform with the department’s technical specification.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2022 to Question 92912 on Department for Education: Telephone Services, how many full-time equivalent staff were available to answer calls to that number in each week from 1 October to 30 November 2021.

In October 2021, there were 32 full time equivalent staff available to answer calls to the department's COVID-19 helpline each week.

In November 2021, there were 18 full time equivalent staff available to answer calls to the department's COVID-19 helpline each week.

The reduction in staffing during November was a temporary measure in response to a reduction in call volumes to our helpline, the staff were redeployed to support a priority business requirement in another part of the department whilst call volumes remained low.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which models of carbon dioxide monitors issued to schools in the autumn term of 2021 were procured by his Department; what technical standards and specifications those monitors were required to meet; and if he will publish those technical standards and specifications.

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, the department has emphasised the importance of ventilation and provided guidance to schools, colleges and nurseries on ventilation requirements, including on how to use CO2 monitors effectively to identify areas where ventilation can be improved. This includes comprehensive advice on how settings can improve ventilation from the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Where readings are consistently higher than 1500 parts per million (ppm) CO2 concentration in an occupied space, schools, colleges and nurseries should take action to improve ventilation. HSE provides more information on this here: https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/identifying-poorly-ventilated-areas.htm. This will be indicated by a red light on the CO2 monitors supplied by the department. This does not mean that you need to stop using the room. It is the responsibility of schools, colleges and nurseries to decide on the use of affected rooms in accordance with their risk assessment procedures and obligations under health and safety law. For further information please refer to our guidance available on our ventilation document sharing platform: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj.

All CO2 monitors units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed in consultation with industry wide experts in ventilation, including chartered engineers, scientists and several government departments. The technical specification has been published along with the contract on Contracts Finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda. Further details of the models of CO2 monitors issued to schools can be found here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj. If schools, colleges or nurseries have any technical queries regarding their CO2 monitors they should contact the supplier of their device.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with the Health and Safety Executive about the suitability of 1500 ppm of carbon dioxide as the threshold for funded Government interventions and the carbon dioxide monitors his Department issued to schools in autumn 2021; and if he will make a statement.

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, the department has emphasised the importance of ventilation and provided guidance to schools, colleges and nurseries on ventilation requirements, including on how to use CO2 monitors effectively to identify areas where ventilation can be improved. This includes comprehensive advice on how settings can improve ventilation from the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Where readings are consistently higher than 1500 parts per million (ppm) CO2 concentration in an occupied space, schools, colleges and nurseries should take action to improve ventilation. HSE provides more information on this here: https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/identifying-poorly-ventilated-areas.htm. This will be indicated by a red light on the CO2 monitors supplied by the department. This does not mean that you need to stop using the room. It is the responsibility of schools, colleges and nurseries to decide on the use of affected rooms in accordance with their risk assessment procedures and obligations under health and safety law. For further information please refer to our guidance available on our ventilation document sharing platform: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj.

All CO2 monitors units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed in consultation with industry wide experts in ventilation, including chartered engineers, scientists and several government departments. The technical specification has been published along with the contract on Contracts Finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda. Further details of the models of CO2 monitors issued to schools can be found here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj. If schools, colleges or nurseries have any technical queries regarding their CO2 monitors they should contact the supplier of their device.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 6 January 2022 to Question 94344 on Schools: Coronavirus, on what date between 1 March 2020 and April 2021 officials from his Department first had discussions with the Department of Health and Social Care on the use of ventilation technology in school classrooms to reduce the transmission of covid-19.

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, the department has emphasised the importance of ventilation and provided guidance to schools, colleges and nurseries on ventilation requirements, including on how to use CO2 monitors effectively to identify areas where ventilation can be improved. This includes comprehensive advice on how settings can improve ventilation from the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Where readings are consistently higher than 1500 parts per million (ppm) CO2 concentration in an occupied space, schools, colleges and nurseries should take action to improve ventilation. HSE provides more information on this here: https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/identifying-poorly-ventilated-areas.htm. This will be indicated by a red light on the CO2 monitors supplied by the department. This does not mean that you need to stop using the room. It is the responsibility of schools, colleges and nurseries to decide on the use of affected rooms in accordance with their risk assessment procedures and obligations under health and safety law. For further information please refer to our guidance available on our ventilation document sharing platform: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj.

All CO2 monitors units provided by the department have met an approved technical specification. The department’s technical specification used to assess the units was developed in consultation with industry wide experts in ventilation, including chartered engineers, scientists and several government departments. The technical specification has been published along with the contract on Contracts Finder in line with the government’s transparency agenda. Further details of the models of CO2 monitors issued to schools can be found here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12cU_I5q0v1_my97yPMpb87RsSL5d5lpj. If schools, colleges or nurseries have any technical queries regarding their CO2 monitors they should contact the supplier of their device.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the evidence on which he based his decision to provide up to a further 7,000 air purifiers to schools without charge; and on what basis that overall number of units was reached.

On 24 January, the department published summary findings from its survey of the use of carbon dioxide monitors, and data on applications for air cleaning units. This is available to view here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/co2-monitor-survey-and-applications-for-air-cleaning-units.

In total, 1,265 providers that applied for department-funded air cleaning units were eligible for air cleaning units. This mirrors the survey’s findings that only 3% of providers using carbon dioxide monitors reported sustained high carbon dioxide readings that could not otherwise be addressed.

The total number of air cleaning units that providers have applied for was just over 8,000. This demonstrates that, in the majority of classrooms and teaching spaces, solutions can already be found to keep ventilation at adequate levels. Up to an additional 1,000 units have now been ordered, bringing the total number of units available up to 9,000, allowing all eligible applications to be fulfilled.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many hours of tutoring have been provided to pupils under the school-led tutoring grant in (a) England, (b) each local authority, (c) each parliamentary constituency during the 2021-22 academic year.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) is due to reach hundreds of thousands more pupils this year, as part of a significant expansion to give schools more flexibility to deliver tutoring that works for them and ensure that no child is left behind.

Building on the success of last year, we are confident of reaching our ambitious target to provide up to 6 million tutoring packages over the next 3 years.

The department continues to collect data from schools for all 3 strands of the NTP (school-led tutoring, tuition partners and academic mentors). As at 1 December 2021, an estimated 230,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils through school-led tutoring since September; by 12 December an estimated 52,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils with tuition partners and an estimated 20,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils with academic mentors in the same period. The department does not collect data on pupils as the programme is focused on tutoring packages and has not committed to publish local level data. Accordingly, it has not published pupil participation by constituency. We will review the collection of data after the end of the current year to determine whether any changes are required.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils have received tuition under the school-led tutoring grant in (a) England, (b) each local authority, (c) each parliamentary constituency during the 2021-22 academic year.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) is due to reach hundreds of thousands more pupils this year, as part of a significant expansion to give schools more flexibility to deliver tutoring that works for them and ensure that no child is left behind.

Building on the success of last year, we are confident of reaching our ambitious target to provide up to 6 million tutoring packages over the next 3 years.

The department continues to collect data from schools for all 3 strands of the NTP (school-led tutoring, tuition partners and academic mentors). As at 1 December 2021, an estimated 230,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils through school-led tutoring since September; by 12 December an estimated 52,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils with tuition partners and an estimated 20,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils with academic mentors in the same period. The department does not collect data on pupils as the programme is focused on tutoring packages and has not committed to publish local level data. Accordingly, it has not published pupil participation by constituency. We will review the collection of data after the end of the current year to determine whether any changes are required.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools are using the school-led tutoring grant to provide tuition in (a) England, (b) each local authority and (c) each parliamentary constituency.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) is due to reach hundreds of thousands more pupils this year, as part of a significant expansion to give schools more flexibility to deliver tutoring that works for them and ensure that no child is left behind.

Building on the success of last year, we are confident of reaching our ambitious target to provide up to 6 million tutoring packages over the next 3 years.

The department continues to collect data from schools for all 3 strands of the NTP (school-led tutoring, tuition partners and academic mentors). As at 1 December 2021, an estimated 230,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils through school-led tutoring since September; by 12 December an estimated 52,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils with tuition partners and an estimated 20,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils with academic mentors in the same period. The department does not collect data on pupils as the programme is focused on tutoring packages and has not committed to publish local level data. Accordingly, it has not published pupil participation by constituency. We will review the collection of data after the end of the current year to determine whether any changes are required.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish a table showing how many children are receiving tutoring via the National Tutoring Programme tuition partners in each (a) local authority, (b) region, and (c) parliamentary constituency.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) is due to reach hundreds of thousands more pupils this year, as part of a significant expansion to give schools more flexibility to deliver tutoring that works for them and ensure that no child is left behind.

Building on the success of last year, we are confident of reaching our ambitious target to provide up to 6 million tutoring packages over the next 3 years.

The department continues to collect data from schools for all 3 strands of the NTP (school-led tutoring, tuition partners and academic mentors). As at 1 December 2021, an estimated 230,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils through school-led tutoring since September; by 12 December an estimated 52,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils with tuition partners and an estimated 20,000 tutoring courses had been started by pupils with academic mentors in the same period. The department does not collect data on pupils as the programme is focused on tutoring packages and has not committed to publish local level data. Accordingly, it has not published pupil participation by constituency. We will review the collection of data after the end of the current year to determine whether any changes are required.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils have been enrolled on the National Tutoring Programme academic mentor pillar in the 2021-22 school year; and how many of those pupils have started to receive mentoring as at 7 January 2022.

The National Tutoring Programme aims to deliver up to 2 million tuition courses this year, and to deliver up to 90 million tuition hours by the 2024/25 academic year across the programme’s 3 pillars.

The programme is currently on course to deliver its objectives. Schools know their pupils best and have the freedom to enrol those who will benefit most. So far, an estimated 230,000 courses have been started by pupils through the School-Led tutoring pillar, an estimated 20,000 with Academic Mentors and an estimated 52,000 with Tuition Partners. As a course consists of 15 tuition hours this means pupils who need it most will be receiving millions of hours of high-quality support.

The department will continue to work closely with its delivery partner to ensure the Tuition Partner and Academic Mentor pillars fulfil their objectives by the end of the academic year.

We will publish further data for the spring and summer terms later this year.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he expects to meet the target for 524,000 children to be receiving tutoring via National Tutoring Programme tuition partners in the 2021-22 academic year; and how many tutoring sessions each of those children is expected to receive.

The National Tutoring Programme aims to deliver up to 2 million tuition courses this year, and to deliver up to 90 million tuition hours by the 2024/25 academic year across the programme’s 3 pillars.

The programme is currently on course to deliver its objectives. Schools know their pupils best and have the freedom to enrol those who will benefit most. So far, an estimated 230,000 courses have been started by pupils through the School-Led tutoring pillar, an estimated 20,000 with Academic Mentors and an estimated 52,000 with Tuition Partners. As a course consists of 15 tuition hours this means pupils who need it most will be receiving millions of hours of high-quality support.

The department will continue to work closely with its delivery partner to ensure the Tuition Partner and Academic Mentor pillars fulfil their objectives by the end of the academic year.

We will publish further data for the spring and summer terms later this year.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils have (a) been enrolled on the tuition pillar and (b) started to receive tutoring as part of the National Tutoring programme in the academic year 2021-22.

The National Tutoring Programme aims to deliver up to 2 million tuition courses this year, and to deliver up to 90 million tuition hours by the 2024/25 academic year across the programme’s 3 pillars.

The programme is currently on course to deliver its objectives. Schools know their pupils best and have the freedom to enrol those who will benefit most. So far, an estimated 230,000 courses have been started by pupils through the School-Led tutoring pillar, an estimated 20,000 with Academic Mentors and an estimated 52,000 with Tuition Partners. As a course consists of 15 tuition hours this means pupils who need it most will be receiving millions of hours of high-quality support.

The department will continue to work closely with its delivery partner to ensure the Tuition Partner and Academic Mentor pillars fulfil their objectives by the end of the academic year.

We will publish further data for the spring and summer terms later this year.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when in 2022 he expects to reach the target of 252,000 children receiving academic mentoring through the National Tutoring programme.

The National Tutoring Programme aims to deliver up to 2 million tuition courses this year, and to deliver up to 90 million tuition hours by the 2024/25 academic year across the programme’s 3 pillars.

The programme is currently on course to deliver its objectives. Schools know their pupils best and have the freedom to enrol those who will benefit most. So far, an estimated 230,000 courses have been started by pupils through the School-Led tutoring pillar, an estimated 20,000 with Academic Mentors and an estimated 52,000 with Tuition Partners. As a course consists of 15 tuition hours this means pupils who need it most will be receiving millions of hours of high-quality support.

The department will continue to work closely with its delivery partner to ensure the Tuition Partner and Academic Mentor pillars fulfil their objectives by the end of the academic year.

We will publish further data for the spring and summer terms later this year.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with the (a) Chancellor of the Exchequer and (b) Comptroller and Auditor General and the National Audit Office on the value for money of spending on the National Tutoring programme.

The department has commissioned the National Foundation for Educational Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the programme’s process and impact.

Findings about last year’s programme will be published in summer 2022.

Interim findings about the current year will be shared with the department throughout this academic year to inform policy making, with final reports published in 2023.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has made an assessment of the impact of (a) covid-19 in general and (b) the omicron variant on the availability of school transport during the second half of the Autumn term in 2021.

The department does not collect data on the availability of home to school transport. However, we are talking regularly to the Department for Transport, local authorities and academy trusts to monitor the situation. Local authorities and transport operators are working hard to ensure children can get to school. We are aware of some temporary, isolated local issues, but the majority of school transport is operating as normal.

During the 2020/21 academic year, the government provided more than £145 million in additional funding for Local Transport Authorities (LTA) to support increased home to school and college transport capacity whilst social distancing was in place on public transport. This funding has enabled many children and young people to access alternatives to public transport. Further information and LTA funding breakdowns can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/extended-rights-to-free-school-travel--2.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance he provides to (a) primary and (b) secondary schools on the level of financial reserves that schools should have; what guidance his Department provides on the purposes for which schools can draw down on those reserves; and what the timescale are over which reserves should be rebuilt when below the recommended level.

The department trusts schools to manage their own finances, and we do not produce guidance on what is an adequate reserve level for academy trusts or schools. The amount of reserves that is appropriate to set aside will depend on the type and size of the academy trust or school as well as the particular risks that they face.

Academy trusts and schools have the flexibility to make their own decisions on how to prioritise their spending to invest in a range of resources and activities that will best support their staff and pupils. They can draw on their reserves for a range of planned and sensible reasons, for example, to spend on capital projects.

Academy trusts are directly accountable to the department for their financial management. Any academy trust reporting a cumulative deficit must agree a recovery plan with the Education and Skills Funding Agency to put the trust back on a financially sustainable path.

Local authority maintained schools are accountable to their local authority for their financial management.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of the change in the level of financial reserves for UK universities and other Higher Education institutions between 1 March 2020 and 31 December 2021.

The Office for Students (OfS) are responsible for monitoring provider financial sustainability of the higher education sector in England.

I and my officials work closely with the OfS and various parties including a variety of universities across the sector, mission groups and other government departments to understand the ongoing impacts and changing landscape of financial sustainability in the sector.

In December 2021 the OfS published the ‘English higher education 2021: The Office for Students annual review report’ which shows that despite the many operational and financial challenges arising from the COVID-19 outbreak, the overall financial position of universities, colleges and other providers registered with the OfS across the higher education sector has remained sound over the course of the last year, with generally reasonable financial resilience.

Providers were able to manage COVID-19 impacts better than originally expected, with student numbers holding up, and through careful management of cash and costs. Government support measures have served to help universities navigate those challenges.

The OfS continuously monitors provider financial sustainability, engaging more closely with those where it considers there to be increased financial risk.

Universities are autonomous businesses and continue to remain responsible for the decisions they make in regard to their business model and sustainability.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of the change in the level of financial reserves held by Further Education colleges between 1 March 2020 and 31 December 2021.

The department monitors further education colleges' financial health on a regular basis and uses this information to determine where support and intervention from the Education and Skills Funding Agency and Further Education Commissioner can help colleges to improve their position.

Where colleges are at risk of running out of cash, emergency funding is considered on a case-by-case basis. This is based on a thorough assessment of each college's circumstances and the minimum funding needed to minimise disruption to learners.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will set out the procurement and selection processes used to approve products for the classroom filtration device marketplace.

To procure air filtration devices the department ran a competitive process on the Crown Commercial Services Framework RM6157 Lot 3. The bids submitted by suppliers were evaluated and moderated anonymously. The bids were evaluated on price, quality, and social value to give a supplier an overall score. The suppliers that met the department’s requirements had their products made available on the marketplace.

The selection process to add products to the marketplace was based on the department’s technical specification created by leading industry experts, including the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers and the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE), and multiple iterations to ensure relevance to schools.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether there was a (a) high priority lane or (b) recommended supplier scheme giving (i) preferential or (ii) more rapid access to approval for inclusion in the classroom filtration device marketplace to which schools have been directed.

There was no high priority lane or recommended supplier scheme giving preferential or rapid access to any suppliers during the procurement of air filtration devices for the marketplace. The procurement was carried out following the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 and the Department for Education’s procurement processes.


Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent discussions Ministers in his Department have had with Ministers in the Department for Health & Social Care on provision for vaccinating school-age children in (a) July 2021, (b) August 2021, and (c) September 2021.

Vaccines are the best way we can protect ourselves and help keep children and young people in face-to-face education.

Since 23 October, 12 to 15 year olds have been able to book a COVID-19 vaccination out of school, through vaccination centres. On 20 December, the NHS opened the national booking service for 12 to 15 year olds to get their second COVID-19 jab. School-age immunisation service providers have been running since schools returned in the new year, with second doses also being offered through schools from 10 January. This offer runs in parallel with the in-school vaccination programme and ensures young people eligible for the vaccine can access appointments out of term time in addition to in school.

All eligible staff and students aged 12 and over are encouraged to take up the offer of the vaccine, including boosters, where eligible.

I met with Department of Health and Social Care ministers once over this period and Department for Education ministers and policy officials an additional four times. A number of these discussions touched on vaccinations.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made on trends in the level of school financial reserves between 1 March 2020 and 31 December 2021, for (a) primary schools, (b) secondary schools; and (i) academies, (ii) all other forms of school governance.

The department trust schools to manage their own budgets. The majority of schools are operating with a cumulative surplus, with only a small percentage having a deficit. The latest published figures show that the percentage of both academy trusts and local authority maintained schools in surplus or breaking even increased compared to the previous reporting year.

Local authority maintained schools report their finances on a financial year basis, and the latest available data is from the end of March 2021 (covering the 2020/21 financial year). Academy trusts report their finances on an academic year basis, and the latest available data is from the end of August 2020 (covering the 2019/20 academic year).

At the end of 2020/21 financial year 92% of local authority maintained schools were in cumulative surplus or breaking even, compared to 88% the previous year. Of primary maintained schools, 93% were in surplus or breaking even, compared to 90% the previous year. Of secondary maintained schools, 81% were in surplus or breaking even, compared to 73% the previous year.

It is important to note that a large majority of secondary schools are academies. At the end of the 2019/20 academic year 96% of academy trusts were in surplus or breaking even, compared to 94% the previous year. Academy trusts may contain both primary and secondary provision, so there is no breakdown between primaries and secondaries in relation to academies.

The latest published figures show 2,604 academy trusts and 11,600 maintained schools in cumulative surplus or breaking even, compared to 112 academy trusts and 1,055 maintained schools in deficit, with an overall cumulative surplus of £5.4 billion, compared to a cumulative deficit of £280 million.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will list the directorates within his Department as at 1 December 2021, and the (a) staffing in FTE terms and (b) total headcount in each of those directorates.

Please see the attached table for the list of the department’s directorates, with their full time equivalent (FTE) and headcount figures as at the requested date.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many external visitors there have been to the Department's office in Sanctuary Buildings in total, in each of the last 48 months.

The table below shows the data held on the number of external visitors to Sanctuary Buildings over the prior 36 months. Data prior to 2019 is not held by the department.

Year

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

2019

5142

4819

5184

4089

4871

4935

4892

3023

4364

5570

5322

2865

2020

4635

4345

2162

0

0

0

13

3

39

37

22

28

2021

8

13

44

31

43

101

111

142

392

339

584

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department's internal policy on sexual harassment was last revised; and if he will place a copy of that policy in the Library.

The department’s internal policy on bullying, harassment and discrimination has been in place since at least 2009 and was last revised in June 2020. A copy will be deposited in the Libraries of both Houses.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department's internal anti-bullying policy was (a) first introduced, (b) last revised.

The department’s internal policy on bullying, harassment and discrimination has been in place since at least 2009 and was last revised in June 2020. A copy will be deposited in the Libraries of both Houses.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department's internal anti-bribery policy was (a) first introduced, (b) last revised.

The department’s anti-bribery and corruption policy was introduced in 2018 and last revised in June 2021.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many items of guidance have been issued by his Department to vice chancellors and principals of higher education institutions, excluding such guidance as relates only to particular individual institutions, in each of the last 36 months.

A database of publications by category can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/search/guidance-and-regulation?parent=department-for-education&level_one_taxon=c58fdadd-7743-46d6-9629-90bb3ccc4ef0&level_two_taxon=dd767840-363e-43ad-8835-c9ab516633de&organisations%5B%5D=department-for-education&public_timestamp%5Bfrom%5D=16/12/2018&order=updated-newest. This database can be interrogated to identify specific guidance aimed at specific audiences, including higher education providers.

The database contains guidance which may have been updated on multiple for instance, the guidance document ‘Higher education COVID-19 operational guidance’ has been updated 38 times since it was first published in June 2020. It is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses.

Each document will include a published date, last updated date and option to show all updates: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses#full-history.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) primary, (b) secondary schools in each lower tier local authority area in England are rated by Ofsted as (i) Outstanding, (ii) Good, (iii) Requires improvement, and (iv) Inadequate; and how many schools do not have, for whatever reason, a published Ofsted assessment.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the hon. Member for Houghton and Sunderland South, and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's coronavirus helpline, advertised as at 0800 046 8687, how many calls have been (a) made to that number, (b) answered, (c) answered within five minutes, (d) answered within ten minutes, (v) abandoned by the caller before being answered, in each of the last 18 months.

The average wait times for the COVID-19 helpline for each month of the last eighteen months are contained in the attached table (row 7).

The average call duration for the COVID-19 helpline for each month of the last eighteen months are contained in the attached table (row 8).

The number of calls made to the COVID-19 helpline are contained in the attached table (row 4, calls offered). The number of calls answered are contained (row 5), as well as the number of calls abandoned (row 6).

It is not possible to provide the number of calls answered within five and ten minutes as this is not a reporting requirement of the contract, the average wait times are included, all of which are under five minutes, with the longest being just under three minutes in September 2020.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, in respect of his Department's coronavirus helpline 0800 046 8687, what the average (a) waiting time was before the call was answered and (b) call duration was, in each of the last eighteen months.

The average wait times for the COVID-19 helpline for each month of the last eighteen months are contained in the attached table (row 7).

The average call duration for the COVID-19 helpline for each month of the last eighteen months are contained in the attached table (row 8).

The number of calls made to the COVID-19 helpline are contained in the attached table (row 4, calls offered). The number of calls answered are contained (row 5), as well as the number of calls abandoned (row 6).

It is not possible to provide the number of calls answered within five and ten minutes as this is not a reporting requirement of the contract, the average wait times are included, all of which are under five minutes, with the longest being just under three minutes in September 2020.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) primary, (b) secondary schools in each parliamentary constituency in England are rated by Ofsted as (i) Outstanding, (ii) Good, (iii) Requires improvement, and (iv) Inadequate; and how many schools do not have, for whatever reason, a published Ofsted assessment.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the hon. Member for Houghton and Sunderland South and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the total number of school classrooms in regular use in schools; and what proportion of those classrooms he estimates to be in (a) primary schools, (b) secondary schools, (c) sixth form colleges in (i) independent and (ii) state schools.

The Department for Education does not hold information on the number of classrooms in regular use in schools and sixth form colleges in either the state or independent sector.

Investment in the school estate is a priority for the government. £23 billion was invested in the school estate from the financial years 2016-17 to 2020-21 to deliver new school places, rebuild or refurbish buildings in the worst condition and deliver thousands of condition projects across the school estate.

The department is investing a total of £5.6 billion of capital funding to support the education sector in the 2021-22 financial year, including £1.8 billion to help maintain and improve the condition of school buildings, £300 million in 2021-22 to invest in new high needs places, and £750 million for new school places needed by 2022.

My right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, announced a new School Rebuilding Programme last year, which will replace poor condition buildings with modern designs that will be net zero carbon in operation. We have announced the first 100 schools, as part of a commitment to 500 rebuilding projects over the next decade - transforming education for thousands of pupils.

The 2021 Spending Review recently announced a total of £19.4 billion of capital funding to support the education sector between the financial years 2022-23 and 2024-25. We have announced nearly £500 million of this for new mainstream primary and secondary school places needed by 2023. £2.6 billion will be invested between 2022 and 2025 to deliver new places and improve existing provision for pupils with special educational needs and disabilities or who require alternative provision.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, in respect of his Department's general helpline 0370 000 2288, what the average (a) waiting time for callers was before the call was answered and (ii) call duration was, in each of the last eighteen months.

Table A details the average wait times for the department for the 0370 000 2288 helpline. Table B details the average call duration.

We are only able to provide this data for the last 12 months as the system data retention policy deletes data older than 1 year.

Table A: Average waiting time for callers before call answered

Month

Average waiting time for callers before call answered (seconds)

November 2020

115.93

December 2020

79.75

January 2021

88.43

February 2021

92.26

March 2021

72.64

April 2021

54.5

May 2021

73.95

June 2021

91.56

July 2021

61.08

August 2021

49.55

September 2021

112.6

October 2021

143.79

November 2021

101.69

December 2021

100.2

TABLE B: Average call duration for inbound calls

Month

Average call duration for inbound calls (seconds)

November 2020

481.05

December 2020

466.55

January 2021

403.76

February 2021

484.29

March 2021

491.8

April 2021

485.68

May 2021

522.83

June 2021

526.29

July 2021

488.79

August 2021

444.82

September 2021

564.77

October 2021

642.04

November 2021

579.38

December 2021

596.73

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's general helpline, 0370 000 2288, how many calls have been (a) made to that number, (b) answered (c) answered within (i) five and (ii) 10 minutes and (d) abandoned by the caller before being answered, in each of the last 48 months.

The number of calls made (presented) to the department’s national helpline from December 2017 to November 2021 are contained in the attached file in Table A, along with the number of calls answered (handled) and the number of calls abandoned.

Table B contains the number of calls answered within (i) 5 and (ii) 10 minutes.

We are only able to provide this data for the last 12 months as the system data retention policy deletes data older than 1 year.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many items of guidance have been issued by his Department to headteachers of secondary schools, excluding such guidance as relates only to particular individual schools, individual local authorities, or individual multi-academy trusts, in each of the last 36 months.

A database of publications by category can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/search/all?level_one_taxon=c58fdadd-7743-46d6-9629-90bb3ccc4ef0&order=most-viewed.

This database can be interrogated to identify specific guidance aimed at specific audiences, including education and training providers.

The database contains guidance that may have been updated on multiple occasions, for instance the guidance document ‘Actions for Schools during the coronavirus outbreak’ has been updated 42 times since it was first published in July 2020: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many items of guidance have been issued by his Department to headteachers of primary schools, excluding guidance that relates only to particular individual schools, individual local authorities, or individual multi-academy trusts, in each of the last 36 months.

A database of publications by category can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/search/all?level_one_taxon=c58fdadd-7743-46d6-9629-90bb3ccc4ef0&order=most-viewed.

This database can be interrogated to identify specific guidance aimed at specific audiences, including education and training providers.

The database contains guidance that may have been updated on multiple occasions, for instance the guidance document ‘Actions for Schools during the coronavirus outbreak’ has been updated 42 times since it was first published in July 2020: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many items of guidance have been issued by his Department to principals of further education institutions, excluding such guidance as relates only to particular individual institutions, in each of the last 36 months.

A database of publications by category can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/search/guidance-and-regulation?parent=department-for-education&level_one_taxon=c58fdadd-7743-46d6-9629-90bb3ccc4ef0&level_two_taxon=dd767840-363e-43ad-8835-c9ab516633de&organisations%5B%5D=department-for-education&public_timestamp%5Bfrom%5D=16/12/2018&order=updated-newest.

This database can be interrogated to identify specific guidance aimed at specific audiences, including education and training providers.

The database contains guidance which may have been updated on multiple occasions, for instance the guidance document ‘Actions for FE colleges and providers during the coronavirus pandemic’ has been updated 48 times since it was first published in March 2020: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-further-education-provision#history.

It includes guidance published by the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) for a variety of audiences. The ESFA communicates all major guidance updates through ESFA Update, which is issued to providers weekly, and ESFA inform, which is issued monthly. It has issued 49 editions of ESFA Update in 2021, 49 in 2020 and 50 in 2019. It has issued 9 editions of ESFA Inform in 2021, 8 in 2020 and 10 in 2019.

The ESFA also publishes Business Update, which is aimed at FE providers and employers offering apprenticeships, highlighting related news and guidance updates. It issued 7 editions of Business Update in 2021, 15 in 2020 and 9 in 2019.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pieces of guidance have been issued by his Department to principals of sixth form colleges, excluding such guidance as relates only to particular individual schools, individual local authorities, or individual multi-academy trusts, in each of the last 36 months.

A database of publications by category can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/search/guidance-and-regulation?parent=department-for-education&level_one_taxon=c58fdadd-7743-46d6-9629-90bb3ccc4ef0&level_two_taxon=dd767840-363e-43ad-8835-c9ab516633de&organisations%5B%5D=department-for-education&public_timestamp%5Bfrom%5D=16/12/2018&order=updated-newest.

This database can be interrogated to identify specific guidance aimed at specific audiences, including education and training providers.

The database contains guidance which may have been updated on multiple occasions, for instance the guidance document ‘Actions for FE colleges and providers during the coronavirus pandemic’ has been updated 48 times since it was first published in March 2020: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-further-education-provision#history.

It includes guidance published by the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) for a variety of audiences. The ESFA communicates all major guidance updates through ESFA Update, which is issued to providers weekly, and ESFA inform, which is issued monthly. It has issued 49 editions of ESFA Update in 2021, 49 in 2020 and 50 in 2019. It has issued 9 editions of ESFA Inform in 2021, 8 in 2020 and 10 in 2019.

The ESFA also publishes Business Update, which is aimed at FE providers and employers offering apprenticeships, highlighting related news and guidance updates. It issued 7 editions of Business Update in 2021, 15 in 2020 and 9 in 2019.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many items of correspondence with Ministers in his Department from (a) hon Members in England, (b) councillors in England, and (c) all other members of the public in England, has been (i) received and (ii) sent in each of the last 48 months.

For the 48 months between 1 December 2017 and 30 November 2021 the Department for Education received 62,645 items of ministerial correspondence and responded to 49,831 items. The number of items received and sent differ as the received figure includes duplicated requests or follow ups, and items responded to after 30 November 2021.

Correspondence received from hon. Members, Councillors, and members of the public [1]

Year

Total

hon. Members[2]

Councillors[3]

Public

2017[4]

1,056

801

6

231

2018

11,738

8,314

72

3,116

2019

9,037

6,189

66

2,584

2020

24,009

19,663

48

3,855

2021[5]

16,805

13,281

36

3,042

Total

62,645

48,248

228

12,828

Correspondence sent to hon. Members, Councillors, and members of the public

Year

Total

hon. Members[6]

Councillors[7]

Public

2017[8]

959

772

3

170

2018

9,632

7,369

52

2,072

2019

7,295

5,427

48

1,710

2020

15,567

12,968

35

2,307

2021[9]

16,378

13,587

37

2,453

Total

49,831

40,123

175

8,712

[1] Includes all correspondence received, including correspondence where a response was not required

[2] Includes all MPs, data for England only is not available for all years

[3] Data included where the Councillor’s title is known

[4] Data covers 1-31 December 2017

[5] Data covers 1 January – 30 November 2021

[6] Includes all MPs, data for England only is not available for all years

[7] Data included where the Councillor’s title is known

[8] Data covers 1-31 December 2017

[9] Data covers 1 January – 30 November 2021

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the breakdown was by sex for each subject for which students were enrolled on T-level courses in (a) September 2020 and (b) September 2021.

We expect to publish data on the breakdown of T Level students by sex and ethnicity in spring 2022 – as part of an addendum to the 2021 T Level action plan (published on 17 December 2021). This will be end-year data and will relate only to students enrolled for the 2020/21 academic year.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of young people in the constituency of Houghton and Sunderland South are in receipt of the 16-19 Bursary, and whether that proportion has increased since 2010.

The department provides a range of financial support for students who need it to enable them to participate in post-16 education, including free meals, bursaries to help with the cost of education (such as travel, books, equipment, and trips), and support for childcare and residential costs where required.

16 to 19 Bursary funding is designed to help students overcome the individual financial barriers to participation that they face, and institutions must ensure the funds go to those who genuinely need them. The funding is allocated to individual education institutions for them to allocate to students.

The administration of the bursary fund is devolved to individual colleges, schools and other providers who are best placed to understand and support the needs of their students. We do not hold the information requested.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much and what proportion of the £560 million for the Multiply programme announced in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021 he plans to disburse in each region of England in 2022-23.

All local areas in the UK will benefit from the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) in order to deliver Multiply, a bespoke adult numeracy programme. Multiply will help people improve their basic numeracy skills through free digital training, flexible courses, and tutoring.

We estimate that up to 500,000 learners across the UK could gain a recognised qualification and/or improve their skills. The government will set out further details of the UKSPF later this year.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much and what proportion of the £560 million for the Multiply programme announced in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021 he plans to disburse in (a) 2022-23, (b) 2023-24 and (c) 2024-25.

All local areas in the UK will benefit from the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) in order to deliver Multiply, a bespoke adult numeracy programme. Multiply will help people improve their basic numeracy skills through free digital training, flexible courses, and tutoring.

We estimate that up to 500,000 learners across the UK could gain a recognised qualification and/or improve their skills. The government will set out further details of the UKSPF later this year.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the Kickstart Scheme on apprenticeship starts; and if he will publish that modelling.

The Kickstart scheme is distinct from an apprenticeship and the types of opportunities employers offer under each scheme will be different.

Kickstart will offer a subsidised six-month work placement for a young person who otherwise might not have got into work or be ready for an apprenticeship. Further guidance on the Kickstart Scheme will be issued in due course. An apprenticeship is a sustained job of at least 12 months with training. Through their apprenticeship, apprentices will gain the technical knowledge, practical experience and wider skills they need to achieve full competence in a recognised occupation.

We are supporting employers, apprentices and training providers during this challenging time, so that people can continue to access high-quality apprenticeship opportunities, to continue to build the skills capabilities the country needs now and in the future.

As part of the Government’s Plan for Jobs, apprenticeships will be more important than ever in helping businesses to recruit the right people and develop the skills they need to recover and grow. To help businesses offer new apprenticeships, they will be able to claim £1,500 for every apprentice they hire as a new employee from 1 August 2020 until 31 January 2021- rising to £2,000 if they hire a new apprentice under the age of 25 - in recognition of the particular impacts of COVID-19 on the employment prospects of this group.

The new payment means it’s a great time for employers to offer new apprenticeship opportunities and take advantage of existing flexibilities to train their apprentices in a way that suits their needs.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what criteria was used to select schools included in the delivery plan for Opportunity North East.

We selected Ofsted ‘Requires Improvement’ as the criterion to be in scope for the ONE Vision schools programme, with ‘Inadequate’ schools included by exception. We then undertook a comprehensive review of their performance data, pupil demographics, Ofsted history, and drew on intelligence from local authorities and trusts to identify the schools’ relative level of need. Schools with the greatest need were invited to participate in the programme. The ONE Strategic board ratified the final list of 28 schools.

The ambition of the ONE Vision programme, as published in the Opportunity North East delivery plan, is to support these schools to move towards ‘Good’ and to improve the outcomes of young people at the end of the secondary phase.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of the use of isolation booths in schools on the (a) mental health and (b) behaviour of pupils placed in those booths for disruptive behaviour.

The Government trusts schools to develop their own policies and strategies for managing disruptive behaviour according to their particular circumstances. To help schools develop effective strategies, the Department has produced advice for schools which covers what should be included in their behaviour policy. This advice can be viewed here:
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/488034/Behaviour_and_Discipline_in_Schools_-_A_guide_for_headteachers_and_School_Staff.pdf.

Existing guidance makes clear that schools can adopt a policy which allows disruptive pupils to be placed in isolation away from other pupils for a limited period. If a school uses isolation as a disciplinary penalty, this should be made clear in their behaviour policy. As with other disciplinary penalties, schools must act lawfully, reasonably and proportionately in all cases. The school must also ensure the health and safety of pupils. The guidance is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/behaviour-and-discipline-in-schools.

The Department does not collect or record information about schools’ use of isolation.

25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools in (a) Houghton and Sunderland South constituency, (b) the North East and (c) England have placed disruptive children in isolation booths in the 2019-2020 academic year.

The Department does not collect or record information about schools’ use of isolation.

Existing guidance makes clear that schools can adopt a policy which allows disruptive pupils to be placed in isolation away from other pupils for a limited period. The guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/behaviour-and-discipline-in-schools.

If a school uses isolation as a disciplinary penalty, this should be made clear in their behaviour policy. As with other disciplinary penalties, schools must act lawfully, reasonably and proportionately in all cases. The school must also ensure the health and safety of all pupils.

16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Financial Conduct Authority on the role of Flood Re in the flood insurance market since 14 February 2020 .

Defra ministers have not met with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) since the 14 February 2020.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent meetings he has had with representatives of (a) the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders and (b) Nissan to discuss the Government's (i) net zero emissions and (ii) clean air targets.

The Secretary of State has not met the SMMT or Nissan. Defra officials have recently updated members of the automotive trade on plans to reduce nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Officials also met SMMT to discuss gathering vehicle data for the Clean Air Zone vehicle checker, which is directly related to the NO2 target.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the effect of (a) shock collars and (b) other aversive training devices on animals' long-term health and wellbeing; and if he will make a statement.

The Government remains committed to banning the use of remote controlled hand-held electronic training collars (e-collars) for dogs and cats in England. This is based on Defra funded research carried out between 2007 and 2010 which showed that e-collars compromise the welfare of some dogs. Anyone causing unnecessary suffering to a dog through the misuse or otherwise of a training device would be in breach of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and subject to a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or an unlimited fine. The Government is committed to increasing the maximum custodial penalty for this offence to five years.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to prevent the Pet Travel Scheme being used to illegally bring dogs into the UK.

The Government takes the welfare of all animals seriously, and that is why we have committed to cracking down on the illegal import of dogs and puppies. This is an abhorrent trade which causes suffering to puppies and puts the health of pets and people in the UK at risk.

All dogs entering the UK must be compliant with specific documentary and health preparations intended to safeguard their welfare and the biosecurity of this country. We have one of the most rigorous pet travel checking regimes in the world and any dogs found to be non-compliant with the Pet Travel Scheme rules may be refused entry or detained until compliant.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of replicating the provisions of Scotland’s wild camping laws in English law.

We are considering a range of options for promoting access to the countryside to meet the ‘connecting people with nature’ goals of the 25 Year Environment Plan. There are no current plans or assessments underway to legislate for wild camping in England, including replicating Scottish camping laws.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of flood defences in the North East.

In the North East of England there are over 22,000 properties in areas at risk of flooding from Main Rivers and the sea. The Environment Agency (EA) maintain over 1,500 flood risk assets to protect communities in the North East against these risks. All EA-maintained assets are visually inspected on a routine basis as part of a risk based programme, with additional intrusive inspections undertaken where required. Where issues are identified during inspections the need for further works are prioritised through the EA’s programme of capital or maintenance works.

The overall investment in the Northumbria Regional Flood and Coastal Committee (NRFCC) in the North East of England for the 6 year capital programme Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management up to 20/21 totals over £100 million. This includes Local Levy and public and private sector contributions, with £48.8 million from Government funding.

The impacts of future climate change are taken into account when considering the levels of flood risk and the level of mitigation required as part of any investment decision.

There are a number of Risk Management Authorities, such as local councils, who also maintain flood risk assets to reduce the risk of surface water and groundwater flooding and better protect from the impacts of coastal erosion.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the Government’s policy on freeports forms part of the negotiating mandate for UK negotiators.

Freeports will be national hubs for international trade, innovation and commerce, attracting new businesses, spreading jobs, and bringing investment to towns and cities across the country.

Our approach to trade negotiations with the US, Australia, New Zealand and to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) is published on GOV.UK.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 10 January 2022 to Question 96861 on Leamside Line, for what reason the Parliamentary Under-Secretary does not plan to visit the Leamside line to discuss the case for its proposed reopening.

As stated in the Integrated Rail Plan, the case for re-opening the Leamside route would be best developed as part of any future city region settlement. The North East will be eligible for these settlements once appropriate governance is in place. I understand that the previous Rail Minister discussed with you the challenges around progressing this scheme at the present time.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if (a) he or (b) another Minister in his Department will meet with the hon. Member for Houghton and Sunderland South and her constituent to discuss the effectiveness of the legislative framework relating to offences of drink- and drug-driving.

Drink and drug driving is unacceptable and has no place on our roads, and we as Ministers are aware of the trauma that results. If the Honourable Member for Houghton and Sunderland South writes to the Secretary of State requesting a meeting the invitation will be considered.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if (a) the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State or (b) another Minister in his Department will visit the Leamside Line to discuss with stakeholders the case for its proposed reopening.

In January 2020 the Government pledged £500 million for the Restoring Your Railway programme to deliver on our manifesto commitment to start reopening lines and stations to reconnect smaller communities, regenerate local economies and improve access to jobs, homes and education. The bid for the Leamside Line to the third round of the Ideas Fund was unsuccessful. My predecessor as Rail Minister provided feedback on the scheme and advice on alternative funding routes to the Hon Member and her colleagues. As stated in the Integrated Rail Plan, the case for re-opening the Leamside route would be best developed as part of any future city region settlement.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when his Department plans to bring forward plans for a future city region settlement to include an assessment of the potential merits of re-opening the Leamside Line.

The Integrated Rail Plan published in November 2021 confirmed that the potential re-opening of the Leamside line would be best considered as part of a future city region settlement.

The Government has committed to investing £5.7bn in the transport networks for eight city regions in England, including the North East, through the City Region Sustainable Transport Settlements programme. The first settlement period will begin in April this year and will last for five years. As set out at the Spending Review, the North East will be eligible to access this funding once appropriate governance in in place.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities on plans for a future city region settlement in North East England to include an assessment of the potential merits of re-opening the Leamside Line.

My predecessor as Rail Minister has provided feedback on the unsuccessful Restoring Your Railway bid to re-open the Leamside Line and advice on alternative funding routes to the Hon Member and her colleagues.

As stated in the Integrated Rail Plan, the case for re-opening the Leamside route would be best developed as part of any future city region settlement. The North East will be eligible for these settlements once appropriate governance is in place. Officials in the Department for Transport and Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities continue to work closely together.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the feasibility of expanding (a) rail and (b) light rail services on the former Leamside railway line.

In January 2020 the Government pledged £500 million for the Restoring Your Railway programme to deliver on our manifesto commitment to start reopening lines and stations. The bid for the Leamside Line to the third round of the Ideas Fund was unsuccessful. My Officials have provided feedback on the scheme and advice on alternative funding routes to the Hon Member and her colleagues.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if (a) he or (b) another Minister will visit the Leamside Line to discuss the case for its proposed reopening.

Having already been asked by the Hon Member for Sedgefield to come and visit I have asked my Officials to find a mutually convenient time to do so. I would be delighted to meet the Hon Lady and other promoters of the line on the visit.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to provide financial support to the Tees Valley Combined Authority in respect of the costs associated with Teesside Airport.

We do not comment on the commercial or financial matters of private firms, because this information is commercially sensitive.

The Government recognises the challenging circumstances facing the aviation industry because of Covid-19 and firms experiencing difficulties can draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor.

This support includes the Airport and Ground Operations Scheme which provides eligible commercial airports and ground operators support towards permitted fixed costs subject to certain conditions. These eligible businesses can claim based on the equivalent of their business rates liabilities, or COVID losses, whichever is lower.

The Scheme originally opened for applications on 29 January for the 2020/21 financial year. In the March Budget, the Chancellor announced a six month renewal to the scheme from 1 April 2021. The renewed scheme opened for applications on 28 May 2021. £86.9m was awarded in grants under the first round of AGOSS, of which £65.1m was awarded to commercial airports. Applications for support under the second round of AGOSS are currently being considered. We continue to take a flexible approach and keep all policies under review.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has received a request from the Tees Valley Combined Authority for additional financial support in respect of the costs associated with Teesside Airport.

We do not comment on the commercial or financial matters of private firms, because this information is commercially sensitive.

The Government recognises the challenging circumstances facing the aviation industry because of Covid-19 and firms experiencing difficulties can draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor.

This support includes the Airport and Ground Operations Scheme which provides eligible commercial airports and ground operators support towards permitted fixed costs subject to certain conditions. These eligible businesses can claim based on the equivalent of their business rates liabilities, or COVID losses, whichever is lower.

The Scheme originally opened for applications on 29 January for the 2020/21 financial year. In the March Budget, the Chancellor announced a six month renewal to the scheme from 1 April 2021. The renewed scheme opened for applications on 28 May 2021. £86.9m was awarded in grants under the first round of AGOSS, of which £65.1m was awarded to commercial airports. Applications for support under the second round of AGOSS are currently being considered. We continue to take a flexible approach and keep all policies under review.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has undertaken an assessment of the potential economic benefits to the (a) North East and (b) UK of opening the proposed Leamside South line.

I refer the hon. Member to the Answer given on 14 June 2021 to Question UIN 12112.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of opening a proposed Leamside South line on congestion on the East Coast Mainline.

The Department received a bid for funding to develop proposals to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

The third round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund closed on 5 March and a revised bid was received, which is currently undergoing assessment. We expect to announce outcomes in the Summer.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine the scope of the assessments that would be carried out should they be successful. The proposal to reinstate the Leamside Line is also being examined by Transport for the North to inform the design of Northern Powerhouse Rail, and, as such, is being considered as part of the IRP. Its forthcoming publication will therefore inform the Department’s planning for the long-term future of both the East Coast Main Line and additional rail routes throughout the North East.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has undertaken an environmental impact assessment of opening a proposed Leamside South line.

The Department received a bid for funding to develop proposals to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

The third round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund closed on 5 March and a revised bid was received, which is currently undergoing assessment. We expect to announce outcomes in the Summer.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine the scope of the assessments that would be carried out should they be successful.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
5th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the timescale for opening the proposed Leamside South line.

I understand that the Hon Member has supported a well-supported bid to the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund for the reinstatement of the Leamside South railway line. The bid is currently being assessed and we expect to announce the outcomes in the summer.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has undertaken an environmental impact assessment of (a) reopening the Leamside Line and (b) opening a Leamside South line.

The Department received a bid to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

A further round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund will open shortly and we expect to receive a stronger revised bid at that point.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine its scope.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the length of time it would take to (a) reopen the Leamside Line and (b) open a Leamside South line.

The Department received a bid to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

A further round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund will open shortly and we expect to receive a stronger revised bid at that point.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine its scope.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect on congestion on the East Coast Mainline of (a) reopening the Leamside Line and (b) opening a proposed Leamside South line.

The Department received a bid to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

A further round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund will open shortly and we expect to receive a stronger revised bid at that point.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine its scope.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has undertaken an assessment of the potential economic benefits to the (a) North East and the (b) UK of (i) reopening the Leamside Line and (ii) opening a Leamside South line.

The Department received a bid to reinstate the Leamside Line (South of Tyne and Wearside) in the first round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund. The bid was not successful at that stage and feedback was provided on how it could be improved.

A further round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund will open shortly and we expect to receive a stronger revised bid at that point.

At this stage it is solely for the promoters of any bid to determine its scope.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what projects received funding from the Restoring Your Railway Fund.

The ten bidders for the first round of the Ideas Fund who have been successful in their application for funding to enable them to progress their proposals towards developing a business case, have been published on GOV.UK and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/re-opening-beeching-era-lines-and-stations/re-opening-beeching-era-lines-and-stations

The second round closed on 19 June and we received 50 bids which are listed in the link above.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to allocate additional financial support to local transport authorities as a result of lower passenger numbers during the covid-19 outbreak.

On 3 April we made available to bus operators and local authorities up to £167 million of new funding over twelve weeks under the new Covid-19 Bus Services Support Grant to keep key routes running. Another £30 million has also been reallocated to local authorities to safeguard bus services. This is on top of £3.2 billion of additional funding, the Government has announced to help local authorities respond to the immediate impacts of coronavirus.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether (a) the North East Combined Authority and (b) other combined authorities without a mayor will be able to bid for funding from the £4.2 billion fund for local transport set out in Budget 2020.

At Budget, Government announced its new £4.2 billion fund for local transport in eight city regions as part of its commitment to level up urban transport. Funding will be delivered through five-year, consolidated transport settlements agreed with central government and based on plans put forward by Mayors. In Tyne and Wear, funding will be conditional on the formation of a single Mayoral Combined Authority across the city region, to ensure accountability and effective delivery of funding, following the model that has worked for London. The details of how Government will take forward the settlement in Tyne and Wear will be set out in due course.

In addition, the whole of England will benefit from the largest ever programme of investment in strategic roads, the £2.5 billion Potholes Fund, and the Transforming Cities Fund. Further local transport funding will be set out at the Spending Review, including the £5 billion announced by the Prime Minister for buses and cycling.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of ticket prices on (a) train and (b) buses on the accessibility of public transport.

We have made no specific assessment of the effect of train ticket prices on the accessibility of public transport. However, we have frozen regulated rail fares in line with inflation for the seventh year in a row, cut costs for thousands of young people with the 26-30 and 16-17 Saver railcards, and will be rolling out a new Veteran’s Railcard later this year.

Bus fares are primarily a matter for the commercial judgement of bus operators. However, we support council spending of around £1 billion a year so older and disabled people can travel on buses up and down the country for free and a further £250 million in Bus Service Operators Grant to keep fares down and maintain an extensive network. Our commitments in the Better Deal for Bus Users will also help passengers secure best value tickets.

On 11 February the Government announced plans for £5 billion of new funding to overhaul bus and cycling links across England. This will include higher frequency services and more affordable and simpler fares. The details of these programmes will be announced in the upcoming National Bus Strategy, to be published later this year.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to build cycle paths in (a) the North East and (b) Houghton and Sunderland South constituency.

The construction of cycle paths is a matter for local authorities. Decisions on future funding for cycling and walking infrastructure will be a matter for the Budget and forthcoming Spending Review.

However, on 11 February the Prime Minister announced £5 billion of new funding to overhaul bus and cycle links for every region outside London.

In addition, in the last Parliament the Department for Transport provided support to 46 local authorities across England to help them develop Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure plans (LCWIPs). Four Local Authorities in the North East - Newcastle, North Tyneside, Northumberland and Tees Valley - have produced draft LCWIPs. The Department is currently working with the sector to develop further support for authorities on LCWIP scheme development.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the oral contribution of the hon. Member for Houghton and Sunderland South of 5 February 2020, Official Report column 395, if (a) he or (b) a Minister will visit the Leamside line to discuss its proposed reopening.

I would be happy to visit the Hon. Member’s constituency at a suitable opportunity to discuss the case for reopening the Leamside line.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the feasibility of expanding (a) rail and (b) light rail services on the former Leamside railway line.

As part of its Continuous Modular Strategic Planning work on long term strategy for the rail network, Network Rail is assessing what is required to make sure that the rail network between York and Newcastle meets the needs of passengers and freight users in the coming decades. This study is considering the potential role of reinstatement of the Leamside line in meeting those needs, including for local connectivity through extension of the Tyne and Wear local conventional rail or Metro network. It will make recommendations for further option development.

To help communities across the country, the Government has pledged £500m to start reopening lines closed following the Beeching report. I am inviting Honourable Members to work with local authorities and community groups to come forward with proposals to explore. I have set out how this should be done and my officials are providing further guidance and assistance. We will consider the proposals received and expect to make a further announcement on development funding in autumn this year.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the annual cost to businesses of paying statutory sick pay at its current rate of £95.85 a week.

The estimated cost to employers of SSP is £1.5 billion a year. This is based on survey data from 2011. Data is not available on the total amount of SSP currently paid each year.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Chancellor of the Exchequer's oral contribution, Official Report, 11 March 2020 col 280, what the evidential basis was for the Government's commitment to reimburse businesses with fewer than 250 employees for statutory sick pay costs in relation to employees being off work for covid-19-related reasons for up to a fortnight as potentially providing over £2 billion for up to two million businesses; and if she will place the modelling used to underpin that estimate in the Library.

The government recognises that small and medium enterprises (SMEs) may need financial support where they incur additional costs of paying Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) due to increased absences relating to Covid-19. Under the Statutory Sick Pay Rebate Scheme, SMEs can reclaim up to two weeks of SSP per employee paid for sickness absences relating to Covid-19.

A range of costings were carried out in March 2020 based on the situation at the time. This was prior to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme being developed.

We will continue to revise costings based on outturn data from initial claims and the latest information about the Covid-19 outbreak.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how her Department plans to promote the take-up of the Kickstart Scheme in the private sector.

We will engage with a wide range of private sector employers, as well as those in the public and third sector, both to promote interest in the scheme and to explore how we enable employers from all sectors to take part. DWP and HM Treasury Ministers and officials have plans to meet a wide range of businesses and employer organisations.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the Kickstart Scheme will be targeted at regions with higher levels of youth unemployment.

Kickstart is a national scheme which will support young people across Britain. We want to support as many people as possible through this scheme, starting with young people at risk of long-term unemployment. We will call on public, private and voluntary sector organisations across the country to create placements, we will cover the cost, and ensure that those who will benefit most are first in line.

More details about the scheme will be published in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will commit to a peer-reviewed evaluation of the Kickstart Scheme after its implementation.

The government will be monitoring and evaluating the Kickstart scheme throughout its implementation.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he is taking to work with (a) other Departments and (b) local authorities to deliver the Kickstart scheme; and how bids from employers wishing to take part in the scheme will be assessed.

DWP will continue to work closely with a range of other government departments including DCMS, BEIS and MHCLG to develop and deliver the Kickstart Scheme.

We know that mayoralties and all local authorities have an important role in the economic recovery. DWP will continue to work with them, and skills advisory panels, to make best use of their expertise and ensure the Kickstart Scheme meets their areas’ economic needs.

Details on how bids will be assessed are yet to be finalised. We aim to make the process as straightforward as possible to allow the widest range of organisations to take part, whilst ensuring value for money. More information will be available in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what conditions will be placed on employers seeking to hire people under the Kickstart scheme.

It is an employer's duty to protect the health, safety and welfare of their employees including young people who will be employed through the Kickstart scheme.

Further details about the Kickstart Scheme will be set out in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions he has had on the delivery of the Kickstart scheme with (a) the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government; (b) Jobcentre Plus Regional Offices and (c) local authorities.

DWP is implementing the Kickstart Scheme. We will continue to work closely with a wide range of government departments including MHCLG, to develop and deliver the Scheme as part of the wider package announced in the Chancellor’s Summer Statement.

With MHCLG we are setting up joint design groups to optimise the effectiveness of the scheme at a local and regional level. I have already discussed the Kickstart Scheme with the M9 Mayors and we have engaged extensively with the Jobcentre network.

We are keen to develop an effective and comprehensive economic response that works nationally and locally. Our Job Centre Plus partnership managers and employer advisors already work closely with key local partners, such as Mayoral Combined Authorities and Local Enterprise Partnerships.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he will take to monitor the Kickstart scheme to ensure people employed under that scheme start new rather than previously existing jobs.

Kickstart jobs will be new jobs - with the funding conditional on the employer demonstrating that these jobs are additional. Further details about the Kickstart Scheme monitoring and evaluation processes will be set out in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the effect of the roll-out of universal credit on the level of income of disabled people.

I refer the Rt.Hon Member to the answer I gave on 3rd March 2020 to Question UIN 20604

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much pension credit was unclaimed in (a) Houghton and Sunderland South constituency, (b) the North East of England and (c) the UK in each of the last three years.

It is important to highlight that in 2017/18 there were around 1.7 million Pension Credit claimants, amounting to around £5.1 billion of Pension Credit payments. The Government is committed to making sure that all pensioners eligible can claim the Pension Credit to which they are rightly entitled.

The information requested on the amount of Pension Credit which remains unclaimed in (a) Houghton and Sunderland South, (b) the North East of England and (c) the UK, is only available at the Great Britain level. Below are the figures on the amount of unclaimed Pension Credit within Great Britain over the past 3 years of data available.

Year

Estimated Amount Unclaimed (Millions of Pounds)

Range (Millions of Pounds)

2017/18

2,160

1,840 - 2,500

2016/17

2,850

2,440 - 3,300

2015/16

2,720

2,330 - 3,140

*Methodological refinements have been applied to the data for 2016/17 and 2017/18. Therefore, comparisons to previous years should be treated with caution.

Official statistics on the take-up of income-related benefits at Great Britain level, including Pension Credit, can be found in the ‘Income-related benefits: estimates of take-up in 2017 to 2018’ publication. Which was published on 27th February 2020.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/income-related-benefits-estimates-of-take-up-financial-year-2017-to-2018

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Feb 2020
To the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to tackle levels of unemployment among the BAME community.

The Government is committed to levelling up skills and opportunity across the country. Using data from the Race Disparity Audit, first published in October 2017, and the Department for Work and Pensions own analysis we are helping those underrepresented in the labour market. Since 2010, 1,223,000 more people from ethnic minority backgrounds are in employment - that’s a 45 per cent increase in the number of ethnic minority people employed.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessments he has made of the adequacy of financial support available from the public purse for unpaid carers.

This Government recognises and values the vital contribution made by carers in supporting some of the most vulnerable in society.

The Government is supporting carers in a number of ways, including through the benefit system. The rate of Carer’s Allowance, the main social security benefit for carers, has increased from £53.90 in 2010 to £66.15 a week, meaning an additional £635 a year for carers since 2010. Subject to Parliamentary approval, Carer’s Allowance will further increase to £67.25 a week in April 2020. By 2023/24, we are forecast to spend £3.7 billion a year on Carer’s Allowance.

The Government also provides targeted financial support for carers on low incomes through means-tested benefits, including Pension Credit and Universal Credit. Subject to Parliamentary approval, in April 2020, the associated carer premia in means-tested benefits will increase from £36.85 to £37.50 a week; and the carer element in Universal Credit will increase from £160.20 to £162.92 per monthly assessment period. These amounts recognise the additional contribution and responsibilities associated with caring and mean that these benefits can be paid to carers at a higher rate than those without caring responsibilities.

A table of proposed benefit rates for 2020/2021 was deposited in the House libraries on 29 November 2019. https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/business-papers/commons/deposited-papers/

27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect of the two child benefit limit on the income of single parents.

DWP and HMRC produce a joint report with statistics related to the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children, the latest of which was published in July 2019 and can be found online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-tax-credit-and-universal-credit-claimants-statistics-related-to-the-policy-to-provide-support-for-a-maximum-of-2-children-april-2019

Providing support for a maximum of two children, or qualifying young persons in Universal Credit and Child Tax Credit, ensures fairness between claimants and those taxpayers who support themselves solely through work.

We recognise that some claimants are not able to make the same choices about the number of children in their family, which is why exceptions have been put in place to protect certain groups. On migration to Universal Credit, families’ existing entitlement will be protected.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, by what date he estimates all eligible (a) 12 to 15 year olds and (b) 16 to 17 year olds will have received at least one dose of a covid-19 vaccine; whether he has set any targets for particular percentages of each of those age groups to have received at least one dose; and if he will make a statement.

The Government met its target of offering a first dose of the Pfizer vaccine to all 16 and 17-year-olds in England on 23 August 2021.

NHS England and NHS Improvement do not have estimated timescales or associated targets for ensuring individuals will have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, including for (a) 12 to 15-year-olds and (b) 16 to 17-year-olds.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 6 January 2022 to Question 94344 on Schools: Coronavirus, what engagement he has had with representatives of businesses (a) manufacturing and (b) fitting air purification technology in the UK (i) before the tender was published, (ii) after the tender was published but before the contract was awarded and (iii) since the contract was awarded.

This tendering was undertaken initially by NHS Test and Trace who explored the market with a variety of representatives of businesses involved in manufacturing and fitting air purification technologies prior to issuing the tender. There was no engagement with businesses involved with this technology between issuing the tender and awarding the contract. The UK Health Security Agency followed public procurement policy, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/public-sector-procurement-policy

Officials have ongoing discussions with successful suppliers as part of setting up the study and the ongoing management of the contract(s).

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 6 January 2022 to Question 94344 on Schools: Coronavirus, whether he plans to publish the full results of the trial as soon as possible.

The results of the trial will be published in due course, following the end of the school year.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 6 January 2022 to Question 94344 on Schools: Coronavirus, what assessment he made, before commencing that trial, of relevant evidence from research into the use of similar equipment for similar purposes (a) in the UK and (b) overseas.

The trial was selected from an environmental innovations workshop in January 2021, where several technologies were presented by experts to an evaluation panel. The assessment was supported by advice from the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies’ Environmental Modelling Group in their paper ‘Potential application of air cleaning devices and personal decontamination to manage transmission of COVID-19’ and the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 6 January 2022 to Question 94344 on Schools: Coronavirus, on what date discussions were first held between his Department and the the Department for Education on the trial’s (a) design, (b) funding and (c) timeline.

Officials from the Department for Health and Social Care and the Department for Education first held discussions on 6 November 2020.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the trial of ventilation technologies taking place in primary classrooms in Bradford, on what date the (a) tender for that trial was first commissioned and (b) trial commenced; between which dates the trial was actively collecting data; and if he will make a statement.

The trial of ventilation technologies in primary schools in Bradford is funded by the UK Health Security Agency. The tender was published 28 April 2021, with contracts awarded to the successful bidders in July 2021. The trial is ongoing and will continue to the end of the school year 2021/2022.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he made an assessment of the future additional annual costs to the public purse in the event that the judgment in the Supreme Court case of Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake, UKSC 2018/0160, was decided in favour of Tomlinson-Blake.

In advance of the Supreme Court’s decision in Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake, UKSC 2018/0160, the Government took steps to consult with affected stakeholders and prepare for various possible outcomes. An assessment of future annual additional costs to the public purse in the event of a judgement in favour of Tomlinson-Blake would have required information about the present and future remuneration of care workers, which is set independently by private sector providers and the degree to which local authorities would reflect any increases in the fees they pay care providers, taking account of local market conditions. This information was not available ahead of the judgement.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2021 to Question 29801 on GP Surgeries: Ventilation, what budget has been made available for enforcement activities in respect of ventilation in GP surgeries in each of the last ten years; what enforcement action has been taken in respect of ventilation in each of the last ten years; and when he or other Ministers in his Department last met representatives of (a) general practitioners and (b) trades unions recognised within the NHS to discuss the ventilation of GP surgeries.

The Care Quality Commission’s (CQC) enforcement activity is funded by Grant-in-Aid from the Department. However, the CQC has advised that information on the budget specifically for enforcement activities is not held in the format requested.

The CQC can consider ventilation as part of an inspection of a hospital or general practitioner practice and has a range of tools it can use on a proportionate basis, in line with its enforcement policy. However, the CQC do not record centrally the specific reason for taking regulatory action and to obtain information relating to enforcement on ventilation issues could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. There have been no specific meetings to discuss ventilation.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2021 to Question 290800 on Hospitals: Ventilation, what budget has been made available for enforcement activities in respect of ventilation in hospitals in each of the last ten years; what enforcement action has been taken in respect of ventilation in each of the last ten years; and when he last met representatives of (a) relevant NHS Trusts and (b) trade unions recognised within the NHS to discuss the ventilation of hospitals.

The Care Quality Commission’s (CQC) enforcement activity is funded by Grant-in-Aid from the Department. However, the CQC has advised that information on the budget specifically for enforcement activities is not held in the format requested.

The CQC can consider ventilation as part of an inspection of a hospital or general practitioner practice and has a range of tools it can use on a proportionate basis, in line with its enforcement policy. However, the CQC do not record centrally the specific reason for taking regulatory action and to obtain information relating to enforcement on ventilation issues could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. There have been no specific meetings to discuss ventilation.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of operating the Track and Trace app compared with operating the Track and Trace service by telephone call.

To date, the cost of developing the National Health Service COVID-19 app is £10.8 million. We will provide information in due course on the cost of the wider Track and Trace programme.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which companies won Government contracts to develop the covid-19 track and trace app; and what the value of those contracts was.

Details on individual contracts can be found on Contract Finder on GOV.UK. Companies which helped to develop the National Health Service COVID-19 contact tracing app include Vmware/Vmware Pivotal Labs, Zuhlke Engineering, Microsoft, and Amazon Web Services.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of the (a) development of the Track and Trace app and (b) merger of that app with Google and Apple.

To date the cost of developing the National Health Service COVID-19 app is £10.8 million. We will publish the total costs in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the estimated cost to the public purse has been of the NHS covid-19 track and trace app.

To date the cost of developing the National Health Service COVID-19 app is £10.8 million.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the additional cost will be of the further data protection requirements of the new covid-19 track and trace app.

We will publish the total costs in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to make available additional (a) funding and (b) resources to ensure that NHS (i) doctors and (ii) nurses are able to access psychological support during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Chancellor has been clear that the National Health Service will receive the resources it needs to manage the COVID-19 pandemic. I have commissioned the NHS to create a package of support for NHS staff during the COVID-19 response. This will include training and guidance, access to psychological support and other practical measures to sustain staff wellbeing.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of psychological support and resources available to doctors and nurses in primary care.

The National Health Service currently provides comprehensive mental health support for doctors and dentists in England through the NHS Practitioner Health Programme, a mental health assessment and treatment service that NHS doctors including general practitioners and dentists can access confidentially via self-referral.

Last year, we asked NHS England to develop an NHS People Plan to address workforce challenges and improve the support offered to all NHS staff. The health and wellbeing of NHS staff is very important. As part of the NHS People Plan, we plan to set out a comprehensive package of support that all NHS staff can expect to receive from their employer, including rapid access to occupational health services and psychological support. Publication of the final NHS People Plan has been deferred to allow the NHS to provide maximum operational effort to COVID-19 response. However, we have commissioned the NHS to urgently put in place a package of support for NHS staff during the COVID-19 response. Details of this will be released soon.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to monitor the effect of emergency legislation on Coronavirus on recipients of social care.

The Coronavirus Act 2020 introduced new Care Act easements to ensure the best possible care for people in our society during this exceptional period.

The guidance states that local authorities should report any decision to operate under easements, and the reasoning behind this decision, to the Department. This information is collated and will be used to monitor the easements internally.

The Care Quality Commission, Think Local Act Personal, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, the Local Government Association, the Care and Support Alliance and the Chief Social Worker are currently considering how to monitor the use of easements and gain a wider understanding of how COVID-19 impacts people receiving care and support by using a more person-centred approach to monitoring.

Full guidance has been published at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-changes-to-the-care-act-2014/care-act-easements-guidance-for-local-authorities

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to facilitate online consultations for outpatients to reduce non-essential contact with clinicians.

The NHS Long Term Plan outlines NHS England and NHS Improvement’s commitment to redesigning outpatient appointments, offering patients the choice of virtual outpatient appointments where appropriate. A pilot programme in April 2019 implemented video consultation in outpatient services at 40 providers. In light of the COVID-19 outbreak, NHS England and NHS Improvement are accelerating this work, rapidly scaling up video consultation capability within National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts to reduce the need for physical attendances.

The decision to conduct a consultation via video will be clinically led. NHS England and NHS Improvement are making a web-based video consultation platform available. It works on multiple devices, does not rely on software downloads and access will be free of charge to all NHS trusts and foundation trusts. NHS England and NHS Improvement will provide training and support materials to facilitate rapid deployment of video consulting technology; a nationally assured Data Protection Impact Assessment; a telephone support desk for clinicians and patients; and up to £20,000 per NHS provider for the purchasing of hardware to support the delivery of video consultations.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant?to the Answer of 30 January 2020 to Question 7625 on Cervical Cancer: Screening, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the recommendation on self-test cervical cancer screening contained in the review of adult screening programmes in England published in October 2019.

The United Kingdom National Screening Committee (UK NSC) reviewed the evidence on the use of human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling as a programme modification within the NHS Cervical Screening Programme at its meeting in February 2019. The Committee recognised that HPV self-sampling offered a promising test but that further work was required to ensure its feasibility and value in the current screening programme. Minutes of the UK NSC’s meeting can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/uk-national-screening-committee-uk-nsc

Public Heath England is now in the early stages of planning for a formal evaluation of HPV self-sampling as a primary test in the national cervical screening programme. The aim of this evaluation is to address key questions from the UK NSC external review of HPV self-sampling, published in 2017.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many full-time equivalent GP clinical staff there were in (a) Sunderland Clinical Commissioning Group area and (b) the North East in 2018-2019.

The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) doctors, direct patient care practitioners and nurses in general practice who worked in general practices in England, the North East and Yorkshire and NHS Sunderland Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) on 31 December 2018 and on 31 December 2019 are presented in the following table.

Due to a change in the regions, there is no comparable ‘North East’ region between September 2018 and 2019.

Full-time equivalent

All regular general practitioners (GPs) (excludes locums)

All nurses

All direct patient care

England

December 2018

34,510

16,348

12,858

December 2019

34,708

16,819

14,050

North East and Yorkshire

December 2018

5,122

3,154

2,454

December 2019

-

-

-

Sunderland CCG

December 2018

151

96

56

December 2019

144

100

58

Source: NHS Digital

Notes:

1. Data as of 31 December.

2. Figures shown do not include general practitioners, direct patient care staff and nurses working in prisons, army bases, educational establishments, specialist care centres including drug rehabilitation centres, walk-in centres and other alternative settings.

3. Each period, figures contain estimates, for practices that did not provide fully valid General Medical Practice general practitioner/nurse/direct patient care/admin/non-clinical staff records.

4. FTE refers to the proportion of full time contracted hours that the post holder is contracted to work. 1 would indicate they work a full set of hours (37.5), 0.5 that they worked half time. In Registrars' contracts 1 FTE = 40 hours. To ensure consistency, these FTEs have been converted to the standard wMDS measure of 1 FTE = 37.5 hours in the table.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to abolish tuition fees for (a) student nurses, (b) midwives and (c) allied health professionals.

The Government has no plans to abolish tuition fees for student nurses, midwives or those studying one of the allied health profession subjects.

The Government announced in December 2019 that new and continuing students from September 2020 will receive a £5,000-£8,000 grant during their course to help with their cost of living – and they will not have to pay it back. Eligible students will receive at least £5,000 and an additional £1,000 for those with child dependents with further funding of up to £2,000 available to new students in regions or disciplines that are struggling to recruit.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee's seventh report of Session 2017-19, Social care funding: time to end a national scandal, published on 4 July 2019, HL Paper 392, if he will make it his policy to allocate an additional £8 billion of funding per year to adult social care.

Putting social care on a sustainable footing, where everyone is treated with dignity and respect, is one of the biggest challenges we face as a society.

The Government is providing councils with access to an additional £1.5 billion for adults and children’s social care in 2020/21. This includes an additional £1 billion of grant funding for adults and children’s social care, and a proposed 2% precept that will enable councils to access a further £500 million for adult social care.

This £1.5 billion is on top of maintaining £2.5 billion of existing social care grants and will support local authorities to meet rising demand and continue to stabilise the social care system.

Future funding for social care will be set out at the next spending review.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 6 February 2020 to Question 11501 on Suicide: Males, if he will make it his policy to include representatives from the LGBTQ+ communities in the ONS working group.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is leading the programme of work to analyse the latest data relating to suicide registrations, informed by a group of academics. The ONS has selected the academics from the National Suicide Prevention Strategy Advisory Group according to their specific expertise in suicide prevention. We expect the ONS will publish its findings in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant?to the Answer of 29 January 2020 to Question 7623 on NHS: Computer Software, whether the table used in the previous answers represents the (a) number of accounts made or (b) number of active individuals using the app on a regular basis.

The NHS App now has over 250,000 registered users and has been designed over many iterations to be usable by all age groups. The table referred to in Question 7623 is the number of active users of the NHS App. These users have been through the registration process, and of these, 76% use the app more than once a month.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the availability of paediatric continence services for children throughout (a) England, (b) the North East and (c) Sunderland.

Continence services are commissioned locally by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). Later this year the National Bladder and Bowel Project Group will undertake an audit of CCGs across all regions in England to assess the commissioning of continence services.

Sunderland CCG is working with providers to improve the pathway in the local area, where continence services are currently provided by:

- South Tyneside and Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust (commissioned by Sunderland CCG), which provides a bladder and bowel service for both adults and children. This includes the provision of products using a locally agreed policy; and

- Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust (commissioned by Sunderland City Council), which provides the 0-19 service and support services including level 1 continence support for nocturnal enuresis, constipation and toilet training and initiating first line treatments.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant?to the Answer of 11 February 2020 to Question 12283 on Dementia: Diagnosis, if he will make it his policy to instruct CCGs to allocate funding for dementia sufferers.

The Government has no plans to change the policy on the commissioning of services or to instruct clinical commissioning groups to allocate specific amounts of funding for dementia.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant?to the Answer of 6 February 2020 to Question 11501 on Suicide: Males, if he will make it policy to include representatives from BAME communities in the ONS working group.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is leading the programme of work to analyse the latest data relating to suicide registrations, informed by a group of academics. The ONS has selected the academics from the National Suicide Prevention Strategy Advisory Group according to their specific expertise in suicide prevention. We expect the ONS will publish its findings in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the report of the Independent Review of Adult Screening Programmes in England, published by Sir Mike Richards in October 2019, what plans he has to develop the IT system supporting the cervical screening programme with the functionality recommended in that report.

Professor Sir Mike Richards’ Review on Adult Screening included a recommendation to develop screening IT systems that focus on the functionality needed to support improvements in the uptake and coverage of screening programmes, including the NHS Cervical Screening and Breast Screening Programmes.

NHSX is taking forward a comprehensive Digital Transformation of Screening programme. As part of this, NHSX is developing an interim cervical screening call/recall system, to end the current reliance on National Health Application and Infrastructure Services (NHAIS). A team has been established to deliver the new system and to migrate data from NHAIS and a technical architecture has been approved. A roadmap for the build and implementation of the new system and a plan with an estimated go-live date are being developed.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many full-time equivalent clinical staff there were in each GP practice in Houghton and Sunderland South constituency in 2018-19.

The data is not available in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant?to the Answer of 29 January 2020 to question 7622 on Social Services, when he plans to publish a Green Paper on adult social care.

We will work across parties to seek consensus on a plan to fix the crisis in social care – giving every older person the dignity and security they deserve. We will bring forward a plan for social care this year.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many full-time equivalent GP clinical staff there were in (a) Houghton and Sunderland South constituency, (b) the North East and (c) England in 2018-2019.

The number (headcount) of doctors (excluding locums), direct patient care practitioners and nurses in general practice who worked full time and part time according to their weekly contracted hours in general practices in NHS Sunderland Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), North East and Yorkshire NHS region and England on 30 September 2018 and 2019 is attached. NHS Sunderland CCG includes Houghton and Sunderland South constituency but does not map directly to the borders. North East and Yorkshire NHS region was formed in April 2019 therefore no data exists for this region prior to this date. The data is divided by those who are contracted to work 15 hours or less, more than 15 but less than 37.5 hours, and more than 37.5 hours per week. General practitioner (GP) locums are excluded as improvements have been made to GP locum recording methodology and figures are not comparable across the time series.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time equivalent clinical staff there were in each GP practice in Houghton and Sunderland South constituency in 2018-19.

The data is not available in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will allocate additional funding to support the early diagnosis of dementia.

NHS England allocates funding to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) which commission services on behalf of their local populations. It is for CCGs to decide how best to use the funding allocated to them in line with local healthcare needs and priorities, working with other local commissioners and organisations.

The Challenge on Dementia 2020 sets out the ambition for two thirds of people with dementia in England to receive a formal diagnosis. This has been achieved and exceeded nationally.

3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the National Suicide Prevention Strategy in helping to prevent men aged between 45 and 49 years old from taking their own lives.

The National Suicide Prevention Strategy highlights men, and especially middle-aged and young men, as a group at high risk of suicide. In September 2018, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) published the final suicide registrations data for 2018, which showed a significant increase amongst men, following four consecutive years of decreases. These latest figures reinforce why suicide prevention continues to be a priority for this Government.

Experts are clear that we need more data to be able to draw firm conclusions, and we have set up a working group with the ONS, Professor Louis Appleby and other academics to consider the data in more detail.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of elderly people to engage with NHS digital services.

We are committed to ensuring that all those using the National Health Service have fair and equitable access to high quality, effective healthcare services that are responsive to all patients’ needs.

Digital tools, such as the NHS App, which have been designed to be useable by all age groups. They can support older people to manage repeat prescriptions, book and cancel appointments and view their medical record.

In July 2019, we published the Digital Inclusion Guide for Health and Social Care to help support local commissioners and designers ensure that services delivered digitally are as inclusive as possible to meet the needs of all members of the population.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of elderly people to engage with the NHS App.

The NHS App launched following a period of testing from September 2018-January 2019, and now has over 250,000 registered users.

The NHS app has been designed over many iterations to be as usable by all age groups. Over 65s have been included in mixed method sessions including in depth interviews and usability testing for every feature of the app produced to date, and the app overall.

Over 10% of the total users are above 65 years old. As of 27 January 2020, the total number of users above 65 years old is:

Age group

Total Number of Users

Over 65

24,307

Over 75

4,674

Over 90

181

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made on the adequacy of the availability of cervical cancer screenings for women with physical disabilities.

General practitioner practices are required to ensure that their premises are suitable for the delivery of essential services and that they are sufficient to meet the reasonable needs of its patients, including those with disabilities. This involves making any necessary reasonable adjustments; making alternative arrangements, such as referral to a specialist screening provider; or undertaking the procedures in another setting that is more suitable given any limitations to a patient’s mobility. Where a patient requires specialist equipment, clinical staff will ensure that patients have access to its use in a safe environment.

NHS England is continuously investing in initiatives to help ensure equality of access to screening and, through the Section 7A public health functions agreement, aims to improve public health outcomes and reduce inequalities.

Professor Sir Mike Richards’ review of Adult Screening programmes was published on 16 October 2019. As part of this review, it was recommended that good practice on physical disabilities is shared to enable this to be adopted more widely. The Department, NHS England and Public Health England is considering the recommendations from Professor Richards’ report and will publish an implementation plan in spring 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure sustainable workforce planning for GPs.

We recognise general practice is under pressure nationally and that is why we have committed to growing the workforce by 6,000 more doctors in general practice and 6,000 more primary care professionals. This is in addition to the 20,000 primary care professionals NHS England is providing funding towards, and other commitments in the NHS Long Term Plan, with primary and community care set to receive at least £4.5 billion more a year by 2023/24, in real terms. The five-year General Practitioner Contract will provide greater financial security and certainty for practices to plan ahead. It will also see billions of extra pounds of investment for improved access, expanded services at local practices, the development of Primary Care Networks, launched in July 2019, and longer appointments for patients who need them.

The full People Plan, published later this year, will set out a broader strategy for a sustainable general practice workforce and how we will meet our commitments through both recruitment and retention programmes.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish a Green Paper on adult social care.

Putting social care on a sustainable footing, where everyone is treated with dignity and respect, is one of the biggest challenges we face as a society. As the Prime Minister has said, the Government will bring forward a plan for social care this year.

The Government will seek to build cross-party consensus and will outline next steps shortly.

24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his Department's policy to increase the level of funding for the early stage of clinical trials of dementia medicines.

The Government remains strongly committed to supporting research into dementia and the United Kingdom research community is playing a significant role in the global effort to find a cure or a major disease-modifying treatment by 2025.

The Government’s 2020 Challenge contained the commitment to spend £300 million on dementia research over the five years to March 2020. This commitment was delivered a year early with £341 million spent on dementia research over the four years to 31 March 2019. We are currently working on ways to significantly boost further research on dementia at all stages of the translation pathway, including on early-phase clinical trials.

29th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the review of the Apprenticeships Levy announced as part of the Spring Statement on 23 March 2022, what matters are most frequently raised with him by (a) businesses, (b) trades unions and (c) colleges on the operation of the existing scheme.

As part of the Spring Statement, the Chancellor set out that he considers that a new culture of enterprise is essential to drive growth through higher productivity. Therefore, the government wants to create the conditions for the private sector to invest more, train more and innovate more.

As part of this work, the Chancellor committed to examining the tax system, including the operation of the Apprenticeship Levy, to determine whether it is doing enough to incentivise businesses to invest in the right kinds of training needed for the economy to strengthen and grow.

The government’s ambition is to encourage greater levels of private sector investment in employee training, both for apprentices and for employees more generally.

The Apprenticeship Levy is a key part of this ambition, it is helping employers invest in and train apprentices which provide businesses with the skills they need to meet their customers’ needs and grow. Employers who pay the Apprenticeship Levy can invest their funds in high-quality apprenticeship training, while the government covers 95 percent of the training costs for employers who do not pay the Levy using unspent levy funds.

The government has already transformed apprenticeships – which are jobs with training for anyone of any age, at any level or stage of their career – to align with employer needs. Since the announcement of the Apprenticeship Levy in May 2015, over 2.7 million apprenticeships have begun.

The government regularly engages with employers, training providers and other interested stakeholders. The Government has recognised that some employers have frustrations with the way that Apprenticeship Levy funds can be spend within the apprenticeships system.

To address these concerns, the Government has delivered various improvements to the apprenticeship system. These include the launch of Flexi-Job Apprenticeship Agencies – with 10 employers receiving a share of £5 million of funding to set up - and the introduction of the Pledge and Match Levy transfer system. Since launching in September 2021, 110 employers including Amazon UK, DPD and HomeServe have pledged to transfer over £7 million to support apprenticeships in businesses of all sizes.

While there will not be a formal review of the Apprenticeship Levy or system, the government is committed to protecting the quality of apprenticeship training and making further improvements to the system to respond to the legitimate concerns raised by employers. The Chancellor will update the House further in the Autumn.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the extent to which the Apprenticeships Levy has (a) funded new apprenticeships, (b) supported new provision for the acquisition of skills and (c) led to the rebadging of existing training since it was introduced; and whether he has plans to update those estimates to inform the review of the Apprenticeships Levy announced as part of the Spring Statement on 23 March 2022.

As part of the Spring Statement, the Chancellor set out that he considers that a new culture of enterprise is essential to drive growth through higher productivity. Therefore, the government wants to create the conditions for the private sector to invest more, train more and innovate more.

As part of this work, the Chancellor committed to examining the tax system, including the operation of the Apprenticeship Levy, to determine whether it is doing enough to incentivise businesses to invest in the right kinds of training needed for the economy to strengthen and grow.

The government’s ambition is to encourage greater levels of private sector investment in employee training, both for apprentices and for employees more generally.

The Apprenticeship Levy is a key part of this ambition, it is helping employers invest in and train apprentices which provide businesses with the skills they need to meet their customers’ needs and grow. Employers who pay the Apprenticeship Levy can invest their funds in high-quality apprenticeship training, while the government covers 95 percent of the training costs for employers who do not pay the Levy using unspent levy funds.

The government has already transformed apprenticeships – which are jobs with training for anyone of any age, at any level or stage of their career – to align with employer needs. Since the announcement of the Apprenticeship Levy in May 2015, over 2.7 million apprenticeships have begun.

The government regularly engages with employers, training providers and other interested stakeholders. The Government has recognised that some employers have frustrations with the way that Apprenticeship Levy funds can be spend within the apprenticeships system.

To address these concerns, the Government has delivered various improvements to the apprenticeship system. These include the launch of Flexi-Job Apprenticeship Agencies – with 10 employers receiving a share of £5 million of funding to set up - and the introduction of the Pledge and Match Levy transfer system. Since launching in September 2021, 110 employers including Amazon UK, DPD and HomeServe have pledged to transfer over £7 million to support apprenticeships in businesses of all sizes.

While there will not be a formal review of the Apprenticeship Levy or system, the government is committed to protecting the quality of apprenticeship training and making further improvements to the system to respond to the legitimate concerns raised by employers. The Chancellor will update the House further in the Autumn.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Spring Statement of 23 March 2022, what his planned timeline is for his review of the working of the Apprenticeships Levy; and when he plans for that review to report.

As part of the Spring Statement, the Chancellor set out that he considers that a new culture of enterprise is essential to drive growth through higher productivity. Therefore, the government wants to create the conditions for the private sector to invest more, train more and innovate more.

As part of this work, the Chancellor committed to examining the tax system, including the operation of the Apprenticeship Levy, to determine whether it is doing enough to incentivise businesses to invest in the right kinds of training needed for the economy to strengthen and grow.

The government’s ambition is to encourage greater levels of private sector investment in employee training, both for apprentices and for employees more generally.

The Apprenticeship Levy is a key part of this ambition, it is helping employers invest in and train apprentices which provide businesses with the skills they need to meet their customers’ needs and grow. Employers who pay the Apprenticeship Levy can invest their funds in high-quality apprenticeship training, while the government covers 95 percent of the training costs for employers who do not pay the Levy using unspent levy funds.

The government has already transformed apprenticeships – which are jobs with training for anyone of any age, at any level or stage of their career – to align with employer needs. Since the announcement of the Apprenticeship Levy in May 2015, over 2.7 million apprenticeships have begun.

The government regularly engages with employers, training providers and other interested stakeholders. The Government has recognised that some employers have frustrations with the way that Apprenticeship Levy funds can be spend within the apprenticeships system.

To address these concerns, the Government has delivered various improvements to the apprenticeship system. These include the launch of Flexi-Job Apprenticeship Agencies – with 10 employers receiving a share of £5 million of funding to set up - and the introduction of the Pledge and Match Levy transfer system. Since launching in September 2021, 110 employers including Amazon UK, DPD and HomeServe have pledged to transfer over £7 million to support apprenticeships in businesses of all sizes.

While there will not be a formal review of the Apprenticeship Levy or system, the government is committed to protecting the quality of apprenticeship training and making further improvements to the system to respond to the legitimate concerns raised by employers. The Chancellor will update the House further in the Autumn.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Spring Statement of 23 March 2022, what the process will be for his review of the working of the Apprenticeships Levy; and whether there will be an opportunity for (a) employers, (b) trades unions, (c) colleges and other training providers, (d) hon. Members, (e) councils and (f) other stakeholders to submit evidence to that review.

As part of the Spring Statement, the Chancellor set out that he considers that a new culture of enterprise is essential to drive growth through higher productivity. Therefore, the government wants to create the conditions for the private sector to invest more, train more and innovate more.

As part of this work, the Chancellor committed to examining the tax system, including the operation of the Apprenticeship Levy, to determine whether it is doing enough to incentivise businesses to invest in the right kinds of training needed for the economy to strengthen and grow.

The government’s ambition is to encourage greater levels of private sector investment in employee training, both for apprentices and for employees more generally.

The Apprenticeship Levy is a key part of this ambition, it is helping employers invest in and train apprentices which provide businesses with the skills they need to meet their customers’ needs and grow. Employers who pay the Apprenticeship Levy can invest their funds in high-quality apprenticeship training, while the government covers 95 percent of the training costs for employers who do not pay the Levy using unspent levy funds.

The government has already transformed apprenticeships – which are jobs with training for anyone of any age, at any level or stage of their career – to align with employer needs. Since the announcement of the Apprenticeship Levy in May 2015, over 2.7 million apprenticeships have begun.

The government regularly engages with employers, training providers and other interested stakeholders. The Government has recognised that some employers have frustrations with the way that Apprenticeship Levy funds can be spend within the apprenticeships system.

To address these concerns, the Government has delivered various improvements to the apprenticeship system. These include the launch of Flexi-Job Apprenticeship Agencies – with 10 employers receiving a share of £5 million of funding to set up - and the introduction of the Pledge and Match Levy transfer system. Since launching in September 2021, 110 employers including Amazon UK, DPD and HomeServe have pledged to transfer over £7 million to support apprenticeships in businesses of all sizes.

While there will not be a formal review of the Apprenticeship Levy or system, the government is committed to protecting the quality of apprenticeship training and making further improvements to the system to respond to the legitimate concerns raised by employers. The Chancellor will update the House further in the Autumn.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much has been spent by each (a) Government department and (b) non-departmental public body on (i) focus group research, (ii) opinion polling and (iii) other forms of opinion research in each of the last 20 years.

The Treasury does not hold research spend for other Governments Departments. However, the Government routinely publishes details of all contracts over £10,000 on Contracts Finder.

As has been the case under successive administrations, any Government research, polling or analysis would be for official use.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he last visited a (a) primary school, (b) secondary school, (c) further education college and (d) university since 14 February 2020; and if he will publish details of those visits.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer has last visited the following educational institutions:

Primary and Secondary School: King Solomon Academy, London – 29 April 2021

Further Education College: Darlington College, Darlington – 11 April 2022

University: Aston University, Birmingham – 2 August 2021

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on how many occasions he has met the Secretary of State for Education since 15 September 2021; and what matters were discussed at each of those meetings.

In line with the practice of successive administrations, details of ministerial discussions are not normally disclosed.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the total amount spent on childcare in England (a) from all sources and (b) from the public purse in each of the last five years.

The Government has spent over £4 billion each year for the last five years on childcare in the United Kingdom through childcare offers led by the Department for Education and Tax-Free Childcare and Employer Support Childcare. This £4 billion is on top of support for childcare paid to Universal Credit and Working Tax Credits claimants, though these elements are calculated as part of the total Universal Credit and tax credit spend respectively and separate figures are not available.

At SR21, my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced an uplift to the hourly rates to be paid to early years providers to deliver the government’s free hours offers, and details of the £160 million for 2022 to 2023 have recently been announced by the Department for Education. Additionally, SR21 reaffirmed £150 million to be spent on the training of early years staff to support children’s learning and development, as part of the £1.4 billion Education Recovery Programme. Demonstrating the Government’s ongoing commitment to high-quality early years education, childcare and family services.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the overall direct cost to the public purse of heating costs for buildings used as workplaces by public sector workers, not including the homes of staff working from home, in winter 2021-22 compared to winter 2020-21.

HM Treasury has not calculated the overall direct cost of heating for buildings used by public sector workers in winter 2021-22 compared to winter 2020-21.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will place in the Library a copy of the advice given to staff working at the Darlington Economic Campus on convenient public transport connections from the Campus.

HM Treasury staff working at the Darlington Economic Campus are currently sharing space on one floor of Bishopsgate House, as an interim office with the Department for International Trade, the Department for Levelling-Up, Housing and Communities, and the Office for National Statistics.

There are 4 carparking spaces available at Bishopsgate House for Darlington Economic Campus staff. HM Treasury does have access to the parking provision, but no reserved spaces. There are spaces available in public carparks that are a short walk from Bishopsgate House.

All HMT Treasury staff, including those in the Darlington Economic Campus, are strongly encouraged to use public transport for official journeys, and we talk about this as part of the corporate induction for new starters. The Darlington Economic Campus is conveniently located in walking distance of local amenities within the town, bus stops and the train station.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many car parking spaces were available for (a) all staff and (b) his Department's staff at the Darlington Economic Campus in the week commencing 22 November 2021.

HM Treasury staff working at the Darlington Economic Campus are currently sharing space on one floor of Bishopsgate House, as an interim office with the Department for International Trade, the Department for Levelling-Up, Housing and Communities, and the Office for National Statistics.

There are 4 carparking spaces available at Bishopsgate House for Darlington Economic Campus staff. HM Treasury does have access to the parking provision, but no reserved spaces. There are spaces available in public carparks that are a short walk from Bishopsgate House.

All HMT Treasury staff, including those in the Darlington Economic Campus, are strongly encouraged to use public transport for official journeys, and we talk about this as part of the corporate induction for new starters. The Darlington Economic Campus is conveniently located in walking distance of local amenities within the town, bus stops and the train station.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many cubic metres of space were being heated each day, on average, in the week commencing 22 November 2021 at the Darlington Economic campus.

HM Treasury staff working at the Darlington Economic Campus are currently sharing space on one floor of Bishopsgate House, as an interim office with the Department for International Trade, the Department for Levelling-Up, Housing and Communities, and the Office for National Statistics.

There are 4 carparking spaces available at Bishopsgate House for Darlington Economic Campus staff. HM Treasury does have access to the parking provision, but no reserved spaces. There are spaces available in public carparks that are a short walk from Bishopsgate House.

All HMT Treasury staff, including those in the Darlington Economic Campus, are strongly encouraged to use public transport for official journeys, and we talk about this as part of the corporate induction for new starters. The Darlington Economic Campus is conveniently located in walking distance of local amenities within the town, bus stops and the train station.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many days and on what dates in the last month he has been working from the Darlington Economic Campus.

All HM Treasury offices are open and available for use. HM Treasury Ministers are working from the Darlington office on a regular basis, including the Chancellor.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the logo for the Darlington Economic Campus was designed by staff in his Department or commissioned from an external source.

The branding for the Darlington Economic Campus was designed in-house by HM Treasury.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the HMRC monthly performance report: September 2021, what steps were taken to contact, on the number from which they rang, the 20.8 per cent of callers to HMRC who wished to speak to an adviser in September 2021 but were unable to get through.

HMRC do not attempt to contact customers whose telephone calls to them have not been answered. Customers can recontact HMRC if they still have concerns.

HMRC is working hard to improve performance and return it to pre-pandemic levels.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion of the office printing paper purchased by his Department is partially or fully recycled.

All of the printing paper purchased by the department is fully recycled.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether there are any formal or informal written internal guidelines or design principles on the production of his Department's graphics for web and social media use.

There is an internal written document setting out design guidelines for HM Treasury graphic design content.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much office printing paper is purchased each year on average by his Department in terms of (a) reams and (b) tonnes.

7,664 reams of paper on average were purchased by the department over the last three years. We do not have information relating to the printing paper purchased in tonnes.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what targets he has set for improving the proportion of written correspondence sent to HM Revenue and Customs which is answered within (a) 15 days and (b) one calendar month.

Due to the impact of COVID-19, HMRC’s role responding to COVID-19, and the wider economic uncertainty, HMRC agreed with Ministers that it would set rolling quarterly performance expectations rather than full year external targets for the year 2021-22. HMRC is publishing these expectations from the Quarter 2 expectation onwards within its quarterly performance publications: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmrc-quarterly-performance-updates

HMRC’s Quarter 3 expectation, October – December 2021, for the percentage of correspondence cleared in 15 days is 55 per cent. This includes both post and online forms. There is no calendar month expectation.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much paper is recycled each year on average by HM Revenue and Customs.

HMRC does not hold the data as requested.

In 2020-21, 76 per cent of HMRC’s total waste was recycled, including paper. Top line figures are available on page 85 of HMRC's Annual Report and Accounts: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1035552/HMRC_Annual_Report_and_Accounts_2020_to_2021_Web.pdf

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much paper is purchased each year by HM Revenue and Customs for the purpose of printing and sending letters to people and businesses in terms of (a) reams and (b) tonnes.

Records of paper purchased directly by HMRC are not held in such a way as to disaggregate the tonnage and reams of paper purchased solely for the process of printing and sending letters to people and businesses.
Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the value for money achieved from advertising spend on HM Revenue and Customs' campaigns to ensure timely submission of self assessment forms from individual taxpayers.

All Government campaigns are subject to rigorous planning and approvals processes, including peer review through the Government Communications Service. Advertising forms only a part of any campaign. They are bolstered with no and low-cost activity wherever possible.

HMRC fully evaluates its advertising campaigns to establish value for money for the UK taxpayer; this includes identifying the effectiveness of each channel as well as assessing the quality of the media bought. It also identifies learnings from each campaign that can be applied to future activity.

In the last three years, HMRC has done additional research into its major campaigns to identify a return on marketing investment. The figures for the Self-Assessment advertising campaign are below:

2020 – 21

14.1: 1 *

2019 – 20

16.8: 1

2018 – 19

9.91:1

*for every £1 spent on advertising, HMRC saves £14.10 in administration costs

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, in which types of media and platforms, advertising campaigns carried out by or on behalf of HM Revenue and Customs encouraging timely submission of self assessment forms by people have been placed in each of the last five years; and how much has been spent on (a) the placement of those campaigns, by each medium or platform used and (b) all other associated costs.

HMRC spent the following on Self-Assessment advertising by channel over the past five years. This is the most detailed channel breakdown available.

2016 – 17

Radio – £389,959

Out of Home (outdoor posters) – £409,505

Digital display - £58,055

Search engine advertising - £96,000

Social media - £20,000

Research - £139,000

Production - £81,828

Total - £1,194,347

2017 – 18

Radio - £234,931

Out of home - £289,794

Digital display - £149,661

Search engine advertising - £149,505

Research - £97,335

Production - £226,580

Total - £1,147,806

2018 – 19

Radio - £254,624

Out of home - £287,841

Digital display - £182,976

Search engine advertising - £99,909

Social media - £49,943

Research - £131,425

Production - £165,017

Total - £1,171,735

2019 – 20

Radio - £185,072

Digital display - £188,363

Search engine advertising - £89,152

Social media - £72,930

Research - £133,294

Production - £55,584

Total - £724,395

2020 – 21

Radio - £290,829

Digital display - £281,545

Search engine advertising - £90,661

Social media - £144,851

Research - £55,272

Production - £90,899

Total - £954,057

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what targets he has set for improving the overall proportion of telephone calls received by HM Revenue and Customs which are answered within (a) five minutes, (b) 10 minutes and (c) at all.

HMRC no longer has a target for the time taken to answer telephone calls. Instead, HMRC now measures the percentage of customers who want to talk to an advisor who are able to do so. This is called Advisor Attempts Handled. Further information on HMRC performance can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmrc-quarterly-performance-updates

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmrc-monthly-performance-reports

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the HMRC monthly performance report: September 2021, what proportion of the 51.7 per cent of iForms and letters sent to HMRC in September 2021 which were not answered within 15 days were answered within one calendar month.
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much his Department has spent on advertising campaigns carried out by or on behalf of HM Revenue and Customs to encourage timely submission of self assessment forms by people in each of the last 10 years.

The amount HMRC spent on Self-Assessment advertising in the years 2014-21 is shown in the table below. HMRC does not hold records of spend before the 2014 -15 financial year.

2014 - 15

£1,916,306

2015 – 16

£1,369,871

2016 – 17

£1,194,347

2017 – 18

£1,147,806

2018 – 19

£1,171,735

2019 – 20

£724,395

2020 – 21

£954,057

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion of the paper purchased each year by HM Revenue and Customs for the purpose of printing and sending letters to people and businesses is partially or fully recycled paper.

As an ecologically conscious consumer, HMRC has ensured that all paper purchased by our supplier was from mills that are accredited by either the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification or the Forest Stewardship Council.

HMRC’s Customer Communications supplier ensures that the paper meets ISO 14001, which is the international standard for environmental management, within their own supply chain.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the launch of Green Savings Bonds by National Savings & Investments.

The Green Savings Bonds were made available to customers via National Savings and Investments on 22 October and will be on sale for a minimum of three months. The 3-year fixed-term savings product was launched with an interest rate of 0.65% and customers can invest between £100 and £100,000.

This innovative policy, a world-first of its kind launched by a sovereign, provides UK savers with the opportunity to take part in the collective effort to tackle climate change. Since the product launch, savers have continued to invest in this bond, and they will benefit from the UK Government green financing programme’s transparent reporting processes which will detail how their savings are helping to address the most pressing environmental issues of the day. The first annual allocation report, due to be published by September 2022, will show exactly how the proceeds raised have been used. The first biennial impact report is due to be published in 2023 and will set out the positive environmental impacts of the expenditures backed by the Green Savings Bonds and green gilts. These will include benefits to the climate and biodiversity as well as, in a first for sovereign issuers, the social co-benefits of green expenditures within the programme.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many staff by (a) full time equivalent and (b) headcount work in each directorate in HMRC.

A copy of HMRC’s breakdown of headcount and Full Time Equivalent (FTE) by Directorate as at 30 November 2021 is provided in the attached document.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing, and Communities on the fitness for purpose of the Bellwin scheme in respect of claims from local authorities for costs arising from winter flooding.

HM Treasury ministers are in regular contact with ministers in the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities on a wide range of issues, including those relating to local authority funding.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the level of staffing of HMRC.

HMRC resourcing levels are set to deliver business plan commitments. HMRC’s latest workforce figures are published in the HMRC annual report and accounts: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-annual-report-and-accounts-2020-to-2021

The latest performance figures are published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-quarterly-performance-report-july-to-september-2021

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2021 Question 10353, on Business: Taxation, if he will publish that information for the 2020-2021 financial year.

The mean and median duration in months for all enquiries concluded by HMRC’s Large Business Directorate was as follows:

Year

Mean

Median

2014-15

11.2

4

2015-16

11.2

4

2016-17

14.3

5

2017-18

12.9

6

2018-19

14.8

8

2019-20

17.2

7

2020-21

19.6

10

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2021 to Question 10352, on Business: Taxation, if he will publish that information for the 2020-2021 financial year.

Information has been provided in the table below:

Risks Closed
During each Year Ended 31 March

2014/15

Crown Dependencies

24

British Overseas Territories

54

2015/16

Crown Dependencies

25

British Overseas Territories

50

2016/17

Crown Dependencies

33

British Overseas Territories

30

2017/18

Crown Dependencies

16

British Overseas Territories

43

2018/19

Crown Dependencies

28

British Overseas Territories

31

2019/20

Crown Dependencies

25

British Overseas Territories

31

2020/21

Crown Dependencies

21

British Overseas Territories

5

Data in respect of individual dependencies and territories has not been provided to protect customer confidentiality.

Any information that could identify individual taxpayers, including aggregate information concerning a small number of taxpayers, is exempt under Section 18 Commissioners for Revenue and Customs Act 2005: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2005/11/section/18

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2021 to Question 10347, on Corporation Tax, if he will publish that information for the 2020-2021 financial year.

Additional Corporation Tax revenues achieved through Large Business Directorate compliance activity was published in an appendix to HMRC’s 2020-21 Annual Report & Accounts.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many staff by (a) full time equivalent and (b) headcount work in each directorate in his Department.

The most recent available 31st October 2021 full time equivalent and headcount of paid staff who work in each directorate within the chancellor’s department are as follows.

Directorate

Full Time Equivalent

Headcount

Business and International Tax

152.9

157

Corporate Centre

226.5

236

Economics

111.0

115

Enterprise & Growth

227.0

231

Financial Services

185.8

187

Financial Stability

80.4

81

Fiscal

106.3

109

International

184.8

187

Ministerial & Communications

119.2

120

Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation

37.4

38

Office of Tax Simplification

7.7

11

Personal Tax, Welfare & Pensions

144.1

147

Public Services

173.6

176

Public Spending

184.0

187

Strategy, Planning & Budget

98.2

100

HM Treasury

2038.9

2082

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on what date his Department's internal policy on dealing with workplace bullying was last substantially updated.

HM Treasury’s Bullying, Harassment and Discrimination Policy is part of a wider policy on Dispute Resolution which was last updated in February 2019.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the (a) completeness and (b) accuracy of published records of Ministerial meetings and hospitality received by Ministers in his Department.

The government is committed to publishing details of ministers’ meetings with external organisations, gifts (given and received), hospitality and overseas travel on a quarterly basis. The Treasury fulfils this commitment through its publications on gov.uk.

Guidance for departments on this process is issued by the Cabinet Office.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what guidance he has issued to Ministers in his Department on the timeliness and fullness of the publication of their Ministerial meetings and activities.

The government is committed to publishing details of ministers’ meetings with external organisations, gifts (given and received), hospitality and overseas travel on a quarterly basis. The Treasury fulfils this commitment through its publications on gov.uk.

Guidance for departments on this process is issued by the Cabinet Office.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on what date his Department's policy on staff working from home was last substantially updated.

HM Treasury’s policy on flexible working, which includes details about staff working from home, was last updated in February 2019.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, in alignment the appropriate Government guidance on workplace safety and availability, as an interim measure, the department suspended the requirement for formal arrangements to be in place in order to allow staff to work from home. Since March 2020, Treasury offices have remained open for all officials to access to meet business and wellbeing needs. The Treasury will continue to be guided by the Government’s Roadmap.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 25 November 2021 to Question 79347, on Treasury: Staff, what recent assessment he has made of the quality of information provided to Parliament by Ministers in his Department.

Treasury Ministers and civil servants take their responsibilities to Parliament seriously and providing accurate information to Parliament is accordingly a high priority.

The Answer to Question 79347 referenced the Answer to Question 73813, which contained an inadvertent error that was corrected as soon as we became aware.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC Tax Credits helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered within ten minutes in each of the last 36 months.
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC VAT helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered within ten minutes in each of the last 36 months.
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC self-assessment helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered within ten minutes in each of the last 36 months.
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC VAT helpline were (a) answered and (b) not answered within five minutes in each of the last 36 months.
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on what date HMRC's policy on staff working from home was last substantially updated.

HMRC has, like all Government departments, been managing through a complex time to support colleagues to continue to deliver vital services and work in line with Government guidance related to the pandemic.

The policies which apply outside of the circumstances related to the pandemic were last updated substantially as follows:

Balancing Home and Office Working – June 2021

Contractual Home Working – July 2021

The temporary policy to support colleagues to follow Government guidance in response to the pandemic was last substantially updated in August 2021 to take account of changes to the guidance and support colleagues with a gradual and phased return to offices. The policy was last reviewed by the HMRC Executive Committee on 22 November 2021, but no immediate updates to the policy have been made.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the level of staffing of the Valuation Office Agency.

At Spending Review 2021, the Valuation Office Agency (VOA) reviewed its demand forecast and the Government invested over £500 million in the VOA. To meet the challenges of the current Business Rates revaluation alongside other priorities, the VOA is continuing to strengthen its workforce, including undertaking additional external recruitment, and growing its own pipeline of surveyors to meet demand over the longer-term. HM Treasury works closely with HMRC and the VOA to ensure the agency is sufficiently funded to meet its resourcing needs.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many calls made to the HMRC national insurance helpline were (a) answered, (b) not answered within 10 minutes in each of the last 36 months.