Lord Pearson of Rannoch Portrait

Lord Pearson of Rannoch

Non-affiliated - Life peer

Lord Pearson of Rannoch is not a member of any APPGs
Draft Mental Incapacity Bill (Joint Committee)
11th Jul 2003 - 17th Nov 2003
European Union Committee
12th Nov 1991 - 8th Nov 1995


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Thursday 21st October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
voted No
One of 2 Independent No votes vs 5 Independent Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 160 Noes - 150
Speeches
Friday 22nd October 2021
Assisted Dying Bill [HL]

My Lords, I draw attention to what I said in two of our previous debates on assisted dying, at col. …

Written Answers
Monday 2nd August 2021
Religious Practice: Islam
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 April (HL15173) and …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 16th June 2014
European Union (Withdrawal) Bill [HL] 2014-15
A Bill To repeal the European Communities Act 1972; and to make provision for the Secretary of State to repeal …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Pearson of Rannoch has voted in 51 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Pearson of Rannoch Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(4 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(2 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Home Office
(3 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(2 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(2 debate contributions)
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View all Lord Pearson of Rannoch's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Pearson of Rannoch, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Pearson of Rannoch has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Pearson of Rannoch has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Lord Pearson of Rannoch


A Bill To repeal the European Communities Act 1972; and to make provision for the Secretary of State to repeal any enactment which has been a consequence of the European Communities Act 1972.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Monday 16th June 2014

First reading took place on 12 June. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled.The 2014-15 session of Parliament has prorogued and this Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for the election of the trustees of the BBC by licence fee payers and in relation to civil enforcement of non-payment of TV licence fees.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Thursday 12th June 2014

First reading took place on 30 July. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled.The 2013-14 session of parliament has prorogued and this Bill will make no further progress. To make provision for election of the trustees of the BBC by licence fee payers; and in relation to civil enforcement of non-payment of TV licence fees.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Tuesday 30th July 2013

A Bill To Repeal the European Communities Act 1972; and to make provision for the Secretary of State to repeal any enactment that has been a consequence of the European Communities Act 1972.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Wednesday 15th May 2013

Lord Pearson of Rannoch has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


110 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
7 Other Department Questions
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker, further to the Written Answers by Lord McFall of Alcluith on 1 and 24 February 2017 (HL4961 and HL5612), why the Religion of Peace website is no longer accessible from computers attached to the parliamentary network, having previously been available.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf. The Parliamentary Digital Service uses an industry standard service to categorise and block websites that are deemed offensive, the “Religion of Peace” website is blocked as part of this automated service as it is classified as a religion-based hate website by the service. There are no indications that the website has been available to access on the parliamentary network.

20th May 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what plans there are for members to return to normal rules of debate for those who are physically present in the Chamber.

The House of Lords Commission, which has responsibility for setting the strategic direction in this area, met on 25 May and had a preliminary discussion of these matters. The Commission discussion was informed by the debate on hybrid proceedings held in the Chamber on 20 May and was followed by a meeting of the Procedure and Privileges Committee, on 26 May, at which an initial consideration of procedural implications was undertaken. Proposals and options will be developed ahead of further anticipated deliberation at June meetings of the House of Lords Commission and Procedure and Privileges Committee. Decisions will continue to be informed by the latest Government guidance and advice from Public Health England. Finally, and most importantly, the House will be invited to consider motions in due course to agree procedures, including those relating to the rules of debate, moving forwards.

13th May 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker whether the Parliamentary Estate will remain closed to visiting members of the public until September; if so, (1) for what reasons, and (2) what consideration he has given to the loosening of COVID-19 restrictions in England on 17 May in respect of the accessibility of the Estate; and what plans there are to resume normal catering services in the House.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf.

Changes affecting the operation of Parliament as a whole, such as non-passholder access to the estate are decided jointly with the House of Commons Commission. Both Commissions agreed that business-related non-passholder access should resume from 17 May to reflect changes in government guidance. This is limited to one person, where the meeting cannot take place virtually. Access for the public will remain limited due to the need to control the overall number of people on the Parliamentary Estate to prevent crowding and control the risk and spread of the virus on the estate. Further changes to access may occur after step 4 following further consideration by the House of Lords Commission.

Changes to House of Lords catering services were made on 17 May, including the re-configuration of outlets in line with the ‘rule of six’. The following Lords catering venues are now open: River Restaurant and Terrace, Peers’ Dining and Guest Room, Long Room Bar, and the Millbank House ‘Coffee pod’. All outlets are operating within government guidance. Catering services in the House will be kept under review in the light of demand and the number of passholders on the estate.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Leader of the House what steps she is taking to (1) encourage, and (2) require, ministers to answer written parliamentary questions as tabled.

As Leader of the House I take very seriously the responsibility incumbent on all Ministers to provide full, timely and comprehensive answers to Questions for Written Answers. Ministers are reminded regularly of the importance of their obligations to the House, and my office works closely with all departmental Parliamentary teams to help provide advice on what is expected of them in providing such answers.

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker, further to the ‘Valuing Everyone’ training session for Peers on the morning of 16 March, whether describing a female over the age of 14 as a ‘girl’ rather than a ‘lady’ in the course of their parliamentary duties would constitute a breach of the Code of Conduct for Members of the House of Lords; and if so, what the penalty would be.

Only the Commissioner for Standards and the Conduct Committee can decide whether something is a breach of the Code of Conduct, upon receipt of a specific complaint to the Commissioner or appeal to the Conduct Committee. They do not deal with hypothetical situations.

10th Dec 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what is the total estimated cost of the report by the Conduct Committee: The conduct of Lord Maginnis of Drumglass (HL Paper 185).

It is not possible to provide an accurate estimate of the cost of the report The conduct of Lord Maginnis of Drumglass as most costs cannot be disaggregated from time spent by members or staff on other work.

1. Member costs

The report into Lord Maginnis was considered at two separate meetings of the Conduct Committee, at the first there were other items on the agenda so claims for attendance were not solely related to consideration of this case. At the second meeting Lord Maginnis’ appeal was the only item on the agenda. All members of the Committee attended for that meeting. HL members can claim attendance allowance for participating in a virtual select committee but those claims may also cover other parliamentary work undertaken that day so it is not possible to say how much they claimed for their work on this case that day. Lay members have so far claimed £1,200 to prepare for and attend that meeting.

2. Payments to the Commissioner and her staff

The costs of the time of the Commissioner for Standards and her office in relation to her investigation in to the complaints against Lord Maginnis cannot be disaggregated from her work on other cases. £5,760 was spent in payment to the external investigator who supported the Commissioner in her investigations into the four complaints.

3. Publication

The report was printed in-house on the same paper used for other parliamentary publications by a permanent staff team therefore the small costs of printing this report cannot be disaggregated from other work.

16th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much compensation has been paid by the Crown Prosecution Service to victims of group-based child sexual exploitation due to a failure to prosecute their attackers in each of the last five years; and how many such cases there have been.

There have been no cases where compensation has been paid by the Crown Prosecution Service to victims of group-based child sexual exploitation due to a failure to prosecute their attackers in the last five years.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many council officials have been (1) charged with, (2) convicted for, and (3) are awaiting trial for, dereliction of duty for failure to support victims of grooming gangs since 1997.

Tackling the sexual exploitation of children remains a top priority for the CPS. Specialist CPS lawyers work closely with police investigators to build strong cases, resulting in many successful prosecutions of complex grooming cases for example in Rochdale, Rotherham, Oxford and Newcastle.

The CPS does not maintain a central record of defendants’ occupations, nor of the specific circumstances under which a person has been charged with an offence. This information could only be obtained by an examination of CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost. The CPS collects data to assist the management of its prosecution functions. The CPS does not collect data that constitutes official statistics as defined in the Statistics and Registration Act 2007.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many deaths have been recorded in each of the last three months; and what assessment they have made of how many deaths would have occurred in each of the last three months if there had been no cases of COVID 19.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Pearson,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am replying to your Parliamentary Question asking for the number of deaths that have been registered in the last three months and predictions about how many deaths there would have been without COVID-19 (HL3274).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) produces a weekly report on provisional deaths registered in England and Wales[1]. The most recent figures available are for the week ending 17 April 2020. ONS mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration.

Table 1 shows the number of weekly deaths registered between week 1 (ending 3 January 2020) and week 16 (ending 17 April 2020), the five-year average per week and the number of deaths where COVID-19 was mentioned on the death certificate. The average is based on the number of death registrations that were recorded for each corresponding week over the previous five years. We have included these figures as they are presented in our weekly report. A copy of the table has been placed in the House of Lords Library. The table shows that the increase in number of excess deaths in the last two months, in relation to the five-year average per week, is greater than the number of deaths due to Covid19, suggesting that there are potentially other factors contributing to the increased death rate.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/latest

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people in England and Wales aged (1) under 65, and (2) under 40 years old have died from COVID-19 since 23 March.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Pearson,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking how many people in England and Wales aged under 65 years, and aged under 40 years have died from coronavirus (COVID-19) since 23 March (HL3276).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) produces a weekly report on provisional deaths registered in England and Wales[1], including deaths involving COVID-19. The week runs from Saturday to Friday. I have therefore provided data from 21 March up to the most recent week available, ending 17 April. ONS mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration.

Table 1 below shows the number of deaths that occurred where COVID-19 was mentioned on the death certificate between week 13 (ending 27 March 2020) and week 16 (17 April 2020). We have included these figures as they are presented in our weekly report.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Weekly provisional figures on death occurrence where coronavirus (COVID-19) was mentioned on the death certificate in England and Wales[2][3][4][5][6]

Week number

13

14

15

16

Week ended

27-Mar-20

03-Apr-20

10-Apr-20

17-Apr-20

All ages

1,806

4,989

7,833

7,288

Under 40

26

39

50

40

Under 65

259

688

1001

799


Source: ONS

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/latest

[2]Counts of deaths involving Covid-19 will include neonatals.

[3]For deaths registered from 1st January 2020, cause of death is coded to the ICD-10 classification using MUSE 5.5 software. Previous years were coded to IRIS 4.2.3, further information about the change in software is available.

[4]Does not include deaths where age is either missing or not yet fully coded

[5]An 'underlying cause of death' refers to the main cause of death, whereas a cause being 'mentioned on the death certificate' means that it might be the main reason or a contributory reason to the cause of death

5These figures include deaths of non-residents.

[6]These figures represent death occurrences, there can be a delay between the date a death occurred and the date a death was registered. More information can be found in our impact of registration delays release.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many deaths attributed to COVID-19 have been recorded in (1) care homes, (2) hospitals, (3) individuals' homes, and (4) other locations.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Pearson,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am replying to your Parliamentary Question asking how many deaths attributed to COVID-19 have been recorded in (1) care homes, (2) hospitals, (3) individuals' homes, and (4) other locations (HL3277).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) produces a weekly report on provisional deaths registered in England and Wales[1], including deaths involving COVID-19. The week runs from Saturday to Friday, and data has therefore been provided for all deaths attributed to COVID-19 up to the most recent week available, ending 17 April. ONS mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration.

Table 1 below shows the number of deaths that occurred where COVID-19 was mentioned on the death certificate up to and including 17 April 2020. We have included these figures as they are presented in our weekly report.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Provisional figures on total death registrations where coronavirus (COVID-19) was mentioned on the death certificate in England and Wales up to 17 April 2020 by place of occurrence[2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]

Total deaths (COVID-19)

Care Home

3,096

Hospital (acute or community, not psychiatric)

14,796

Home

883

Other

337

Total

19,112

Source: ONS

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/latest

[2]Coding of deaths by cause for the latest week is not yet complete and counts could be subject of change.

[3]For deaths registered from 1st January 2020, cause of death is coded to the ICD-10 classification using MUSE 5.5 software. Previous years were coded to IRIS 4.2.3, further information about the change in software is available.

[4]These figures represent death registrations, there can be a delay between the date a death occurred and the date a death was registered. More information can be found in our impact of registration delays release.

[5]An 'underlying cause of death' refers to the main cause of death, whereas a cause being 'mentioned on the death certificate' means that it might be the main reason or a contributory reason to the cause of death

[6]Deaths at home are those at the usual residence of the deceased (according to the informant)‚ where this is not a communal establishment.

[7]Care homes includes homes for the chronic sick; nursing homes; homes for people with mental health problems and non-NHS multi-function sites.

[8]Other includes:

Hospices: including Sue Ryder Homes; Marie Curie Centres; oncology centres; voluntary hospice units; and palliative care centres.

Other Communal Establishments: including schools for people with learning disabilities; holiday homes and hotels; common lodging houses; aged persons’ accommodation; assessment centres; schools; convents and monasteries; nurses’ homes;

Elsewhere: including all places not covered above such as deaths on a motorway; at the beach; climbing a mountain; walking down the street; at the cinema; at a football match; while out shopping; or in someone else's home.

This category also includes people who are pronounced dead on arrival at hospital.

[9]These figures are calculated using the most up-to-date data we have available to get the most accurate estimates.

[10]Non-residents are included in the England and Wales total but not England and Wales separately. For this reason, counts for "England" and "Wales" may not sum to "England and Wales".

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, subject to a parental right to withdraw children from particular lessons, to require depictions of the Prophet Mohammed to be shown to pupils and discussed as part of Religious Studies in the school curriculum; and if they have no such plans, why not.

The department does not specify what a religious education (RE) curriculum should consist of, or how lessons on particular religions or non-religious beliefs should be taught. This is a matter for the school and the local authority’s Agreed Syllabus Conference, depending on whether a school is maintained or an academy, and whether the school has a religious designation or not. The details of these arrangements can be found in department guidance found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/religious-education-guidance-in-english-schools-non-statutory-guidance-2010 and https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/re-and-collective-worship-in-academies-and-free-schools.

There are therefore no plans for the department to require the depictions of the Prophet Mohammed to be shown to pupils and discussed as part of RE.

Schools are free to include a full range of issues, ideas, and materials in their curriculum, including where they are challenging or controversial, subject to their obligations to ensure political balance. They must balance this with the need to promote respect and tolerance between people of different faiths and beliefs, including in deciding which materials to use in the classroom.

13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment have they made as to when the Batley Grammar School teacher who has been receiving threats to his life will be able to return to normal (1) teaching duties, and (2) family life.

The department has continued to work closely with Batley Multi Academy Trust, the local authority and the Police to ensure that the trust is fully supported in implementing any necessary safety measures for the individual staff member.

The department does not hold specific information on individual staff members, as this is deemed personal information and is exempt from disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 4 February 2020 (HL646) and 13 February 2020 (HL1377 and HL1414) and by Baroness Berridge on 12 March 2020 (HL2002), and in pursuit of their anti-terrorism policies, what plans they have, if any, to allow Ofsted to inspect madrassas in the UK which provide teaching for fewer than 18 hours per week.

As indicated in my answer to Question HL2002 on 12 March 2020, madrassas are generally considered to be out-of-school settings, which are not captured by a single dedicated regulatory framework, and therefore are not subject to inspections by Ofsted or the department.

However, as explained previously, the department is taking forward a package of measures to enhance safeguarding in out-of-school settings, safeguarding children from all forms of harm, including extremism and terrorism.

The main phase of this work concluded in March 2020. We are currently considering how the outputs can be used to help inform best practice on how existing legal powers, held by local authorities, the police, Ofsted and other departments and agencies, can best be used to address safeguarding and welfare concerns. We are also looking into what more we might need to do at a national level.

In addition to this, we have also published a voluntary code of practice for out-of-school setting providers, such as madrassas, to support them in understanding what they need to do to run a safe setting. This is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/keeping-children-safe-in-out-of-school-settings. Accompanying guidance for parents and carers is also available to help them make more informed choices when considering out-of-school settings for their children, including the red flags to look out for and what steps to take where they might have concerns.

As indicated in my previous answer, if the department became aware of a setting where children were at risk of harm, we would work closely with relevant agencies, such as the local authority, Ofsted or the police to take action.

7th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Berridge on 4 June (HL4788, HL4789 and HL4790), whether parents will have the right to withdraw primary school children from all sex education from September; and if so, how they may do so.

The department is committed to supporting schools to deliver high quality teaching of Relationships Education in primary, Relationships and Sex Education in secondary, and Health Education in all state-funded schools.

In light of the circumstances caused by the COVID-19 outbreak, and following engagement with the sector, the department is reassuring schools that although the subjects will still be compulsory from 1 September 2020, schools have flexibility over how they discharge their duty within the first year of compulsory teaching. For further information, I refer the noble Lord to the answer given on 10 June 2020 to Question 55660.

The statutory guidance states that although Relationships Education for all primary-age pupils is compulsory, sex education is not compulsory in primary schools (excluding compulsory content covered in the science curriculum). It is for primary schools to determine whether they need to cover any additional content on sex education to meet the needs of their pupils.

If a primary school chooses to teach sex education, they will be required to publish a policy on this and allow parents the right to withdraw their child. If a parent wishes to withdraw their child from sex education, this request must be complied with by the headteacher. The statutory guidance, which was published in June 2019, can be accessed via the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education.

20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether schools have a duty to respect the wishes of parents who want to raise their children in accordance with their own religious and philosophical convictions.

We are making Relationships Education compulsory for primary school-aged pupils, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) compulsory for secondary school-aged pupils and Health Education compulsory for pupils in all state-funded schools, from September 2020.

These subjects are designed to give pupils the knowledge they need to lead happy, safe and healthy lives and to foster respect for other people and for difference. Through these subjects, children will be taught about the importance of respectful relationships and the different types of relationships that exist. This can be done in a way that respects everyone’s views.

The statutory guidance states that all pupils should receive teaching on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) relationships during their school years, and that secondary schools should include LGBT content in their teaching. Primary schools are encouraged and enabled, when teaching about different types of family, to include families with same sex parents.

In all schools, the religious background of all pupils must be taken into account when planning teaching, so that topics included in the statutory guidance are handled appropriately. Schools must ensure they comply with the relevant provisions of the Equality Act 2010. The statutory guidance is attached and can be accessed via the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/805781/Relationships_Education__Relationships_and_Sex_Education__RSE__and_Health_Education.pdf.

Schools are also required to consult with parents when developing and reviewing their policies for Relationships Education (primary) and RSE (secondary), which will inform schools’ decisions on when and how certain content is covered. Schools should ensure that parents know what will be taught and when, and clearly communicate the fact that parents have the right to request that their child be withdrawn from some or all of sex education delivered as part of statutory RSE.

20th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to give schools discretion over what they teach under relationships education, relationships and sex education; and if so, what safeguards there will be to ensure that such teaching will be age-appropriate and have regard for the religious background of pupils.

We are making Relationships Education compulsory for primary school-aged pupils, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) compulsory for secondary school-aged pupils and Health Education compulsory for pupils in all state-funded schools, from September 2020.

These subjects are designed to give pupils the knowledge they need to lead happy, safe and healthy lives and to foster respect for other people and for difference. Through these subjects, children will be taught about the importance of respectful relationships and the different types of relationships that exist. This can be done in a way that respects everyone’s views.

The statutory guidance states that all pupils should receive teaching on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) relationships during their school years, and that secondary schools should include LGBT content in their teaching. Primary schools are encouraged and enabled, when teaching about different types of family, to include families with same sex parents.

In all schools, the religious background of all pupils must be taken into account when planning teaching, so that topics included in the statutory guidance are handled appropriately. Schools must ensure they comply with the relevant provisions of the Equality Act 2010. The statutory guidance is attached and can be accessed via the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/805781/Relationships_Education__Relationships_and_Sex_Education__RSE__and_Health_Education.pdf.

Schools are also required to consult with parents when developing and reviewing their policies for Relationships Education (primary) and RSE (secondary), which will inform schools’ decisions on when and how certain content is covered. Schools should ensure that parents know what will be taught and when, and clearly communicate the fact that parents have the right to request that their child be withdrawn from some or all of sex education delivered as part of statutory RSE.

27th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 13 February (HL1377), whether they assess whether extremist ideology is being taught in madrasas; and if so, how.

Madrasas are generally considered to be out-of-school settings and, as indicated in the answer provided by my predecessor, the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the School System, on 13 February 2020, out-of-school settings are not captured by a single dedicated regulatory framework. Therefore, they are not subject to assessment regarding their teachings by the department or Ofsted.

However, as explained previously, the department is taking forward a package of measures to enhance safeguarding in out-of-school settings – safeguarding children from all forms of harm, including extremism. This includes a £3 million pilot scheme as previously outlined by my predecessor in his response on 16 January 2020. The pilot scheme will be used to inform development of best practice on how to identify and intervene in out-of-school settings of concern.

If the department became aware of a setting where extremist activity was taking place resulting in children being at risk of harm, we would work closely with relevant agencies, such as the local authority and police, to take action.

6th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 4 February (HL646), what estimate they have made of the number of pupils that are taught in madrasas in the UK.

A madrasa operating for fewer than 18 hours per week would generally be considered to be an out-of-school setting. The department does not hold data on the number of out-of-school settings in the UK and therefore does not collect data on the number of children who are attending these settings.

As indicated in the answer I gave on 4 February 2020, out-of-school settings are not captured by a regulatory framework, therefore they are not subject to any assessment regarding their teachings. However, as set out in my previous answer, the department is taking forward a package of measures to enhance safeguarding in out-of-school settings – safeguarding children from all forms of harm, including extremism.

If the department became aware of a setting where extremist activity was taking place resulting in children being at risk of harm, we would work closely with the local authority, police and other relevant agencies to take action. For guidance that covers both out-of-school settings and unregistered schools setting out how the department, Ofsted and local authorities can work collaboratively to help ensure that children attending unregistered independent schools and out-of-school settings, are safe and are receiving a suitable education is attached and available from: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/690495/La_Guidance_March_2018.pdf

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
5th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 4 February (HL646), how many madrasas in the UK are teaching for less than 18 hours per week; and how they assess whether extremist ideology is being taught in them.

A madrasa operating for fewer than 18 hours per week would generally be considered to be an out-of-school setting. The department does not hold data on the number of out-of-school settings in the UK and therefore does not collect data on the number of children who are attending these settings.

As indicated in the answer I gave on 4 February 2020, out-of-school settings are not captured by a regulatory framework, therefore they are not subject to any assessment regarding their teachings. However, as set out in my previous answer, the department is taking forward a package of measures to enhance safeguarding in out-of-school settings – safeguarding children from all forms of harm, including extremism.

If the department became aware of a setting where extremist activity was taking place resulting in children being at risk of harm, we would work closely with the local authority, police and other relevant agencies to take action. For guidance that covers both out-of-school settings and unregistered schools setting out how the department, Ofsted and local authorities can work collaboratively to help ensure that children attending unregistered independent schools and out-of-school settings, are safe and are receiving a suitable education is attached and available from: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/690495/La_Guidance_March_2018.pdf

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
21st Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 16 January (HL157), whether they assess what is being taught in madrasas in the UK; if so, how; and what plans they have to introduce inspections for such schools.

As stated in my answer of 16 January, religious settings such as madrasas would generally be considered an out-of-school setting. As a large and diverse sector these settings are not captured by a single dedicated regulatory framework; and as such, are not subject to assessment or inspection by the department or Ofsted.

There are currently a number of legal powers in place to protect children attending these settings – for example, child protection legislation, health and safety and fire safety law – and there are no plans by the department, at this time, to introduce a new system of regulation or inspection of these settings.

However, the department is taking forward a package of measures aimed at enhancing the safeguarding of children in this sector. This includes a £3 million pilot scheme outlined in my previous response, which will be used to inform the development of best practice on how existing legal powers, held by local authorities and other agencies, can best be used to identify and intervene in out-of-school settings of concern. This work started in summer 2018 and is due to conclude in March 2020.

Alongside this, we have also been developing a voluntary code of practice for out-of-school setting providers to support them to understand what they need to do to run a safe setting. There is accompanying guidance for parents and carers to help them make more informed choices when considering out-of-school settings for their children, as well as understanding the steps they can take where they have concerns. We consulted on these documents last year and will respond and publish the final guidance in due course. The consultation can be found here: https://consult.education.gov.uk/regulatory-framework-unit/out-of-school-settings-voluntary-safeguarding-code/.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to remove the restriction on Ofsted's inspection of schools which teach for less than 18 hours a week.

Settings that only have pupils attending for less than 18 hours per week are not considered full time and are therefore not required to register as schools. As they are not registered as schools, such settings are not subject to inspection. In March 2018, the department published guidance setting out how the government, Ofsted and local authorities can work collaboratively to help ensure children attending unregistered schools and out-of-school settings are safe and are receiving a suitable education. This guidance is attached and can be found at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/independent-school-registration.

Part-time settings should be considered to be out-of-school settings, which the department currently defines as “any institution providing tuition, training, instruction or activities to children in England, without their parents’ or carers supervision, that is not a school, college, 16-19 academy or provider caring for children under 8 years old, which is registered with Ofsted or a childcare agency.” This covers a large, broad and diverse sector, ranging from: settings offering part-time or supplementary education to support mainstream or home education and religious settings offering education in their own faith, to extra-curricular clubs and activities, such as dance classes, sports tuition, as well as uniformed youth organisations.

In 2015, the government consulted on proposals to introduce a new system regulation of the sector. However, in 2018 following careful consideration of the large number of wide ranging views and representations received, the government decided not to pursue the model proposed, but to instead further develop the evidence base for a national approach, including future legislation where gaps in existing powers might be identified. In connection with this, the government is currently taking forward a package of measures aimed at enhancing the safeguarding of children in this sector, including the provision of £3 million of targeted funding, in 16 local authorities, to test different approaches to multi-agency working. This work will be used to inform best practice on how existing legal powers, held by local authorities and other agencies, such as the Police, Ofsted and the Charity Commission can best be used to intervene in settings of concern and to help inform the need for any further legislation.

Some part-time settings provide alternative provision which is commissioned by a school or local authority. Ofsted can look at such a part-time setting as part of an inspection of the commissioner. In all cases (whether commissioning a place for a child in care or any other child), the local authority or school acting as the alternative provision commissioner should assure themselves that the setting is registered where applicable and that the provision is delivered by high quality staff with suitable training, experience and safeguarding checks.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the average time it takes for an unstunned (1) sheep, and (2) cow, to die after having their throat cut in a UK slaughterhouse.

No such assessment has been made.

When an animal is slaughtered without stunning, in accordance with religious rites, it must not be moved in any way until it is unconscious and, in any event, not before the expiry of 20 seconds for sheep and 30 seconds for cattle from the neck cut. These “standstill” times are to ensure the animal is unconscious and insensible so it can be moved and are not related to the time it may take for the animal to die.

All slaughterhouses in England, including those where religious slaughter takes place, must have CCTV in place in all areas where live animals are present.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of (1) sheep, and (2) cattle, which were slaughtered without prior stunning in the last year for which figures are available, split by (a) Kosher, and (b) Halal slaughter; and what percentage of UK slaughterhouses are licensed to carry out such slaughter.

The most recent assessment was carried out by the Food Standards Agency (FSA), on behalf of Defra and the Welsh Government, over a one-week period in 2018. During that period, the numbers slaughtered without stunning were 60,748 sheep by halal and 222 sheep by Shechita; and 214 cattle by halal and 164 cattle by Shechita

Religious slaughter can only be carried out in an FSA approved slaughterhouse but there is no separate licensing of slaughterhouses carrying out religious slaughter.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to legislate to ensure that meat from animals which have been slaughtered without prior stunning is clearly labelled as such.

The Government has committed to consult on what can be done through labelling to promote high standards and high welfare across the UK market. First, we will launch a call for evidence this summer to assess the impacts on different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare, including method of slaughter. This will feed into the Government’s wide-ranging review on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure the emergency services comply with the provisions of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 which require them to use vehicle sirens only when it is necessary and desirable to do so, and that they should therefore refrain from sounding sirens late at night when streets are empty of traffic.

The conditions under which sirens may be used are governed by Regulation 99 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 (C & U). Emergency service vehicles are permitted to use a siren to indicate to other road users the urgency of the purposes for which the vehicle is being used, or to warn other road users of the presence of the vehicle on the road.

Subject to the regulations and any form of guidance, drivers are expected to use their professional judgement to decide when and where the use of sirens is appropriate.

The use of sirens and other attributes fitted to road vehicles used by the emergency services is a matter for the chief officers of those services in conjunction with the chief officer of police for that area. There are no current plans to intervene.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 24 June (HL1198), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what assessment they have made of the economic benefits that might be realised if responsibility for roads in London was transferred from the Mayor of London and Transport for London to the Department for Transport.

Transport is devolved in London, and the Government has no plans to assess the benefits of reversing devolved arrangements for the capital.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 24 June (HL1198), what assessment they have made, if any, of the economic benefits which might be realised if responsibility for roads in London were transferred from the Mayor of London and Transport for London to the Department for Transport and the formers' road closure programme was reversed.

The Government has no plans to amend responsibilities for roads in London.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the economic benefits that might be realised if responsibility for roads in London was transferred from the Mayor of London and Transport for London to the Department for Transport.

Strategic roads in London are the responsibility of TfL, with each local authority responsible for its respective local road network. The Government has no plans to amend these responsibilities.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 29 April (HL15336), what assessment they have made of the supply of diamorphine; what steps they are taking to ensure that any shortage in the availability of diamorphine to NHS patients is addressed; and when they expect any such shortage to end.

The Department is aware of ongoing supply issues resulting in intermittent availability of diamorphine injections, due to manufacturing issues. Further supplies of diamorphine injections are expected to be available in June. The Department continues to work closely with all suppliers and the National Health Service to maintain supply to patients who require it. The Department has communicated this issue to the NHS, advising the need to move to alternative opioids where diamorphine is currently used.

28th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the supply of diamorphine; and what steps they are taking to ensure that any shortage in the availability of diamorphine to NHS patients is addressed.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

20th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 17 July (HL5874), what information they hold on (1) the number of children who have been given GnHR, or any other gender re-assignment treatment, by the NHS, (2) the amount of compensation paid to patients who received such treatments but who were subsequently deemed to have been mis-diagnosed, and (3) the number of compensation claims made following such treatments.

The National Health Service currently offers the following medical treatments to under 18-year olds on gender dysphoria pathways: hormone blockers, cross sex hormones and psychological assessment. The service does not offer surgery to under 18-year olds.

Information on the number of children who have been prescribed GnHR is not available centrally, as information on prescribing drugs is collected locally. Further, the drugs used in gender identity pathways are not exclusively prescribed for such, meaning records do not reflect total patient numbers on these pathways.


Information on number of treatments and misdiagnosis is not available in the format requested.

17th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many children have been given GnHR or any other gender re-assignment treatment by the NHS; over what period of time such treatments have been available on the NHS; and how much compensation has been paid to patients who received such treatments but who were subsequently deemed to have been misdiagnosed.

A gender identity development service for children and adolescents has been delivered by the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust since 1995.

Information on number of treatments and misdiagnosis is not available in the format requested.

6th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 4 May (HL3274), what assessment they have made of the other factors that are potentially contributing to the increased death rate; what estimate they have made of the number of non-COVID-19 related deaths resulting from the measures taken to prepare for a surge in NHS hospital admissions; and how many operations were cancelled or postponed in anticipation of a surge in COVID-19 cases.

No formal assessment has yet been made of other factors contributing to excess deaths, but the Department is carrying out extensive work with Public Health England, the Office for National Statistics and the Care Quality Commission to better understand the virus and causes of excess deaths.

The National Health Service does not collect data on operations which have been cancelled or postponed on a national level, except for on the day urgent cancellations for non-clinical reasons. About five operations each day are urgently cancelled for non-clinical reasons, although this is a significantly small subset of cancellations. Information on the data held on cancelled elective operations can be found in Cancelled Elective Operations, which is attached.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the risks and benefits of lifting the lockdown now, while advising those aged over 65 years old to continue to self-isolate.

The Government advises anyone aged 70 or older regardless of medical conditions to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures because they are at increased risk of severe illness.

The Government has been clear throughout the COVID-19 outbreak that it is vital to take the right steps at the right time. Any change to social distancing measures now would risk a return to exponential spread of the virus and undo all the good progress made to date, requiring a longer period of more stringent distancing measures, damaging both the economy and public health.

As set out by the First Secretary of State (the Rt. Hon. Dominic Raab MP), there are five tests that the Government needs to be satisfied with before we adjust the measures of the lockdown:

- The National Health Service is able to provide sufficient critical care and specialist care across the United Kingdom;

- A fall in the death rate;

- Rate of infection has decreased across all settings;

- Confidence that operational challenges, such as increasing our testing capacity and having enough personal protective equipment, are in hand; and

- Confidence that any changes will not lead to a significant second peak of infections.

At all times we have been consistently guided by scientific advice to protect lives. The current advice from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies is that relaxing any of the measures could risk damage to public health, our economy, and the sacrifices we have all made. Only when the evidence suggests that it is safe to do so, and the scientific advice provides for it, will we adjust these measures.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many operations to treat cancer have been cancelled as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic; and what assessment have they made of when such operations could resume.

The first published data covering the period of the COVID-19 outbreak for the month of March will be available during May.

National Health Service providers have previously been asked to maintain access to essential cancer surgery and other treatment throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, in line with guidance from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and NHS England and NHS Improvement. Exceptions have been where clinicians consider that for an individual patient the risk of the procedure at the current time outweighs the benefit to the patient.

Local systems and Cancer Alliances are continuing to identify surgical capacity for cancer, and providers must protect and deliver cancer surgery and cancer treatment by ensuring that cancer surgery hubs are fully operational. Full use should be made of the available contracted independent sector hospital and diagnostic capacity locally and regionally.

Cancer treatment must be brought back to pre-pandemic levels at the earliest opportunity to minimise potential harm, and to reduce the scale of the post-pandemic surge in demand.

7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether there has been any increased incidence of osteoporosis in women who wear the Burka.

No assessment has been made.

12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the safety of people in Afghanistan who are not Muslim; and what plans they have, if any, to offer such individuals asylum.

British Embassy officials in Kabul regularly meet with representatives from religious minority groups to hear their concerns. We continue to stress that the human rights of all Afghans should be protected. We also continue to make public condemnations about targeted killings and violence against minorities, calling for transparent investigations. The UK is committed to defending freedom of religion or belief (FoRB) for all, and promoting respect between different religious and non-religious communities around the world. Only a negotiated and inclusive settlement will bring sustainable peace to Afghanistan. We continue to make clear to all sides that any political settlement must protect the progress made in the country, including protection for women and minority groups.

The UK has a proud record of providing protection for people who need it, in accordance with our obligations under the Refugee Convention and the European Convention on Human Rights. However, there is no provision within our Immigration Rules for someone to be allowed to travel to the UK to seek asylum or temporary refuge. Those who need international protection should claim asylum in the first safe country they reach - that is the fastest route to safety.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much the UK has paid to the EU since the 2016 referendum; how much they anticipate the UK will pay to the EU in the future; and for what purposes.

The Government publishes a summary of the UK’s financial relationship with the European Union in an annual report to Parliament by HM Treasury. The latest edition of the European Union Finances Statement has been laid before Parliament today, covering the calendar year 2020 as well as certain information for previous years. A copy is available in the Library of the House. The Statement reports the UK’s contributions to the EU Budget and public-sector receipts from the EU, in addition to receipts which flow directly to the private sector without being included in Government accounts. The EU Finances Statement provides the most complete analysis of the UK’s financial relationship with the EU.

The European Union Finances Statement also includes an annex on the impact of EU Withdrawal, which provides an updated estimate of the total value of the financial settlement. The Statement explains all components of the outstanding net liability and provides an extended description of the assurance arrangements which will ensure the UK pays only what it owes under the Withdrawal Agreement.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 29 April (HL15257), when they expect the Financial Conduct Authority to provide a response about the (1) value, and (2) service, provided by UK pension providers to holders of UK Self-Invested Personal Pensions.

Information on the value and service provided to holders of Self-Invested Personal Pensions has now been provided by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) in the form of a letter and a copy of the letter has been placed in the Library of the House. The FCA apologise for the delay in their response.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
26th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) value, and (2) service, provided by UK pension providers to holders of UK Self-Invested Personal Pensions.

This is an operational matter for the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), who are operationally independent from Government.

The question has been passed on to the FCA. The FCA will reply directly to the Noble Lord by letter. A copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)
7th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether their proposed ban on same sex attraction therapy will include a prohibition on talking therapy.

The Government takes this issue of Conversion Therapy very seriously and fundamentally disagrees with attempts to forcibly change someone’s sexuality. In order to end conversion therapy practice for good, we are thoroughly considering all legislative and non-legislative options.

My officials are reviewing the current legislative framework to see how certain harmful and abhorrent practices referred to as conversion therapy may already be captured by existing laws and offences. Where these practices are already unlawful, we will ensure that the law is clear, well-understood and enforced. Where dangerous conversion therapy practices are not already unlawful, we are examining the best ways to prevent them being conducted, without sending them underground.

21st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 April (HL15173) and 20 July (HL1825), whether they have assessed any mosques in the UK for evidence of the promotion of violence towards non-Muslims, including the dissemination of literature which encourages such violence; and if not, why not.

We assess all evidence of those that radicalise others though their support for or justification of violence, and will not tolerate those who spread divisive and harmful narratives. Any violent threat is assessed and managed by the police and security services based on the threat that it is deemed to pose.

Our work to counter radicalisation through Prevent works best when it is delivered in partnership with communities and civil society, including faith institutions.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the threats to the Batley Grammar School teacher; and what steps they are taking to support the police to pursue those making such threats.

It would not be appropriate to provide information or details in relation to a specific case.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) they, or (2) the police, are paying for the protection of the Batley Grammar School teacher who has received threats on his life; if so, what is the cost of that protection; and if not, what steps they are taking to ensure his safety.

It would not be appropriate to provide information or details in relation to a specific case.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many racially motivated attacks there have been in the Whalley Range area of Blackburn in the last five years; and how many of these were against white people.

The Home Office publishes information on the number hate crime offences recorded by the police by monitored strand, including racial hate crime, in England and Wales at the Police Force Area level. The latest data, including figures for Lancashire, are available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hate-crime-england-and-wales-2019-to-2020

The hate crime collection was expanded on April 2021 to include information on the ethnicity of racially motivated offences. These data will be published in due course.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 29 April (HL15173), what is their estimate of the number of mosques in the UK; and how many have they assessed for evidence of radicalisation through their (1) support, or (2) justification, of violence towards non-Muslims.

We assess all evidence of those that radicalise others though their support for or justification of violence and will not tolerate those who spread divisive and harmful narratives. We cannot discuss individual cases and we have made no assessment of the number of mosques in the UK.

We continue to work with law enforcement agencies and multi-agency partners to increase our understanding of new and emerging radicalising threats to society. Any violent threat is assessed and managed by the police and security services based on the threat that it is deemed to pose.

Our work to counter radicalisation through Prevent works best when it is delivered in partnership with communities and civil society, including faith institutions.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 21 April (HL14809), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what assessment have they made of (1) any verses in the Koran which appear to support violence, and (2) the use of these verses by Islamist extremists to sanction violence.

We look at and assess all material that may be used by extremists to support or justify violence and will not tolerate those who spread divisive and harmful narratives. We remain of the view that the propaganda used by Islamist extremists is a distortion of true Islam.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in pursuit of their anti-terrorism policies, what is their estimate of the number of Imams preaching in the UK; and what is the estimate of the proportion of Imams who cannot speak English.

HMG has made no assessment of the number of Imams present in the UK as part of the Government’s Counter-Terrorism Strategy CONTEST, nor of their language skills. As outlined in our previous response. The Immigration Rules governing T2 Minister of Religion roles require applicants to demonstrate a strong command of the English language in order to qualify for a visa.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in pursuit of their anti-terrorism policies, what assessment they have made, if any, of any Islamist teaching in mosques in the UK.

We look at and assess all evidence of those that radicalise others though their support or justification of violence and will not tolerate those who spread divisive and harmful narratives. We remain of the view that the propaganda used by Islamist extremists is a distortion of true Islam.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in pursuit of their anti-terrorism policies, what discussions, if any, they have had with Islamic faith leaders to discuss the language in which services in mosques are conducted.

HMG has no plans to mandate English language in any religious service as part of the Government’s Counter-Terrorism Strategy CONTEST. Everyone has a right to freedom of religion under Article 9 of the Human Rights Act and is one of the fundamental rights that we will always protect in this country

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in pursuit of their anti-terrorism policies, what plans they have, if any, to require services in mosques in the UK to be conducted in English.

HMG has no plans to mandate English language in any religious service as part of the Government’s Counter-Terrorism Strategy CONTEST. Everyone has a right to freedom of religion under Article 9 of the Human Rights Act and is one of the fundamental rights that we will always protect in this country.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Greenhalgh on 8 April (HL14593), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, in pursuit of their anti-terrorism policies, (1) what assessment they have made of any Islamist teaching in (a) mosques, and (b) madrassas, in the UK, (2) what assessment they have made of the number of Imams in the UK who cannot speak English, and (3) what plans they have to require services in mosques in the UK to be conducted in English.

We look at and assess all evidence of those that radicalise others though their support for or justification of violence and will not tolerate those who spread divisive and harmful narratives.

HMG has made no assessment of the number of Imams present in the UK as part of the Government’s Counter-Terrorism Strategy CONTEST, nor of their language skills.

HMG has no plans to mandate English language in any religious service as part of the Government’s Counter-Terrorism Strategy CONTEST. Everyone has a right to freedom of religion under Article 9 of the Human Rights Act and is one of the fundamental rights that we will always protect in this country.

As outlined in our previous response, the Immigration Rules governing T2 Minister of Religion roles require applicants to demonstrate a strong command of the English language in order to qualify for a visa.

Whether through Islamism or any other ideology, the Government is committed to tackling those who spread views that promote violence and hatred against individuals and communities in our society, and that radicalise others into terrorism. We remain of the view that the propaganda used by Islamist extremists is a distortion of true Islam.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 22 March (HL14054) which states "Islamist extremism is not true Islam", what assessment have they made of (1) any verses in the Koran which appear to support violence, and (2) the use of these verses by Islamist extremists to sanction violence.

We look at and assess all material that may be used by extremists to support or justify violence and will not tolerate those who spread divisive and harmful narratives.

We remain of the view that the propaganda used by Islamist extremists is a distortion of true Islam.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 22 March (HL14054), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what assessment they have made of any Islamist teaching in mosques in the UK; what assessment they have made of the number of Imams in the UK who cannot speak English; and what plans they have to require services in mosques in the UK to be conducted in English.

As outlined in our previous response, religious organisations and faith-based institutions may recruit religious leaders from overseas via our T2 Minister of Religion route. The Immigration Rules governing this category require applicants to demonstrate a strong command of the English language in order to qualify for a visa.

The Government will always protect people’s legitimate rights – for example, to free speech and to practise their religion within the law – but we cannot and will not shy away from challenging cultures and practices that are harmful. Whether through Islamism or any other ideology, the Government is committed to tackling those who spread views that promote violence and hatred against individuals and communities in our society, and that radicalise others into terrorism.

MHCLG continues to lead on broader matters of integration and faith, including on religious practice in communities.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 1 December 2020 (HL10439), what lessons they have learned from the anti-terrorism measures introduced by the governments of (1) France, and (2) Austria; and what new anti-terrorism measures they plan to introduce as a result.

Further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 1 December 2020, HMG already has robust counter-terrorism measures in place, which are outlined in the UK’s Counter-Terrorism Strategy (CONTEST).

Our overseas approach to countering terrorism is global but completely integrated with our domestic approach. We continuously review policies in light of new developments. We closely monitor France and Austria’s responses to the attacks.

We will continue to look to learn from these examples where they are applicable to the UK context. We continue to share best practices, and discuss evolving threats and responses, such as preventing terrorist use of the internet, with the governments of both France and Austria.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the activities of the Islamic Online University in respect of any risk to (1) UK national security, and (2) the incidence of Islamist radicalisation in the UK.

We do not comment on individual cases.

The Government is committed to tackling those who spread views that promote violence and hatred against individuals and communities in our society, and that radicalise others into terrorism.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the activities of the European Institute for Human Sciences in respect of any risk to (1) UK national security, and (2) the incidence of anti-Semitism.

We do not comment on individual cases.

The Government is committed to tackling those who spread views that promote violence and hatred against individuals and communities in our society, and that radicalise others into terrorism.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent assessment they have made, if any, of the threat to national security posed by the preacher Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips.

We do not comment on individual cases.

The Government is committed to tackling those who spread views that promote violence and hatred against individuals and communities in our society, and that radicalise others into terrorism.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the cost of the works to make the toilets in the Home Office unisex; what assessment they have made of staff satisfaction with the unisex toilets; whether any female (1) staff, or (2) visitors, have refused to use the unisex facilities; and if so, how many.

The cost of directional signage and conversion works carried out in 2017 at the department’s Headquarters at 2 Marsham Street to provide gender neutral toilet facilities was £36,963.

Data is not collected on the number of staff or visitors who may have refused to use the facilities.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to respond to the letter from Lord Pearson of Rannoch to Baroness Williams of Trafford, sent on 19 February; and if so, when.

I can confirm to the noble Lord that a response to this letter was sent on 16th March 2021.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 January (HL11680), as part of their report Group-based Child Sexual Exploitation Characteristics of Offending, whether any members of their External Reference Group sought to include Islamic teaching among the cultural drivers for offending; and if so, how many.

It is important to acknowledge and address the cultural contexts in which group-based child sexual exploitation occurs, and this is something the External Reference Group (ERG) considered at length. However, no member of the Group sought to include Islamic teaching as a driver for offending.

The ERG was established with the specific purpose of reviewing and informing the paper, ‘Group-based Child Sexual Exploitation Characteristics of Offending’. The ERG did not specifically discuss Quilliam’s report. However, as part of its work in producing the paper, the Home Office published an independently peer-reviewed literature review, which considered published studies of group-based child sexual exploitation. The literature review made the following assessment:

Research by Quilliam asserted that 84% of 264 offenders convicted for grooming gang offences between 2005 and 2017 were Asian, 8% were Black, 7% were White and 1% were of unknown ethnicity. This figure of 84% has been widely repeated as academic evidence for an extreme over-representation of Asian offenders despite a lack of clarity about sampling and data analysis methods. For example, the authors identify 264 offenders, but do not specify how they were found, or how their ethnicity was categorised. These findings are therefore not suitable for drawing conclusions about ethnicity of group-based CSE offenders.

When publishing the paper, the Home Secretary expressed her disappointment in the quality of data on the characteristics of offending and committed to addressing this issue. As such, in the new national Tackling Child Sexual Abuse Strategy, the Government commits to engaging with criminal justice partners, academics, think tanks, charities and frontline professionals on improving the range, quality and analysis of data collected, to help protect children by preventing and detecting offending.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 January (HL11680), as part of their report Group-based Child Sexual Exploitation Characteristics of Offending, published in December 2020, whether (1) the Home Office, or (2) the External Reference Group, considered the report of the Quilliam Foundation Group Based Child Sexual Exploitation – Dissecting Grooming Gangs, published on 12 December 2017; and, if so, what assessment they made of the finding of that report that 84 per cent of perpetrators had Asian heritage, of which the majority were (1) British-Pakistani, and (2) Muslim.

It is important to acknowledge and address the cultural contexts in which group-based child sexual exploitation occurs, and this is something the External Reference Group (ERG) considered at length. However, no member of the Group sought to include Islamic teaching as a driver for offending.

The ERG was established with the specific purpose of reviewing and informing the paper, ‘Group-based Child Sexual Exploitation Characteristics of Offending’. The ERG did not specifically discuss Quilliam’s report. However, as part of its work in producing the paper, the Home Office published an independently peer-reviewed literature review, which considered published studies of group-based child sexual exploitation. The literature review made the following assessment:

Research by Quilliam asserted that 84% of 264 offenders convicted for grooming gang offences between 2005 and 2017 were Asian, 8% were Black, 7% were White and 1% were of unknown ethnicity. This figure of 84% has been widely repeated as academic evidence for an extreme over-representation of Asian offenders despite a lack of clarity about sampling and data analysis methods. For example, the authors identify 264 offenders, but do not specify how they were found, or how their ethnicity was categorised. These findings are therefore not suitable for drawing conclusions about ethnicity of group-based CSE offenders.

When publishing the paper, the Home Secretary expressed her disappointment in the quality of data on the characteristics of offending and committed to addressing this issue. As such, in the new national Tackling Child Sexual Abuse Strategy, the Government commits to engaging with criminal justice partners, academics, think tanks, charities and frontline professionals on improving the range, quality and analysis of data collected, to help protect children by preventing and detecting offending.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 5 December 2018 (HL Deb, col 1019), how many UK citizens have a non crime hate incident registered on their police record but have not been (1) charged with, or (2) found guilty of, such an offence.

The police and Crown Prosecution Service define and record hate crime as “any criminal offence which is perceived by the victim or any other person, to be motivated by hostility or prejudice based on a person's race or perceived race; religion or perceived religion; sexual orientation or perceived sexual orientation; disability or perceived disability and any crime motivated by hostility or prejudice against a person who is transgender or perceived to be transgender.”

This definition has been produced for operational purposes. Any arrest, charge or prosecution taken forward by the police or Crown Prosecution Service must relate to a criminal offence laid out in legislation that has been approved by Parliament.

Information on how many UK citizens have a hate crime registered on their police record but have not been (1) charged with, or (2) found guilty of, such an offence is not held centrally.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 5 December 2018 (HL Deb, col 1019), whether the definition of a hate crime used by the police and Crown Prosecution Service has been (1) debated, and (2) approved, by Parliament; and if so, when.

The police and Crown Prosecution Service define and record hate crime as “any criminal offence which is perceived by the victim or any other person, to be motivated by hostility or prejudice based on a person's race or perceived race; religion or perceived religion; sexual orientation or perceived sexual orientation; disability or perceived disability and any crime motivated by hostility or prejudice against a person who is transgender or perceived to be transgender.”

This definition has been produced for operational purposes. Any arrest, charge or prosecution taken forward by the police or Crown Prosecution Service must relate to a criminal offence laid out in legislation that has been approved by Parliament.

Information on how many UK citizens have a hate crime registered on their police record but have not been (1) charged with, or (2) found guilty of, such an offence is not held centrally.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Exploitation in Rotherham, published on 21 August 2014; and in particular the finding that more than 1,400 girls were estimated to be the victims of child sexual exploitation.

Child sexual abuse is an abhorrent crime and this Government is committed to keeping children and young people safe from all forms of abuse, including child sexual exploitation.

The National Crime Agency’s Operation Stovewood in Rotherham is the largest historical child sexual exploitation investigation undertaken to date in this country, and continues to investigate these offences, with more than 170 people arrested to date. Since 2016-17, we have provided £31.1 million of special grant funding to South Yorkshire Police towards the cost of Operation Stovewood. We have also made significant increases to funding for victims, including doubling funding for national services which support victims of child sexual abuse.

This funding forms part of a comprehensive package of measures the Government has set out to prevent offending and help victims and survivors of abuse. The recently published Tackling Child Sexual Abuse Strategy sets out how we will drive action across every part of Government, across all agencies, all sectors, charities, communities, technology companies and society more widely to tackle child sexual abuse in all its forms, including group-based child sexual exploitation.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 1 December 2020 (HL10439), what assessment they have made of any Islamist teaching in mosques in the UK; what assessment they have made of the number of Imams in the UK who cannot speak English; and what plans they have to require services in mosques in the UK to be conducted in English.

Religious organisations and faith-based institutions may recruit religious leaders from overseas via our T2 Minister of Religion route. The Immigration Rules governing this category require applicants to demonstrate a strong command of the English language in order to qualify for a visa.

Muslims make an enormous contribution to British society and have done so for centuries. Islam is a religion observed peacefully by over a billion people worldwide and we remain clear that Islamist extremism is not true Islam. Whether through Islamism or any other ideology, the Government is committed to tackling those who spread views that promote violence and hatred against individuals and communities in our society, and that radicalise others into terrorism.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether in compiling their report Group based child sexual exploitation characteristics of offending, published on 15 December, they or the External Reference Group received evidence on the use of Islamic teachings for the justification of sexual exploitation; and if any such evidence was received, what that evidence was.

Political or cultural sensitivities must not deter national and local agencies from uncovering and preventing these devastating crimes.

The paper published on 15 December 2020 sets out that child sexual exploitation is not exclusive to any single culture, community, race or religion. It happens in all areas of the country and can take many different forms.

Whilst developing this paper, officials and members of the External Reference Group considered evidence from a range of sources, including academic research, official statistics and published work by organisations working in the child sexual exploitation area, as well as a series of interviews with police officers and safeguarding officers involved in investigating this type of offending. The paper was published alongside a literature review, which provides an overview of evidence from recent research on group-based child sexual exploitation in the community.

While the External Reference Group considered and discussed the available evidence for the cultural drivers of offending as well as the use of cultural factors as a justification for offending, this evidence did not make specific reference to Islamic teaching.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their report Group based child sexual exploitation characteristics of offending, published on 15 December, whether they plan to require the police to record the (1) ethnicity, and (2) religion, of offenders; and if not, why not.

Child sexual abuse is a despicable crime and the Government is committed to keeping children and young people safe from all forms of abuse.

The paper, ‘Group-based Child Sexual Exploitation Characteristics of Offending’ sets out the limited available evidence on the characteristics of offenders involved in group-based child sexual exploitation. An External Reference Group (ERG) of experts was established to advise in the development of the paper.

Members of the ERG provided advice in their capacity as individual experts and votes were not cast to establish whether views were held by a majority of members. While some members of the ERG wanted the paper to provide more detail on the characteristics of offending within certain communities, there was not substantial discussion of religion specifically.

The paper recognises that understanding cultural drivers is one of the key aspects in preventing and tackling offending. In publishing the paper, the Home Secretary expressed disappointment in the lack of robust data on these characteristics. We will set out action to address this in the Government’s forthcoming Tackling Child Sexual Abuse Strategy. Any new data collection requirements of police forces will be made in consultation with the police which are rightly independent of Government.

The Police Act 1996 sets out that forces must submit data to the Home Office when requested to do so. All proposals for new data collections are consulted on with policy and operational colleagues, other government departments, National Policing Leads and other key police stakeholders to ensure that such requests are proportionate and eliminate unnecessary burdens. This ensures a proper balance between the accountability and efficiency of police operation and is reviewed on an annual basis.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 4 February (HL711) and on 1 October (HL8244), and their report Group based child sexual exploitation characteristics of offending, published on 15 December, whether the majority of members of the External Reference Group wanted to include a reference to any role of religion in group based child sexual exploitation.

Child sexual abuse is a despicable crime and the Government is committed to keeping children and young people safe from all forms of abuse.

The paper, ‘Group-based Child Sexual Exploitation Characteristics of Offending’ sets out the limited available evidence on the characteristics of offenders involved in group-based child sexual exploitation. An External Reference Group (ERG) of experts was established to advise in the development of the paper.

Members of the ERG provided advice in their capacity as individual experts and votes were not cast to establish whether views were held by a majority of members. While some members of the ERG wanted the paper to provide more detail on the characteristics of offending within certain communities, there was not substantial discussion of religion specifically.

The paper recognises that understanding cultural drivers is one of the key aspects in preventing and tackling offending. In publishing the paper, the Home Secretary expressed disappointment in the lack of robust data on these characteristics. We will set out action to address this in the Government’s forthcoming Tackling Child Sexual Abuse Strategy. Any new data collection requirements of police forces will be made in consultation with the police which are rightly independent of Government.

The Police Act 1996 sets out that forces must submit data to the Home Office when requested to do so. All proposals for new data collections are consulted on with policy and operational colleagues, other government departments, National Policing Leads and other key police stakeholders to ensure that such requests are proportionate and eliminate unnecessary burdens. This ensures a proper balance between the accountability and efficiency of police operation and is reviewed on an annual basis.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what has been the cost of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse to date; and what they estimate the total cost of that Inquiry will be.

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse is operationally independent and responsible for the management of its own budget. The Inquiry publishes financial statements on a quarterly basis on its website https://www.iicsa.org.uk/.

The most recent financial statement, covering the Inquiry’s 2020/21 spend as at 30 September 2020, can be found here: https://www.iicsa.org.uk/news/inquiry-publishes-financial-report-q2-202021

The inquiry’s total spend up to 30 September 2020 was £152m.

It is difficult to provide an expected final cost of the Inquiry at this stage, but the Inquiry has recently concluded its public hearings and will publish its full life costs at the close of the Inquiry.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the anti-terrorism measures proposed by the government of (1) France, and (2) Austria; whether they intend to introduce similar measures in the UK; and if not, why not.

HMG already has robust counter-terrorism measures in place, which are outlined in the UK’s Counter-Terrorism Strategy (CONTEST). We continuously review these policies in light of new developments. We are closely monitoring France and Austria’s responses – and have been in discussions with both governments following the attacks - and will look to learn from these examples where they are applicable to the UK context.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 7 October (HL8424), whether they intend any extradition from the UK to any EU jurisdiction after the end of transition period to be possible only with a court ruling that there is a prima facie case to answer; and if not, why not.

There is no intention for extradition to any EU jurisdiction after the end of transition period to be made subject to a court ruling that there is a prima facie case.

In the absence of an agreement on Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice with the European Union, the UK’s extradition relations with EU Member States would be governed by the European Convention on Extradition 1957 and its Additional Protocols. The prima facie evidence requirement for extradition requests from States which are parties to the European Convention on Extradition was removed when the Convention came into force in the UK in May 1991. To introduce a prima facie case requirement would be incompatible with the Convention.

The Government’s approach to negotiations with the EU provides for extradition arrangements which are more streamlined than the European Convention on Extradition. The Government has not sought to introduce a prima facie case requirement, as to do so would render future arrangements with the EU less effective at bringing fugitives to justice than the Convention.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, how many UK citizens have been extradited from the UK under the European Arrest Warrant; how long, on average, those citizens spend in custody before trial; how many such citizens were found to be not guilty; how much compensation has been paid to those found not guilty; and in each case, who paid that compensation.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

However, some statistics on the European Arrest Warrant are published by the National Crime Agency each year. These figures include a breakdown of the numbers of UK citizens extradited from the UK.

These figures are published at:

https://nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/what-we-do/how-we-work/providing-specialist-capabilities-for-law-enforcement/fugitives-and-international-crime/european-arrest-warrants

Compensation is not paid to individuals who have stood trial for a criminal offence and have been found not guilty.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a UK citizen could be extradited under the European Arrest Warrant after the end of the transition period; and if so, why.

The Withdrawal Agreement provides that procedures under the European Arrest Warrant Framework Decision will continue to conclusion only in circumstances where an arrest has already been made prior to the end of the Transition Period. The UK has a longstanding policy of not distinguishing between UK nationals and others in extradition proceedings.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 21 July (HL6581), whether their paper on group-based child sexual exploitation will include any consideration of the religious characteristics of offenders.

The Home Secretary announced on 19th May that the Government intends to publish a paper on group-based child sexual exploitation. This work is currently ongoing, and we will publish the paper by the end of this year.

We intend this paper to present the available evidence on this form of offending, bringing together all of the insights gathered in the course of the Home Office’s work on this issue. We are not excluding any characteristics from our consideration, and conclusions will be drawn from the demographic data that is available.

The paper will set the direction for future work to tackle this form of offending.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Hatun Tash was detained by the police on 13 September; if so, on what grounds; whether there are any restrictions in place on Hatun Tash's ability to speak (1) at Speaker's Corner, or (2) publicly elsewhere; and if so, why any such restrictions are in place.

We do not comment on individual cases.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish their paper on group-based child sexual exploitation; and who externally has been appointed to review the paper prior to its publication.

The Home Secretary announced on 19th May that the Government intends to publish a paper on group-based child sexual exploitation. This work is currently ongoing, and we will publish the Paper by the end of this year.

We are working closely with an External Reference Group to provide feedback on the Paper as it develops.

Membership for the External Reference Group was chosen to allow for a variety of expertise that may provide constructive challenge on this issue. The group has a broad membership that reflects a range of experience, including academia, criminal justice, the voluntary and community sector and representatives of victims and survivors.

Details of the membership to the External Reference Group will be made public in due course.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the role of religion in participation in terrorism.

The legal definition of terrorism, in section 1 of the Terrorism Act 2000, identifies that a religious cause may be the motivation for committing or threatening terrorism. However, this is alongside political, racial or ideological causes, all equally seen as evidence of terrorism. This is in line with Government’s wider understanding of radicalisation in that there is no single pathway and the motivation of each individual may vary.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 13 July (HL6245), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what assessment they have made of whether Abdul Aziz, Adil Khan, and Qari Abdul Rauf have connections in (1) the Home Office, or (2) UK Visas and Immigration, which have had an impact on their deportation.

I must continue to reiterate to the noble Lord that I am unable to comment on individual cases.

The Home Office will always ensure that cases such as these are handled with extreme professionalism to ensure that decisions are lawfully made in the best interests of the British public. Any outcome or ongoing consideration of the cases in question will have been made in accordance with legislation.

This Government makes clear that foreign criminals should be deported from the UK wherever it is legal and practical to do so. Foreign national offenders should be in no doubt of our determination to remove them, and since 2010 we have removed more than 53,000.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 13 July (HL6246), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what progress they have made towards the deportation of (1) Adil Khan, (2) Qari Abdul Rauf, and (3) Abdul Aziz.

I must continue to reiterate to the noble Lord that I am unable to comment on individual cases.

The Home Office will always ensure that cases such as these are handled with extreme professionalism to ensure that decisions are lawfully made in the best interests of the British public. Any outcome or ongoing consideration of the cases in question will have been made in accordance with legislation.

This Government makes clear that foreign criminals should be deported from the UK wherever it is legal and practical to do so. Foreign national offenders should be in no doubt of our determination to remove them, and since 2010 we have removed more than 53,000.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) hate incidents, and (2) cases of burglary and theft, have been recorded by the police in each of the last five years; and how many of the cases of burglary and theft have resulted in a successful prosecution.

The Home Office routinely publishes data on the number of hate crimes burglary and theft offences recorded by the police in England and Wales.

This is published as part of the ‘Police recorded crime and outcomes open data tables’, which can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

The Ministry of Justice is responsible for prosecutions data and publishes information on the number of prosecutions, and the number of these which resulted in a conviction by offence types, including theft and burglary. These can be found here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/888344/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2019.xlsx

Information on the number of hate crimes that have been prosecuted are published by the Crown Prosecution Service and can be found here:

https://www.cps.gov.uk/cps/publication/hate-crime-data

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 24 June (HL5064), what assessment they have made of whether Abdul Aziz, Adil Khan, and Qari Abdul Rauf have connections in (1) the Home Office, or (2) UK Visas and Immigration, which have had an impact on their deportation.

I refer the noble Lord to my answer of 24 June 2020 which can be found at:

https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Lords/2020-06-02/HL5062/

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made towards the deportation of (1) Adil Khan, (2) Qari Abdul Rauf, and (3) Abdul Aziz.

I refer the noble Lord to my answer of 24 June 2020 which can be found at:

https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Lords/2020-06-02/HL5062/

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the continued presence in Rochdale of Abdul Aziz, Adil Khan and Qari Abdul Rauf on their victims and their victim's families.

We cannot comment on individual cases. The Home Office is in contact with the local Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) panel to ensure appropriate safeguards are in place.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer from Baroness Williams of Trafford on 26 May (HL4429), on what basis they are unable to comment on individual cases.

I refer the Right Honorable Lord to my answer of 26 May 2020 on this matter. The position still remains that I am unable to comment on individual cases on the grounds of data protection principles and operational independence of the police and courts.

The Home Office will however always ensure that cases such as these are handled with extreme professionalism to ensure that decisions are lawfully made in the best interests of the British public.

This Government makes clear that foreign criminals should be deported from the UK wherever it is legal and practical to do so. Foreign national offenders should be in no doubt of our determination to remove them, and since 2010 we have removed more than 53,000.

Child sexual abuse is a devastating crime and we are committed to ensuring the protection of victims who have the courage to come forward to report abuse. The Home Office is in contact with the local Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) panel to ensure appropriate safeguards are in place.

We are also developing a first of its kind national Child Sexual Abuse Strategy which will set out our long-term ambition in tackling all forms of child sexual abuse, including how we will work across government, law enforcement, safeguarding partners and industry to root out offending, and protect and help victims and survivors to recover and rebuild their lives.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the possibility of deporting Abdul Aziz, Adil Khan and Qari Abdul Rauf from the UK; and if they have concluded that this is not possible, why not.

I refer the Right Honorable Lord to my answer of 26 May 2020 on this matter. The position still remains that I am unable to comment on individual cases on the grounds of data protection principles and operational independence of the police and courts.

The Home Office will however always ensure that cases such as these are handled with extreme professionalism to ensure that decisions are lawfully made in the best interests of the British public.

This Government makes clear that foreign criminals should be deported from the UK wherever it is legal and practical to do so. Foreign national offenders should be in no doubt of our determination to remove them, and since 2010 we have removed more than 53,000.

Child sexual abuse is a devastating crime and we are committed to ensuring the protection of victims who have the courage to come forward to report abuse. The Home Office is in contact with the local Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) panel to ensure appropriate safeguards are in place.

We are also developing a first of its kind national Child Sexual Abuse Strategy which will set out our long-term ambition in tackling all forms of child sexual abuse, including how we will work across government, law enforcement, safeguarding partners and industry to root out offending, and protect and help victims and survivors to recover and rebuild their lives.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether there are any connections between Abdul Aziz, Adil Khan and Qari Abdul Rauf and staff in the (1) Home Office, or (2) UK Visas and Immigration.

I refer the Right Honorable Lord to my answer of 26 May 2020 on this matter. The position still remains that I am unable to comment on individual cases on the grounds of data protection principles and operational independence of the police and courts.

The Home Office will however always ensure that cases such as these are handled with extreme professionalism to ensure that decisions are lawfully made in the best interests of the British public.

This Government makes clear that foreign criminals should be deported from the UK wherever it is legal and practical to do so. Foreign national offenders should be in no doubt of our determination to remove them, and since 2010 we have removed more than 53,000.

Child sexual abuse is a devastating crime and we are committed to ensuring the protection of victims who have the courage to come forward to report abuse. The Home Office is in contact with the local Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) panel to ensure appropriate safeguards are in place.

We are also developing a first of its kind national Child Sexual Abuse Strategy which will set out our long-term ambition in tackling all forms of child sexual abuse, including how we will work across government, law enforcement, safeguarding partners and industry to root out offending, and protect and help victims and survivors to recover and rebuild their lives.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many deportation orders (1) were issued, (2) were appealed, and (3) failed on appeal, in each year from 2014 to 2019; and in each of those years, how many people were deported .

Providing the information requested would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

The Home Office does routinely publish statistics on the number of Foreign National Offenders removed from the UK. This information can found by accessing the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2020/list-of-tables

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 21 January (HL158), whether they have made any recent estimate of the number of women and girls raped by Muslim men involved in grooming gangs since 1997.

Government does not hold data on the religious beliefs of perpetrators of rape and there is no data that delineates sexual offences which might be described as “grooming gang” offending from other forms of sexual offending.

The Government has estimated that there were approximately 6,850 victims of organised child sexual exploitation in the UK in 2015. This estimate includes all forms of child sexual exploitation and does not distinguish between rape and other sexual offences. It includes organised child sexual exploitation committed by groups and gangs within a range of contexts.

The Government is developing a first of its kind national Child Sexual Abuse Strategy which will set out our long-term ambition in tackling all forms of child sexual abuse.

Our new strategy, which will be published this year, will set out our whole system response to tackling child sexual abuse and how we will work across government, law enforcement, safeguarding partners and industry to root out offending, protect victims and help victims and survivors rebuild their lives. We will work tirelessly to end these heinous crimes; there will be no no-go areas

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to deport Abdul Aziz, Adil Khan and Qari Abdul Rauf.

I am aware of the cases referred to, but I am unable to comment on individual cases.

The crimes committed by child sexual exploitation gangs, such as those in Rochdale, who prey on the young and vulnerable are appalling. I have every sympathy with their victims.

We are clear that foreign criminals should be deported from the UK wherever it is legal and practical to do so.

Foreign national offenders should be in no doubt of our determination to remove them, and since 2010 we have removed more than 52,000.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 21 January (HL158), whether they published their national strategy to tackle all forms of child sexual abuse; and if so, where it can be found.

The government is committed to publishing a first of its kind national strategy on tackling all forms of child sexual abuse, outlining our long-term ambition to drive a whole system response to tackle this horrific crime. However, we must respond to the threats raised by Covid-19 and our priority is to tackle offending, protect children and support victims and survivors during this challenging time.

We have responded swiftly to the risks posed by COVID-19. We are working with Law Enforcement, the UK Intelligence Community, safeguarding partners and the third sector to assess the threat and ensure they have the resources they need to tackle offending and provide the greatest protection for vulnerable children.

The Government has made £1.6 million available immediately for the NSPCC to expand and promote its national helpline for adults. We have also launched a £1.2 million funding competition for organisations providing support for victims and survivors of child sexual abuse at a national level, including through support lines, online resources and remote counselling. We have further driven forward work to respond to the increased risk of children coming to harm online, by working across government, with the NCA and industry to ensure that teachers, parents and carers have access to the support they need to help keep children safe online.

The Home Office will further distribute £7.8 million in emergency support for charities helping vulnerable children who have been impacted by the coronavirus outbreak. The Home Office is working closely with other government departments to ensure that this funding is prioritised and that charities who need this support receive it as soon as possible.

On Thursday 21st May, the Prime Minister hosted a virtual summit focused on ‘hidden harms’, including child sexual abuse. The virtual summit brought key decision makers together to share insight, best practice and agree an approach for tackling these crimes as we move towards easing lockdown measures.

Ahead of the summit, the Home Secretary announced that £9.86 million is being allocated to the National Crime Agency to improve its ability to tackle perpetrators seeking to offend against children via the Dark Web. An additional £3.36 million is being committed to further improve our understanding and tackle all aspects of the child sexual abuse threat. We will also launch a £2.8 million transformation fund to promote and embed best practice in Child Sexual Abuse victim support.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their response to the petition Release the Home Office's Grooming Gang Review in full, published on 24 April, how many victims of grooming gangs they estimate there have been in the UK since 1998; how much financial support they are providing to each victim per annum; which Minister was responsible for clearing the wording of that response; what plans they have to hold a debate to consider that petition in Parliament; whether they intend to publish any research into such gangs; and if not, why not.

There is no official definition of ‘grooming gang’ offending and no means of delineating data on offending that might be described in this way from other forms of child sexual exploitation. The Government has estimated that there were approximately 6,850 victims of organised child sexual exploitation in the UK in 2015. This estimate includes all forms of child sexual exploitation and does not distinguish between rape and other sexual offences. It includes organised child sexual exploitation committed by groups and gangs within a range of contexts.

We are determined that all victims and survivors of child sexual abuse, whether they are a child or an adult, can access the specialist support they need. In 2019/20 the government through a number of funding streams provided over £7m for non-statutory organisations providing support to victims and survivors of child sexual abuse across the country. Victims and survivors can access these services throughout their lifetime to help them cope with and, as far as possible, recover from the abuse they have suffered.

We are increasing funding. For example, last month the Ministry of Justice and Home Office launched the Support for Victims and Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse Fund, doubling the value of last year's fund and providing £2.4m over two years to voluntary sector organisations providing direct support to victims and survivors at a national level. Home Office will also shortly be launching a new £2.8m transformation fund to promote and embed best practice in child sexual abuse victim support.

On 19 May, the Home Office announced its plans to publish a paper on group-based child sexual exploitation later this year. The paper, which will be published following engagement with subject matter experts, will bring together the insights gained from the Home Office’s work and set the direction for future policy and research. In announcing these plans the Home Secretary said ‘What happened to these children remains one of the biggest stains on our country’s conscience. It is shameful. I am determined to deliver justice for victims and ensure something like this can never happen again.’

The Home Office’s response to the petition was cleared by the Home Secretary. It has now been revised and re-issued to reflect this decision.

It is for the Petitions Committee to decide whether a petition should be put forward for debate

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Manzoor on 18 October 2018 (HL Deb, col 562), whether they intend to publish the findings of the working group set up on 3 September 2018 to examine the characteristics of the perpetrators of child sexual exploitation and abuse; and if not why not.

Officials have been pursuing work on several fronts to improve our understanding of the characteristics of group-based child sexual exploitation, as well as the implications for the investigation and prevention of these crimes.

This internal work is being carried out as part of routine policy development. As such, it has not been undertaken with the intention of publication.

Much of the insight gained through our work with law enforcement partners contains operationally and personally sensitive information and will need to remain confidential.

In early 2020 the Government will publish a national strategy, the first of its kind, to tackle all forms of child sexual abuse.

Our new strategy will set out our whole system response to tackling child sexual abuse, including group-based sexual offending, drawing on this internal work. It will set out how we will work across government, law enforcement, safeguarding partners and industry to root out offending, protect victims and help victims and survivors rebuild their lives. We will work tirelessly to tackle all forms of sexual abuse; there will be no no-go areas.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 4 April 2018 (HL6553), what is the current status of the investigation of the Independent Office for Police Conduct into 33 police officers in connection with cases of child sexual exploitation in Rotherham.

The IOPC is independent of Government and the police and is responsible for the investigations it carries out. We understand that the IOPC’s investigation into South Yorkshire Police’s response to non-recent allegations of child sexual abuse in Rotherham remains ongoing and its website does include further background: https://policeconduct.gov.uk/investigations/rotherham-csa-investigations-south-yorkshire-police.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of women and girls raped by Muslim men involved in grooming gangs since 1997.

The Government has estimated that there were approximately 6,850 victims of organised child sexual exploitation in the UK in 2015. This estimate includes all forms of child sexual exploitation and does not distinguish between rape and other sexual offences. It includes organised child sexual exploitation committed by groups and gangs within a range of contexts.

In early 2020 the Government will publish a national strategy, the first of its kind, to tackle all forms of child sexual abuse.

Our new strategy will set out our whole system response to tackling child sexual abuse and how we will work across government, law enforcement, safeguarding partners and industry to root out offending, protect victims and help victims and survivors rebuild their lives. Their will be no no-go areas.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent discussions they have had, and with whom, about the investigation of whether any police officers, social workers and council officials failed to fulfil their statutory duty to protect victims of grooming gangs; and whether (1) there have been any, or (2) there are planned to be, prosecutions of any such officers and officials.

The extent to which statutory authorities have failed to protect children from sexual exploitation is being investigated by bodies that are rightly independent of Government.

The Government established the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse to consider the extent to which institutions in England and Wales have failed in their duty to protect children from sexual abuse. As part of its work, the Inquiry is investigating institutional responses to child sexual exploitation by organised networks. While independent of Government we welcome the Inquiry’s work in this area and, as always, the Government will cooperate fully and will give careful consideration to its findings in due course.

The Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) investigates the most serious and sensitive incidents and allegations involving the police. The IOPC is independent of Government and the police and is responsible for the investigations it carries out.

Government does not hold information on prosecutions specifically relating to different types of misconduct in a public office.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will introduce legislation to require (1) property owners, (2) developers, and (3) building firms, to pay compensation to neighbours affected by (a) noise, (b) vibrations, (c) dust, (d) lost or diminished letting income, (e) over-run of time to complete projects, and (f) diminished property values, while building works are in prospect or progress.

This Government supports construction activity, which is crucial to delivering much needed housing as well as infrastructure and other development necessary to sustain and grow our communities. This is why we have taken steps for a temporary period during the Covid pandemic to encourage planning authorities to take a flexible approach to enforcement of breaches of conditioned construction working hours. However, we recognise the disruption that noise, vibration and dust can have on neighbours which is why these changes do not alter authorities' legal obligations under the existing statutory environmental health framework. I can confirm that the Government has no intention of introducing compensation schemes in respect of building activity.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which local authorities have authorised the broadcasting by loudspeaker of the Muslim call to prayer; and what assessment have they made of the effect of such broadcasts on community cohesion.

We understand that some Mosques across the country have been given permission to broadcast the call to prayer, particularly during Ramadan, due to the closure of all Places of Worship during the Covid-19 pandemic. Places of Worship play an important role in spiritual and mental health for many, and in bringing our communities together, which is why we want to reopen them as soon as we can. Local councils understand best the needs of their communities and it is a matter for them to work with their local community. We will continue to engage with stakeholders on matters relating to integration, and the Government remains committed to building strong integrated communities.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist on 9 March (HL2003) and the remarks by Viscount Younger of Leckie on 13 February (HL Deb, col 2339), what assessment, if any, they have made of Imam Qari Asim’s views on freedom of speech, as reported in The Times on 9 February; and of any impact such views may have on his role as an independent adviser to the Government.

Freedom of religion or belief is a fundamental human right and one which must be upheld and defended. Equally, freedom of speech is the foundation of a healthy society, allowing for debate and disagreement, underpinned by those values that bind people together – tolerance, equality and fairness. It is important that all have the right to speak freely, and provide legitimate criticism, and that a strong legal framework provides the appropriate space to do so. The Government will continue to protect people’s legitimate rights and freedoms whilst also remaining committed to tackling hate crime. We are confident that all our advisers uphold high standards and strongly advocate British values.

Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist on 9 March (HL2003), to which ''abhorrent hate crime' Viscount Younger of Leckie was referring on 13 February (HL Deb, col 2339); and whether the police are investigating that crime.

The abhorrent hate crime which Viscount Younger of Leckie referred to was posted publicly on Imam Qari Asim’s twitter account. I understand the incident has been reported to the police, where appropriate and proportionate action will be taken in response. We are proud to have some of the strongest legislation in the world to tackle hate crime.

Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
27th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the response by Viscount Younger of Leckie on 13 February (HL Deb, col 2339), on what grounds the reports about Qari Asim were considered to be an “abhorrent hate crime”; and whether the police are investigating such reports as a hate crime.

The phrase of “abhorrent hate crime” was used by Viscount Younger of Leckie in reference to the abusive messages that were sent to Imam Qari Asim on Twitter following the report in The Sunday Times rather the report itself. Reported hate crime incidents are investigated by the police who take appropriate and proportionate action in response to them. We are proud to have some of the strongest legislation in the world to tackle hate crime.

Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
19th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money has been spent in legal aid for members of the Rochdale grooming gang; and what is their estimate of the amount of money spent assisting the victims of that gang.

The table below reflects the most recent legal aid costs held for each individual as at the time of writing. Costs are inclusive of both VAT and disbursements where applicable.

Defendant

Solicitor (Crown Court)

Barrister (Crown Court)

Police Station Advice

Court of Appeal

Civil Costs

Abdul Aziz

£139,519

£55,758

£202

£3,209

Adil Khan

£200,350

£67,465

£216

£780

Abdul Rauf

£207,582

£74,789

£459

£2,700

Shabir Ahmed

£183,468

£69,748

£233

£1,684

Mohammed Sajid

£147,583

£77,292

£4,301

£194.40

Mohammed Amin

£132,249

£57,552

£205

Hamid Safi

£143,644

£54,747

£211

£870

£520.20

Abdul Qayyum

£156,482

£55,442

£3,469

Kabeer Hassan

£138,130

£45,026

It should be noted that these criminals did not receive a penny of these sums, which were paid to lawyers so that the criminals could face justice at a fair trial, following which they were imprisoned. Without legal representation, criminals could argue their trial was unfair and any convictions could be quashed. Defendants must pass a strict means test before being granted legal aid and they may have to pay it back if they are found guilty and can afford to do so.

In 2021-22, the MoJ will provide just under £151m for victim and witness support services. This includes an extra £51m to increase support for rape and domestic abuse victims.

We do not collect data on the costs of supporting individual victims.

We understand how traumatic the court process can be, and despite the pandemic we are continuing to improve the support provided for victims. This includes protective screens and video links in every criminal court, more separate waiting rooms, as well as piloting the pre-recording of cross-examination for rape victims to help further reduce the stress of attending court. At the same time, a new Victims’ Bill – set out in the Queen’s Speech – will strengthen the rights of victims at every stage of the justice system.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
17th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many cases of (1) rape or attempted rape, and (2) sexual misconduct, by individuals whose sex at birth was male but subsequently identified as female have been reported in (a) women's prisons, and (b) women-only spaces outside of prisons such as changing rooms; and how many of those reports led to prosecutions.

There is no reported incident of rape or attempted rape by prisoners who have reported they are declared male on their birth certificate who self-identify as a female in the women’s estate.

Between 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2019, there were 97 sexual assaults in the women’s estate overall and 7 of these assaults involved a transgender prisoner. Out of those 7 incidents, there were 6 sexual assaults where a transgender prisoner was recorded as the assailant or suspected assailant. In one incident the transgender prisoner was recorded as having ‘active involvement’, which means they did not necessarily start the assault. It is not possible from the records available to confirm whether these transgender prisoners were born male and subsequently identify as female. Other groups of prisoners may also be included, including those born female who identify as male, or who identify as non-binary.

We do not hold data for reported assaults that have taken place outside of prison.

Strict safeguards are in place to care for and manage transgender individuals in custody while protecting our staff and other service users.

Details of transgender prisoners were provided by public and private prisons in England and Wales, between 26 March 2019 and 24 April 2019 following an exercise to gather information from transgender individuals in custody. The figures give an estimate of the number of transgender prisoners based on that exercise and may underestimate the true number. Prisoners who have a full Gender Recognition Certificate are excluded from this dataset.

4th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Keen of Elie on 3 March (HL Deb, cols 507–9), what estimate they have made of the percentage of Muslim managing chaplains in prisons in England and Wales (1) currently, and (2) 10 years ago; and what percentage of current prisoners are Muslim.

As of 6 March 2020, 29% of Managing Chaplains in prisons in England and Wales were Muslim. No information is held centrally of the faith adherence ten years ago of managing chaplains (or their then equivalent). As of 31 December 2019, 16% of prisoners in England Wales declared that they were Muslim.

Data on prisoner religion up to December 2019 is shown below. These figures are regularly published on gov.uk under table 1.5 of the prison statistics information.

Table 1.5: Prison population by religion and sex

31-Dec-18

31-Mar-19

30-Jun-19

30-Sep-19

31-Dec-19

Percentage change December
2018 to 2019

Males and Females

82,236

82,634

82,710

83,810

82,868

1%

All Christian

39,293

39,515

39,257

39,731

39,176

0%

Anglican

13,496

13,480

13,273

13,389

13,225

-2%

Free Church

758

737

739

770

753

-1%

Roman Catholic

14,094

14,160

14,194

14,350

14,183

1%

Other Christian

10,945

11,138

11,051

11,222

11,015

1%

Muslim

12,894

13,008

13,341

13,474

13,424

4%

Hindu

361

343

341

354

342

-5%

Sikh

638

611

601

588

571

-11%

Buddhist

1,575

1,619

1,603

1,627

1,661

5%

Jewish

482

477

494

502

495

3%

Other religious group

1,838

1,876

1,910

1,955

1,965

7%

Non recognised

6

7

6

5

7

**

No religion

25,053

25,034

25,023

25,455

25,099

0%

Not recorded

96

144

134

119

128

33%

Males

78,476

78,802

78,940

79,943

79,165

1%

All Christian

37,119

37,336

37,167

37,607

37,102

0%

Anglican

12,827

12,789

12,632

12,763

12,604

-2%

Free Church

703

685

693

716

707

1%

Roman Catholic

13,377

13,438

13,473

13,606

13,470

1%

Other Christian

10,212

10,424

10,369

10,522

10,321

1%

Muslim

12,659

12,782

13,098

13,222

13,183

4%

Hindu

350

329

327

337

326

-7%

Sikh

618

589

581

571

555

-10%

Buddhist

1,500

1,534

1,524

1,548

1,586

6%

Jewish

476

469

484

495

487

2%

Other religious group

1,735

1,774

1,806

1,850

1,855

7%

Non recognised

6

7

6

5

6

**

No religion

23,919

23,846

23,827

24,204

23,944

0%

Not recorded

94

136

120

104

121

29%

Females

3,760

3,832

3,770

3,867

3,703

-2%

All Christian

2,174

2,179

2,090

2,124

2,074

-5%

Anglican

669

691

641

626

621

-7%

Free Church

55

52

46

54

46

**

Roman Catholic

717

722

721

744

713

-1%

Other Christian

733

714

682

700

694

-5%

Muslim

235

226

243

252

241

3%

Hindu

11

14

14

17

16

**

Sikh

20

22

20

17

16

**

Buddhist

75

85

79

79

75

0%

Jewish

6

8

10

7

8

**

Other religious group

103

102

104

105

110

7%

Non recognised

0

0

0

0

1

**

No religion

1,134

1,188

1,196

1,251

1,155

2%

Not recorded

2

8

14

15

7

**

The role of Managing Chaplain is predominantly managerial rather than faith based and posts are filled through fair and open competition in line with Civil Service guidelines.

7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the murders of Jack Merritt and Saskia Jones on 29 November 2019, what plans they have to reassess the recommendations of the Review of Islamist extremism in prisons, probation and youth justice led by Ian Acheson, published in August 2016.

Following Ian Acheson’s 2016 review, which included several recommendations, the Department responded to the review and took a number of steps to refresh its approach to the management of terrorist offenders in prison and on probation, for example, this included the establishment of a separation centre and the implementation of enhanced vetting for prison chaplains of all faiths.

In the wake of the London Bridge attack, Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service will undertake an internal review of the recommendations made by Ian Acheson in 2016 to look again at any lessons that can be learned. We will work closely with the Home Office (lead department on counter-terrorism policy) and other security agencies.