Lord Norton of Louth Portrait

Lord Norton of Louth

Conservative - Life peer

Became Member: 1st August 1998


Constitution Committee
8th Jun 2015 - 1st Jul 2019
Information Committee (Lords)
12th Jun 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee
16th May 2012 - 14th May 2014
Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee
9th Jun 2010 - 14th May 2014
Draft Voting Eligibility (Prisoners) Bill
14th May 2013 - 16th Dec 2013
Merits of Statutory Instruments Committee
9th Jun 2010 - 15th May 2012
Constitution Committee
14th Nov 2007 - 1st May 2012
Draft House of Lords Reform Bill (Joint Committee)
6th Jul 2011 - 26th Mar 2012
Committee on Regulators
23rd Nov 2006 - 30th Oct 2007
Constitution Committee
28th Jun 2001 - 7th May 2005


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Norton of Louth has voted in 535 divisions, and 14 times against the majority of their Party.

2 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 215 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 304 Noes - 260
9 Nov 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 44 Conservative No votes vs 147 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 165 Noes - 433
9 Nov 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 38 Conservative No votes vs 134 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 148 Noes - 407
20 Oct 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 39 Conservative Aye votes vs 158 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 395 Noes - 169
28 Sep 2020 - Coronavirus Act 2020: Temporary Provisions - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative Aye votes vs 166 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 99 Noes - 198
9 Feb 2022 - Dissolution and Calling of Parliament Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 144 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 120 Noes - 230
25 Apr 2022 - Elections Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 10 Conservative Aye votes vs 192 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 265 Noes - 199
15 May 2023 - Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 16 Conservative Aye votes vs 147 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 245 Noes - 154
15 May 2023 - Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 11 Conservative Aye votes vs 146 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 222 Noes - 154
17 May 2023 - Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 15 Conservative Aye votes vs 155 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 231 Noes - 167
13 Jun 2023 - Public Order Act 1986 (Serious Disruption to the Life of the Community) Regulations 2023 - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 136 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 177 Noes - 141
12 Sep 2023 - Hunting Trophies (Import Prohibition) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 22 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 25 Noes - 32
12 Sep 2023 - Hunting Trophies (Import Prohibition) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 23 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 30 Noes - 39
23 May 2024 - Post Office (Horizon System) Offences Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Norton of Louth voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative Aye votes vs 108 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 76 Noes - 111
View All Lord Norton of Louth Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord True (Conservative)
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
(18 debate interactions)
Lord Greenhalgh (Conservative)
(3 debate interactions)
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
(2 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(38 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(4 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(3 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Norton of Louth's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Norton of Louth, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


2 Bills introduced by Lord Norton of Louth


A Bill to make provision for the appointment of a Commission to advise the Prime Minister on recommendations to the Crown for the creation of life peerages; to establish principles to be followed in making recommendations; and for connected purposes

Lords - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 18th November 2022
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision for the appointment of a Commission to advise the Prime Minister on recommendations to the Crown for the creation of life peerages; to establish principles to be followed in making recommendations; and for connected purposes

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 14th July 2021
(Read Debate)

Lord Norton of Louth has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 35 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6 Other Department Questions
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many items of postal correspondence were received in the Palace of Westminster in 2023; and of those, how many were received in the House of Lords.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf. 721,005 mail items were received on the Parliamentary Estate in 2023. The Administration does not count which House each item goes to but estimates that approximately 15 per cent of these items were destined for the House of Lords. These figures do not include courier items or internal mail.

Please note that this figure refers to the whole Parliamentary Estate, not just the Palace of Westminster.

22nd Nov 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what representations he has made to the BBC regarding the reduction in funding of BBC Parliament and its implications for public awareness of the work of Parliament.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf. The House of Lords Administration is aware that there was a change in the management structure of BBC Parliament and the funding levels of the service in spring/summer 2021, however we are not aware of any further reduction in funding of BBC Parliament over the last 18 months. Neither the Senior Deputy Speaker nor I have made any representations to the BBC.

6th Jun 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many times fire alarms have been activated on the Parliamentary Estate in each of the first five months of 2022.

The number of times fire alarms have been activated on the Parliamentary Estate in the first five months of 2022 is as follows:

January – 4

February – 2

March – 5

April – 6

May – 3

17th May 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker, further to the Written Answer by Lord McFall of Alcluith on 23 January 2018 (HL4602), what is the estimated cost to the public purse for the repair and maintenance of the Palace of Westminster in each year from 2022/23 to 2026/27; and what is the estimated risk of a catastrophic failure within the Palace during that period.

The forecast cost of repair and maintenance of the Palace of Westminster in each year from 2022/23 to 2024/25, as per the most recent Medium Term Financial Plans, is set out in the table below. This includes the forecast spend on both maintenance and major projects on the Palace. There is not yet a reliable forecast for repair and maintenance beyond the 2024/25 financial year.

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Planned preventative & Reactive maintenance

£7,821,724

£8,156,641

£8,134,727

£8,218,493

Minor projects

£2,212,473

£2,212,473

£2,212,473

£2,212,473

Maintenance team

£5,013,950

£5,013,950

£5,013,950

£5,013,950

Maintenance and Minor projects

£15,048,146

£15,383,063

£15,361,149

£15,444,916

Major projects

£102,393,805

£140,357,071

£98,586,481

£23,504,834

Total

£117,441,951

£155,740,134

£113,947,630

£38,949,749

The risks of failure relating to the physical condition of the Palace of Westminster are reviewed and mitigated as part of the operation and maintenance of the Parliamentary Estate. These risks include fire, hitting uncharted underground services, unexploded ordnance, and failure of legally required services, all of which have mitigation plans in place to reduce the risk of failure. The table below shows the current assessment of the likelihood of the top five risk events in relation to catastrophic failure.

Top 5 Risk Events in relation to Catastrophic Failure

Likelihood

Fire during construction work

Low

Collapsing structures

Very Low

Uncharted underground services

Very Low

Unexploded ordnance (UXO) or other hazardous materials

Very Low

Failure of legally required services (e.g. water)

Medium

Source: In-House Services and Strategic Estates Health and Safety & maintenance team risk registers

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many items of postal correspondence were received in the Palace of Westminster in 2020; and of those, how many were received in the House of Lords.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf. 858,483 mail items were received on the Parliamentary Estate in 2020. The Administration does not count which House each item goes to but estimates that approximately 15 per cent of these items were destined for the House of Lords.

Please note that this figure refers to the whole Parliamentary Estate, not just the Palace of Westminster, and these figures do not include parcels, courier items or internal mail.

19th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 13 September 2023 (HL10154), what steps the Deputy Prime Minister has taken to ensure that senior ministers are aware of, and have regard to, the core principles of the UK constitution, and what consultation there has been with the Lord Chancellor to ensure that the rule of law is upheld.

As set out in the Ministerial Code, there is an overarching duty on all ministers to comply with the law. Ministers are personally responsible for deciding how to conduct themselves in light of the Code.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 8 February (HL1937), whether they will list the 19 non-statutory and 23 statutory inquiries established under the Inquiries Act 2005, along with the (1) length, (2), cost, and (3) sponsoring department, for each of those inquiries.

The Cabinet Office collects data on the duration and cost of inquiries from departments, inquiries’ own reports, and other publicly available information.

We have provided details on all statutory and non-statutory inquiries established since 2005 in the table below.

In some cases, information in the table below has come from reports from outside the Government. We have not included the costs for ongoing inquiries, which are published at different frequencies on inquiry or departmental websites, and we have not included the details for any investigations commissioned by NHS England (some of which were counted in the total number of non-statutory inquiries in our previous response, answered on 8th February 2024, UIN HL1937). It has been noted where the publicly available information provides the cost excluding VAT.

Inquiry

Sponsor Department

Legislative Basis

Year established

Duration in months (from announcement to publication of final report)

Reported final costs where publicly available

Jalal Uddin Inquiry

HO

Inquiries Act 2005

2023

Ongoing

-

Cranston Inquiry

DfT

Non-statutory

2023

Ongoing

-

Andrew Malkinson Inquiry

MoJ

Non-statutory

2023

Ongoing

-

Thirlwall Inquiry

DHSC

Inquiries Act 2005

2023

Ongoing

-

Inquiry into the preventability of the Omagh bombing

NIO

Inquiries Act 2005

2023

Ongoing

-

Independent inquiry relating to Afghanistan

Ministry of Defence

Inquiries Act 2005

2022

Ongoing

-

Dawn Sturgess Inquiry

HO

Inquiries Act 2005

2022

Ongoing

-

Fuller Inquiry

DHSC

Non-statutory

2022

Ongoing

-

Angiolini Inquiry

HO

Non-statutory

2022

Ongoing

-

UK Covid-19 Inquiry

Cabinet Office

Inquiries Act 2005

2022

Ongoing

-

Lampard Inquiry

DHSC

Inquiries Act 2005

2021

Ongoing

-

Jermaine Baker inquiry

HO

Inquiries Act 2005

2020

29

£4.1m

Post Office Horizon IT inquiry

DBT

Inquiries Act 2005

2020

Ongoing

-

Manchester Arena inquiry

HO

Inquiries Act 2005

2019

41

£35.6m

Brook House Inquiry

HO

Inquiries Act 2005

2019

46

£18.7m

The Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review

Department of Health

Non-statutory

2018

29

£1.7m

Independent Inquiry into the issues raised by Ian Paterson

Department of Health

Non-statutory

2018

26

£1.9m

Grenfell Tower Inquiry

Cabinet Office

Inquiries Act 2005

2017

Ongoing

-

Infected Blood Inquiry

Cabinet Office

Inquiries Act 2005

2017

Ongoing

-

Independent inquiry into the award of the Magnox decommissioning contract by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) and its subsequent termination

BEIS

Non-statutory

2017

48

[unknown]

Anthony Grainger Inquiry

HO

Inquiries Act 2005

2016

40

£2.6m

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse

HO

Inquiries Act 2005

2015

99

£192.7m (as of Dec 2022)

Undercover Policing Inquiry

HO

Inquiries Act 2005

2015

Ongoing

-

Gosport Independent Panel

Department of Health

Non-statutory

2014

42

£13m

The Litvinenko Inquiry

HO, FCO and 3 x Intelligence Agencies

Inquiries Act 2005

2014

18

£2.4m (exc. VAT)

Harris Review / Independent review of self-inflicted deaths of young adults in custody aged between 18 and 24

MoJ

Non-statutory

2014

17

£0.2m

The Morecambe Bay Maternity and Neonatal Services Investigation

Department of Health

Non-statutory

2013

18

£1.1m

Daniel Morgan Independent Panel

HO

Non-statutory

2013

97

£17.6m

The Leveson Inquiry

DCMS and HO

Inquiries Act 2005

2011

16

£5.4m

The Azelle Rodney Inquiry

MoJ

Inquiries Act 2005

2010

40

£2.6m

Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Inquiry 2013 / The Francis Inquiry

Department of Health

Inquiries Act 2005

2010

36

£13.7m

The Detainee Inquiry

Cabinet Office

Non-statutory (Committee of Privy Counsellors)

2010

45

£2.3m (exc. VAT)

The Hillsborough Independent Panel

HO

Non-statutory

2009

33

Less than £5m

The Al Sweady Inquiry

MoD

Inquiries Act 2005

2009

61

£24.9m (exc. VAT)

Independent Inquiry into care provided by Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust January 2001 – March 2009

Department of Health

Non-statutory

2009

7

-

The Iraq Inquiry / The Chilcot Inquiry

Cabinet Office, FCO, DfID

Non-statutory (Committee of Privy Counsellors)

2009

85

£13.1m

The Bernard (Sonny) Lodge Inquiry

MoJ

Inquiries Act 2005

2009

10

£0.4m

The Baha Mousa Inquiry

MoD

Inquiries Act 2005

2008

39

£13m

Inquiry into Human Tissue Analysis in UK Nuclear Facilities / Redfern Inquiry

DTI - BERR - DECC

Non-statutory

2007

43

-

Contaminated Blood and Blood Products Inquiry

Department of Health

Non-statutory

2007

48

£75k

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
25th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many statutory and non-statutory inquiries they have undertaken since 2005, and what were their (1) length, (2) cost, (3) sponsoring department, and (4) subject matter.

Since 2005, our records show that His Majesty’s Government has established 19 non statutory inquiries and 23 statutory inquiries under the Inquiries Act 2005 on a broad range of subject matters. 28 of the total 42 inquiries have been completed. Several of these statutory inquiries had previously been established as non statutory inquiries or inquests. The length of completed inquiries in this period ranges from 7 to 99 months and published costs vary significantly from between £0.2m and £194m. Most Whitehall departments have sponsored public inquiries. Further information can be found on inquiry and departmental websites and in the National Archives.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 7 August (HL9634), which Acts of Parliament are currently eligible for, but are not receiving, post-legislative review by their departments.

This information is not held centrally. All bills that have reached Royal Assent are eligible for post-legislative scrutiny three to five years after they are enacted. Post-legislative scrutiny memoranda have been published on GOV.UK where bills have undergone the process. In addition, the Lords Special Inquiry Committee appointed to carry out post-legislative scrutiny on specific Acts publishes information on its inquiries on parliament.uk.

While all bills that have reached Royal Assent are eligible for post-legislative scrutiny enacted, it can be agreed between the department and the relevant Commons departmental select committee that a memorandum is not required.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 26 June (HL8404), why the responsibility of the Deputy Prime Minister for constitutional policy is omitted from the updated list of ministerial responsibilities.

The Deputy Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster has oversight of all Cabinet Office policy and continues to maintain responsibility for constitutional policy, with support from a wider ministerial team within the Cabinet Office and across Government.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
30th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when they next plan to publish the list of ministerial responsibilities.

An updated List of Ministerial Responsibilities will be published before the summer recess.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many post-legislative reviews have been undertaken and published by government departments since January 2020; how this figure compares with reviews published in the periods 2010–15 and 2016–20; and what plans there are to expand the use of post-legislative reviews of Acts three to five years after enactment.

The Government published two post-legislative reviews between January 2020 and June 2023, two post-legislative reviews between 2010-15 and nine post-legislative reviews between 2016-20. The Government remains committed to using post-legislative reviews to examine the impact of legislation after it has been passed.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
12th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government which member of the Cabinet has overall responsibility for constitutional affairs and for upholding the constitution.

The Deputy Prime Minister holds ministerial responsibility for constitutional policy, with support on matters relating to the constitution from a wider ministerial team within the Cabinet Office and across Government.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
3rd May 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 25 April (HL Deb cols 1184–5), what plans they have to ensure that (1) ministers, and (2) senior civil servants, are trained in key leadership skills.

(1) The Government Skills and Curriculum Unit committed to developing a programme of induction and training for new ministers in the Declaration of Government Reform. The Declaration noted the importance of support for ministers in their roles as the most senior leaders in Government. This work is ongoing. A programme of masterclass sessions was rolled out over the last year. A particular area of focus is legislation and the provision of guidance and support to ministers taking bills through parliament.

(2) We recognise the importance of ensuring Senior Civil Servants have the right leadership training. We provide a range of training programmes and events to support them in growing their knowledge, skills and networks to tackle many challenges. For example, we have recently launched a new programme for Directors, The Directors Leadership Programme. This has had input from the Blavatnik School for Government and a consortium of experts, to create a rigorous and focussed vehicle for leadership improvement.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
31st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which Cabinet minister has overall responsibility for constitutional issues.

The Prime Minister has overall responsibility for constitutional issues. How responsibilities across government are allocated and how the Prime Minister is supported in the discharge of responsibilities is set out in the List of Ministerial Responsibilities, the last version of which was published on 3 March 2022.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Acts of Parliament enacted in the 2010–15 and 2015–17 Parliaments and eligible for post-legislative review by Government departments have not yet been the subject of such review; and what plans they have to increase the number that are reviewed.

There is no centrally held record of the number of post-legislative reviews submitted by Government departments. The decision on whether a review should be submitted to the relevant departmental select committee is a matter for discussion between departments and the committee. There will be occasions when the department and committee may agree that a memorandum is not required, for example where an Act has already been repealed, has only a very limited policy or practical significance, a review has already been committed to or carried out (e.g. following a pilot); or a department has already submitted relevant evidence in connection with another inquiry by the committee.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) Cabinet ministers and (2) other ministers have undertaken professional development programmes to prepare for their roles in government in the current Parliament.

Information on professional development programmes taken by individual Ministers is not held centrally by the Government.

Ministers are able to access advice on specific subjects, including professional development programmes, such as the short modular training programme on major project delivery, designed by the Infrastructure Projects Authority and University of Oxford Saïd Business School.

The declaration on government reform published in June states a commitment to ensuring Ministers receive training in how to assess evidence, monitor delivery, and work effectively with Civil Service colleagues. This work is underway.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
8th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what arrangements they put in place in 2020 to ensure that Government Departments complied with the requirements of section 3(6) of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010.

The Civil Service Code sets out that civil servants advising ministers should be aware of the constitutional significance of Parliament, and of the conventions governing the relationship between Parliament and the government.

The Code is part of the terms and conditions for civil servants. Each department or agency has a duty to make civil servants aware of the Code and its values.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 11 August (HL7467), whether a feasibility study of using a site in York for the House of Lords or a government department has been commissioned by the Cabinet Office; and whether discussions about such a site have taken place with York Central Partnership.

There are already Civil Servants based in York. Through the Places for Growth Programme, the Cabinet Office is exploring opportunities to relocate Civil Service roles across the UK. By relocating more Civil Service roles, including senior grades and decision-making roles, out of London, the Government wants to create and distribute opportunity, jobs and investment across the whole United Kingdom.

In that context, the Government has engaged with the York Central Partnership, and, as part of this, explored whether the space would allow for Parliamentary activity, should it be required.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord True on 14 July (HL Deb, cols 1542–6), whether any feasibility study or costings have been undertaken by the Cabinet Office on moving the House of Lords to York; and, if so, which minister authorised the study.

As part of the strategic review for the Restoration and Renewal Programme, the Government believes the Sponsor Body should consider decant locations outside London, including York. The location of the House is a decision for a sovereign Parliament.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
11th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to undertake post-legislative review of (1) the Business and Planning Act 2020, (2) the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2020, (3) the Trade (Disclosure of Information) Act 2020, and (4) the United Kingdom Internal Market Act 2020, in line with the policy of reviewing Acts three to five years after enactment.

All bills that have reached Royal Assent are eligible for post-legislative scrutiny three to five years after they are enacted.

The Trade (Disclosure of Information) Act 2020 was repealed by the Trade Act 2021 and is no longer in force.

There is no planned timetable for post legislative scrutiny of the other bills mentioned in the question.

Lord Johnson of Lainston
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
3rd May 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government who in the Department for Education is responsible for ensuring that senior civil servants in the Department comply with section 3(6) of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010, as embodied in the Civil Service Code; and what steps they have taken to monitor and ensure compliance with the provision in the past two years.

The department’s Leadership Team is responsible for setting standards within the department. Individual line managers are responsible for ensuring that staff are adhering to the Civil Service Code on a day-to-day basis.

Information about the Civil Service Code is shared regularly with employees, including in employee contracts and induction material. Clear processes are in place to enable anyone to report a breach of the Code. In the latest staff survey, 100% of Senior Civil Servants confirmed they are aware of and understand the Code.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to undertake post-legislative review of (1) the Ivory Act 2018, (2) the Wild Animals in Circuses Act 2019, (3) the Agriculture Act 2020, and (4) the Fisheries Act 2020, in line with the policy of reviewing Acts three to five years after enactment.

Together with other initiatives, post-legislative scrutiny promotes the delivery of meaningful and effective legislation. Post-legislative reviews are tailored for each Act and should be proportional in scope.

The Ivory Act 2018 came into force on 6 June 2022 when the ban on dealing in elephant ivory commenced. To allow an effective assessment to be made of how the Act is working in practice, we are recommending that a post-legislative review be undertaken in due course in line with the three-to-five-year timeframe from when the Act came into effect rather than the date of Royal Assent.

Defra, as the Act's enforcement authority, monitors routinely the Wild Animals in Circuses Act 2019 and will discuss the most appropriate way to review the 2019 Act with the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee.

Defra intends to undertake post-legislative review of the Agriculture Act 2020 by no later than November 2025.

Post-legislative scrutiny of the Fisheries Act 2020 will be taken forward within the three to five years’ timeframe after Royal Assent. In planning the timing of the post-legislative scrutiny, we need to consider that the Joint Fisheries Statement (JFS) required by the Act was published in November 2022, the first Fisheries Management Plans (FMPs) as required by both the Act and the JFS, were published at the end of December 2023. The Act also requires review of the JFS and FMPs. We are considering the most appropriate point for the post-legislative review.

Lord Douglas-Miller
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to undertake post-legislative review of (1) the Automated and Electrical Vehicles Act 2018, (2) the Haulage Permits and Trailer Registration Act 2018, (3) the Laser Misuse (Vehicles) Act 2018, and (4) the Space Industry Act 2018, in line with the policy of reviewing Acts three to five years after enactment.

Part 1 of The Automated and Electric Vehicles Act 2018 concerning automated vehicles was reviewed by the Law Commission in the report ‘Automated Vehicles’ on 26 January 2022 as part of a wider review into future automated vehicle law. Part 2 of the Act concerning electric vehicles was reviewed by the Government in the publication 'Automated and Electric Vehicles Act 2018 Regulatory Report 2022' on 31 May 2023.

Both the Laser Misuse (Vehicles) Act 2018 and the Haulage Permits and Trailer Registration Act 2018 are not currently under consideration for post-legislative reviews. The Haulage Permits and Trailer Registration Act 2018 does not contain a review clause as it pertains to EU exit. The Laser Misuse (Vehicles) Act 2018 does not have a review clause and thus far there has not been any secondary legislation brought in to support the Act. Therefore, a review would be disproportionate to complete at this time.

The Department for Transport has commenced a review of the Space Industry Act (2018), which will conclude at the end of March 2024 and be published alongside a wider review being undertaken by the Department for Science, Innovation, and Technology.

Lord Davies of Gower
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans the Home Office has to undertake post-legislative review of (1) the Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Act 2019, (2) the Crime (Overseas Production Orders) Act 2019, (3) the Offensive Weapons Act 2019, (4) the Extradition (Provisional Arrest) Act 2020, (5) the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Act 2020, and (6) the Windrush Compensation Scheme (Expenditure) Act 2020, in line with the policy of reviewing Acts three to five years after enactment.

We continue to review all aspects of the Compensation Scheme, listening and responding to feedback received from stakeholders and customers to ensure the Scheme is operating effectively for those affected. The Windrush Compensation Scheme will also undertake a review in October 2024, in line with the published Impact Assessment.

The Compensation Scheme has no end date and there is no cap on the number of claims we will accept or the amount of compensation we will pay out.

There is no planned timetable for post legislative scrutiny of the other bills mentioned in the question.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd May 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Sharpe of Epsom on 22 March (HL6263), what evidence the Permanent Secretary to the Home Office has to demonstrate that officials who advise ministers "are aware of the constitutional significance of Parliament and of the conventions governing the relationship between Parliament and [His] Majesty's Government", as set out in section 3(6) of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010.

All submissions to Ministers ask that Civil Servants have considered Parliamentary handling and followed the Civil Service Code. The Code makes reference to section 3(6) of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010. All submissions must be signed off by a Senior Civil Servant (SCS) and copied to the Permanent Secretary.

The Home Office also has an extensive parliamentary capability training programme for teams across the department, which at its centre focuses on training civil servants to support Ministers in fulfilling their obligations to Parliament.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government who in the Home Office is responsible for ensuring senior civil servants in the Department comply with section 3(6) of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010, as embodied in the Civil Service Code; and what steps they have taken in the past two years to monitor and ensure compliance with the provision.

All civil servants are expected to observe the principles of the Civil Service Code as well as relevant departmental rules, policies and procedures relating to conduct, standards and service.

Annual assurance activity takes place to ensure compliance, including a self-assessment assurance framework completed by all Directors overseen by the Audit & Risk Assurance Committee (ARAC). This is designed as an evidence-based exercise and undergoes moderation by subject matter experts and a central team.

There are also regular communications on this topic to all staff from the Permanent Secretary and official routes are available to raise concerns in the Home Office.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many police forces employ integrated street triage for mental health services; what assessment they have made of the effectiveness of such provision; and whether they plan to encourage more police forces to employ this practice.

There is no single generic model for mental health crisis “street triage” services and the Home Office does not routinely collect information on such schemes. However, the 2018 report of Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) on policing and mental health recorded that mental health triage schemes were operational in 42 of the 43 police forces in England and Wales.

There have been a number of local and academic evaluations of such schemes, however HMICFRS noted that evaluation of schemes was not always consistent and recommended that all forces should review their arrangements using practice guidelines developed by the College of Policing to help forces benchmark their triage activity. HMICFRS will be inspecting on progress as part of their integrated PEEL assessments inspection framework. It is an operational matter for Chief Officers to determine whether to establish or maintain street triage schemes.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
21st Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that a training barracks remains within a two-hour drive for members of the Army Reserve.

The cohesive collective element is a key component of being part of the Reserve, and the Army is reviewing the Reserve Forces and Cadets Estate to ensure local hubs maintain a visible and accessible Army Reserve footprint. Travel distances are being assessed alongside wider considerations relating to output, the employment of Smarter Ways of Working and personal preferences including cap badge affiliation and specialist capabilities.

As a Ministry of Defence asset, any changes to the Volunteer Estate would be made in consultation with all the Services, to enable alignment of strategic and fiscal priorities.

Earl of Minto
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Sep 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Harrington of Watford on 28 July (HL952), what research they have undertaken on the availability and cost of alternative sites to the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre for hosting the House of Lords during any potential decant of Parliament; and what was the cost of this research.

DLUHC has not undertaken any work on the availability and cost of alternative locations for the potential House of Lords decant during the Restoration and Renewal Programme. Nor has it led on developing the proposed costings work for the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre. In the context of the Places for Growth programme, the Government has previously explored whether space outside London would allow for parliamentary activity. The location of Parliament is a matter for Parliament.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the letter from the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities to the Lord Speaker, dated 13 May, represents Government policy.

The Government is clear that it is up to the House of Lords to decide where they wish to be located, including during any potential decant of Parliament. The previous Secretary of State said in his letter that he would welcome the House of Lords playing a role in the levelling up agenda and he suggested a number of illustrative options.

The freehold of the QEII Conference Centre is held by the Secretary of State. The Restoration and Renewal programme is currently being reshaped. Tangentially, the department is taking steps to deliver clarity for the commercial users of the Centre, and good outcomes for the British taxpayer.

29th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans the Ministry of Justice has to undertake post-legislative review of (1) the Civil Liability Act 2018, (2) the Courts and Tribunals (Judiciary and Functions of Staff) Act 2018, (3) the Voyeurism (Offences) Act 2019, (4) the Divorce, Dissolution and Separation Act 2020, (5) the Prisoners (Disclosure of Information About Victims) Act 2020, (6) the Private International Law (Implementation of Agreements) Act 2020, (7) the Sentencing Act 2020, and (8) the Terrorist Offenders (Restriction of Early Release) Act 2020, in line with the policy of reviewing Acts three to five years after enactment

All bills that have reached Royal Assent are eligible for post-legislative scrutiny three to five years after they are enacted. Post-legislative scrutiny memoranda have been published on GOV.UK where bills have undergone the process. In addition, the Lords Special Inquiry Committee appointed to carry out post-legislative scrutiny on specific Acts publishes information on its inquiries on parliament.uk.

It is also important to note that post-legislative scrutiny is not the only way policy is reviewed. Many Acts have built-in statutory review mechanisms and consultations have also been launched. This has the effect of providing opportunities for the legislation to be reviewed and assessed without requiring post-legislative scrutiny.

There is no planned timetable for post-legislative scrutiny of the Acts mentioned in this question.

Lord Bellamy
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
24th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when the loss of earnings allowance for those on jury service was last increased; and what plans they have, if any, to increase the allowance to bring it into line with the national minimum wage.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Lord Bellamy
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)