Lord Hannan of Kingsclere

Conservative - Life peer

Lord Hannan of Kingsclere is not a member of any APPGs
Lord Hannan of Kingsclere has no previous appointments


Department Event
Wednesday 6th July 2022
Northern Ireland Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Identity and Language (Northern Ireland) Bill - report stage
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 6th July 2022
13:00
Department Event
Wednesday 13th July 2022
Northern Ireland Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Identity and Language (Northern Ireland) Bill [HL] - third reading
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 7th June 2022
Speeches
Thursday 23rd June 2022
Bill of Rights
My Lords, when the European convention was promulgated in 1950 and enshrined in 1953, this country already had strong and …
Written Answers
Tuesday 15th March 2022
Patents
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they will ensure that UK patents granted via the European Patent Office are subject …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Hannan of Kingsclere has voted in 161 divisions, and 4 times against the majority of their Party.

28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Hannan of Kingsclere voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 156 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 93 Noes - 418
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Hannan of Kingsclere voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative Aye votes vs 151 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 401
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Hannan of Kingsclere voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 144 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 409
6 Dec 2021 - Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Hannan of Kingsclere voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative Aye votes vs 70 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 25 Noes - 74
View All Lord Hannan of Kingsclere Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(10 debate interactions)
Lord Grimstone of Boscobel (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
(8 debate interactions)
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
(8 debate interactions)
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View all Lord Hannan of Kingsclere's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Hannan of Kingsclere, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Hannan of Kingsclere has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Hannan of Kingsclere has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Hannan of Kingsclere has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Hannan of Kingsclere has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


8 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they will ensure that UK patents granted via the European Patent Office are subject to the same conditions, and confer the same rights, as national patents granted via the UK Intellectual Property Office (IPO); and what assessment they have made as to whether the IPO could grant a separate but equivalent right which provides the same benefits as a national UK patent but provides a grace period which is fully compatible with the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific (CPTPP).

The Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership sets clear and consistent rules in the intellectual property sector which will be of benefit to both UK businesses and consumers. It would be inappropriate to comment on the specific matters raised as negotiations on the terms of the UK’s accession are ongoing.

The UK possesses a world leading intellectual property regime, and it will not sign trade deals that compromise it. Our membership of the European Patent Convention (EPC) is an important part of that regime, by providing an efficient mechanism for innovative UK businesses to protect their inventions across 38 states. The UK takes its international obligations seriously and our accession negotiations will be consistent with our national interest and wider Government priorities, which include our continued alignment with the European Patent Convention and other international IP treaties.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the cost of applying the EU’s Working Time Directive (2003/88/EC).

In 2014, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills conducted a review of the impact on the UK labour market of the UK Working Time Regulations. These Working Time Regulations implemented the EU Working Time Directive into UK law. The report is attached, but can also be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/working-time-regulations-impact-on-uk-labour-market

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the cost of applying the EU’s REACH Regulation (1907/2006); and what assessment they made, if any, of that cost compared to the risk-based regime that predated REACH.

In 2006, Defra produced a Partial Impact Assessment ahead of the implementation of EU REACH [please see attached]. It forecasts the cost to UK industry of implementing EU REACH to be £404m. The costs associated with supporting HSE in its role as the UK competent authority under EU REACH since it came into force are estimated at around £15m. A comparative assessment of these costs and the regime that predated EU REACH, is not available.


In 2018, the European Commission published an evaluation of EU REACH. It found that costs to industry for the first two registration deadlines amounted to €2.3- 2.6 billion. Dossier evaluation costs were estimated at €200 million. Restriction costs were estimated at €170 million per year.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific (CPTPP) membership is compatible with the UK’s continued membership of the Convention on the Grant of European Patents; and whether they have requested exclusions from Article 18.38 CPTPP (patent grace period) or Article 18.46 CPTPP (patent term adjustment).

The UK has a world leading intellectual property regime and will not sign trade deals that compromise it. The Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership sets clear and consistent rules for the intellectual property (IP) sector which will benefit UK businesses and consumers. Article 18.46 (patent term adjustment) is a suspended provision so the UK does not have to sign up to it.

The UK takes its international obligations seriously and our accession negotiations will be consistent with our national interest and wider Government priorities, which include our continued alignment with the European Patent Convention and other international IP treaties.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
10th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, if any, of the cost to business of applying VAT on imports from EU states.

Before the UK left the EU, sales of goods from the EU to UK customers were already subject to VAT. This has not changed. Prior to the end of the transition period, VAT was collected and paid through the VAT return system. For sales to consumers or non-VAT-registered businesses, VAT was either due in the EU Member State or in the UK, depending on whether the volume of the supplier’s sales made into the UK breached an annual threshold. For sales to VAT-registered businesses, the VAT registered-business would be responsible for accounting for the VAT on a VAT return through what is known as a ‘reverse charge’. The VAT-registered business could reclaim this VAT as input tax on the same VAT return, subject to the normal recovery rules. Only sales to the UK from outside the EU were subject to import VAT collection at the border.

Now that the transition period has ended, the UK has used its freedom from EU rules to create a fairer and more robust tax system, while also complying with World Trade Organisation rules by treating EU and non-EU goods the same. For goods in consignments up to £135, VAT is due at the point of sale. Where a UK VAT-registered business provides its VAT registration number to the supplier, the VAT registered business is responsible for accounting for the VAT due on the goods through a reverse charge. For goods in consignments over £135, import VAT is due and UK VAT-registered businesses can choose to use ‘postponed VAT accounting’. Accounting for VAT on a VAT return in these ways allows businesses to reclaim it as input tax on the same VAT return, as was the case under the previous rules, and ensures continuity for businesses.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
7th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had, if any, with the UK insurance sector regarding the impact of timing differences arising from Pillar 2 of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development BEPS Framework.

OECD discussions on addressing the tax challenges of digitalisation have been ongoing for a number of years, with the detailed frameworks for Pillars One and Two having been under development since 2019.

Over the course of that time the OECD has conducted multiple public consultations on the proposals and had extensive engagement with businesses across sectors to take their views on board.

UK government officials are also engaged with many sectors regarding the potential impact of both pillars, including with the insurance sector on the specific issue of timing differences under Pillar 2.

21st Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's proposal for a global minimum corporation tax on the ability of the UK Government to adjust its domestic taxation policy.

It is a UK priority to reach a comprehensive two-pillar solution addressing the tax challenges of digitisation.

The details of a final agreement, including on the exact framework for implementation, are still subject to international negotiation.

If a political agreement is reached and both pillars are implemented in the UK, they will be subject to the normal tax policymaking process. That would include legislation in the relevant Finance Bill, with impacts then being formally assessed and set out in a Tax Information and Impact Note upon the introduction of the legislation.

Any significant subsequent changes to that legislation would likewise be made through a future Finance Bill.

21st Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether parliamentary approval will be required for a future increase in the world minimum rate of corporation tax under Pillar 2 of the framework on Base Erosion and Profit Shifting.

It is a UK priority to reach a comprehensive two-pillar solution addressing the tax challenges of digitisation.

The details of a final agreement, including on the exact framework for implementation, are still subject to international negotiation.

If a political agreement is reached and both pillars are implemented in the UK, they will be subject to the normal tax policymaking process. That would include legislation in the relevant Finance Bill, with impacts then being formally assessed and set out in a Tax Information and Impact Note upon the introduction of the legislation.

Any significant subsequent changes to that legislation would likewise be made through a future Finance Bill.