Lord Green of Deddington Portrait

Lord Green of Deddington

Crossbench - Life peer

Became Member: 28th November 2014


Lord Green of Deddington is not a member of any APPGs
Lord Green of Deddington has no previous appointments


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 12th July 2023
Illegal Migration Bill
voted No
One of 3 Crossbench No votes vs 33 Crossbench Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 217 Noes - 151
Speeches
Monday 19th February 2024
Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill
I understand that but I said at the beginning of my speech that I was going to range more widely. …
Written Answers
Wednesday 20th December 2023
Immigration
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the statement by the Home Secretary on 4 December (HC Deb cols 41–43), …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Green of Deddington has voted in 111 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
(17 debate interactions)
Lord Paddick (Non-affiliated)
(14 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Home Office
(97 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(14 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(10 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Green of Deddington's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Green of Deddington, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Lord Green of Deddington has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Green of Deddington has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


75 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2nd Dec 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how many arrivals by (1) Ukrainians and their dependants, (2) Hong Kong BNOs and their dependants, and (3) Afghan citizens and their dependants, are included in the latest Office for National Statistics net migration figures, published on 24 November.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon. Member's Parliamentary Question: HL3965 and HL3966 are attached.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Lord Green of Deddington

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

12 December 2022

Dear Lord Green,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking how many arrivals by (1) Ukrainians and their dependants, (2) Hong Kong BNOs and their dependants, and (3) Afghan citizens and their dependants, are included in the latest Office for National Statistics net migration figures, published on 24 November; and when the International Passenger Survey (IPS) stopped being used as a significant element in calculating net migration; and what has taken its place (HL3965;HL3966).

In the Office for National Statistics (ONS) bulletin published on 24 November, Section 4, Migration Events[1] details the following published Home Office data included in the ONS’ total long-term international migration estimates:

Ukrainians: around 89,000 arrived in the UK in the year to June 2022

Afghans: around 21,000 arrived in the UK in the year to June 2022

For British nationals overseas (BN(O)) status holders and their families from Hong Kong, colleagues from the ONS and the Home Office are working together to resolve how we identify those that are long-term international migrants in the data. Home Office statistics show that around 76,000 visas were issued for the BN(O) route in the year ending June 2022. This will represent the upper bound for arrivals, as not all of those with a visa will arrive in the UK or stay long term. The ONS is also working to identify BN(O) status holders in their International Passenger Survey (IPS) data using country of birth and country of last residences as this may help provide a more robust estimate. Current analysis suggests that 28,000 British nationals with a country of birth of Hong Kong immigrated into the UK in the year ending June 2022.

The long-term international migration data from the IPS was the largest component of the LongTerm International Migration (LTIM) estimates until its suspension in March 2020 because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

In August 2020 the ONS announced that they would not return to producing official migration statistics from the IPS because it had been stretched beyond its original purpose. The ONS now focuses on measuring actual migration, as opposed to intentions, using primarily administrative data (admin-based migration estimates (ABMEs)). The ONS’ International migration statistical design progress report: July 2022 provides more information.[2]

For the latest long-term international migration estimates; non-EU figures are based on Home Office Border Systems data, EU figures are based on Registration and Population Interaction Database (RAPID) data received from Department for Work and Pensions and HM Revenue and Customs, and British Nationals figures are based on the International Passenger Survey (IPS). See the Measuring the data section[3] for more detail. Thank you for your continued interest in our international migration estimates.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1] https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/internationalmigration/ bulletins/longterminternationalmigrationprovisional/yearendingjune2022#migration-events

[2] https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/internationalmigration/ articles/internationalmigrationstatisticaldesignprogressreport/july2022

[3] https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/internationalmigration/ bulletins/longterminternationalmigrationprovisional/yearendingjune2022#measuring-the-data

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Dec 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government when the International Passenger Survey (IPS) stopped being used as a significant element in calculating net migration; and what has taken its place.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon. Member's Parliamentary Question: HL3965 and HL3966 are attached.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

Lord Green of Deddington

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

12 December 2022

Dear Lord Green,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking how many arrivals by (1) Ukrainians and their dependants, (2) Hong Kong BNOs and their dependants, and (3) Afghan citizens and their dependants, are included in the latest Office for National Statistics net migration figures, published on 24 November; and when the International Passenger Survey (IPS) stopped being used as a significant element in calculating net migration; and what has taken its place (HL3965;HL3966).

In the Office for National Statistics (ONS) bulletin published on 24 November, Section 4, Migration Events[1] details the following published Home Office data included in the ONS’ total long-term international migration estimates:

Ukrainians: around 89,000 arrived in the UK in the year to June 2022

Afghans: around 21,000 arrived in the UK in the year to June 2022

For British nationals overseas (BN(O)) status holders and their families from Hong Kong, colleagues from the ONS and the Home Office are working together to resolve how we identify those that are long-term international migrants in the data. Home Office statistics show that around 76,000 visas were issued for the BN(O) route in the year ending June 2022. This will represent the upper bound for arrivals, as not all of those with a visa will arrive in the UK or stay long term. The ONS is also working to identify BN(O) status holders in their International Passenger Survey (IPS) data using country of birth and country of last residences as this may help provide a more robust estimate. Current analysis suggests that 28,000 British nationals with a country of birth of Hong Kong immigrated into the UK in the year ending June 2022.

The long-term international migration data from the IPS was the largest component of the LongTerm International Migration (LTIM) estimates until its suspension in March 2020 because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

In August 2020 the ONS announced that they would not return to producing official migration statistics from the IPS because it had been stretched beyond its original purpose. The ONS now focuses on measuring actual migration, as opposed to intentions, using primarily administrative data (admin-based migration estimates (ABMEs)). The ONS’ International migration statistical design progress report: July 2022 provides more information.[2]

For the latest long-term international migration estimates; non-EU figures are based on Home Office Border Systems data, EU figures are based on Registration and Population Interaction Database (RAPID) data received from Department for Work and Pensions and HM Revenue and Customs, and British Nationals figures are based on the International Passenger Survey (IPS). See the Measuring the data section[3] for more detail. Thank you for your continued interest in our international migration estimates.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1] https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/internationalmigration/ bulletins/longterminternationalmigrationprovisional/yearendingjune2022#migration-events

[2] https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/internationalmigration/ articles/internationalmigrationstatisticaldesignprogressreport/july2022

[3] https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/internationalmigration/ bulletins/longterminternationalmigrationprovisional/yearendingjune2022#measuring-the-data

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, for each year from 2010 to date, how many UK households there were (1) with a non-UK born household reference person, (2) with a UK-born household reference person, and (3) with a household reference person for whom the country of birth was not known.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Lord Green of Deddington
House of Lords
London
SW1A 0PW

12 October 2021

Dear Lord Green,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question requesting data for how many UK households there were (1) with a non-UK born household reference person, (2) with a UK-born household reference person, and (3) with a household reference person for whom the country of birth was not known (HL2843).

The Office for National Statistics is responsible for undertaking the Labour Force Survey (LFS), from which these estimates of household reference person by country of birth have been derived. Table 1 shows the number of households by the household reference person’s country of birth in the UK from 2010 to 20201.

The table contains estimates of the number of households for household reference persons who are UK born, non-UK born or whose country of birth is missing. The totals of each column may not add up to the total households figure due to rounding, and estimates are rounded to the nearest hundred. As the estimates are based on a survey, they are subject to sampling variability. This is because the sample selected is only one of a large number of possible samples that could have been drawn from the population.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

1. A household reference person (HRP) is the householder who owns the accommodation; is legally responsible for the rent; or occupies the accommodation as reward of their employment, or through some relationship to its owner who is not a member of the household. If there are joint householders, the one with the highest income is the HRP. If their income is the same, then the eldest one is the HRP.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many international students are currently in higher education in the UK; and whether it remains their ambition to increase the number of international students entering higher education in the UK to 600,000 per year by 2030.

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) publishes data annually on the number of international students at UK higher education providers; they are available here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/students/where-from.

The table below shows the number of international student (non-UK domiciled) enrolments at UK higher education providers between the academic years 2015/16 and 2019/20, the latest year for which there is available data.

HE student enrolments of non-UK domicile students

Academic years 2015/16 to 2019/20

UK HE providers

Academic year

Non-UK domicile enrolments

2015/16

443,320

2016/17

450,835

2017/18

469,205

2018/19

496,315

2019/20

556,625

The table above is available at: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb258/figure-9.

The most recent update to the International Education Strategy, published in February 2021, reaffirms the government’s commitment to increase the value of our education exports to £35 billion per year, and sustainably to increase the number of international higher education students hosted in the UK to 600,000 per year, both by 2030.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Stedman-Scott on 11 February (HL5761), what is (1) the underlying data issue affecting the calculation of the scale of National Insurance numbers issued to adult overseas arrivals from June 2021 onwards, (2) the scale of the uncertainty about the numbers involved, (3) the degree and manner in which this has affected and is likely to affect the future development of the Administrative-Based Migration Estimates, and (4) the period over which net migration estimates are likely to be affected.

The decision was made to delay the November 2021 release of the National Statistics publication of National Insurance numbers allocated to adult overseas nationals following an investigation involving HMRC where a technical issue was identified which work is now underway to rectify. Once the work is complete and the data has been validated, we will notify users of our plans to publish the statistical back series in line with the UK Statistics Authority Code of Practice for Statistics.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for migration estimates and they announced in November 2021 their plan to include data from the DWP Registration And Population Interactions Dataset (RAPID) in their Administrative-Based Migration Estimates. The current RAPID data is not affected by this issue as it only covers the period to end March 2021.

28th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government why the statistics on National Insurance numbers issued to overseas nationals were delayed two days before the due publication date of 25 November 2021; why they have now been suspended; and when they expect them to be published.

All statistics produced by the Department for Work and Pensions are subject to routine quality assurance procedures before publication. During one of these procedures an underlying data issue was discovered in the quarterly National Statistics for ‘National Insurance number allocations to adult overseas nationals entering the UK’, which was due to be published on 25 November 2021. An assessment was made to understand the cause and identify if a solution could be swiftly implemented before the publication date. However, as it was not possible to do this, a decision was made to notify users both of the delay to the November release and that an update would be provided in January 2022.

The investigation is taking longer than first anticipated and will therefore impact the production of the next quarterly release of the statistics, so the update provided on 26 January 2022 informed users of the decision to suspend the release of the statistics. The statistical series will be reinstated as soon as possible after a solution is implemented, in line with the UK Statistics Authority Code of Practice for Statistics and a further progress update will be provided in early April 2022.

9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Stedman-Scott on 2 November (HL9276), what estimate they have made of the number of young people aged 16 to 24 who will benefit from the Kickstart Scheme.

The Department for Work and Pensions Kickstart Scheme is making £2 billion available to eligible employers and Kickstart gateways. This Government has not set a limit to the number of Kickstart jobs that can be funded.

19th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many young people in the UK are expected to benefit from the Kickstart Scheme in 2021.

The Kickstart Scheme is a £2 billion programme, planning to create thousands of new jobs for young people aged 16-24 at risk of long term unemployment. Whilst we will not limit our ambitions, our first priority is to ensure the quality of experiences created for young people.

16th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to withdraw from (1) the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, and (2) the 1966 Protocol relating to the Status of Refugees; and if they have any such plans, what assessment they have made of the need for parliament to have a role in such withdrawals.

The Government does not have plans to withdraw from the Refugee Convention and its Protocol.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to withdraw from (1) the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, and (2) the 1966 Protocol relating to the Status of Refugees; and if they have any such plans, what assessment they have made of the need for replacement legislation.

The Government does not have plans to withdraw from the Refugee Convention and its Protocol.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Sugg on 5 August (HL7139), why they do not publish the results of their assessments of how many people they expect to take up the bespoke immigration route for British Nationals (Overseas) and their dependants; and what the result of their most recent assessment was.

Our offer to British Nationals (Overseas), (BN(O)s), is not about the numbers. The Government has taken decisive action to uphold our commitments to the people of Hong Kong. As previously stated, this scheme is for eligible BN(O) status holders and their immediate family dependants. We estimate that there are up to 2.9 million BN(O) status holders. In reality, a large number of those who are eligible will want to stay in Hong Kong or relocate to other countries in the region.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 21 July (HL6842), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, what estimate they have made of (1) the number of holders of British National (Overseas) status in Hong Kong, and (2) their dependants, who are expected to migrate to the UK in the next five years.

As the Foreign Secretary said on 21 July, we constantly assess the numbers of those expected to take up the bespoke immigration route for British Nationals (Overseas) (BN(O)s) and their dependants. We estimate that there are 2.9 million eligible for BN(O) passports. Of those, there are around 350,000 passport holders. Many of those who may be eligible will want to stay in Hong Kong, or relocate temporarily. The UK will honour its historic and moral responsibilities to BN(O)s.

14th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of (1) the number of holders of British National (Overseas) status in Hong Kong, and (2) their dependants, who are expected to migrate to the UK in the next five years. [T]

As the Foreign Secretary said in Parliament on 1 July, we constantly assess the numbers of those expected to take up the bespoke immigration route which we will put in place for British Nationals (Overseas) (BN(O)s) and their dependants. We estimate that there are up to 2.9 million status holders eligible for BN(O) passports. Of those, there are around 350,000 passport holders.

However, we recognise that there will be people from Hong Kong who do not qualify for these new arrangements. The Foreign Secretary is coordinating closely with international partners, particularly those with specific and close relationships with Hong Kong, to discuss what support they might provide.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have a target for increasing the trend rate of economic growth; and if so, what it is.

The Government is committed to sustainable economic growth within a stable macro-economic environment. The Government will set out the approach to growth policy at the Autumn Statement on the 17th November.
Baroness Penn
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
25th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the increase in GDP per head resulting from a 50,000 increase in the number of work permits if, on average, 90 per cent of applicants continue to be accompanied by one dependant.

The independent Office for Budget Responsibility provides forecasts of the overall impact on economic growth of government policy, including those resulting from immigration policy. The next forecast will be provided on the 17th of November alongside the Autumn Statement.

It is not appropriate to provide commentary on specific scenarios, but the government does consider relevant impacts in assessing potential changes to immigration policy.

Baroness Penn
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
25th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the impact on the trend rate of economic growth of a 50,000 increase in the number of work permits issued per year.

The independent Office for Budget Responsibility provides forecasts of the overall impact on economic growth of government policy, including those resulting from immigration policy. The next forecast will be provided on the 17th of November alongside the Autumn Statement.

It is not appropriate to provide commentary on specific scenarios, but the government does consider relevant impacts in assessing potential changes to immigration policy.

Baroness Penn
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
8th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the total UK net public sector contribution to the (1) European Economic Community, and (2) EU, budget since the accession of the UK to the European Communities in 1973 at real 2019 prices.

The total UK Net Public Sector Contributions to the EEC during the period 1973 to 1993, adjusted to real 2019 prices, is equal to £51.5bn. The total UK Net Public Sector Contributions to the EU during the remaining period 1994 to 2019, adjusted to real 2019 prices, is equal to £174.7bn. These figures do not include receipts received by private UK entities, which would reduce the UK’s net contributions.

5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the total UK net public sector contributions to the EU/EC budget between 1991 and 2019 at real 2019 prices.

The total UK Net Public Sector Contributions to the EU budget during the period 1991 to 2019, adjusted to real 2019 prices, is equal to £182.6 billion (average £6.3 billion per annum). This figure does not include receipts received by private UK entities, which would further reduce the UK’s net contribution.

11th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the statement by the Home Secretary on 4 December (HC Deb cols 41–43), what are the specific components of the 300,000 per annum reduction in migration figure he provided, and whether this number refers to the future inflow of student migration or to the net inflow of migrants overall.

Analytical work has been undertaken across Government to support decision making in this process, and an Impact Assessment will be developed in due course.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government who has held office since 1 October 1993 as (1) Home Secretary, and (2) minister responsible for immigration; and what were the dates of their appointment.

The Home Office believes that this information is readily available to the Peer online.

12th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Statement by the Minister of State for Immigration on 8 June (HCWS837), how many asylum applications there have been since 28 June 2022 from nationals of (1) Afghanistan, (2) Eritrea, (3) Libya, (4) Syria, (5) Yemen, and (6) Sudan, together with the number of accompanying dependants of each nationality.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum applications in the ‘Immigration System Statistics Quarterly Release’ on GOV.UK. Data on asylum applications by nationality and applicant type are published in table Asy_D01 of the Asylum and resettlement detailed datasets: found here. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the end of March 2023.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’ on GOV.UK.

12th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the to the Written Statement by the Minister of State for Immigration on 8 June (HCWS837), what are the reasons for their policy changes on the treatment of asylum seekers set out in that Written Statement.

The Illegal Migration Bill represents a considerably stronger means of tackling the same issue that the differentiation policy sought to address: people making dangerous and unnecessary journeys through safe countries to claim asylum in the UK.

20th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what is their objective for net migration in (1) three years' time, and (2) five years' time.

As the Prime Minister has said, the Government remains committed to reducing net migration over time, while ensuring we have the skills our economy needs to grow. The Government continues to keep the immigration system under review.


Our immediate priority is getting a grip on illegal migration, to stop the abuse of our system and stop the boats making illegal, dangerous and unnecessary journeys across the Channel for the profits of criminal people smuggling gangs.

12th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how many work permits have been issued to Indian nationals in each of the past five years; and how many Indian nationals have overstayed their visas in each of the past five years.

The Home Office is committed to publishing data as part of the immigration statistics quarterly release. The transparency data provides outstanding applications by specific route and can be found featured in the ‘Migration Transparency Data’ on the GOV.UK website.

The immigration statistics Data Tables for Work can be found at Migration Statistics – Immigration Statistics, year ending June 2022, using the link ‘Why do people come to the UK? Work’ section 3 ‘Data Tables’. This table, at ‘Vis_03a’ tab, provides the numbers of work entry clearance visa cases applied for, issued, and refused for the year ending June 2022. There have been 117,446 applications for entry clearance for work purposes by Indian nationals from June 2021-June 2022, with 110,816 visas granted. Further details can be found on GOV.UK, including archived statistics.

The statistics relating to in-country work visa applications (extensions) is available on GOV.UK per annum, covering each year since the transparency data reporting began in 2010: however it is not broken down by nationality.

We do not routinely publish any data on numbers of individuals that have overstayed their visa expiry in the UK.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
11th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how many entry clearance visas grants they provided to main applicants under the (1) Skilled Worker, and (2) Skilled Worker - Health & Care, routes for each quarter of the year up to June; and for each route, how many were issued for jobs at (a) RQF Level 6, (b) RQF Levels 3 to 5, and (c) RQF Level 3.

Applications granted to main applicants of the ‘Skilled Worker’ visa

Quarter

Grants

2020 Q4

429

2021 Q1

4,553

2021 Q2

6,682

2021 Q3

11,762

2021 Q4

12,602

2022 Q1

12,701

2022 Q2

14,844

Total

63,573

Applications granted to main applications of the ‘Skilled Worker – Health & Care’ visa

Quarter

Grants

2020 Q4

689

2021 Q1

6,771

2021 Q2

5,815

2021 Q3

8,684

2021 Q4

10,530

2022 Q1

12,411

2022 Q2

15,646

Total

60,546

There is no published data that links the entry clearance visas granted in these categories to the respective RQF classifications.

23rd May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to section 16 of the Memorandum of Understanding between the UK and the government of Rwanda for the provision of an asylum partnership arrangement, how many refugees from Rwanda will be resettled in the UK; and over what time period they will be resettled.

A small number of the most vulnerable refugees in Rwanda will be resettled in the UK as part of the Migration and Economic Development Partnership.

More details on the resettlement of vulnerable refugees will be set out in due course. The partnership between the UK and Rwanda is now underway and is expected to last for at least five years.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
18th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with P&O Ferries about the (1) immigration status, and (2) right to work in the UK, of the replacement workers they are reportedly hiring; what assessment they have made of the right to work in the UK of these workers; and, of the workers of foreign nationality hired by P&O Ferries, what were the immigration routes by which they have been admitted to the UK.

There are ongoing discussions between P&O Ferries and HM Government.

It is the Government’s policy that all migrants coming to work in UK territorial waters (i.e., 12 nautical miles), or on the UK landmass, need permission to work unless exemptions apply. Conversely, if they are working outside of UK territorial waters then permission to work is not required.

Seafarers who earn a living by working on a ship such as seamen or crew members do not need permission to work if they are in transit (under contract) to join a ship or are in transit as part of a crew, subject to entry requirements.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
25th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 24 January (HL5259), what immigration controls will be put in place under the proposed ETA system at (1) sea crossings between the Republic of Ireland and the UK and (2) sea crossings between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK.

The Common Travel Area (CTA) supports the long-standing principle of movement for British and Irish citizens between the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, Isle of Man and Ireland.

As now, the UK will not operate routine immigration controls on journeys from within the CTA. There are no border controls for travel within the UK including from Northern Ireland to Great Britain.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many EU citizens have been granted settled status since the introduction of the EU Settlement Scheme; how many who have been granted pre-settled status will qualify to apply for settled status in each calendar year from 2022 to 2026; and what proportion of applications for settled status from pre-settled status have been granted in the last 12 months.

The Home Office publishes data on the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) in the 'EU Settlement Scheme Statistics', which can be found on gov.uk.

The latest published information on EUSS applications concluded to 30 September 2021, can be found in tables EUSS_03_UK: (EU Settlement Scheme: concluded applications by outcome type and nationality - UK total) and EUSS_MON, Table 5: (EU Settlement Scheme – Repeat applicants moving from Pre-settled to Settled status), in the Annex.

A person granted pre-settled status under the EUSS can apply for settled status as soon as they qualify for this. Applicants who have completed five years’ continuous residence, or where other criteria for settled status without that length of continuous residence are met, are eligible for settled status.

The Home Office cannot assess a person’s eligibility for settled status until they make an application to the EUSS, and therefore cannot state how many of those granted pre-settled status or who are yet to apply to the scheme will be eligible for settled status in the period sought.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many mobile phones have been issued (1) to individuals in immigration removal centres, and (2) to asylum seekers arriving in the UK after crossing the English Channel by boat, between 1 January 2018 and 30 June 2021.

The published Detention Services Order 08/2012 sets out the Home Office’s policy on detained individuals’ possession of mobile phones in immigration removal centres.

To enable contact with friends, family and legal representatives, where individuals do not have a suitable mobile phone, Home Office suppliers can provide temporary access to basic model mobile phones for individuals in detention, or those awaiting initial processing. These mobile phones are returned when individuals leave the respective centre.

No mobile phones are provided in Initial Asylum Accommodation, however; individuals can request a data sim card which enables internet access, for use during their stay.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many migrants who initially entered the UK on a student visa were granted the right to settle in each of the past 10 years.

Data is published as part of the Migrant Journey report in dataset MJ_D02, which contains grants of settlement by initial leave category.

Details for the last 10 years for study are below:

Sum of Total

Column Labels

Row Labels

Study

2011

27,375

2012

23,364

2013

32,126

2014

25,694

2015

26,668

2016

17,663

2017

18,176

2018

26,622

2019

27,625

2020

16,764

Grand Total

242,077

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
9th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which countries' passport holders are able to use e-gates at UK borders when coming to the UK for short stays; what arrangements they have made to ensure that such people (1) are not taking paid employment whilst in the UK, and (2) do not stay longer than their permitted six months; and what assessment they have made of whether the system has been abused so far.

The use of e-Gates is a secure and efficient way of crossing the border.

In addition to British and Irish citizens aged 12 and over, who can use e-Gates to enter the UK for any purpose, citizens aged 12 and over of the countries named in the Schedule to the Immigration (Leave to Enter and Remain) Order 2000, as amended, are eligible to seek entry to the UK using an e-Gate for the purpose of short visits. The list of countries can be found online under the ‘Amendment of the Immigration (Leave to Enter and Remain) Order 2000’ on the legislation.gov.uk website.

We also operate the Registered Traveller service, where regular, compliant visitors to the UK and those with long term entry clearance can apply for membership which allows them to seek entry using an e-Gate once they have passed initial checks and been examined by a Border Force officer (BFO) on their next entry to the UK. The list of countries whose citizens are currently eligible to apply for membership of the RTS can be viewed on gov.uk

In terms of preventing illegal working and overstaying those who enter using an e-Gate and go on to work illegally or overstay will be identified in the same way as those who are granted leave to enter by an entry clearance officer or BFO.

We continue to monitor reports and trends of immigration abuse across the immigration system, including of illegal working and overstaying to ensure the immigration system continues to operate in the national interest.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
28th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by the Migration Advisory Committee Impact of International Students in the UK, published in September 2018, and in particular the conclusion that "it is likely that those who would benefit from a longer period to find a graduate level job are not the most highly skilled".

The Government strongly wishes to attract international students to study in the UK. They enhance our educational institutions both financially and culturally; they enrich the experience of domestic students; and they can become important ambassadors for the United Kingdom in later life. The Graduate route significantly enhances our offer to international students and the attractiveness of the UK as a world-leading destination for higher education.

The Government at the time, set out its response to the recommendation of the Migration Advisory Committee. However, following the UK’s exit from the EU and the launch of our new points-based system, the introduction of the Graduate route demonstrates our global outlook and support for the UK’s education sector. The route will also help us realise our ambition, as set out in the International Education Strategy, to increase UK education exports to £35 billion and the number of international higher education students to 600,000 by 2030.

This Government has set out its assessment of the impact of the route. This can be found on the gov.uk website or through the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/statement-of-changes-to-the-immigration-rules-hc-1248-4-march-2021

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
27th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effect of the new graduate work route on the displacement of UK workers.

Our new Graduate route demonstrates our determination to attract the brightest and best talent from around the world to study and then work in the UK.

A full economic impact assessment for the Graduate Route was published on 4 March 2021 and features a section on the expected labour market impact of the route. This can be found on the gov.uk website or through the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/statement-of-changes-to-the-immigration-rules-hc-1248-4-march-2021

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
27th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people who originally came to the UK on a study visa were granted settled status under the 10 year long-term residency rule in each of the past five years.

Such data is not currently held in a reportable way and to gather it could only be achieved at a disproportionate cost.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
27th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people who originally came to the UK on a study visa were later granted limited leave to remain in each of the past five years.

Such data is not currently held in a reportable way and to gather it could only be achieved at a disproportionate cost.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many applications for (1) settled, and (2) pre-settled, status have been granted under the EU Settlement Scheme, broken down by parliamentary constituency.

The Home Office publishes data on the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) in the ‘EU Settlement Scheme statistics’.

The latest published information on EUSS applications received and applications concluded to 30 June 2021, by Local Authority can be found in tables EUSS_LA_01, EUSS_LA_02 and EUSS_LA_03 (see attached) available at:

EU Settlement Scheme quarterly statistics, June 2021 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) how many permissions under the EU Settlement Scheme have been granted to date to (a) EEA, and (b) non-EEA, national family members of the main applicants, for settled and pre-settled status, and (2) how many applications under the EU Settlement Scheme have been received to date from individuals not living in the UK.

The Home Office publishes data on the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) in the ‘EU Settlement Scheme statistics’.

The latest published information on EUSS applications concluded to 30 June 2021, by nationality and outcome type can be found in table EUSS_03_UK available at: EU Settlement Scheme quarterly statistics, June 2021 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

EUSS_03_UK: EU Settlement Scheme: concluded applications by outcome type and nationality, 28 August 2018 to 30 June 2021 - UK total

Country of nationality

Total

of which are Settled

of which are Pre-settled

of which are Refused

of which are Withdrawn or Void

of which are Invalid

Total

5,444,550

2,846,820

2,327,850

109,430

80,600

79,730

Total EU 27

5,065,570

2,725,830

2,103,510

94,800

68,010

73,330


The vast majority of EUSS applications are associated with a UK address, although there is no requirement to give a UK address and applications can be made in-country or in some cases from overseas. In our latest publication, we reported that “total applications include small numbers of records (1.6%) where locational data is not currently in an analysable form from live systems.” This proportion includes applications associated with a non-UK address.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) how many British National (Overseas) visas have been granted, including to dependants, since 31 January, (2) how many individuals have been granted leave outside the Immigration Rules at the UK border since 1 January, and (3) how many British National (Overseas) passports issued each month since January.

(1),(2)

The Home Office publishes data on visas and the British National Overseas (BN(O)) route in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’ on GOV.UK:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

The data relates to the first and second quarter of 2021, January to June, and are derived from management information. These statistics include data on main applicants and dependants and are rounded to the nearest hundred. Data for Q3 2021 will be published on 25 November 2021.

(3)

The table below provides the number of British National (Overseas) passports issued to customers each month since January 2021. *

Month

BNO Passports Issued

January

13,315

February

8,217

March

7,032

April

4,747

May

4,192

June

3,141

July

2,728

August

5,613

*These figures are correct at the time of reporting and subject to change.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
28th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the UK still participates in the EU's return and readmission agreements with (1) Albania, (2) Bosnia and Herzegovina, (3) Republic of Northern Macedonia, (4) Georgia, (5) Hong Kong, (6) Macau, (7) Moldova, (8) Montenegro, (9) Pakistan, (10) Russia, (11) Serbia, (12) Sri Lanka, (13) Turkey, and (14) Ukraine.

Since 1 January 2021 the UK has not participated in EU Readmission Agreements with third countries. We are no longer party to these agreements. Where appropriate we are looking to transition to new bilateral agreements with third countries.

28th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many return and readmission agreements, or Memoranda of Understanding for the return of migrants found illegally in the UK, they have participated in either (1) bilaterally, and (2) as a member state of the EU, in each of the past five years.

Bilaterally outside of the EU, the UK has a range of returns arrangements with receiving countries including bilateral MoU, formal readmission agreements and informal operational arrangements which provide the basis for administrative removal and deportation of own country nationals.

Formal immigration returns arrangements are in place with following countries:

Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Azerbaijan, China, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Guinea, Iraq, Kuwait, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Korea, South Sudan, Switzerland, Vietnam.

As an EU Member State, the UK participated in 14 of the 18 EU Readmission Agreements. These were with: Pakistan, Georgia, Serbia, Albania, Turkey, Sri Lanka, Ukraine, Russia, Moldova, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Montenegro, Macedonia, Macao and Hong Kong.

28th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government with what countries they have (1) bilateral return and readmission agreements, and (2) agreed Memoranda of Understanding for the return of migrants found to be illegally in the UK.

Bilaterally outside of the EU, the UK has a range of returns arrangements with receiving countries including bilateral MoU, formal readmission agreements and informal operational arrangements which provide the basis for administrative removal and deportation of own country nationals.

Formal immigration returns arrangements are in place with following countries:

Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Azerbaijan, China, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Guinea, Iraq, Kuwait, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Korea, South Sudan, Switzerland, Vietnam.

As an EU Member State, the UK participated in 14 of the 18 EU Readmission Agreements. These were with: Pakistan, Georgia, Serbia, Albania, Turkey, Sri Lanka, Ukraine, Russia, Moldova, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Montenegro, Macedonia, Macao and Hong Kong.

28th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the UK currently has bilateral return and readmission agreements, or Memoranda of Understanding for the return of migrants found to be illegally in the UK, with (1) Albania, (2) Brazil, (3) Bangladesh, (4) Pakistan, and (5) Turkey.

We are currently in discussions with a number of third countries regarding the transition of existing EURAs the UK participated in, into bilateral returns agreements, along with creating other new relationships with third countries.

21st Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many EU citizens are expected to achieve settled status in each calendar year from 2021 to 2026.

A person granted pre-settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme can apply for settled status as soon as they qualify for this. Applicants who have completed five years’ continuous residence, or where other criteria for eligibility for settled status without the length of continuous residence are met, are eligible for settled status.

The Home Office cannot assess a person’s eligibility for settled status until they make an application to the scheme, and therefore cannot state how many of those granted pre-settled status or who are yet to apply to the scheme will be eligible for settled status in the period sought.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
26th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many of the 2.2 million EU citizens now granted pre-settled status will be able to switch to settled status in (1) 2021, and (2) each of the next five calendar years.

A person granted pre-settled status can apply for settled status as soon as they qualify for this. They will be eligible for settled status once they have completed five years’ continuous residence or where other criteria for eligibility for settled status without that length of continuous residence are met.

The Home Office cannot assess a person’s eligibility for settled status until they make an application to the scheme.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) people, and (2) children, are included in the 27,000 British Nationals (Overseas) applications referred to in their press release of 8 April, National welcome for Hong Kong arrivals.

The new Hong Kong BN(O) route was launched on 31 January 2021, with the new digital application launching on 23 February.

As of 19 March 2021, approximately 27,000 BN(O) status holders and their family members have applied for the route.

Further breakdown of the application numbers and updated figures will be published as part of the the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’, the next update is due for publication on 27 May 2021 and will be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of applications made under the EU Settlement Scheme; and of why this number is now nearly one million more than the upper estimate included in the report Impact Assessment for EU Settlement Scheme – Updated analysis, published in March 2019.

The latest published information on EU Settlement Scheme applications and outcomes can be found in the Home Office’s ‘EU Settlement Scheme statistics’ monthly publication, which is available at:

EU Settlement Scheme statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

The Impact Assessment for the EU Settlement Scheme (March 2019) is available at:

The Immigration and Nationality (Fees) (Refund, Waiver and Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 (legislation.gov.uk)

This discussed the assumptions, risks, uncertainties and exclusions surrounding its estimate of eligible citizens and made clear it should be considered as indicative and not as minimum and maximum estimates.

23rd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) arrests, (2) prosecutions, and (3) convictions, there were for offences committed under section 24 of the Immigration Act 1971 in each of the last five years.

20/21

19/20

18/19

17/18

16/17

Arrests

129

16

42

57

209

Charges

116

13

24

48

154

Convictions

48

11

23

48

117

8th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of British National (Overseas) passport holders and their dependants who may apply to work in the UK; and how many of these would meet the English language requirements that apply to migrants from elsewhere.

On 31 January, the Home Office launched the new Hong Kong British National (Overseas) (BN(O)) route. The route will enable BN(O) status holders and their eligible family members to come to the UK to live, work and study.

As set out in the published impact assessment, our central estimates of those who will take up this offer range between 123,000 and 153,700 BN(O) status holders and their dependants coming in the first year and between 258,000 and 322,400 over five years. Details of the impact assessment can be found at:

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukia/2020/70/pdfs/ukia_20200070_en.pdf

We have communicated the expectation throughout the development of the route; applicants should be self-sufficient and economically active. Part of the integration planning for the new BN(O) route includes access to support materials to help BN(O) status holders find work. There are no minimum skill levels or salary thresholds on this route as it comes with a general right to work in the UK.

There is no English language requirement when applying for the BN(O) route so this aspect is not assessed, although English is commonly used in Hong Kong.

The government looks forward to welcoming applications from those British National (Overseas) who wish to make our United Kingdom their home.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
4th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many asylum claims in (1) January, (2) February, and (3) to date in March, 2021, have been treated as inadmissible on the basis that the claimant was judged to have travelled through or have a connection to a safe third country; and which those countries were.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum applications in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of asylum applications are published in Table Asy_D01 and data on the number and type of asylum initial decisions are published in table Asy_D02 of the Asylum and Resettlement datasets.

Figures on the number of asylum application decisions made in the first quarter of 2021 are due to be published on 27 May 2021. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. We are working to bring inadmissibility decisions in line with current reporting and hope to publish that information in the same timeframe.

We are reviewing the cases of those who claimed asylum before 1 January and their suitability for decision-making under the new rules. If it is appropriate for any claimants to receive decisions under the new provisions, they will be informed of that, in line with the Home Office published policy guidance.

The Home Office current published guidance is clear that we will serve an inadmissibility decision only when an individual’s return is agreed by a third country. The Home Office continues to work closely with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development to secure agreements to enable returns to be made. Any case where return is not agreed within 6 months from the date of claim will be admitted to the asylum process and will have their asylum claim substantively considered in the UK.

Information on the Home Office inadmissibility rules can be found on gov.uk under ‘Inadmissibility: third country cases’.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many individuals have been removed from the UK in each of the last 10 years as a result of the expiry of their leave to remain.

The Home Office publishes data on the number of returns from the UK in each quarter in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly release’. The latest data are published in Ret_01 of the Returns summary tables. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relate to the year ending September 2020.

The Home Office seeks to return people who do not have any legal right to stay in the UK, which includes people who:

  • enter, or attempt to enter, the UK illegally (including people entering clandestinely and by means of deception on entry);
  • overstay their period of legal right to remain in the UK;
  • breach their conditions of leave;
  • are subject to deportation action; for example, due to a serious criminal conviction and
  • have been refused asylum.

The published data relate to all returns, regardless of reason for return.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what measures are in place to identify EU citizens in the UK who overstay their visas.

EU migrants whose visas expire will be identified and treated in the same way as any other overstayers.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 21 January (HL11926), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, how many non-visa nationals whose permission to be in the UK expired, and for whom there was no record of departure, there were in each of the past five years.

We do not currently hold any existing assured data relating to the cohort of non-visa national visitors whose permission to be in the UK has expired and there is no record of departure.

To attempt to answer the question from data we hold would require significant technical, analytical and assurance work to establish the accuracy of any data for this cohort held within the immigration system.

However, the Home Office publishes statistics relating to departures by visa holders as part of its annual Exit Checks report. Fifth report on statistics relating to exit checks - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) The report includes the percentage of non-EEA visa holders whose leave expired with no initially identified departure in time, including both people for whom there was no record of departure and people with a confirmed late departure. It is important to note that individuals with no departure recorded were not necessarily non-compliant.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
18th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many British National (Overseas) passport applications were received in each month of 2020.

British passport applications are not recorded by nationality type when an application is received, and therefore the data requested is unavailable.

The table below provides the number of British National (Overseas) passports that were issued in each month of 2020:

Month

BNO Issued in 2020

January

28,995

February

7,889

March

6,288

April

363

May

2,270

June

7,719

July

24,973

August

33,249

September

48,081

October

60,907

November

56,563

December

39,687

*These figures are correct at the time of reporting and subject to change.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
8th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish statistics about the operation of the new points-based immigration system under which employers could apply from 1 December 2020 to sponsor skilled workers; and which data (1) have been collected, and (2) they intend to publish.

Data relating to the new points-based immigration system will be incorporated in the tables published quarterly as part of the Immigration Statistics, which provide statistics on visa applications and outcomes by nationality.

As a National Statistics output, data published by the Home Office is reviewed regularly to ensure it meets the needs of users of the statistics.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
8th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many visa nationals on (1) six-month visit visas, (2) long-term visit visas, and (3) long-term work, study or family visas, whose permission to be in the UK expired, and for whom there was no record of departure, there were in each of the past five years.

The Home Office publishes statistics relating to departures by visa holders as part of its annual Exit Checks report (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fifth-report-on-statistics-relating-to-exit-checks). The report includes the percentage of non-EEA visa holders whose leave expired with no initially identified departure in time, including both people for whom there was no record of departure and people with a confirmed late departure.

It is important to note individuals with no departure recorded were not necessarily non-compliant. There are known coverage gaps with the ISA system (most notably the Common Travel Area) which means individuals may have departed and not been recorded. In addition, information regarding a departure may have been received but not successfully matched against their arrival or visa by the system.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
8th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many non-visa nationals whose permission to be in the UK expired, and for whom there was no record of departure, there were in each of the past five years.

The Home Office publishes statistics relating to departures by visa holders as part of its annual Exit Checks report (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fifth-report-on-statistics-relating-to-exit-checks). The report includes the percentage of non-EEA visa holders whose leave expired with no initially identified departure in time, including both people for whom there was no record of departure and people with a confirmed late departure.

It is important to note individuals with no departure recorded were not necessarily non-compliant. There are known coverage gaps with the ISA system (most notably the Common Travel Area) which means individuals may have departed and not been recorded. In addition, information regarding a departure may have been received but not successfully matched against their arrival or visa by the system.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
18th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 17 November (HL9917), by what means they are able to introduce a limit on the number of skilled workers able to come to the UK; what is the nature of any parliamentary approval that would be required; and how long would be required for any such changes to take effect.

The Points-Based Immigration System will allow the Government to take back full control of our borders. We will suspend the cap on the number of skilled workers able to come to the UK but other controls, such as salary thresholds and the Immigration Skills Charge, will ensure immigration is managed and considered alongside investment in and protection of the UK’s resident labour market.

We have considered carefully the possible impacts of the new immigration system, making best use of existing evidence and data. However, variables including Coronavirus are not the only uncertainty. We will need time to monitor the impacts on migration flows and the labour market, and whether this is in line with our detailed planning assumptions, before making any changes.

Any limit could be introduced through changes to the Immigration Rules, which are subject to negative resolution in both Houses. Changes are conventionally laid before Parliament 21 days before they take effect. The cap on skilled workers will be suspended when the new Rules come into force on1 December, but the Home Office processes required to enforce such a control will remain in place.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why the previous arrangements for a cap on the annual number of work permits (1) have been deleted in the revised Immigration Rules, published on 22 October, and (2) are stated as having been suspended in the explanatory notes, published on 22 October; what are the steps which need to be taken (a) to re-impose, and (b) to bring into force, such a cap; and what estimate they have made of the time it would take to take such steps.

The Points-Based Immigration System will allow the Government to take back full control of our borders. We will suspend the cap on the number of skilled workers able to apply to come to the UK, as recommended by the Migration Advisory Committee. Other controls such as sponsorship by a licenced employer, a system of salary thresholds and a requirement for employers to pay the Immigration Skills Charge, will ensure immigration is managed and considered alongside investment in and protection of the UK’s resident labour market.

The Skilled Worker route will be kept under review and we will retain the right to introduce further controls if necessary, based on experience and evidence.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
29th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, under the new arrangements coming into force in January 2021, citizens of Hong Kong who are not British National (Overseas) passport holders will need to obtain a visa (1) in advance of arrival to enter the UK, or (2) at the port of entry.

The bespoke new Hong Kong British National (Overseas) (BN(O)) Visa route recognises our historic and moral commitment to BN(O) citizens in Hong Kong, giving them the option to live in the UK if they decide that is an appropriate choice for them.

Consistent with the wider Immigration Rules, individuals in Hong Kong who do not hold BN(O) status or who are not dependents from the same household as a BN(O) will be able to apply under the new Points-Based System to come to live, work or study in the UK, provided they meet the necessary requirements. Those wishing to come to the UK under the new Points-Based-System will need to apply for a visa in advance of travel.

As with BN(O)s, citizens of Hong Kong are able to travel to the UK visa free for visit purposes for up to six months.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 17 September (HL7646), what are their (1) ‘central’, and (2) ‘high’, range estimates for the number of people with British National (Overseas) status who will arrive in the UK (a) in the first year, and (b) over five years, of the new immigration route.

Further details of the new Hong Kong British National (Overseas) (BN(O)) Visa were put before Parliament on 22 October. This included an Impact Assessment which set out the projected numbers of BN(O)s who might come to the UK under the new BN(O) route.

The impact assessment can be found here: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukia/2020/70/pdfs/ukia_20200070_en.pdf

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
19th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan for the proposed “new entrant” aspect of their points-based immigration system to interact with the Kickstart Scheme.

The Government set out its plans for the UK’s Points-Based Immigration System in the February Policy Statement and the July Further Details document, including the salary requirement for new entrants to the UK’s labour market, the definition of which is based on the advice of the Migration Advisory Committee.

An impact assessment was published to accompany the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill, and a further impact assessment will be published to accompany the Immigration Rules for the new Skilled Worker route when they are laid. There will be no numerical limit on the number of new entrant workers who can be sponsored; however, the offer is limited in length and new entrants must meet mandatory Skilled Worker route requirements.

The Government encourages employers to look to recruit resident workers wherever possible. The Kickstart scheme offers financial support to employers who create jobs for young Universal Credit claimants. This support is not available for sponsoring migrant new entrants. Employers will need to meet the full wage costs of their sponsored new entrants, as well as paying the Immigration Skills Charge. This provides a double financial incentive to recruit unemployed young people who are already in the UK, rather than looking to overseas recruitment

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
19th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of young workers overseas who would qualify as "new entrants" to the UK labour market under the planned criteria for their points-based immigration system.

The Government set out its plans for the UK’s Points-Based Immigration System in the February Policy Statement and the July Further Details document, including the salary requirement for new entrants to the UK’s labour market, the definition of which is based on the advice of the Migration Advisory Committee.

An impact assessment was published to accompany the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill, and a further impact assessment will be published to accompany the Immigration Rules for the new Skilled Worker route when they are laid. There will be no numerical limit on the number of new entrant workers who can be sponsored; however, the offer is limited in length and new entrants must meet mandatory Skilled Worker route requirements.

The Government encourages employers to look to recruit resident workers wherever possible. The Kickstart scheme offers financial support to employers who create jobs for young Universal Credit claimants. This support is not available for sponsoring migrant new entrants. Employers will need to meet the full wage costs of their sponsored new entrants, as well as paying the Immigration Skills Charge. This provides a double financial incentive to recruit unemployed young people who are already in the UK, rather than looking to overseas recruitment

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
19th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of young workers from overseas who will be recruited by British employers to work in the UK as "new entrants" as part of their points-based immigration system.

The Government set out its plans for the UK’s Points-Based Immigration System in the February Policy Statement and the July Further Details document, including the salary requirement for new entrants to the UK’s labour market, the definition of which is based on the advice of the Migration Advisory Committee.

An impact assessment was published to accompany the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill, and a further impact assessment will be published to accompany the Immigration Rules for the new Skilled Worker route when they are laid. There will be no numerical limit on the number of new entrant workers who can be sponsored; however, the offer is limited in length and new entrants must meet mandatory Skilled Worker route requirements.

The Government encourages employers to look to recruit resident workers wherever possible. The Kickstart scheme offers financial support to employers who create jobs for young Universal Credit claimants. This support is not available for sponsoring migrant new entrants. Employers will need to meet the full wage costs of their sponsored new entrants, as well as paying the Immigration Skills Charge. This provides a double financial incentive to recruit unemployed young people who are already in the UK, rather than looking to overseas recruitment

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
19th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to limit the number of “new entrant” workers permitted to migrate to the UK for work; and if so, what is that limit.

The Government set out its plans for the UK’s Points-Based Immigration System in the February Policy Statement and the July Further Details document, including the salary requirement for new entrants to the UK’s labour market, the definition of which is based on the advice of the Migration Advisory Committee.

An impact assessment was published to accompany the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill, and a further impact assessment will be published to accompany the Immigration Rules for the new Skilled Worker route when they are laid. There will be no numerical limit on the number of new entrant workers who can be sponsored; however, the offer is limited in length and new entrants must meet mandatory Skilled Worker route requirements.

The Government encourages employers to look to recruit resident workers wherever possible. The Kickstart scheme offers financial support to employers who create jobs for young Universal Credit claimants. This support is not available for sponsoring migrant new entrants. Employers will need to meet the full wage costs of their sponsored new entrants, as well as paying the Immigration Skills Charge. This provides a double financial incentive to recruit unemployed young people who are already in the UK, rather than looking to overseas recruitment

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how long successful new entrants under the points-based immigration scheme will be able to stay in the UK.

The Government set out its plans for the UK’s future points-based immigration system in the Policy Statement published on 19 February. The definition of new entrants will be based on the advice provided by the Migration Advisory Committee in its most recent report, which includes retaining the current upper age of 26 but also allowing new entrants to qualify in other ways, for example if they are taking up a postdoctoral position.

The salary requirement for new entrants will be set 30% lower than the rate for experienced workers in any occupation, but must still meet the minimum salary threshold of £20,480. New entrants will be able to extend their stay and settle in the UK, just as others in the Skilled Worker route, but their sponsors must increase their pay to the level required for experienced workers.

The Policy Statement indicated our intention to remove the resident labour market test. An impact assessment will be published to accompany the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the salary threshold for new entrants under the points-based immigration system will be; and what assessment they have made of how that relates to the living wage in (1) London, and (2) the rest of the UK.

The Government set out its plans for the UK’s future points-based immigration system in the Policy Statement published on 19 February. The definition of new entrants will be based on the advice provided by the Migration Advisory Committee in its most recent report, which includes retaining the current upper age of 26 but also allowing new entrants to qualify in other ways, for example if they are taking up a postdoctoral position.

The salary requirement for new entrants will be set 30% lower than the rate for experienced workers in any occupation, but must still meet the minimum salary threshold of £20,480. New entrants will be able to extend their stay and settle in the UK, just as others in the Skilled Worker route, but their sponsors must increase their pay to the level required for experienced workers.

The Policy Statement indicated our intention to remove the resident labour market test. An impact assessment will be published to accompany the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what requirements, if any, there will be, as part of their new immigration system, for businesses to advertise jobs in the UK before recruiting overseas.

The Government set out its plans for the UK’s future points-based immigration system in the Policy Statement published on 19 February. The definition of new entrants will be based on the advice provided by the Migration Advisory Committee in its most recent report, which includes retaining the current upper age of 26 but also allowing new entrants to qualify in other ways, for example if they are taking up a postdoctoral position.

The salary requirement for new entrants will be set 30% lower than the rate for experienced workers in any occupation, but must still meet the minimum salary threshold of £20,480. New entrants will be able to extend their stay and settle in the UK, just as others in the Skilled Worker route, but their sponsors must increase their pay to the level required for experienced workers.

The Policy Statement indicated our intention to remove the resident labour market test. An impact assessment will be published to accompany the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the age limit for new entrants under the points-based immigration system will be.

The Government set out its plans for the UK’s future points-based immigration system in the Policy Statement published on 19 February. The definition of new entrants will be based on the advice provided by the Migration Advisory Committee in its most recent report, which includes retaining the current upper age of 26 but also allowing new entrants to qualify in other ways, for example if they are taking up a postdoctoral position.

The salary requirement for new entrants will be set 30% lower than the rate for experienced workers in any occupation, but must still meet the minimum salary threshold of £20,480. New entrants will be able to extend their stay and settle in the UK, just as others in the Skilled Worker route, but their sponsors must increase their pay to the level required for experienced workers.

The Policy Statement indicated our intention to remove the resident labour market test. An impact assessment will be published to accompany the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of people who will enter the UK each year as new entrants under the points-based immigration system, broken down by country of origin.

The Government set out its plans for the UK’s future points-based immigration system in the Policy Statement published on 19 February. The definition of new entrants will be based on the advice provided by the Migration Advisory Committee in its most recent report, which includes retaining the current upper age of 26 but also allowing new entrants to qualify in other ways, for example if they are taking up a postdoctoral position.

The salary requirement for new entrants will be set 30% lower than the rate for experienced workers in any occupation, but must still meet the minimum salary threshold of £20,480. New entrants will be able to extend their stay and settle in the UK, just as others in the Skilled Worker route, but their sponsors must increase their pay to the level required for experienced workers.

The Policy Statement indicated our intention to remove the resident labour market test. An impact assessment will be published to accompany the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
29th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they propose to publish the new immigration rules that will come into effect on 1 January 2021; what arrangements will be made for Parliamentary scrutiny of those rules; and how they intend to seek Parliamentary approval of them.

Parliament will be able to scrutinise and approve any statement of changes to the Immigration Rules under the normal process in due course.

We are reviewing the approach to Parliamentary engagement on the future immigration system, and further announcements will be made in due course.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reduce the overall number of migrants coming to the UK following the end of free movement.

The Government’s election manifesto set out plans for a new immigration system that will give us full control over who is coming in and going out and will lead to an overall reduction in numbers.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
14th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government who has held office since 1 October 1993 as the minister responsible for housing; and what were the dates of their appointment.

The Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities does not maintain an historical list of ministerial appointments and the dates of those appointments. Such information is publicly available through a variety of sources.

Lord Evans of Rainow
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether BN(O) citizens who have arrived from Hong Kong are required to become British citizens before they can register to vote in a UK general election.

British Nationals Overseas (BN(O)s) who have arrived from Hong Kong are not required to become British Citizens in order to register to vote in UK general elections.

Although BN(O)s are not classed as British citizens, the British Nationality Act 1981 determines that they have the status of Commonwealth citizens. This means that Hong Kong BN(O)s, with leave to enter or remain in the UK, are entitled to register to vote as an elector in UK parliamentary elections, providing they fulfil the age and residence requirements for such registration and are not subject to any other legal incapacity.