Lord Goddard of Stockport Portrait

Lord Goddard of Stockport

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

Became Member: 15th September 2014


Built Environment Committee
31st Jan 2023 - 11th May 2023
Delegated Powers and Regulatory Reform Committee
1st Jul 2019 - 31st Jan 2023
Land Use in England Committee
19th Jan 2022 - 28th Nov 2022
High Speed Rail (West Midlands - Crewe) Bill Select Committee (Lords)
5th Mar 2020 - 14th Oct 2020
Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee
8th Jun 2015 - 1st Jul 2019
SLSC Sub-Committee B
4th Sep 2018 - 30th Apr 2019
Refreshment Committee (Lords)
8th Jun 2015 - 31st Aug 2016


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 6th February 2024
Electoral Commission Strategy and Policy Statement
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 57 Liberal Democrat Aye votes vs 0 Liberal Democrat No votes
Tally: Ayes - 175 Noes - 159
Speeches
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Avanti Trains
My Lords, if the House were sitting for five days next week and the Minister had Questions every day, and …
Written Answers
Thursday 21st December 2023
Bank Services: Cryptoassets
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) the crypto and digital asset industry, and (2) …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Goddard of Stockport has voted in 438 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

22 Feb 2022 - Procedure and Privileges Committee - View Vote Context
Lord Goddard of Stockport voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Liberal Democrat No votes vs 29 Liberal Democrat Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 144 Noes - 133
View All Lord Goddard of Stockport Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Vere of Norbiton (Conservative)
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
(12 debate interactions)
Lord Greenhalgh (Conservative)
(10 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
(6 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Legislation Debates
Finance Act 2020
(1,488 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Goddard of Stockport's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Goddard of Stockport, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Lord Goddard of Stockport has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Goddard of Stockport has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


55 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3rd Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how many incidences of subsea cables being damaged there have been within the UK's Exclusive Economic Zone in the last 10 years; and how many were attributable to (1) UK fishing trawlers, and (2) non-UK actors.

Information on the number of cable damages is not held. Subsea cable operators have arrangements in place to ensure a prompt response to damage or disruption, drawing upon national and international cable laying and repair companies.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
24th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what directions they intend to give Ofgem to reduce or abolish standing charges, to ease the financial burden on consumers, particularly the poorest.

Ofgem is an independent regulator and is directly accountable to Parliament. There are no plans to give directions to Ofgem to change the approach to standing charges.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
24th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what directions they intend to give Ofcom to reduce or abolish standing charges, to ease the financial burden on consumers, particularly the poorest.

Standing charges are not a feature in the telecommunications sector. Fixed broadband and landline suppliers charge a line rental fee which are set out in the terms and conditions that customers agree to when taking out their service.

We have taken steps to address the affordability concerns of people from low-income households. We have successfully negotiated with providers to introduce a range of low-cost, high-quality social tariffs for as little as £10 for people on Universal Credit and other means-tested benefits. We also secured a set of commitments from broadband and mobile providers to support people through the global rise in the cost of living. These commitments include more manageable payment plans and allowing households to switch to cheaper packages without penalty.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what directions they intend to give Ofwat to reduce or abolish standing charges, to ease the financial burden on consumers, particularly the poorest.

Ofwat and the Consumer Council for Water (CCW) wrote to water companies on 18th October 2022 regarding water bills and requested companies to:

  • show that they understand the needs of their customers and respond accordingly;
  • ensure that more customers are benefiting from support measures;
  • consider how they can mitigate any significant inflationary increases in customers' bills for 2023-24; and
  • to set out, by 8th December, their plans for supporting customers through current cost of living pressures.

Defra expects all companies to make sure households are aware of the support schemes available to help those struggling to pay their bills. That includes bill discount schemes such as Watersure and social tariffs, payment holidays, adjusting payment plans and getting support for customers on managing their personal finances.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Sep 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effectiveness of OFWAT in relation to the imposition of obligations on water companies to reduce losses through leakages over the last three years.

The Environment Secretary made it clear that water companies must improve their environmental performance and deliver more for customers.

Water companies have targets set by Ofwat that they need to meet (performance commitments), and reducing leakage is one of these. They face automatic financial penalties when these are missed.

Ofwat also has enforcement powers in regard to legal obligations companies have in legislation or their license. If a company significantly misses its leakage performance commitment this could indicate the company might be breaching a legal obligation, which would prompt Ofwat to investigate further.

Ofwat has already put in place clear financial consequences for companies that underperform on leakage. For example, in 2018 Thames Water was found to have breached its general duty under Section 37 of the Water Industry Act 1991 in regard to leakage. Enforcement action resulted in them paying rebates totalling £120 million back to customers, comprising underperformance penalties of £55 million and an additional £65 million to reflect failures of the company.

Ofwat has also set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. Water companies have committed to delivering a 50% reduction in leakage from 2017 to 2018 levels by 2050, and we expect Ofwat to challenge companies to deliver this and monitor progress.

In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s proposed Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2037. This includes a 31.3% reduction in leakage by 2037, a pathway for companies to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Sep 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what direction they have given, if any, to OFWAT to increase the penalties imposed on water companies for failing to rectify or prevent water leakages.

The Environment Secretary made it clear that water companies must improve their environmental performance and deliver more for customers.

Water companies have targets set by Ofwat that they need to meet (performance commitments), and reducing leakage is one of these. They face automatic financial penalties when these are missed.

Ofwat also has enforcement powers in regard to legal obligations companies have in legislation or their license. If a company significantly misses its leakage performance commitment this could indicate the company might be breaching a legal obligation, which would prompt Ofwat to investigate further.

Ofwat has already put in place clear financial consequences for companies that underperform on leakage. For example, in 2018 Thames Water was found to have breached its general duty under Section 37 of the Water Industry Act 1991 in regard to leakage. Enforcement action resulted in them paying rebates totalling £120 million back to customers, comprising underperformance penalties of £55 million and an additional £65 million to reflect failures of the company.

Ofwat has also set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. Water companies have committed to delivering a 50% reduction in leakage from 2017 to 2018 levels by 2050, and we expect Ofwat to challenge companies to deliver this and monitor progress.

In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s proposed Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2037. This includes a 31.3% reduction in leakage by 2037, a pathway for companies to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Sep 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for water, forestry, rural affairs and resource management on 30 June 2014 (202032), what recent assessment they have made of using Kielder Water as a water source linked to a national water grid; and what directives, if any, have been issued to water companies to ensure the subject is included in their Water Resources Management Plans.

In its 2019 Water Resources Management Plan (WRMP), Northumbrian Water identified a water surplus available for trading from the Kielder Water Resources Zone. However, no other water company took this forward, due to the costs of the project compared with alternate solutions to secure water supplies.

In line with the aims of the National Framework for Water Resources, the Water Resources North regional planning group is assessing how Kielder might be able to support national water resources resilience in the future. In the autumn of this year, we will see draft regional plans and 2024 WRMPs consulted on publicly, and we expect to see water transfers, bulk supplies and connections considered against all other options.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Sep 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) Ofwat, and (2) the Environment Agency, in 2022 about (a) leakages of potable water, (b) sewage discharge into rivers and seas, (c) shareholder dividends, (d) executive bonuses, and (e) gearing of balance sheets, by water companies; and what steps they took, if any, as a result of those discussions.

Officials regularly discuss with Ofwat and the Environment Agency a number of issues across the water sectors covering all of the subjects in your questions and more. As a result a number of steps have been taking, for example, launching the Storm Overflow Plan [ Storm overflows discharge reduction plan - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)], the consultation on introducing mandatory water efficiency labels [ UK mandatory water efficiency labelling - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)] and the Ofwat's consultation on dividends and company performance [ Consultation on proposed modifications to strengthen the ring-fencing licence conditions of the largest undertakers]. Copies of these documents are attached to this answer.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to appoint a replacement Trade Envoy to Morocco.

The Department for International Trade is constantly reviewing suitable markets to identify where the appointment of a Trade Envoy can be of greatest benefit to the trade and investment aims of the UK.

The former Trade Envoy to Morocco resigned on the 5th July and a recommendation will be made to the next Prime Minister in due course.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what is their justification for the further extension to the contract for Avanti West Coast, given its service record over the last six months.

Avanti West Coast (AWC) introduced a new timetable in December which amounted to an approximate 40 per cent increase in services. The first month did not see an improvement for passengers given the period of prolonged industrial action. Since then, AWC has demonstrated improvement in performance justifying an extension to October 2023, with cancellation rates falling to an average of 4.2 per cent in early March. AWC needs to do more to win back passengers with a reliable and dependable service.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
31st Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to propose further fiscal measures to widen bus use, such as supporting (1) reduced, or (2) free, fares for everyone (a) under 21, or (b) in full-time education.

The Department currently has no plans to offer universal free or reduced fares specifically to those under 21 or in full-time education.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
31st Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government when they will formally (1) announce, and (2) award, Bus Service Improvement Programme grants; and when the 34 areas chosen will receive (a) funding, or (b) written confirmation of funding.

34 places received an indicative funding allocation for their Bus Service Improvement Plan.

24 had their allocations confirmed in August. For 10 places we have had further questions to resolve with the authorities first. Decisions on confirming those allocations will be made in due course.

Delivery of most of the allocated funding is conditional on the submission of a robust and ambitious Enhanced Partnership between the local council and bus operators. We are working closely with stakeholders to ensure these are in place, with the first round of grants expected to be released in November. Two locations are pursuing a system of franchising, for which the release of funding is conditional on adequate mechanisms being in place to deliver the improvement plan before franchising takes effect.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
31st Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government whether the grant funding within Bus Service Improvement Programmes is for physical measures only, or if it covers support for services too.

Bus Service Improvement Plan funding includes both capital funding for physical infrastructure, and revenue funding for fares measures and service enhancements.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
31st Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government whether any agreements for areas looking to form enhanced partnerships under the Bus Service Improvement Programme grants have been signed; whether they are (1) fully, or (2) partially, funded; and if they are partially funded, what levels of financial need are funded.

Bus Service Improvement Plans are intended to demonstrate Local Transport Authorities’ vision for bus in local areas, and to draw on a number of funding sources over the long-term.

All 79 Local Transport Authorities in England outside London are pursuing either an Enhanced Partnership or developing a business case for franchising to deliver their bus services. 34 places have been allocated funding from the £1.1 billion Bus Service Improvement Plan budget.

Around half of the Local Transport Authorities that are pursuing Enhanced Partnerships have completed them so far. Bus Service Improvement Plan funding, in conjunction with City Region Sustainable Transport Settlements for Mayoral Combined Authorities, will support local bus transformation but is not intended necessarily to entirely fund all projects.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how has the value of the basic state pension altered as a percentage of average national earnings since 2010.

The basic State Pension rate as a percentage of mean earnings is set out below.

Date of Uprating

Basic State Pension Rate as a percentage of mean earnings (%)

April 2010

16.3

April 2011

16.9

April 2012

17.7

April 2013

17.8

April 2014

18.2

April 2015

18.5

April 2016

18.5

April 2017

18.5

April 2018

18.4

April 2019

18.4

April 2020

19.0

April 2021

18.9

Source: Abstract of DWP benefit ratestatistics 2021 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings: Earnings and hours worked, all employees: ASHE Table 1 - Office for National Statistics (ons.gov.uk)

The basic State Pension is payable to those who reached State Pension age before 6 April 2016. It should be noted that some individuals may also be receiving the earnings-related additional State Pension (SERPS and/or State Second Pension (S2P)) or if they were contracted out of the additional State Pension, a private pension instead. Some individuals may also be receiving Graduated Retirement Benefit.

18th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of decisions by some banks to introduce limits or restrictions on cryptocurrency transactions.

The government takes the issue of bank account access very seriously, and that is why the Chancellor asked the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to help us collect evidence to understand where account closures or refusals are happening and why.

The FCA’s interim report (“UK Payment Accounts: Access and Closures”) set out areas for further consideration by government in relation to business accounts and we are continuing to explore this issue.

HM Treasury acknowledges concerns regarding how banks’ decisions affect access to accounts and consumer payments to cryptoasset firms. However, it would not be appropriate for the government to intervene in commercial decisions taken by banks.

The government is committed to supporting safe innovation within our financial technology sector; HM Treasury regularly engages with a range of stakeholders in the cryptoasset sector and is also progressing work on legislation to implement its proposals for the future financial services regulatory regime for cryptoassets, which will bring a number of cryptoasset activities into the regulatory perimeter for financial services for the first time.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have plans to bring forward regulation to ensure that crypto and digital asset businesses can open a UK bank account.

The government takes the issue of bank account access very seriously, and that is why the Chancellor asked the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to help us collect evidence to understand where account closures or refusals are happening and why.

The FCA’s interim report (“UK Payment Accounts: Access and Closures”) set out areas for further consideration by government in relation to business accounts and we are continuing to explore this issue.

HM Treasury acknowledges concerns regarding how banks’ decisions affect access to accounts and consumer payments to cryptoasset firms. However, it would not be appropriate for the government to intervene in commercial decisions taken by banks.

The government is committed to supporting safe innovation within our financial technology sector; HM Treasury regularly engages with a range of stakeholders in the cryptoasset sector and is also progressing work on legislation to implement its proposals for the future financial services regulatory regime for cryptoassets, which will bring a number of cryptoasset activities into the regulatory perimeter for financial services for the first time.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to issuing guidance to UK banks in relation to providing access to bank accounts for crypto and digital asset businesses.

The government takes the issue of bank account access very seriously, and that is why the Chancellor asked the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to help us collect evidence to understand where account closures or refusals are happening and why.

The FCA’s interim report (“UK Payment Accounts: Access and Closures”) set out areas for further consideration by government in relation to business accounts and we are continuing to explore this issue.

HM Treasury acknowledges concerns regarding how banks’ decisions affect access to accounts and consumer payments to cryptoasset firms. However, it would not be appropriate for the government to intervene in commercial decisions taken by banks.

The government is committed to supporting safe innovation within our financial technology sector; HM Treasury regularly engages with a range of stakeholders in the cryptoasset sector and is also progressing work on legislation to implement its proposals for the future financial services regulatory regime for cryptoassets, which will bring a number of cryptoasset activities into the regulatory perimeter for financial services for the first time.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) the crypto and digital asset industry, and (2) the UK banking industry, regarding access to UK bank accounts for crypto and digital asset business.

The government takes the issue of bank account access very seriously, and that is why the Chancellor asked the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to help us collect evidence to understand where account closures or refusals are happening and why.

The FCA’s interim report (“UK Payment Accounts: Access and Closures”) set out areas for further consideration by government in relation to business accounts and we are continuing to explore this issue.

HM Treasury acknowledges concerns regarding how banks’ decisions affect access to accounts and consumer payments to cryptoasset firms. However, it would not be appropriate for the government to intervene in commercial decisions taken by banks.

The government is committed to supporting safe innovation within our financial technology sector; HM Treasury regularly engages with a range of stakeholders in the cryptoasset sector and is also progressing work on legislation to implement its proposals for the future financial services regulatory regime for cryptoassets, which will bring a number of cryptoasset activities into the regulatory perimeter for financial services for the first time.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports that many UK crypto and digital asset businesses are unable to open a UK bank account.

The government takes the issue of bank account access very seriously, and that is why the Chancellor asked the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to help us collect evidence to understand where account closures or refusals are happening and why.

The FCA’s interim report (“UK Payment Accounts: Access and Closures”) set out areas for further consideration by government in relation to business accounts and we are continuing to explore this issue.

HM Treasury acknowledges concerns regarding how banks’ decisions affect access to accounts and consumer payments to cryptoasset firms. However, it would not be appropriate for the government to intervene in commercial decisions taken by banks.

The government is committed to supporting safe innovation within our financial technology sector; HM Treasury regularly engages with a range of stakeholders in the cryptoasset sector and is also progressing work on legislation to implement its proposals for the future financial services regulatory regime for cryptoassets, which will bring a number of cryptoasset activities into the regulatory perimeter for financial services for the first time.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how many (1) undocumented migrants, and (2) refugees, entering the UK in the last five years were nationals of (a) European, (b) African, and (c) Asian countries.

In your question we have interpreted ‘undocumented’ as meaning people who are detected entering the UK who do not carry valid documentation which entitles them to come to the UK, and therefore are termed ‘irregular’ arrivals.

The Home Office publishes data on irregular arrivals to the UK in the quarterly Irregular Migration to the UK release which can be found on gov.uk. Data on small boat arrivals by nationality are published on gov.uk.

If by ‘undocumented’ arrivals you meant undetected arrivals, we cannot provide this as by the very nature of these individuals going undetected, we hold no information on them. Please see the ‘About the statistics’ section of the Irregular Migration to the UK release on gov.uk for more information on what the statistics do and do not include.

Information on asylum cases is published in the Immigration statistics quarterly release on gov.uk.

3rd Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what is the breakdown by (1) sex, and (2) age, of (a) undocumented migrants, and (b) refugees, who have arrived in the UK in each of the last five years.

In your question we have interpreted ‘undocumented’ as meaning people who are detected entering the UK who do not carry valid documentation which entitles them to come to the UK, and therefore are termed ‘irregular’ arrivals.

The Home Office publishes data on irregular arrivals to the UK in the quarterly Irregular Migration to the UK release which can be found on gov.uk. Data on small boat arrivals by nationality are published on gov.uk.

If by ‘undocumented’ arrivals you meant undetected arrivals, we cannot provide this as by the very nature of these individuals going undetected, we hold no information on them. Please see the ‘About the statistics’ section of the Irregular Migration to the UK release on gov.uk for more information on what the statistics do and do not include.

Information on asylum cases is published in the Immigration statistics quarterly release on gov.uk.

26th Sep 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how much money has been reimbursed for payments to people volunteering accommodation to Afghan refugees to date; and what liabilities have been incurred in this respect.

Afghan families are provided with safe and clean accommodation in hotels, which are procured through Crown Commercial and contracting partners, whilst officials work to source appropriate settled accommodation for them. Those temporarily living in a hotel have access to healthcare, education, any essential items they need, as well as employment opportunities or Universal Credit.

Whilst we cannot comment on individual contracts, please be assured that the Home Office works hard to secure contracts that offer the best value for money, whilst providing an appropriate level of support to those under our care.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many mine-resistant vehicles procured for operations in Afghanistan remain in storage; which vehicle types they are; and what consideration they have given to supplying such vehicles to the government of Ukraine.

Mastiff, Ridgback, Wolfhound (MRW), High Mobility Tactical Vehicle (Jackal, Coyote), Foxhound and Husky are all protected mobility platforms procured for operations in Afghanistan.

Husky is no longer an in-service platform and is held entirely within the disposals fleet. I am withholding the numbers of the remaining in-service platforms held in storage as disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness, or security of the Armed Forces.

Granting in Kind activity has considered each of the above platforms in detail, with Mastiff, Wolfhound and Husky forming significant elements of the UK's first two tranches of support to Ukraine.

18th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many of the 227 Challenger tanks originally procured for the army (1) remain in service, and (2) are currently serviceable.

408 Challenger 2 Main Battle Tanks were originally procured for the Army in the 1990s. 227 platforms remain in the Army's current active fleet.

18th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to upgrade the Royal Air Force Typhoon aircraft; and what are the numbers per annum for the type leaving service in future.

Withdrawing the Tranche 1 Typhoon aircraft enables the reinvestment required in the rest of the Typhoon fleet out to its out of service date. There are 30 Typhoon in Tranche 1. On current plans, the bulk of the Typhoon Tranche 1 aircraft will go out of service on 31 March 2025, whilst four will be retained until 2027.

10th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to upgrade the Royal Air Force Typhoon aircraft; and how many of those aircraft left service in each of the past five years.

In July 2022, the Ministry of Defence announced a further £2.35 billion investment in Typhoon, including fitting an electronically scanned radar, the European Common Radar System (ECRS) Mk2, as well as other improvements under the Phase 4 Enhancement aircraft upgrade package.

On current planning the bulk of the Typhoon Tranche 1 aircraft will go out of service on 31 March 2025, whilst four will be retained until 2027. As the Tranche 1 fleet draws down, aircraft will undergo a Reduce To Produce programme to strip them of useable parts after which they will be sent for disposal action.

The retirement of Typhoon Tranche 1 will enable further investment in Typhoon Tranche 2 and 3.

9th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many hours were flown by Royal Air Force Typhoon aircraft during 2022.

The number of hours flown by the RAF Typhoon fleet is given below:

Financial Year

Flying Hours1

2021-22

21,360

2022-232

15,710

  1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  2. 1 April to 31 December 2022.
9th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many Royal Air Force reservists at the end of 2022 had qualified to fly Typhoon aircraft during their service.

I am withholding the information requested as its disclosure would, or would be likely to prejudice the capability, effectiveness or the security of the Armed Forces.

9th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many Typhoon aircraft, in service with the Royal Air Force, were deployed abroad at the end of 2022.

As at 13 January 2023 a total of 27 RAF Typhoon aircraft are deployed overseas. In addition, further Typhoon aircraft are conducting operational missions from their home bases in the UK, undertaking Quick Reaction Alert and contributing to the security of NATO's Eastern flank.

9th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many Royal Air Force pilots were qualified to fly Typhoon aircraft operationally at the end of 2022.

I am withholding the information requested as its disclosure would, or would be likely to prejudice the capability, effectiveness or the security of the Armed Forces.

9th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what is their current estimate of the support costs for Royal Air Force Typhoon aircraft per flying hour; and how this compares with the original estimate when the aircraft were procured.

I refer the Noble Lord to the Answer I gave to the Noble Lord, Lord Moonie on 8 October 2020, to Question HL 8679. Support costs are based on engineering and support requirements and are not correlated with flying hours.

7th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to increase the number of River-class patrol vessels.

There are currently no plans to increase the number of River-class Offshore Patrol Vessels. The National Shipbuilding Strategy sets out the pipeline of future Royal Navy procurements.

7th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of basing Royal Navy Lynx Wildcat helicopters on the east coast to reduce flight times to Critical National Infrastructure in the North Sea and environs.

Royal Navy assets are based at locations where they can be logistically supported and are at their most agile. The Wildcat Maritime Force, which is based at the Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton, is one of a range of assets held at high readiness that could be deployed by the Royal Navy to respond to any threat in UK waters.

7th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of enhancing River-Class Offshore Patrol Vessels to protect Critical National Infrastructure in the North Sea and environs.

The Royal Navy constantly assess the optimal mix of platforms and capabilities required to deliver its outputs, including Homeland defence and underwater and seabed infrastructure protection. The Royal Navy's Offshore Patrol Vessels safeguard our territorial waters, protect fishing stocks and perform constabulary duties both in UK waters and overseas. They are not currently assessed as the optimal means of protecting our underwater and seabed infrastructure, but we keep this under constant review.

The Government have accelerated the acquisition of two Multi-Role Ocean Surveillance ships in order to protect Critical National Infrastructure such as subsea cables and pipelines.

7th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the UK’s participation in the European Sky Shield Initiative on the UK’s “Team Complex Weapons”.

The UK Ministry of Defence (MOD) is proactively engaging in the European Sky Shield Initiative in support of its current Land Ground Based Air Defence programme. In so doing, the UK MOD is looking to identify opportunities with its European partners to build on and strengthen the UK's Team Complex Weapons portfolio.

5th Sep 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the UK's fleet of F35B jet fighters has been supplied with the software necessary to allow fully autonomous mission planning.

The UK Lightning Force is designed, operated and supported in a manner which provides full Sovereign freedom of action in all operational contexts, from mission planning through to execution.

5th Sep 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what measures they have taken to increase the (1) availability, and (2) use of, the British Army's Armoured Fighting Vehicles fleet.

To meet the current and future threats, the Army is aiming to be "More Ready", which includes increasing the availability and readiness of our Armoured Fighting Vehicle fleet (AFVs).

In addition to increased activity across Europe in support of NATO, there has also been a significant increase in the Armoured Fighting Vehicles (AFVs) placed within units. This means the vehicles are maintained and utilised more by personnel, rather than being held in storage. Similarly, an enlarged training fleet of AFVs has allowed for increased AFV driver and commander training to be carried out.

20th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the (1) proportion, and (2) absolute value, of Ministry of Defence spend on procurement of goods and services that were denominated in dollars for 2021–22; and what is anticipated for 2022–23.

For financial year (FY) 2021-22, the Departmental spend on the procurement of goods and services in dollars was around USD$5.3 billion, which is approximately 8.4% of the total £46 billion Defence budget. For FY 2022-23, the Department does not routinely release forecast spending figures.

20th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which departmental budget funds the purchases of military equipment from third (1) nations, or (2) parties, for onward supply to Ukraine; and what is the current anticipated spend in 2022–23.

Her Majesty's Treasury are funding all Ukraine associated procurement. The Department does not routinely release forecast spending figures and all spend in the current financial year will be captured and published in the Department's Annual Reports and Accounts in due course.

18th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the status of their Single Living Accommodation Modernisation (SLAM) programme.

The Single Living Accommodation Modernisation (SLAM) Programme is complete.

The SLAM Programme was a 10 year contract awarded by the Ministry of Defence in 2002. In late 2012, during the last six months of the contract, 14 new build projects were added. Design and construction of these projects followed with completion in 2016. The Final Account of the SLAM Programme took place in 2017.

The SLAM Programme was one of the largest new build and refurbishment programmes in the UK and delivered successful renovations and constructions on 52 locations from Scotland to Cornwall. 121 separate projects improved or created more than 22,000 bedspaces.

18th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money they plan to invest in improving and replacing living accommodation in barracks and married quarters for Armed Forces personnel in 2022/23.

£460.358 million of investment is planned to improve and replace Single Living Accommodation and Service Family Accommodation across the UK Defence Estate for Armed Forces personnel in Financial Year 2022-23.

18th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money they invested in improving and replacing living accommodation in barracks and married quarters for Armed Forces personnel in 2021/22.

£284.875 million has been invested in improving and replacing Single Living Accommodation and Service Family Accommodation for Armed Forces personnel across the UK Defence Estate in Financial Year 2021-22.

18th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people leaving the Armed Forces last year cited the quality of accommodation as one of the reasons for leaving.

The requested information can be found on page 12 of the 2022-Armed Forces Continuous Attitudes Survey (AFCAS) results:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1075579/Armed_Forces_Continuous_Attitude_Survey_2022_Main_Report.pdf

26 per cent of personnel cited accommodation provision as a factor influencing their intention to leave versus 37 per cent citing it as a factor influencing their intention to stay.

15th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what military exercises they plan to conduct with allies during the rest of this year; and how many British participants will be in each exercise.

81 military exercises are planned to be conducted with allies during the rest of this year. Circa 14,500 British Service Personnel with participate across these exercises.



15th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what military exercises they have conducted with allies so far this year; and how many British participants were deployed.

71 military exercises have been conducted with allies and partners so far this year. Circa 17,000 British Service Personnel were deployed.



1st Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how they intend to address inequalities in Fire Authority budgets in (1) the Fair Funding Review, and (2) the 2023/24 Local Government Finance Settlement, to ensure funding is fairly distributed on the basis of (a) local levels of deprivation and need, and (b) rates of price inflation and wage inflation.

The Government is committed to ensuring funding allocations are based on an up-to-date assessment of councils’ needs and resources. We will always work with local partners, including Fire and Rescue Authorities, to take stock of the challenges and opportunities they face as part of any potential reforms to local authority funding.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
26th Sep 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to introducing a mandatory requirement to include water capture capabilities in all new build residential properties.

In July 2021 the Government issued a Written Ministerial Statement, which can be found (attached) here: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2021-07-01/hcws140 , on reducing demand for water in response to the Defra consultation on 'measures to reduce personal water consumption'. Within this statement, we committed to developing a roadmap towards greater water efficiency in new developments and retrofits, including the exploration of revised building regulations and how the development of new technologies can contribute to meeting these standards. We will ensure that the underlying legislation can, where appropriate, accommodate any potential future expansion of rainwater harvesting, water re-use and storage options. We plan to publish this roadmap by the end of 2022.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what additional funds they will make available to Housing Associations to enable them (1) to increase their stock of properties ahead of proposals on extending Right-to-Buy, and (2) to offset the impact on their balance sheets.

This Government is committed to the Right to Buy, which has helped nearly two million social housing tenants to realise their dream of home ownership.

We want housing association tenants to have the same opportunity as local authority tenants and to be able to enjoy the benefits that homeownership brings. That is why the Prime Minister announced on the 9 June 2022 the intention to extend the Right to Buy to housing association tenants.

We will work closely with the housing association sector on the design of the scheme, including consideration of the impact on housing association stock levels and their balance sheets. We will make sure that the scheme is designed in a way that enables the homes sold to be replaced one-for-one, and we will produce a full impact assessment of this policy in due course, ahead of the scheme’s introduction.

15th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what impact assessment they have carried out on proposals to strengthen tenants' rights on the stock of private homes available to rent.

We will publish an impact assessment as the Bill passes through Parliament, which will set out the costs and benefits and overall impact on the sector including both tenants and landlords. Our White Paper is based on a balanced package of reforms that support both tenants and landlords, drawing from the experience of reforms in other parts of the United Kingdom.

15th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the future demand for homes to rent.

The English Housing Survey provides information on housing stock. The proportion of Private Rented Sector (PRS) households has remained relatively stable for nearly a decade. The PRS was 19% of stock in 2013-14, increased to 20% in 2015-16 and 2016-17 and then went back to 19% thereafter.

We continue to monitor the Office for National Statistics rental price statistics as an indicator of demand and will evaluate the impact of the private rented reforms on the sector.

15th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the stock of private homes available to rent following changes to regulations regarding buy-to-let accommodation.

Since 2010, there have been a range of policy changes affecting private landlords. These include tax changes for buy-to-let landlords, changes to the Stamp Duty Land Tax, tightening lending criteria on buy-to-let mortgages and the growing role of the build-to-rent sector.

The Private Rented Sector remains an important part of the housing market, with 4.4 million households currently in the Private Rented Sector. The proportion of PRS households has remained relatively stable for nearly a decade, as evidenced through the English Housing Survey. According to the English Private Landlord Survey (2021) over half (57%) of landlords had a buy-to-let mortgage, representing 68% of tenancies, indicating that buy-to-let landlords continue to invest.