Lord Fox

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)

(since June 2017)
1 APPG membership (as of 22 Jul 2022)
Motor
3 Former APPG memberships
Apprenticeships, Digital Currencies, Electric Aviation
Science and Technology Committee (Lords)
8th Jun 2015 - 1st Jul 2019


Department Event
Monday 5th September 2022
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Legislation - Main Chamber
Energy Bill [HL] - committee stage (day 1)
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Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 6th September 2022
15:00
Economic Affairs Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: UK labour supply
6 Sep 2022, 3 p.m.
At 3.00pm: Oral evidence
Mike Keoghan - Deputy National Statistician for Economic, Social and Environmental Statistics at Office for National Statistics
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Department Event
Wednesday 7th September 2022
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Legislation - Main Chamber
Energy Bill [HL] - committee stage (day 2)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Monday 12th September 2022
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Legislation - Main Chamber
Energy Bill [HL] - committee stage (day 3)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Tuesday 13th September 2022
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Orders and regulations - Grand Committee
Exclusivity Terms for Zero Hours Workers (Unenforceability and Redress) Regulations 2022
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Tuesday 13th September 2022
15:45
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Orders and regulations - Grand Committee
13 Sep 2022, 3:45 p.m.
Warm Home Discount (Scotland) Regulations 2022
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Wednesday 14th September 2022
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Legislation - Main Chamber
Energy Bill [HL] - committee stage (day 4)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Wednesday 6th July 2022
Procurement Bill [HL]
My Lords, at the beginning of the Committee the Minister had a teaser with his announcement. It is very clear …
Written Answers
Tuesday 25th January 2022
National Security
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many referrals have been called in to date following the implementation of the National …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Fox has voted in 301 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

22 Feb 2022 - Procedure and Privileges Committee - View Vote Context
Lord Fox voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Liberal Democrat No votes vs 29 Liberal Democrat Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 144 Noes - 133
View All Lord Fox Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(138 debate interactions)
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
(26 debate interactions)
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View all Lord Fox's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Fox, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Fox has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Fox has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Fox has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Fox has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


32 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many referrals have been called in to date following the implementation of the National Security and Investment Act 2021.

The National Security and Investment Act 2021 commenced on 4 January 2022 and represents the biggest shake-up of the UK’s investment screening regime in 20 years, while keeping the country firmly open for business.

The Act requires the Government to publish an annual report setting out information about the numbers and types of trigger events that it has been notified about and those it subsequently called in for a national security assessment. The first annual report will be published later in 2022, after the conclusion of the financial year.

We have ensured that we have the people, the technology and the processes we need so that the Investment Security Unit is as effective and efficient as possible.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) how many referrals have been received, and (2) what is the average wait time for processing cases, following the implementation of the National Security and Investment Act 2021.

The National Security and Investment Act 2021 commenced on 4 January 2022 and represents the biggest shake-up of the UK’s investment screening regime in 20 years, while keeping the country firmly open for business.

The Act requires the Government to publish an annual report setting out information about the numbers and types of trigger events that it has been notified about and those it subsequently called in for a national security assessment. The first annual report will be published later in 2022, after the conclusion of the financial year.

We have ensured that we have the people, the technology and the processes we need so that the Investment Security Unit is as effective and efficient as possible.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many additional people have been recruited by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy to staff the monitoring unit following the implementation of the National Security and Investment Act 2021.

The National Security and Investment Act 2021 commenced on 4 January 2022 and represents the biggest shake-up of the UK’s investment screening regime in 20 years, while keeping the country firmly open for business.

The Act requires the Government to publish an annual report setting out information about the numbers and types of trigger events that it has been notified about and those it subsequently called in for a national security assessment. The first annual report will be published later in 2022, after the conclusion of the financial year.

We have ensured that we have the people, the technology and the processes we need so that the Investment Security Unit is as effective and efficient as possible.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Competition and Markets Authority following Veolia's agreement to acquire SUEZ Group.

Competition investigations into mergers are a matter for the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), which is an independent non-Ministerial department. In the normal course of an investigation, the CMA may reach out to relevant stakeholders, including other regulators or relevant government departments to assist in its understanding of the market. The CMA is currently considering whether to refer Veolia’s acquisition of a minority shareholding in Suez and Veolia’s proposed public takeover bid for the remaining share capital of Suez for an in-depth review. The CMA will publish updates on its review of this transaction on its website.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had about possible anti-trust issues following Veolia's agreement to acquire SUEZ Group.

Competition investigations into mergers are a matter for the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), which is an independent non-Ministerial department. In the normal course of an investigation, the CMA may reach out to relevant stakeholders, including other regulators or relevant government departments to assist in its understanding of the market. The CMA is currently considering whether to refer Veolia’s acquisition of a minority shareholding in Suez and Veolia’s proposed public takeover bid for the remaining share capital of Suez for an in-depth review. The CMA will publish updates on its review of this transaction on its website.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to enforce the right of data portability and other interoperability requirements to ensure that individuals with existing devices and tools such as smart meters can exercise this right.

Under Article 20 of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), consumers have the right to obtain and reuse their personal data, including smart metering consumption data that they have provided to the energy supplier. Energy consumers’ rights under the GDPR are not affected by switching energy supplier.

In order to ensure that energy consumers have control over their energy consumption data, the Government established the smart metering Data Access and Privacy Framework, which is implemented through energy licences and codes and complements wider data protection legislation. Energy suppliers are required to make available to domestic consumers with meters in smart mode, upon request, up to 24 months of data relating to consumption in each day, week, month and year. The data must be made available free of charge and in a readily understandable format.

The Information Commissioner's Office is responsible for upholding information rights, while the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets is responsible for regulating energy suppliers’ compliance with licence obligations.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the ability of consumers to exercise their right to data portability under Article 20 of the General Data Protection Regulation when switching between energy suppliers using smart meters, and (2) whether such switches are being hindered by a lack of compliance by energy companies with this right.

Under Article 20 of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), consumers have the right to obtain and reuse their personal data, including smart metering consumption data that they have provided to the energy supplier. Energy consumers’ rights under the GDPR are not affected by switching energy supplier.

In order to ensure that energy consumers have control over their energy consumption data, the Government established the smart metering Data Access and Privacy Framework, which is implemented through energy licences and codes and complements wider data protection legislation. Energy suppliers are required to make available to domestic consumers with meters in smart mode, upon request, up to 24 months of data relating to consumption in each day, week, month and year. The data must be made available free of charge and in a readily understandable format.

The Information Commissioner's Office is responsible for upholding information rights, while the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets is responsible for regulating energy suppliers’ compliance with licence obligations.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many grants and loans have been (1) applied for by, and (2) paid to, new and existing recipients from (a) the £750 million targeted support fund announced on 20 April for the most R&D intensive SMEs, and (b) the £40 million Fast Start investment scheme announced on 20 May; and what is the total value of these grants and loans.

I refer the noble Lord to the answer given to the hon. Member for Feltham and Heston by my hon. Friend the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (the Minister for Science, Research and Innovation) on 17th June 2020 to Question 57218.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they require accredited banks to take a super-senior position when granting Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme loans.

Except in respect of a residential development facility, a Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBILS) facility must at all times during its life, rank on at least a pari passu basis with the most senior obligations (including secured and/or super-senior obligations, if any) of the Borrower. This includes from all collateral taken by any lender from the borrower unless the borrower is a financing vehicle, whereby this will include any collateral from any member of its Group.

There are certain carveouts from this requirement including:

  • collateral with an aggregate value not greater than 10% of the value (determined by the lender in accordance with its lending policies) of all relevant collateral; and
  • collateral relating to asset and invoice finance facilities entered into in the ordinary course of business where the proceeds of such collateral would not be available to facilities other than such asset or invoice finance facility and where the lending policies and procedures would not require it to take security over such collateral.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what levels of security they recommend accredited banks take when granting Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme loans.

We would expect a lender to follow its normal credit policy when assessing additional security generally. Personal guarantees of any form cannot be used in respect of any Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBILS) facilities up to £250,000. For facilities of £250,000 and over, claims on personal guarantees applied to the scheme facility cannot exceed 20% of losses on the scheme facility after all other recoveries have been applied.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to respond to the report by Professor Adrian Smith and Professor Graeme Reid Changes and choices: advice on future frameworks for international collaboration on research and innovation, published on 5 November 2019.

Sir Adrian and Professor Reid’s report ‘Changes and Choices’ makes overarching recommendations which highlight the importance of stabilising and building on the UK capability, it presents opportunities for the future funding landscape of UK research and innovation globally, and it also provides options should the UK decide not to associate to Horizon Europe.

The Government is carefully considering the recommendations including how this might inform future policy and plans to publish a response in due course.

28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to amend the data subject rights of UK citizens under the General Data Protection Regulation after the end of the Brexit transition period.

As with all policy areas, the UK will control our own data protection laws and regulations in line with our interests, after the end of the transition period.

We want our data protection law to remain fit for purpose, and to support the future objectives of the UK. The UK will continue to operate a high-quality regime that promotes high data protection standards, growth and innovation, and underpins the trustworthy use of data as the UK economy becomes increasingly digital and data-enabled.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the benefits of providing greater financial support for learners on shorter higher education courses.

The government recognises the importance of studying part-time and the benefits that it can bring to individuals, employers and the wider economy, including the opportunities it can provide to develop new skills, which will be especially important in the recovery from the COVID-19 outbreak.

In recent years, we have made a number of changes to support part-time and mature learners. Students who started a part-time degree level course from 1 August 2018 onwards are able to access full-time equivalent maintenance loans. We have removed the “equivalent or lower qualification” restrictions, for all science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) part-time degree courses. Students on these courses who already hold a degree can now access support through student loans. We have also made funding available through the teaching grant to providers to recognise the additional costs of part-time study.

Evidence shows that shorter, accelerated degree courses appeal to those who want to retrain and to enter the workplace more quickly than a traditional course would permit. Graduating one year sooner means that accelerated degree students have one less year of tuition fees and save on the living costs of the final year of standard degree study. If a student is required to attend their course for more than 30 weeks and 3 days in an academic year (which is very common for accelerated degree courses), they can apply for a means-tested Long Courses Loan in addition to the standard loan for living costs.

The Independent Panel led by Philip Augar, set up to provide input into the Review of Post 18 Education and Funding, considered different ways to support learners who want to study higher education more flexibly. The government is considering the Independent Panel’s report carefully but has not yet taken decisions with regards to the recommendations put forward. The government will conclude the review alongside the next Spending Review.

15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to encourage those who have lost work as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic to develop new skills through part-time higher education.

The government recognises the importance of studying part-time and the benefits that it can bring to individuals, employers and the wider economy, including the opportunities it can provide to develop new skills, which will be especially important in the recovery from the COVID-19 outbreak.

In recent years, we have made a number of changes to support part-time and mature learners. Students who started a part-time degree level course from 1 August 2018 onwards are able to access full-time equivalent maintenance loans. We have removed the “equivalent or lower qualification” restrictions, for all science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) part-time degree courses. Students on these courses who already hold a degree can now access support through student loans. We have also made funding available through the teaching grant to providers to recognise the additional costs of part-time study.

Evidence shows that shorter, accelerated degree courses appeal to those who want to retrain and to enter the workplace more quickly than a traditional course would permit. Graduating one year sooner means that accelerated degree students have one less year of tuition fees and save on the living costs of the final year of standard degree study. If a student is required to attend their course for more than 30 weeks and 3 days in an academic year (which is very common for accelerated degree courses), they can apply for a means-tested Long Courses Loan in addition to the standard loan for living costs.

The Independent Panel led by Philip Augar, set up to provide input into the Review of Post 18 Education and Funding, considered different ways to support learners who want to study higher education more flexibly. The government is considering the Independent Panel’s report carefully but has not yet taken decisions with regards to the recommendations put forward. The government will conclude the review alongside the next Spending Review.

11th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the average amount spent from apprenticeship levy pots by companies; how much of the apprenticeship levy fund was spent in total in 2019; whether that total represents an (1) overspend, (2) underspend, or (3) spend as forecast; and how the forecast overspend of that fund was calculated.

The apprenticeship levy is collected by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) from all UK employers with a pay bill above £3 million. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland receive a share of levy funding, which increased to £459 million in 2019-20. It is for the devolved administrations to decide how their allocations should be used.

The funds available to levy-paying employers through their apprenticeship service accounts are not the same as the Department for Education’s annual apprenticeships budget, which is set to fund apprenticeships in England only and is set irrespective of actual levy receipts. This budget is used to fund training for new apprenticeship starts in levy and non-levy paying employers and to cover the ongoing costs of apprentices already in training. It is also used to cover the cost of end-point assessment and any additional payments made to employers and providers.

In 2018-19, we spent £1.7 billion of the £2.3 billion ring-fenced budget. The underspend of £489 million against this budget is set out on page 71 of the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s annual report and accounts, published in July 2019 and attached. In 2019-20, our total budget allocation is £2.5 billion. Final end-of-year outturns will be published in the 2019-20 annual report and accounts.

Spending on the apprenticeship programme is demand-led and employers can choose which apprenticeships they offer, how many apprenticeships they offer and when they offer the apprenticeships. We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will need or want to use all the funds available to them but they are able to do so if they wish.

In 2018-19, levy paying employers spent, on average, around 30% of the funds available to them in their apprenticeship service accounts. In the same period, spending on apprenticeship training and assessment in non-levy paying employers was £0.5 billion.

11th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of the apprenticeship levy fund is currently being spent by non-levy payers.

The apprenticeship levy is collected by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) from all UK employers with a pay bill above £3 million. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland receive a share of levy funding, which increased to £459 million in 2019-20. It is for the devolved administrations to decide how their allocations should be used.

The funds available to levy-paying employers through their apprenticeship service accounts are not the same as the Department for Education’s annual apprenticeships budget, which is set to fund apprenticeships in England only and is set irrespective of actual levy receipts. This budget is used to fund training for new apprenticeship starts in levy and non-levy paying employers and to cover the ongoing costs of apprentices already in training. It is also used to cover the cost of end-point assessment and any additional payments made to employers and providers.

In 2018-19, we spent £1.7 billion of the £2.3 billion ring-fenced budget. The underspend of £489 million against this budget is set out on page 71 of the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s annual report and accounts, published in July 2019 and attached. In 2019-20, our total budget allocation is £2.5 billion. Final end-of-year outturns will be published in the 2019-20 annual report and accounts.

Spending on the apprenticeship programme is demand-led and employers can choose which apprenticeships they offer, how many apprenticeships they offer and when they offer the apprenticeships. We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will need or want to use all the funds available to them but they are able to do so if they wish.

In 2018-19, levy paying employers spent, on average, around 30% of the funds available to them in their apprenticeship service accounts. In the same period, spending on apprenticeship training and assessment in non-levy paying employers was £0.5 billion.

11th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the apprenticeship levy fund is being spent on, other than supporting apprentice training instigated by (1) companies, (2) levy payers, and (3) non-levy payers.

The apprenticeship levy underpins our reforms to raise apprenticeship quality and supports employers to make long-term, sustainable investments in the skills that they need to grow.

The levy is collected by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs from all UK employers with a pay bill above £3 million. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland receive a share of levy funding, which increased to £459 million in 2019-20. It is for the devolved administrations to decide how funds raised from the levy should be used.

The funds available to levy-paying employers through their apprenticeship service accounts are not the same as the Department for Education’s annual apprenticeships budget, which is set to fund apprenticeships in England only, and is set irrespective of actual of levy receipts. We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will need or want to use all the funds available to them, but they are able to if they wish. In the 2019-20 year, over £2.5 billion is available for investment in apprenticeships in England. This is double what was spent in 2010.

The apprenticeship budget is used to fund training for new apprenticeship starts in levy and non-levy paying employers and to cover the ongoing costs of apprentices already in training. It is also used to cover the cost of end-point assessment and any additional payments made to employers and/or providers, including for apprentices who are 16 to 18, 19 to 24 and have previously been in care, or who need additional support to achieve the English and maths requirements.

23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in their consultation with UK businesses about the future regulation of chemicals in the UK once the participation with EU REACH ends; how many businesses they have consulted; which sectors those businesses are part of; and when they intend to publish the results of that consultation.

UK regulators are well prepared to take on new responsibilities under UK REACH. We have already provided extra resources to both the Health and Safety Executive (HSE and the Environment Agency (EA) to prepare for UK REACH and we will continue to scale up their resources over the next two years. We have previously estimated the cost of operating UK REACH at £13 million a year at full operation. That figure includes the operation and maintenance of the Comply with UK REACH IT system and staff resourcing in Defra, HSE and the EA. We are keeping this estimate of resource requirements under regular review as planning for the end of the Transition Period continues.

We have put in place measures to enable industry to comply with UK REACH through a phased transitional period. Defra's estimates of the costs to industry broadly align with those identified by industry, and we continue to explore a range of further steps to minimise the burdens on businesses.

As part of that process we have been undertaking a focused evidence-gathering exercise to better understand costs and practical options to reduce burdens on industry. This involves a number of key stakeholders including businesses of different sizes across the supply chain, trade associations and NGOs. We are now considering how to respond to the conclusions of this work.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their latest estimate of the cost to the private sector of the implementation of a new UK chemicals regulation system to replace EU REACH.

UK regulators are well prepared to take on new responsibilities under UK REACH. We have already provided extra resources to both the Health and Safety Executive (HSE and the Environment Agency (EA) to prepare for UK REACH and we will continue to scale up their resources over the next two years. We have previously estimated the cost of operating UK REACH at £13 million a year at full operation. That figure includes the operation and maintenance of the Comply with UK REACH IT system and staff resourcing in Defra, HSE and the EA. We are keeping this estimate of resource requirements under regular review as planning for the end of the Transition Period continues.

We have put in place measures to enable industry to comply with UK REACH through a phased transitional period. Defra's estimates of the costs to industry broadly align with those identified by industry, and we continue to explore a range of further steps to minimise the burdens on businesses.

As part of that process we have been undertaking a focused evidence-gathering exercise to better understand costs and practical options to reduce burdens on industry. This involves a number of key stakeholders including businesses of different sizes across the supply chain, trade associations and NGOs. We are now considering how to respond to the conclusions of this work.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the adequacy of the resources in place to implement the new UK chemicals regulation system replacing EU REACH; and what estimate they have made of the annual cost of that new system.

UK regulators are well prepared to take on new responsibilities under UK REACH. We have already provided extra resources to both the Health and Safety Executive (HSE and the Environment Agency (EA) to prepare for UK REACH and we will continue to scale up their resources over the next two years. We have previously estimated the cost of operating UK REACH at £13 million a year at full operation. That figure includes the operation and maintenance of the Comply with UK REACH IT system and staff resourcing in Defra, HSE and the EA. We are keeping this estimate of resource requirements under regular review as planning for the end of the Transition Period continues.

We have put in place measures to enable industry to comply with UK REACH through a phased transitional period. Defra's estimates of the costs to industry broadly align with those identified by industry, and we continue to explore a range of further steps to minimise the burdens on businesses.

As part of that process we have been undertaking a focused evidence-gathering exercise to better understand costs and practical options to reduce burdens on industry. This involves a number of key stakeholders including businesses of different sizes across the supply chain, trade associations and NGOs. We are now considering how to respond to the conclusions of this work.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the absolute value of the increased funding that the National Institute for Health Research will receive over the spending review period.

The Spending Review settlement provides £5 billion over the Spending Review period for health-related research and development (R&D). This includes the largest funding received by health R&D, with an increase of £605 million on 2020-21 funding by 2024-25 which means the investment will rise to £2 billion by the end of the Spending Review period.

The National Institute for Health Research budget will be finalised as part of a detailed financial planning process. The distribution of capital across health R&D areas will be confirmed before funding is made available in April 2022.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of the overall Research and Development funding uplift announced in the Spending Review will go to the National Institute for Health Research.

The Spending Review settlement provides £5 billion over the Spending Review period for health-related research and development (R&D). This includes the largest funding received by health R&D, with an increase of £605 million on 2020-21 funding by 2024-25 which means the investment will rise to £2 billion by the end of the Spending Review period.

The National Institute for Health Research budget will be finalised as part of a detailed financial planning process. The distribution of capital across health R&D areas will be confirmed before funding is made available in April 2022.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their obesity strategy which recommends the use of digital technologies for the monitoring of weight loss and lifestyle improvements, what steps they will take to protect personal data collected by fitness trackers and apps.

Public Health England (PHE) digital products complete a Data Protection Impact Assessment. This assessment is reviewed by their Data Protection Officers prior to launch to ensure the processing complies with the requirements of data protection law. ?

PHE stores information such as weight, age, sex and ethnic group in the Weight Loss App but PHE does not store any personally identifiable information.

On Monday 27 July, PHE launched an adult health campaign, ‘Better Health’, encouraging adults to kick start their health by losing weight, eating better and getting active.

The campaign directs people to a variety of free tools and apps including the 12-week NHS Weight Loss Plan, Couch to 5k, Active10 and Easy Meals. These tools were reviewed ahead of the campaign launch and approved by PHE Data Protection Officers.

11th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much in total the NHS has contributed to the apprenticeship levy fund to date; and what proportion of that total has been spent on apprenticeships.

We are working closely with employers, Health Education England and other delivery partners to make sure that the National Health Service is supported to recruit apprentices, thus utilising their levy contributions, in a range of occupations. This is to ensure the NHS has a workforce that is reflective of the population it serves.

The apprenticeship levy is paid by NHS employers with a pay bill over £3 million. It is for each NHS employer to determine how to spend the funds available to them for apprenticeships. The Department for Education hold the official data on employer level spending. Individual NHS employers hold their own data on their levy spend. We do not collect this data centrally.

24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to build infrastructure at UK ports to accommodate new checks on (1) vehicles, and (2) goods, coming from the EU after 1 January 2021.

HMRC will continue to engage with port authorities at key border locations to understand the constraints in different sites, and to discuss how to ensure ports are operationally ready for the end of the transition period.

HMRC will also continue to keep their plans for additional infrastructure under review, depending on what is needed as part of the future trading relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union.

21st Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what data they are using to establish the time it takes police forces to return victims' phones.

The Home Office is working with police forces to collect preliminary data on timeliness to return adult rape victim mobile phones by early next year and with the National Police Chiefs’ Council to agree appropriate long-term data collection.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what instructions they have issued to Police Chief Constables regarding systematic data gathering to measure forensic services.

We have not issued instructions to the Police Chief Constables regarding systematic data gathering to measure forensic services. The NPCC is responsible for measurement of forensic services for operational performance purposes.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what forensic services (1) input, and (2) output, data are measured systematically.

The measurement of forensic services for operational performance purposes is undertaken by the NPCC rather than the Home Office.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effect that the level of the spend on forensic services has on the outcome of legal cases.

As part of the Home Office’s project to measure the impact of forensic science on the CJS, we have worked with academia to develop an approach to assess the impact of forensic science from crime scene to court, but we have not made an assessment of the effect that the level of the spend on forensic services has on the outcome of legal cases.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect the independent review of the Forensic Capability Network commissioned by the National Police Chiefs’ Council to be published.

The review is independent of the Government, and the National Police Chiefs’ Council will control publication, but we understand that they aim to complete it by June 2021.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)