Earl of Caithness Portrait

Earl of Caithness

Conservative - Excepted Hereditary

Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006 Committee
29th Jun 2017 - 13th Mar 2018
Communications and Digital Committee
25th May 2016 - 27th Apr 2017
European Union Committee
12th Jun 2014 - 12th May 2016
EU Financial Affairs Sub-Committee
12th Jun 2015 - 12th May 2016
Procedure and Privileges Committee
9th Jun 1997 - 18th Nov 2004
Procedure and Privileges Committee
19th Nov 2002 - 18th Nov 2004
House of Lords Offices Committee
5th Jun 1997 - 30th Nov 2000
Minister of State (Transport) (Railways and Roads)
14th Apr 1992 - 11th Jan 1994
Procedure and Privileges Committee
7th Jul 1987 - 22nd Oct 1991
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Sep 1985 - 10th Sep 1986
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
14th Jun 1979 - 31st Oct 1984


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Thursday 21st October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 125 Conservative No votes vs 3 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 180 Noes - 130
Speeches
Wednesday 15th September 2021
Environment Bill

My Lords, I support the noble Earl, Lord Devon, in his amendments. They are hugely important. I am a great …

Written Answers
Monday 20th July 2020
Environment Protection: Treaties
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money they have spent in each financial year since 2015 to support the …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Earl of Caithness has voted in 165 divisions, and 11 times against the majority of their Party.

2 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 215 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 304 Noes - 260
15 Dec 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 215 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 265 Noes - 269
7 Dec 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 215 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 308 Noes - 261
30 Nov 2020 - High Speed Rail (West Midlands–Crewe) Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 198 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 57 Noes - 234
20 Oct 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 39 Conservative Aye votes vs 158 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 395 Noes - 169
20 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 218 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 158 Noes - 260
20 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 11 Conservative Aye votes vs 183 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 278 Noes - 200
22 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 175 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 249 Noes - 200
22 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 145 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 266 Noes - 159
17 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 201 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 280 Noes - 218
15 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Earl of Caithness voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 182 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 258 Noes - 208
View All Earl of Caithness Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(19 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
View all Earl of Caithness's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Earl of Caithness, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Earl of Caithness has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Earl of Caithness has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Earl of Caithness has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Earl of Caithness has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


6 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money they have spent in each financial year since 2015 to support the development and implementation of (1) the Convention on Biological Diversity, (2) the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, (3) the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, (4) the Ramsar Convention, (5) the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals, (6) the African–Eurasian Waterbird Agreement, (7) the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, (8) the Berne Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats, and (9) the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services; and for each such agreement and body, how much of that money was (a) a voluntary, and (b) a mandatory, contribution.

The information requested on money spent and staff resources to support development and implementation of the listed agreements and bodies is not held centrally. Compiling it would be a complex exercise incurring disproportionate costs. We have therefore provided the information that is readily available below.

As a Party or Member of these Conventions, Agreements and Bodies, the UK is required to make financial contributions to support their development and implementation. Details of the mandatory and voluntary financial contributions made will be publicly available in their financial records. The UK’s mandatory contributions to the conventions and bodies listed amount to more than £18 million since 2015[1].

The UK also implements these agreements through financing a large number of cross-cutting programmes and activities. One example is the world-renowned Darwin Initiative which delivers on multiple international commitments and on the UK’s wider ambitions for the protection of global biodiversity. The Darwin Initiative has committed £57 million since 2015.

Staff resources are in place to work directly on UK input to the listed agreements and organisations and also on programmes to implement them. Given the cyclical timetable of the global meetings of the Conventions and Agreements and the changing nature of the topics which they cover, staff resources are adjusted over time to ensure the UK is able to participate effectively in them. For this reason, it is difficult to accurately quantify the staff resources that have been involved since 2015.

The UK Government is fully committed to putting nature at the heart of our plans for tackling the interlinked global crises of biodiversity loss and climate change. Our departure from the EU presents an important opportunity for the UK to play a stronger global role and in some areas this will require additional resource. Efforts are underway to make sure that resources are available in order that we seize these opportunities, starting with securing an ambitious set of post-2020 global biodiversity targets at CBD COP15 and successful hosting of COP-26.

[1] Based on current exchange rates. Some subscriptions are paid in non-sterling currencies.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) strategies, and (2) resources, they have (a) put, or (b) are putting, in place to ensure that the UK continues (i) to benefit from, and (ii) to engage with, biodiversity-related multilateral environmental agreements following the UK's departure from the EU.

The information requested on money spent and staff resources to support development and implementation of the listed agreements and bodies is not held centrally. Compiling it would be a complex exercise incurring disproportionate costs. We have therefore provided the information that is readily available below.

As a Party or Member of these Conventions, Agreements and Bodies, the UK is required to make financial contributions to support their development and implementation. Details of the mandatory and voluntary financial contributions made will be publicly available in their financial records. The UK’s mandatory contributions to the conventions and bodies listed amount to more than £18 million since 2015[1].

The UK also implements these agreements through financing a large number of cross-cutting programmes and activities. One example is the world-renowned Darwin Initiative which delivers on multiple international commitments and on the UK’s wider ambitions for the protection of global biodiversity. The Darwin Initiative has committed £57 million since 2015.

Staff resources are in place to work directly on UK input to the listed agreements and organisations and also on programmes to implement them. Given the cyclical timetable of the global meetings of the Conventions and Agreements and the changing nature of the topics which they cover, staff resources are adjusted over time to ensure the UK is able to participate effectively in them. For this reason, it is difficult to accurately quantify the staff resources that have been involved since 2015.

The UK Government is fully committed to putting nature at the heart of our plans for tackling the interlinked global crises of biodiversity loss and climate change. Our departure from the EU presents an important opportunity for the UK to play a stronger global role and in some areas this will require additional resource. Efforts are underway to make sure that resources are available in order that we seize these opportunities, starting with securing an ambitious set of post-2020 global biodiversity targets at CBD COP15 and successful hosting of COP-26.

[1] Based on current exchange rates. Some subscriptions are paid in non-sterling currencies.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much staff resource from the Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs in each financial year since 2015 has been used to support the development and implementation of (1) the Convention on Biological Diversity, (2) the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, (3) the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, (4) the Ramsar Convention, (5) the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals, (6) the African–Eurasian Waterbird Agreement, (7) the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, (8) the Berne Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats, and (9) the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services.

The information requested on money spent and staff resources to support development and implementation of the listed agreements and bodies is not held centrally. Compiling it would be a complex exercise incurring disproportionate costs. We have therefore provided the information that is readily available below.

As a Party or Member of these Conventions, Agreements and Bodies, the UK is required to make financial contributions to support their development and implementation. Details of the mandatory and voluntary financial contributions made will be publicly available in their financial records. The UK’s mandatory contributions to the conventions and bodies listed amount to more than £18 million since 2015[1].

The UK also implements these agreements through financing a large number of cross-cutting programmes and activities. One example is the world-renowned Darwin Initiative which delivers on multiple international commitments and on the UK’s wider ambitions for the protection of global biodiversity. The Darwin Initiative has committed £57 million since 2015.

Staff resources are in place to work directly on UK input to the listed agreements and organisations and also on programmes to implement them. Given the cyclical timetable of the global meetings of the Conventions and Agreements and the changing nature of the topics which they cover, staff resources are adjusted over time to ensure the UK is able to participate effectively in them. For this reason, it is difficult to accurately quantify the staff resources that have been involved since 2015.

The UK Government is fully committed to putting nature at the heart of our plans for tackling the interlinked global crises of biodiversity loss and climate change. Our departure from the EU presents an important opportunity for the UK to play a stronger global role and in some areas this will require additional resource. Efforts are underway to make sure that resources are available in order that we seize these opportunities, starting with securing an ambitious set of post-2020 global biodiversity targets at CBD COP15 and successful hosting of COP-26.

[1] Based on current exchange rates. Some subscriptions are paid in non-sterling currencies.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the ability of landowners and foresters to be able to plant and grow strands of commercial broadleaved trees which may be affected by pests and diseases.

The latest Woodland Natural Capital Accounts were published by the Office for National Statistics in February 2020. These classify 85% of woodlands in Great Britain as in a favourable condition for tree health. They also provide information on the number of sites and felling areas under Statutory Plant Health Notices.

The UK Plant Health Risk Register contains the details of over 1,000 plant pests and pathogens which have been assessed for their potential to be damaging to the UK. 350 of these are forest pests, 17 of which are considered high priority and are tracked in an annual corporate performance indicator published by the Forestry Commission.

Deer, grey squirrels and rabbits can also prevent trees and woodlands establishing and realising their full potential.

This information is used by the Forestry Commission to assess applications for new woodlands (for timber production and other purposes). Landowners who do not include a mixture of tree species, suited to site conditions, adequately protected and resilient to known pests and disease threats, will not receive grant aid for woodland creation. In England, grants are available to help owners restock woodlands after felling due to a tree health issue, including where disease has killed ash, a broadleaf species planted for timber production in the past. The Government also works in partnership with others to reduce the negative impacts of squirrels and deer on trees.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reduce the amount of timber imported annually; and what plans they have to enable England to become a net exporter of timber.

This spring we will consult on an English Tree Strategy, including measures to support our domestic timber industry.

We are working to understand the scope for increasing UK-sourced timber in buildings, and our commitment to increase tree planting will increase the supply of domestically grown timber, reducing current reliance on imports.

Increasing the use of domestically grown timber in construction is a goal of the Clean Growth Strategy and 25 Year Plan for the Environment. This can lock up carbon in the long term and create a market for domestic timber.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following their policy of achieving net zero emissions by 2050, what plans they have to instruct local authorities to refuse planning applications for demolition and rebuilding properties when an existing building can be refurbished to modern standards.

Planning permission may be required to demolish a building, but if not required, the applicant may still be required to seek prior approval from the local planning authority before demolition. Where the demolition of one or more buildings is required as part of a redevelopment, details of the demolition can be included in the planning application. This will give the local planning authority the opportunity to consider demolition alongside other aspects of the development including energy efficiency. Where appropriate, the local planning authority may impose conditions on demolition if planning permission is granted.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)