Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon Portrait

Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon

Labour - Life peer

Became Member: 6th September 2013


1 APPG membership (as of 13 May 2024)
Race Equality in Education
3 Former APPG memberships
Governance and Inclusive Leadership, Mindfulness, Vaccinations for All
Children and Families Act 2014 Committee
19th Jan 2022 - 21st Nov 2022
Human Rights (Joint Committee)
19th Jul 2017 - 1st Jul 2019
Human Rights (Joint Committee)
16th Jul 2015 - 27th Apr 2017


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon has voted in 428 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

28 Feb 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour No votes vs 111 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 237 Noes - 154
View All Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
(11 debate interactions)
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
(4 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(9 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(5 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(5 debate contributions)
Department for Business and Trade
(3 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Schools Bill [HL] 2022-23
(390 words contributed)
Health and Care Act 2022
(267 words contributed)
Coronavirus Act 2020
(122 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 18 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, following reports of the differential impact of COVID-19 on BAME communities, all relevant public authorities in the UK should be gathering data on the ethnic profile of those dying with the condition; and if not, what plans they have to instruct such authorities to do so.

The potential for impact on ethnicity, gender, age, and other vulnerable groups is a cause for significant concern to us. This is why we have asked Public Health England to review COVID-19 outcomes among different groups, including ethnic minority communities, and to explore reasons for the disparities.

The findings of this review will inform what further action we can take to better protect these communities. In the meantime, we have implemented specific measures to reduce the spread of the virus in all communities.

The statistical information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Baroness Lawrence,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking whether, following reports of the differential impact of COVID-19 on BAME communities, all relevant public authorities in the UK should be gathering data on the ethnic profile of those dying with the condition; and if not, what plans they have to instruct such authorities to do so (HL4512).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing weekly numbers of deaths registered in England and Wales. The most recent annual figures published are for deaths registered in 2018[1]. However, we do publish provisional weekly deaths registrations, which are currently published for deaths registered up to 8 May 2020[2]. National Records Scotland (NRS) and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) are responsible for publishing the number of deaths registered in Scotland and Northern Ireland respectively.

Cause of death is defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10). Deaths involving COVID-19, which refers to deaths where COVID-19 is mentioned anywhere on the death certificate, are identified by the ICD-10 codes U07.1 and U07.2.

The ONS have recently published an article[3] and accompanying datasets[4] on provisional analysis of deaths involving COVID-19 by ethnicity for England and Wales. These analyses are based on a new dataset developed by the ONS that links 2011 Census records to deaths that occurred between 2 March and 10 April 2020 registered by death registrations up to 17 April 2020, with deaths being added on a weekly basis. These analyses will be updated and extended in June 2020.

Collecting information on the ethnic profile of individuals dying with COVID-19 presents practical and methodological challenges. This is because ethnicity is a self-identification measure reflecting how individuals define themselves, and guidance on the collection of ethnic group data in the UK states that responses on ethnicity should be answered by the individual directly, particularly if they are an adult[5].

Ethnicity is not recorded on the death certificate. To enable us to undertake our specific analysis at the ONS, deaths involving COVID-19 were linked to the 2011 Census, which allowed us to ascertain the self-reported ethnicity of the deceased and other demographic factors.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/deathsregisteredinenglandandwalesseriesdrreferencetables

[2]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/weekending8may2020

[3]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/coronavirusrelateddeathsbyethnicgroupenglandandwales/2march2020to10april2020

[4]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/coronavirusrelateddeathsbyethnicgroupenglandandwales/2march2020to10april2020/relateddata

[5]https://www.ons.gov.uk/methodology/classificationsandstandards/measuringequality/ethnicgroupnationalidentityandreligion

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with trade unions about identifying staff at greatest risk of contracting COVID-19 and re-assigning the duties of such staff.

We recognise that some workers will be anxious about returning to work and understand that all employees should feel safe.

The Government has stated that vulnerable people who are at increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19) need to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures. Members of staff who are vulnerable or extremely vulnerable, as well as individuals whom they live with, should be supported by their employers as they follow the required social distancing and shielding measures.

It’s critical that employers offer safe workplaces. The Government has published new guidance to help ensure workplaces are as safe as possible during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. These guides cover a range of working environments and are available at www.gov.uk/workingsafely.

This guidance has been developed by the Department for Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) with input from firms, unions, industry bodies and the devolved administrations in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland, and in consultation with Public Health England (PHE) and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

Our continued engagement with the trade unions provides a useful insight into the information and best practice that might support us in ensuring that businesses can reopen whilst adhering to the social distancing guidelines.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they intend to meet representatives of Barnardo’s to discuss developing a Black Foster Care Network to improve the experiences of Black children in care.

I refer the noble Lady to the answer of 15 January 2024 to Question 8232.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
26th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, following the child poverty statistics published on 21 March, what plans they have to initiate a cross-government strategy to address child poverty.

The Department for Work and Pensions already works consistently across Government to support the most vulnerable households. This includes a cross-government senior officials’ group on poverty.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to strengthening local welfare services.

A total of £3 billion including Barnett impact has been announced since October 2021 to enable the delivery of Household Support Fund in England. This includes over £2.5 billion allocated to Local Authorities in England. It is for the devolved administrations to decide how to allocate their additional Barnett funding.

Councils continue to have the flexibility to use funding from the Local Government Finance Settlement to provide local welfare assistance.

The Government has delivered a balanced package of funding through the Local Government Finance Settlement for 2024-25 which makes available up to £64.7 billion. The most relatively deprived areas of England will receive 18% more per dwelling in available resource through the 2024-25 Settlement than the least deprived areas.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the announcement by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in the Budget Statement on 6 March that the Household Support Fund has been extended until September, what support they will provide to local authorities when the fund ends.

As announced by the Chancellor in the Spring Budget on 6 March, the government is providing an additional £500m to enable the extension of the Household Support Fund, including funding for the Devolved Administrations through the Barnett formula to be spent at their discretion. This means that Local Authorities in England will receive an additional £421m to support those in need locally through the Household Support Fund.

The funding will be available to Local Authorities in England from 1 April 2024 and will run until 30 September 2024.

The Household Support Fund is not the only way we are supporting people on lower incomes. April’s benefit uprating of 6.7% will see an average increase in Universal Credit of £470, raising the National Living Wage will deliver an increase of over £1800 to the gross annual earnings of someone working full-time on that wage, and uplifting Local Housing Allowance to the 30th percentile of local rents will benefit 1.6 million private renters by, on average, £800 a year.

The Government has also delivered a balanced package of funding through the Local Government Finance Settlement for 2024-25 which makes available up to £64.7 billion. The most relatively deprived areas of England will receive 18% more per dwelling in available resource through the 2024-25 Settlement than the least deprived areas.

As announced by the Chancellor in this year’s Spring Budget, we are also doubling the repayment period for new Universal Credit Budgeting Advances.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the announcement by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in the Budget Statement on 6 March that the Household Support Fund has been extended until September, what assessment they have made of the position of local authorities who had already reduced their local crisis support services and disbanded delivery teams.

As announced by the Chancellor in the Spring Budget on 6 March, the government is providing an additional £500m to enable the extension of the Household Support Fund, including funding for the Devolved Administrations through the Barnett formula to be spent at their discretion. This means that Local Authorities in England will receive an additional £421m to support those in need locally through the Household Support Fund.

The funding will be available to Local Authorities in England from 1 April 2024 and will run until 30 September 2024.

The Household Support Fund is not the only way we are supporting people on lower incomes. April’s benefit uprating of 6.7% will see an average increase in Universal Credit of £470, raising the National Living Wage will deliver an increase of over £1800 to the gross annual earnings of someone working full-time on that wage, and uplifting Local Housing Allowance to the 30th percentile of local rents will benefit 1.6 million private renters by, on average, £800 a year.

The Government has also delivered a balanced package of funding through the Local Government Finance Settlement for 2024-25 which makes available up to £64.7 billion. The most relatively deprived areas of England will receive 18% more per dwelling in available resource through the 2024-25 Settlement than the least deprived areas.

As announced by the Chancellor in this year’s Spring Budget, we are also doubling the repayment period for new Universal Credit Budgeting Advances.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have any plans to work with (1) Barnado’s, and (2) other charities who have developed recommendations for the future of local crisis support, prior to the ending of the Household Support Fund in September.

As announced by the Chancellor in the Spring Budget on 6 March, the government is providing an additional £500m to enable the extension of the Household Support Fund, including funding for the Devolved Administrations through the Barnett formula to be spent at their discretion. This means that Local Authorities in England will receive an additional £421m to support those in need locally through the Household Support Fund.

The funding will be available to Local Authorities in England from 1 April 2024 and will run until 30 September 2024.

The Household Support Fund is not the only way we are supporting people on lower incomes. April’s benefit uprating of 6.7% will see an average increase in Universal Credit of £470, raising the National Living Wage will deliver an increase of over £1800 to the gross annual earnings of someone working full-time on that wage, and uplifting Local Housing Allowance to the 30th percentile of local rents will benefit 1.6 million private renters by, on average, £800 a year.

The Government has also delivered a balanced package of funding through the Local Government Finance Settlement for 2024-25 which makes available up to £64.7 billion. The most relatively deprived areas of England will receive 18% more per dwelling in available resource through the 2024-25 Settlement than the least deprived areas.

As announced by the Chancellor in this year’s Spring Budget, we are also doubling the repayment period for new Universal Credit Budgeting Advances.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
31st Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they will meet the charities, including the Trussell Trust, Barnardo’s, and the Children’s Society, who are worried about how the closure of the Household Support Fund will affect the families that they support.

The current Household Support Fund runs from April 2023 until the end of March 2024, and the Government continues to keep all its existing programmes under review in the usual way.

The Government is putting significant additional support in place for those on the lowest incomes from April. Subject to Parliamentary approval, working age benefits will rise by 6.7% while the Basic and New State Pensions will be uprated by 8.5% in line with earnings, as part of the ‘triple lock'.

To further support low-income households with increasing rent costs, the government will raise Local Housing Allowance rates to the 30th percentile of local market rents, benefitting 1.6m low-income households by on average £800 a year in 24/25. Additionally, the Government will increase the National Living Wage for workers aged 21 years and over by 9.8% to £11.44 representing an increase of over £1,800 to the gross annual earnings of a full-time worker on the National Living Wage.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
31st Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on low-income households of not renewing the Household Support Fund.

The current Household Support Fund runs from April 2023 until the end of March 2024, and the Government continues to keep all its existing programmes under review in the usual way.

The Government is putting significant additional support in place for those on the lowest incomes from April. Subject to Parliamentary approval, working age benefits will rise by 6.7% while the Basic and New State Pensions will be uprated by 8.5% in line with earnings, as part of the ‘triple lock'.

To further support low-income households with increasing rent costs, the government will raise Local Housing Allowance rates to the 30th percentile of local market rents, benefitting 1.6m low-income households by on average £800 a year in 24/25. Additionally, the Government will increase the National Living Wage for workers aged 21 years and over by 9.8% to £11.44 representing an increase of over £1,800 to the gross annual earnings of a full-time worker on the National Living Wage.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
31st Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the need for a funded strategy for local crisis support in England to ensure that councils can respond effectively to the needs of low-income households.

Councils continue to have the flexibility to use funding from the Local Government Finance Settlement to provide local welfare assistance.

Over £2bn in support has to date been allocated to Local Authorities in England via the Household Support Fund to support those most in need.

The Government is putting significant additional support in place for those on the lowest incomes from April. Subject to Parliamentary approval, working age benefits will rise by 6.7% while the Basic and New State Pensions will be uprated by 8.5% in line with earnings, as part of the ‘triple lock”.

To further support low-income households with increasing rent costs, the government will raise Local Housing Allowance rates to the 30th percentile of local market rents, benefitting 1.6m low-income households by on average £800 a year in 24/25. Additionally, the Government will increase the National Living Wage for workers aged 21 years and over by 9.8% to £11.44 representing an increase of over £1,800 to the gross annual earnings of a full-time worker on the National Living Wage.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the statement by the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that “data suggests a disproportionate burden of illness and death among racial and ethnic and minority groups” from COVID-19; and whether the CDC study has direct implications for the control of the virus in the UK.

To provide a more comprehensive response to a number of outstanding Written Questions, this has been answered by an information factsheet Science of Covid-19 note for House of Lords, which is attached due to the size of the data. A copy has also been placed in the Library.

14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the letter sent by Sir Simon Stephens to all NHS Trusts on 29 April which stated "on a precautionary basis we recommend employers should risk-assess staff at potentially greater risk and make appropriate arrangements accordingly"; and what action NHS Trusts should take in response.

Proper risk assessment is key to ensuring the protection and wellbeing of our staff. NHS Employers, working in partnership with key stakeholders, published guidance for employers on 30 April on how to carry out risk assessments particularly for vulnerable groups, to understand the specific risks staff members face from exposure to COVID-19 and actions which employers can take to keep staff safe. NHS Employers will be keeping its guidance to employers under review to reflect any feedback or additional evidence coming to light and signpost to key national guidance where available.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the accuracy of the measurement of the differential incidence of COVID-19 within BAME communities.

Public Health England led a rapid review to better understand how different factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, sex (male and female) and obesity can impact on how people are affected by COVID-19.

The review found that people from Black ethnic groups were most likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19. Also, death rates from COVID-19 were highest among people of Black and Asian ethnic groups.

These findings did not account for the effect of occupation or comorbidities. These are important factors because they are associated with the risk of acquiring COVID-19, the risk of dying, or both.

A copy of Disparities in the risk and outcomes of COVID-19 is attached.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by the Institute of Fiscal Studies Are some ethnic groups more vulnerable to COVID-19 than others?, published on 1 May; and what comparison they have made of the findings of that report and their own analysis of COVID-19 and the incidence and impact of that virus within BAME communities.

Public Health England (PHE) led a review to better understand how different factors such as ethnicity, deprivation, age, sex (male and female) and obesity can impact on how people are affected by COVID-19. PHE’s report Disparities in the risk and outcomes of COVID-19 was published on 2 June 2020 and is attached.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with governments of other countries about the differential impact of COVID-19 on BAME communities; and what lessons they have learned from any such discussions.

The Department is regularly in discussions with other countries on a wide range of issues of issues relating to COVID-19. COVID-19 presents a global challenge which requires a collaborative response. The Department will continue to work with other countries throughout the crisis and beyond.

Public Health England is undertaking a programme of stakeholder engagement as part of its review into the impact of COVID-19 on black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities; this has included the devolved nations. PHE continues to be committed to working with experts in the devolved nations to share learning and identify opportunities for collaboration. PHE is also working with the National Institute for Health Research to undertake an evidence review looking at the factors impacting health outcomes from COVID-19 on BAME communities. The scope of this work will include international evidence.