Baroness Greengross

Crossbench - Life peer

Baroness Greengross is not a member of any APPGs
7 Former APPG memberships
Adult Social Care, Competition for Heathrow Expansion, Continence Care, Loneliness, Longevity, Sepsis, Vaccinations for All
Intergenerational Fairness and Provision Committee
17th May 2018 - 25th Apr 2019
Draft Care and Support Bill
22nd Nov 2012 - 6th Mar 2013


Division Voting information

Baroness Greengross has voted in 440 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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All Debates

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Sparring Partners
Earl Howe (Conservative)
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
(49 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(20 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(156 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(29 debate contributions)
Home Office
(19 debate contributions)
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Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Greengross, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Greengross has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Greengross has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Baroness Greengross has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Greengross has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


79 Written Questions

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Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6 Other Department Questions
15th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made towards the formation of the cross-departmental task force on older people’s housing announced in their Levelling Up White Paper, published on 2 February.

This Government is committed to further improving the diversity of housing options available to older people and boosting the supply of specialist elderly accommodation.

The Older People's Housing taskforce will look at ways we can provide greater choice, quality and security of housing for older people, and support the growth of a thriving older people's housing sector in this country. This work will be taken forward in partnership with the Department of Health and Social Care. Further details about the taskforce including panel membership and scope will be confirmed in due course.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
24th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) whether capital funding is an effective way to incentivise the supply of housing for older people, and (2) how capital funding interacts with other factors such as planning legislation in this context.

Boosting the supply of a range of specialist housing across the country is key to our aim of ensuring older people can access the right homes to suit their needs. We work closely with the Department of Health and Social Care to provide capital funding to incentivise supply.

Since 2010, we have delivered over 574,100 new affordable homes, including specialist housing for older people, through our investment in affordable housing.

We know that communities would welcome more homes, so long as they are the right sort of homes, are well designed and have the right supporting infrastructure. The Levelling Up and Regeneration Bill centres these interests, and will change the plan-making system, creating incentives to have a plan in place, with this plan having more weight in planning decisions. This will give certainty to communities and applicants about what can be built and where, supporting more permissions for development communities want.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
24th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they will take to ensure that (1) older people, and (2) people with disabilities, can live in suitable housing.

This Government is committed to ensuring older and disabled people can access homes that best suits their needs.

We work closely with the Department of Health and Social Care to provide capital funding to incentivise supply. This includes investing £11.5 billion in the new Affordable Homes Programme, which includes delivery of new specialist or supported housing for older, disabled and other vulnerable people. We have also committed £573 million for the Disabled Facilities Grant each year from 2022-23 to 2024-25 to support eligible older and disabled people to adapt their homes to suit their needs.

As announced in the Levelling Up White Paper, we will shortly launch a new government taskforce to look at ways we can provide better choice, quality and security of housing for older people.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
3rd Sep 2019
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker whether appropriate disposal bins are provided in the male toilets on the Parliamentary Estate for the disposal of stoma and other continence and personal care products.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chairman of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf.

Clinical waste bins (which are suitable for the disposal of continence products) are currently provided in all accessible toilets in the House of Lords (Palace of Westminster, Millbank House and Old Palace Yard) where space provides, with an additional one situated in the male Peers’ shower / toilet room on the Ground Floor West Front.

Separately, feminine hygiene bins are provided in all female, accessible and unisex toilets in the House of Lords.

18th Nov 2014
To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they expect that all homes in the United Kingdom will reach energy efficiency level Band C.

The Government believes that improving residential energy efficiency is an important part of its efforts to reduce UK greenhouse gas emissions, combat fuel poverty and enhance the country’s energy security, as well as helping all consumers save money on their energy bills and enjoy warmer, more comfortable homes.

We continue to see progress in the deployment of energy efficiency measures towards our goal of 1 million homes helped by March 2015. We have not set any particular target regarding all homes reaching EPC Band C and do not hold any detailed projections as to when this might be achieved.

13th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the Office for National Statistics removed the upper age limit from the Crime Survey for England and Wales; and when the statistics from this survey relating to those aged 75 and older will be published.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

20 January 2021

Dear Baroness Greengross,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking when the Office for National Statistics (ONS) removed the upper age limit from the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW); and when the statistics from this survey relating to those aged 75 and older will be published (HL12104).

The CSEW is a face-to-face victimisation survey which asks people aged 16 and over resident in households in England and Wales about their experiences of a range of crimes. Self-completion modules are included on the survey to collect information on topic areas that respondents could feel uncomfortable talking to an interviewer about. The upper age limit for respondents eligible for the self-completion modules of the CSEW was increased from 59 years to 74 years in April 2017. This is different to the main face-to-face part of the survey which has no upper age limit.

In response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, it was necessary to move the CSEW from a face-to-face survey to a telephone-only survey (by which it may be referred to differently as the TCSEW, or “Telephone-operated Crime Survey for England and Wales”, in publications). As a result, we are currently not asking questions around any sensitive topics, including domestic abuse and sexual assault, because of ethical and safeguarding concerns with this new mode of delivery.

Once it is possible to return to the face-to-face mode of delivery, we will immediately remove the upper age limit for respondents to the self-completion modules, in the interests of inclusivity. It will then take at least 12 months of data collection to enable us to produce accurate victimisation estimates for adults aged 75 and over.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to support older veterans who are facing social isolation and loneliness; and how they plan to ensure that such veterans are treated equitably with those of working age.

In the Strategy for our Veterans Consultation Response published in January 2020, we committed to exploring how veterans could benefit from initiatives developed and invested in through the cross-Government Tackling Loneliness agenda. The Office for Veterans’ Affairs (OVA) is working with colleagues across Government to develop new initiatives to support veterans of all ages who are facing social isolation.

The Government recognises the important role that the charity sector plays in supporting and connecting with vulnerable and isolated veterans on the ground. In light of COVID-19, the Government awarded £6 million in emergency COVID-19 funding to 100 Service charities, to ensure that they could continue to provide vital services to the Armed Forces community throughout the pandemic. This is in addition to £10 million awarded yearly through the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust, which provides specific funding to organisations through grants programmes. This includes a current grant programme to identify and support charities working to tackle loneliness in the Armed Forces community. Previous recipients of grant funding include Veterans Breakfast Clubs, Age UK and a number of other organisations who support older and socially isolated veterans.

The OVA has also commissioned new research looking at the specific impact of COVID-19 on the veteran community, including in terms of isolation and loneliness. This will allow policy makers to understand how the pandemic has affected the veteran community and respond with evidence-based and targeted interventions.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
16th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many schools in England offered Citizenship as a standalone subject in 2009; and how many students were entered into (1) GCSE, and (2) A Level, examinations for Citizenship in that year.

The department does not hold information on the subjects offered by individual schools and colleges. However, the department does publish the number of entries into GCSE Citizenship and A level Citizenship Studies, which can be used as a guide to how many schools and colleges offer these qualifications.

GCSE Citizenship was first introduced as a full course in academic year 2010/11 and the earliest national data held by the department is available for academic year 2011/12. In 2011/12, 10,474 pupils at the end of key stage 4 were entered for GCSE Citizenship and 237 schools entered pupils. In 2018/19, 18,098 pupils at the end of key stage 4 were entered for GCSE Citizenship and 570 schools entered pupils.

A level Citizenship studies became operational in September 2008 and this qualification ended operation in July 2019. There were no pupils aged 16 to 18 who were entered for A level Citizenship studies in academic years 2008/09 or 2018/19. The 2008/09 figure is not published separately but has been included as part of ‘other social studies’ up until and including 2017/18.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many schools in England offered Citizenship as a standalone subject in 2019; and how many students were entered into (1) GCSE, and (2) A Level, examinations for Citizenship in that year.

The department does not hold information on the subjects offered by individual schools and colleges. However, the department does publish the number of entries into GCSE Citizenship and A level Citizenship Studies, which can be used as a guide to how many schools and colleges offer these qualifications.

GCSE Citizenship was first introduced as a full course in academic year 2010/11 and the earliest national data held by the department is available for academic year 2011/12. In 2011/12, 10,474 pupils at the end of key stage 4 were entered for GCSE Citizenship and 237 schools entered pupils. In 2018/19, 18,098 pupils at the end of key stage 4 were entered for GCSE Citizenship and 570 schools entered pupils.

A level Citizenship studies became operational in September 2008 and this qualification ended operation in July 2019. There were no pupils aged 16 to 18 who were entered for A level Citizenship studies in academic years 2008/09 or 2018/19. The 2008/09 figure is not published separately but has been included as part of ‘other social studies’ up until and including 2017/18.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to work with supermarkets to ensure that anyone at increased risk from COVID-19 or with a disability under the Equality Act 2010, of any age, and their carers, has priority access to home deliveries and stores if they need it.

The Government's response to food vulnerability caused by COVID-19 is built around three categories of vulnerability: Clinically Extremely Vulnerable (CEV), other Non-Shielded Vulnerable (NSV), and the economically vulnerable.

Individuals in the CEV group are those who have a medical condition that is deemed to put them at very high risk of COVID-19 related serious illness. This group has been asked to 'shield' by the Government until at least the end of June, meaning they need to stay at home at all times and minimise all contact with others, including other members of their household.

There are around 2.2. million people in England who fit into this group. The majority will have received a letter from the NHS or been contacted by their GP to inform them of their vulnerable status. The group comprises people of all ages - with extreme respiratory conditions (such as cystic fibrosis), certain types of cancers (such as leukaemia), those who have had organ transplants, as well as a range of other conditions or medical histories.

Many within this group have local family and friends who can get the vital provisions needed. There is a significant subset of the CEV group however who do not. Individuals in this group can register as extremely clinically vulnerable with the Government. Data from these registrations is shared with supermarkets on an ongoing basis, whereby supermarkets provide individuals with access to priority access to booking slots for delivery. The vast majority of supermarkets are engaged in this data-sharing initiative.

Individuals in the NSV group are those who are unable to access food and other essential supplies due to a COVID-19 related change in physical or financial circumstance.

We have been working quickly with local authorities, retailers, food businesses and the voluntary sector to support those who do not necessarily fall into the shielded category, but who may be struggling to access food and essential supplies as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. We have been careful to ensure that the definition of non-shielded food-vulnerable people includes those who are unable to access food due to the impact of COVID-19 on food services and delivery, as well as those who are in temporary isolation or enhanced social distancing. This group would include disabled people whose disabilities make it difficult for them to comply with social distancing requirements in food shops or whose access to food has been compromised by COVID-19. This could be a result of increased delivery demand, or their usual support networks being unable to help due to self-isolation or social distancing.

This group of non-shielded vulnerable people are now able to access food in a variety of ways, including through being paired with volunteers who will shop for them, and through food deliveries from local retailers, wholesalers and food businesses, many of whom will be able to take orders over the phone. We have also been working with retailers to enable these individuals to access priority delivery or click and collect slots.

Over 750,000 people have signed up as NHS Volunteer Responders via the mobile app GoodSam. Verified volunteer responders can receive tasks to help those in their communities, including through shopping for vulnerable people for food and essential supplies. Health and care professionals and a number of approved Voluntary and Community Services organisations are now able to refer vulnerable individuals into the system to receive support from volunteers. It is now also possible for individuals to self-refer for assistance from the programme, if they consider themselves to be vulnerable and in need of support.

Supermarkets have also been working at pace to expand the total number of delivery and click and collect slots. Most supermarkets are offering prioritised delivery or click and collect slots to those they have identified as vulnerable from their customer database (for example by age, shopping habits, previous use of vulnerable customer helplines).

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that the Department for International Development prioritises non-communicable diseases through its Universal Health Coverage programs.

DFID’s approach to non-communicable diseases is focused on improving the provision of basic health services for the poorest by supporting health systems strengthening such as improving health worker capacity and access to essential medicines. This helps to increase coverage, equity, access and quality of health services to address all health problems including non-communicable diseases.

As part of these efforts the UK Government continues to champion universal health coverage (UHC) to ensure access to quality essential services for all. UHC includes ensuring that no one is impoverished through paying for health services and reducing financial barriers for essential services, especially for the poorest and most vulnerable.

24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking to reduce the time needed to process new Attendance Allowance claims.

The Government currently spends £5.8 billion a year providing some help to 1.43 million people of pension age with the cost of their care needs.

Attendance Allowance provides financial support towards the extra costs faced by those with a severe disability. It is only available to those over State Pension age who require care or supervision as a result of their disability. The support is aimed at those with long term care needs so there is a qualifying period of 6 months. The qualifying period is waived for those with a terminal illness.

Claims for Attendance Allowance can be made by to the Department by telephone on 0800 731 0122 or by obtaining a claim form online at: www.gov.uk and returning to: Freepost DWP Attendance Allowance.

The Department routinely reviews its use of staffing resources to ensure that it meets the needs of our customers. The Department have recently recruited more staff to process Attendance Allowance claims, which will enable us to determine benefit eligibility within a shorter timescale.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is a statutory requirement for public buildings and offices to provide appropriate disposal bins for the disposal of stoma and other continence products and personal care products in (1) female, and (2) male toilets.

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 cover a wide range of basic health, safety and welfare issues and apply to most workplaces. These Regulations require for suitable and sufficient sanitary conveniences to be available at readily accessible places. The attached documents the Workplace Health Safety and Welfare Approved Code of Practice and Guidance (L24) and Welfare at Work – Guidance for employers (INDG293), which are guidance to help dutyholders comply with the regulations, say:

  • provision must be made for any worker with a disability to enable them to have access to facilities which are adjusted for their use as necessary; and

  • that toilets used by women should be provided with suitable means for the disposal of sanitary dressings.

There are no equivalent requirements for men.

These regulations do not apply to non-workplaces; however, the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government’s building regulations are applicable to public buildings and the advice is:

  • Statutory guidance supporting Part M of the building regulations, includes a sanitary waste disposal bin in accessible toilets. All building other than dwellings in scope, including offices and all public buildings would require as a minimum one accessible toilet where a stoma bag can be safely disposed of.

  • Building Regulations come with statutory guidance on the layout of wheelchair-accessible unisex toilets. These toilets offer private space for anyone needing to attend to a medical need and are not exclusively for use by ambulant disabled people. The guidance for accessible WCs includes a sanitary waste disposal bin with a lid and a wash hand basin. The layout and content of these spaces are controlled in all newly built offices and public buildings.

  • The statutory guidance given in Approved Document M (Access to and use of buildings) also points to the British Standard BS8300-2:2018 “Design of an accessible and inclusive built environment. Buildings. Code of practice”. This independent best practice standard was updated in January 2018 with further information describing best practice in a range of toilets for people treating a medical condition.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jul 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of (1) the number, and (2) percentage, of eligible state pensioners who claimed pension credit in (a) 2017–18, and (b) 2018–19; and how many pensioners are forecast to claim that benefit in 2019–20.

In 2016-17, 1.81m (60 per cent) of eligible state pensioners claimed Pension Credit. Corresponding figures for 2017-18 and 2018-19 are not yet available.

Official statistics on the take-up of income related benefits at Great Britain level, including Pension Credit, can be found in the ‘Income-related benefits: estimates of take-up in 2016 to 2017’ publication on gov.uk.

Historic and forecast benefit expenditure and caseload data relating to DWP benefits at Great Britain level, including Pension Credit, can be found in the ‘Benefit expenditure and caseload tables 2019’ publication on gov.uk.

15th Jul 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the average sum held in the pension funds of people who were enrolled in a pension scheme as part of the auto-enrolment process.

The information is not available in the format requested.

Findings from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) Wealth and Asset survey show that overall, the average (median) amount of wealth held in pensions not yet in payment was £33,000 in 2010/12. There is no breakdown available to show wealth held in funds created due to Automatic Enrolment.

DWP’s annual official statistics on workplace pension participation found that in 2014, the annual total amount saved in workplace pensions by employees eligible for Automatic Enrolment was £80.3 billion, an increase of £6.6 billion from 2012.

29th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to invest in preventative healthcare; and what assessment they have made of the effect of such investment on (1) the waiting lists for hospital treatment, and (2) demand for NHS services generally.

Local authorities in England receive a public health grant to support their statutory duty to improve the health of their population. The public health grant to local authorities in England has increased from £3.279 billion in 2020/21 to £3.324 billion in 2021/22.

The NHS Long Term Plan commits to a range of actions to prevent ill health, including the prevention of up to 150,000 heart attacks, strokes and dementia cases over a 10 year period. Although no formal assessment has yet been made on the effects on investing in preventative healthcare on waiting lists and demand, it is estimated there will be a significant positive impact on National Health Service waiting lists as part of recovery from the pandemic. Preventative interventions can deliver significant health benefits for individuals as well as reducing the burden of preventable illness on the NHS.

26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the occupancy rate, as a percentage of the total capacity, of nursing and care homes in England for each month in 2021.

The information is not available in the format requested. Data on care home occupancy has not been systematically collected from care homes, whose residents are a mix of publicly and self-funded clients.

25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the occupancy rate as a percentage of the nursing and care homes in England was for each month in 2020.

The information is not available in the format requested. Data on care home occupancy has not been systematically collected from care homes, whose residents are a mix of publicly and self-funded clients.

25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the occupancy rate as a percentage of the nursing and care homes in England was for each month in 2019.

The information is not available in the format requested. Data on care home occupancy has not been systematically collected from care homes, whose residents are a mix of publicly and self-funded clients.

25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the occupancy rate as a percentage of the nursing and care homes in England was for each month in 2018.

The information is not available in the format requested. Data on care home occupancy has not been systematically collected from care homes, whose residents are a mix of publicly and self-funded clients.

25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the occupancy rate as a percentage of the nursing and care homes in England was for each month in 2016.

The information is not available in the format requested. Data on care home occupancy has not been systematically collected from care homes, whose residents are a mix of publicly and self-funded clients.

25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the occupancy rate as a percentage of the nursing and care homes in England was for each month in 2015.

The information is not available in the format requested. Data on care home occupancy has not been systematically collected from care homes, whose residents are a mix of publicly and self-funded clients.

26th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, and if so, why there is a shortage of (1) widely used contraceptive preparations, and (2) hormone replacement therapy products; why (a) Brevinor, (b) Eloine, (c) Norimin, (d) Synphase, (e) Tisnell, and (f) Zoely, oral contraceptive tablets are currently unavailable; when they estimate that those tablets will be resupplied; and what steps they are taking to ensure the continued availability of all contraceptive preparations and HRT products.

The overall supply position of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) products has been improving since the end of February 2020 and will continue to improve in the coming months.

We have been advised that supplies of Brevinor, Norimin and Synphase tablets will be available from late January/early February 2021, with supplies of Yiznell available from early January 2021. Supplies of Eloine and Zoely tablets remain available via the usual routes.

Issues such as regulatory or manufacturing problems, problems accessing supplies of pharmaceutical raw ingredients and commercial decisions to divest certain products can affect the supply of medicines, including HRT and oral contraceptives.

2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the suspension of all casework by the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman between 26 March and 29 June due to the COVID-19 pandemic, what steps they have taken to ensure that complaints made during that period were handled in line with the Local Authority Social Services and National Health Service Complaints (England) Regulations 2009; and what steps they are now taking to ensure that complaints about adult social care are handled appropriately.

The Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman (LGSCO) took the decision to suspend new complaints in order to protect frontline services. It has now fully reopened and is working through complaints received during the pause. Members of the public will not lose their access to justice because of the pandemic, and complaints regarding the COVID-19 outbreak period are now being considered as are all other complaints. The LGSCO has taken steps to ensure complainants are not penalised on time grounds for not being able to come to the LGSCO during the pause. The LGSCO has also carefully tracked legislation and guidance in operation since the outbreak and developed expertise to consistently investigate complaints made about council and social care provider actions during that period.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure that all workers in community retirement settings are provided with adequate personal protection equipment and have access to COVID-19 testing.

We have made arrangements to help ensure that settings providing adult social care services can access personal protection equipment (PPE) where they have a clinical need, in line with published guidance. This includes community retirement settings that have care provision.

We have released millions of items of PPE to wholesalers for onward sale to the adult social care sector for providers to access if they cannot obtain PPE through their business as usual routes. We have also released of millions of items of PPE to Local Resilience Forums to help them respond to urgent local spikes in need across the adult social care sector and some other front-line services, where they are unable to access PPE through their business as usual and designated wholesaler routes. We have also mobilised a National Supply Disruption Response system to respond to emergency PPE requests, including for the adult social care sector if they cannot obtain PPE through other routes.

On access to COVID-19 testing, staff that are experiencing symptoms can be referred for testing by their employer, use the self-referral portal to order a home test kit or visit a regional testing site.

28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Care Quality Commission personnel have been dispatched to the front line during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is committed to supporting its colleagues who wish to undertake a different role to support the national effort in combatting COVID-19. As of 30 April 2020, the CQC has 101 colleagues with a formal external loan agreement. It has released 18 colleagues to the Department, 16 to NHS Improvement, one to Public Health England and one to Public Health Wales. It has released an additional 65 colleagues under local agreements to organisations including National Health Service trusts, general practitioner practices and pharmacies. In the majority of cases they are undertaking a frontline role. The CQC paused its routine inspection programme on 16 March 2020. This has freed up around 2,300 specialist advisors, who are not the CQC’s employees but can be called upon to support their inspection programme alongside clinical duties, to focus on frontline work.

24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made towards the introduction of a statutory appeals process for adult social care as provided for by section 72 of the Care Act 2014; and whether such a process will be in place by April 2020.

Putting social care on a sustainable footing, where everyone is treated with dignity and respect, is one of the biggest challenges we face as a society. The Government will bring forward a plan for social care this year. There are complex questions to address, which is why we will seek to build cross-party consensus. We will consider all options available to ensure that every person is treated with dignity and offered the security they deserve, and that nobody needing care is forced to sell their home to pay for it.

25th Jun 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance and advice they provide for informal carers of patients with nutritional problems and eating difficulties.

The Government remains committed to support informal carers to provide care for those they care for.

While the Department does not provide specific guidance and advice for carers of those they care for with nutritional problems and eating difficulties, the Care Act 2014 requires that where an adult or carer appears to have care and support needs the local authority must carry out a care assessment. It must then decide if the person has eligible needs by considering the outcomes the person wants to achieve, what needs they have, and how these impact on their wellbeing.

Where a person is assessed as having eligible care and support needs, these must be met by their local authority. For those who do not meet the eligibility criteria, local authorities should signpost people to relevant services. This includes guidance and advice for informal carers of patients with nutritional problems.

One of the eligibility determinations in the Care Act 2014 for care and support is managing and maintaining nutrition. In addition, there are other sources of information carers can access, such as advice from healthcare professionals. The nutrition company Nutricia also produces information for carers to help provide better support for them around nutritional problems and eating difficulties. The leaflets are available free online as downloads from Carers UK.

6th Feb 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to conduct a public consultation on changing the pneumococcal vaccination programme, following advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation to move to a "1 + 1" schedule for pneumococcal vaccine use in children.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) provides independent expert advice on the United Kingdom immunisation programme. It bases its recommendations on a comprehensive review of a wide range of scientific and other evidence, including from the published literature, and commissioned studies such as independent analyses of vaccine effectiveness and cost effectiveness. It can consult with stakeholders on its advice when it deems this necessary.

At its meeting in October 2017, the JCVI advised a change to the UK’s childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) schedule. It recommended that infants should receive a single dose in infancy followed by a booster at one year of age (a “1+1” schedule). This advice was based on high vaccine uptake and effectiveness of the current PCV programme in the UK which has reduced vaccine-preventable pneumococcal disease.

The JCVI conducted a short focused consultation in January on its proposed advice about the PCV schedule. This concluded on 2 February. It is understood that some stakeholders have requested an extension to this consultation. The JCVI considered this request at its meeting on 7 February and their decision on this will be made public shortly. It is the JCVI rather than the Government that is best placed to carry out consultation about scheduling within the vaccine programme and who to target the consultation at.

6th Feb 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will place in the Library of the House copies of estimates made by the Joint Committee on Immunisation and Vaccination of the number of cases of invasive pneumococcal disease that may result from a reduction in the number of doses in the infant pneumococcal vaccination programme.

Public Health England has undertaken modelling on the impact of a reduced dose pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) schedule in the United Kingdom. The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) reviewed the modelling in October 2017 and after considering all relevant evidence advised a revised schedule for PCV13 vaccine, with vaccination offered at three months and 12 months.

The JCVI is currently undertaking a consultation on their advice, therefore the estimates requested are not yet finalised. The modelling will be submitted for publication in a peer reviewed journal in spring 2018.

6th Dec 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to ensure that people delivering homecare are at Tier 2 within the Care Certificate, equivalent to their NHS counterparts.

The Challenge on Dementia 2020, published in February 2015, made clear that, by 2020, we expect social care providers to provide appropriate training on dementia to all relevant staff. A copy of the Challenge on Dementia 2020 is attached.

The Department estimates that more than 100,000 social care workers have already received dementia awareness training. Newly appointed health care assistants and social care support workers, including those providing care and support to people with dementia and their carers, should undergo training as part of the national implementation of the Care Certificate.

Standard 9 of the Care Certificate concerns awareness of mental health, dementia and learning disabilities. In meeting the standard, each worker must show that he or she understands the needs and experiences of people with mental health conditions, dementia or learning disabilities, the importance of promoting their health and wellbeing, the adjustments which may be necessary in delivering their care, and the importance of early detection. They must also prove that they understand the legal context, including mental capacity considerations.

This standard is based in tier 1 of the Dementia Core Skills Education and Training Framework, which focuses on awareness. This tier of knowledge is applicable across the spectrum of health and adult social care services and so is at an appropriate level to inform the Care Certificate’s content.

6th Dec 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what recent assessment they have made of the level of dementia training provided to homecare workers delivering care to people with dementia.

The Challenge on Dementia 2020, published in February 2015, made clear that, by 2020, we expect social care providers to provide appropriate training on dementia to all relevant staff. A copy of the Challenge on Dementia 2020 is attached.

The Department estimates that more than 100,000 social care workers have already received dementia awareness training. Newly appointed health care assistants and social care support workers, including those providing care and support to people with dementia and their carers, should undergo training as part of the national implementation of the Care Certificate.

Standard 9 of the Care Certificate concerns awareness of mental health, dementia and learning disabilities. In meeting the standard, each worker must show that he or she understands the needs and experiences of people with mental health conditions, dementia or learning disabilities, the importance of promoting their health and wellbeing, the adjustments which may be necessary in delivering their care, and the importance of early detection. They must also prove that they understand the legal context, including mental capacity considerations.

This standard is based in tier 1 of the Dementia Core Skills Education and Training Framework, which focuses on awareness. This tier of knowledge is applicable across the spectrum of health and adult social care services and so is at an appropriate level to inform the Care Certificate’s content.

6th Dec 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to ensure that all homecare workers receive training relating specifically to dementia.

The Challenge on Dementia 2020, published in February 2015, made clear that, by 2020, we expect social care providers to provide appropriate training on dementia to all relevant staff. A copy of the Challenge on Dementia 2020 is attached.

The Department estimates that more than 100,000 social care workers have already received dementia awareness training. Newly appointed health care assistants and social care support workers, including those providing care and support to people with dementia and their carers, should undergo training as part of the national implementation of the Care Certificate.

Standard 9 of the Care Certificate concerns awareness of mental health, dementia and learning disabilities. In meeting the standard, each worker must show that he or she understands the needs and experiences of people with mental health conditions, dementia or learning disabilities, the importance of promoting their health and wellbeing, the adjustments which may be necessary in delivering their care, and the importance of early detection. They must also prove that they understand the legal context, including mental capacity considerations.

This standard is based in tier 1 of the Dementia Core Skills Education and Training Framework, which focuses on awareness. This tier of knowledge is applicable across the spectrum of health and adult social care services and so is at an appropriate level to inform the Care Certificate’s content.

5th May 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Prior of Brampton on 26 April (HL7576), why the current section 7a public health functions agreement does not include performance indicators for the provision of pneumococcal vaccination to severely immunocompromised children aged at least five years and adults, as recommended by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation in July 2013.

The performance indicators included in the 2016-17 S7A public health functions agreement do not reflect every activity which is carried out under the agreement.

As I stated in my answer of 26 April, the provision of pneumococcal vaccination to severely immunocompromised children aged at least five years and adults, as recommended by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation in July 2013, is reflected in the relevant service specification for the existing pneumococcal immunisation programme and within the document Immunisation against Infectious Diseases (‘the Green Book’). The Green Book is published on the GOV.UK website in an online only format.

A copy of the service specification on the pneumococcal immunisation programme is attached.

12th Apr 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Prior of Brampton on 21 March (HL7044), why the current section 7a public health functions agreement does not include key deliverables for the provision of pneumococcal vaccination to severely immunocompromised children aged at least five years and adults, as recommended by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation in July 2013.

The 2016-17 Section 7A public health functions agreement specifies key deliverables in relation to new or changed programmes that are being introduced within 2016-17.

The provision of pneumococcal vaccination to severely immunocompromised children aged at least five years and adults, as recommended by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation in July 2013, is reflected in the relevant service specification for the existing pneumococcal immunisation programme and within the document Immunisation against Infectious Diseases (‘the Green Book’). The Green Book is published on the GOV.UK website in an online only format.

15th Mar 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans they have to ensure that the section 7a agreement between the Department of Health and NHS England is automatically updated to reflect recommendations made by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation.

The Section 7A public health functions agreement is updated on an annual basis, at which point any new recommendations from relevant expert committees, including the Joint Committee on Vaccinations and Immunisation (JCVI), are taken into account.

If the JCVI makes a recommendation which is urgent, for example in the case of a public health emergency, the agreement can be amended in-year by agreement between the Department and NHS England.

15th Mar 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what actions (1) NHS England, and (2) Public Health England, are taking to improve levels of vaccination coverage of recommended vaccines for adults in areas with low levels of uptake.

Through the National Health Service public health functions agreement (S7A), NHS England commissions services from a variety of providers across England, and has a national service specification outlining the national standards and expectations. Immunisation programmes are delivered in partnership with Public Health England (PHE) and the Department, who use contracting and commissioning levers to reduce variation in local levels of performance between different geographical areas. In addition, organisations are working together on a number of priority programmes where there is variation, such as measles, mumps, and rubella to put in place effective actions for improvement.

PHE works in partnership with NHS England and Directors of Public Health to ensure that local population needs are understood and addressed by local immunisation services, and with NHS England local teams to provide leadership and coordination to sustain and improve the successful delivery of existing programmes.

PHE constantly monitors cases of vaccine preventable disease and levels of vaccine coverage.

15th Mar 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans Public Health England has to issue guidance to healthcare professionals on the use of nationally procured vaccine stock.

Public Health England issues guidance to healthcare professionals on the use of nationally procured vaccine stock through chapter three of its publication, ‘Immunisation against infectious diseases’ titled ‘Storage, distribution and disposal of vaccines’. A copy is attached.

15th Mar 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans NHS England has to establish performance floors setting out minimum levels of vaccination coverage in different areas of the country, in line with the commitment in its Putting Patients First business plan.

NHS England has a specific role to commission those public health services set out in the Section 7A public health functions agreement 2016-17, including immunisation programmes and to hold to account providers to ensure that they deliver the contracts that have been agreed. The agreement sets out specific outputs and outcomes to be achieved by NHS England including performance indicators that outline minimum levels of vaccination coverage for different programmes. NHS England publishes national service specifications outlining the minimum levels of vaccinations expected, which in turn are put into contracts with providers at local level.

The Section 7A agreement requires NHS England to at least maintain, or improve, national levels of performance on existing services, while also implementing planned changes. It also includes an ambition to reduce local variation in performance between different geographical areas.

There are no plans to review incentives, however a number are already in place. For example, within primary care general practitioner (GP) settings, some vaccination services such as flu for those with diabetes have quality outcome framework indicators attached, whereby GPs are rewarded for good practice. Also, as part of the contracts given outside of the primary care settings, local teams can develop Commissioning for Quality and Innovation payments that link a proportion of providers' income to the achievement of local quality improvement goals.

15th Mar 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans they have to carry out a review of incentives and reimbursement for the delivery of routine immunisation programmes.

NHS England has a specific role to commission those public health services set out in the Section 7A public health functions agreement 2016-17, including immunisation programmes and to hold to account providers to ensure that they deliver the contracts that have been agreed. The agreement sets out specific outputs and outcomes to be achieved by NHS England including performance indicators that outline minimum levels of vaccination coverage for different programmes. NHS England publishes national service specifications outlining the minimum levels of vaccinations expected, which in turn are put into contracts with providers at local level.

The Section 7A agreement requires NHS England to at least maintain, or improve, national levels of performance on existing services, while also implementing planned changes. It also includes an ambition to reduce local variation in performance between different geographical areas.

There are no plans to review incentives, however a number are already in place. For example, within primary care general practitioner (GP) settings, some vaccination services such as flu for those with diabetes have quality outcome framework indicators attached, whereby GPs are rewarded for good practice. Also, as part of the contracts given outside of the primary care settings, local teams can develop Commissioning for Quality and Innovation payments that link a proportion of providers' income to the achievement of local quality improvement goals.

9th Feb 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether Clinical Commissioning Groups and NHS trusts are responsible for the funding or provision of incontinence pads to residents of (1) care homes for personal care, and (2) care homes with nursing care.

The legislation under which NHS England and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) commission services requires them to arrange for the provision of services for which they are responsible, to such extent as they consider necessary to meet all reasonable requirements.

For CCGs, this includes offering continence services as part of their obligation to provide community health. Although CCGs often focus on prevention and treatment, it is expected any standard continence service should include access to products. The criteria for the provisioning of continence products are set by individual CCGs. To support CCGs, NHS England has recently published new guidance to help improve the care and experience of children and adults with continence issues. This encourages much greater collaboration between health and social care.

A copy of the guidance Excellence in continence care is attached.

18th Nov 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what policy the NHS has about protecting the mental health of its workforce.

NHS England’s recent announcement "A healthy NHS workforce", aims to raise staff awareness and understanding of mental health issues and ensure staff have access to help, support and treatment when they need it.


“A healthy NHS workforce” includes, for example, line manager training and, providing NHS staff rapid access to talking therapies. This is currently being tested as part of the Healthy Workforce programme led by NHS England.


NHS Employers is working with NHS England and Public Health England on improving NHS staff health and wellbeing. They offer extensive information and tools for managers to support their employees who are demonstrating signs of mental health problems, or returning to work following periods of sickness absence.


These resources, which are only available online, can be found at the following link:


www.nhsemployers.org/your-workforce/retain-and-improve/staff-experience/health-work-and-wellbeing/protecting-staff-and-preventing-ill-health/supporting-line-managers/managers-guide-on-supporting-workplace-mental-health/supporting-staff-who-are-experiencing-mental-health-problems

18th Nov 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of how many NHS employees have attempted, or committed, suicide in each year between 2009 and 2014.

The Government has not assessed how many National Health Service employees have attempted, or committed, suicide in each year between 2009 and 2014. The Department does not collect this information centrally.


However, the Department is not complacent and commissions NHS Employers to support trusts to improve the physical and mental health and wellbeing of their employees, which is the responsibility of employers across the NHS in England.


NHS Employers is working with NHS England and Public Health England on NHS England’s recently announced “A healthy NHS workforce", a commitment in its Five Year Forward View “which includes increasing awareness of and addressing mental health issues affecting NHS staff”. A copy of the announcement is attached.


18th Nov 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what cost was incurred by the NHS due to days lost through the sickness of healthcare workers in each year between 2009 and 2014.

The number of days lost through the sickness of healthcare workers between 2009 and 2014 were:


England

Full Time Equivalent Days Lost to Sickness Absence (includes non-working days)

Full Time Equivalent Days Available (includes non-working days)

Sickness Absence Rate

2009-10

16,745,315

380,199,666

4.40%

2010-11

15,947,054

383,278,845

4.16%

2011-12

15,555,507

377,908,880

4.12%

2012-13

15,947,518

376,187,354

4.24%

2013-14

15,385,468

378,691,376

4.06%

2014-15

16,423,722

386,388,483

4.25%


Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre


The Government does not record the cost incurred by the National Health Service due to days lost through the sickness of healthcare workers.


Employers are responsible for reducing the days lost through sickness of their staff. The Department supports the NHS by commissioning NHS Employers to provide trusts with advice, guidance and good practice on improving NHS staff health and wellbeing which is available on an online only resource at:


www.nhsemployers.org/your-workforce/retain-and-improve/staff-experience/health-work-and-wellbeing/protecting-staff-and-preventing-ill-health/supporting-line-managers/managers-guide-on-supporting-workplace-mental-health/supporting-staff-who-are-experiencing-mental-health-problems


NHS Employers is also working with NHS England and Public Health England on a £5 million initiative to improve NHS staff health announced in its Five Year Forward View. A copy of the ‘A healthy NHS workforce’ announcement is attached.


18th Nov 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many days were lost through the sickness of healthcare workers in each year between 2009 and 2014.

The number of days lost through the sickness of healthcare workers between 2009 and 2014 were:


England

Full Time Equivalent Days Lost to Sickness Absence (includes non-working days)

Full Time Equivalent Days Available (includes non-working days)

Sickness Absence Rate

2009-10

16,745,315

380,199,666

4.40%

2010-11

15,947,054

383,278,845

4.16%

2011-12

15,555,507

377,908,880

4.12%

2012-13

15,947,518

376,187,354

4.24%

2013-14

15,385,468

378,691,376

4.06%

2014-15

16,423,722

386,388,483

4.25%


Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre


The Government does not record the cost incurred by the National Health Service due to days lost through the sickness of healthcare workers.


Employers are responsible for reducing the days lost through sickness of their staff. The Department supports the NHS by commissioning NHS Employers to provide trusts with advice, guidance and good practice on improving NHS staff health and wellbeing which is available on an online only resource at:


www.nhsemployers.org/your-workforce/retain-and-improve/staff-experience/health-work-and-wellbeing/protecting-staff-and-preventing-ill-health/supporting-line-managers/managers-guide-on-supporting-workplace-mental-health/supporting-staff-who-are-experiencing-mental-health-problems


NHS Employers is also working with NHS England and Public Health England on a £5 million initiative to improve NHS staff health announced in its Five Year Forward View. A copy of the ‘A healthy NHS workforce’ announcement is attached.


18th Nov 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what action they are taking to address the stigma of mental health problems amongst healthcare workers.

The Government included in its Mandate to NHS England an objective for them to “make partnership a success”. This includes “championing the Time to Change campaign to raise awareness of mental health issues and reduce stigma, including in the NHS workforce”.


In taking this forward, NHS England recently announced the "A healthy NHS workforce" initiative. This aims to raise staff awareness and understanding of mental health issues, helping to ensure they have access to help, support and treatment when they need it. A copy of the announcement is attached.


“A healthy NHS workforce” includes, for example, line manager trainingand, providing NHS staff rapid access to talking therapies. Thisis currently being tested as part of the Healthy Workforce programme led by NHS England.


In addition, NHS Employers have launched the How are you feeling NHS? toolkit. This has been developed with NHS staff to help bridge a gap in understanding and enable them to: talk openly and regularly about their emotional health; assess the impact emotional wellbeing has on themselves, their colleagues and patients, and help with action planning to enable more good days than bad. The online only resource can be found at:


www.nhsemployers.org/your-workforce/retain-and-improve/staff-experience/health-work-and-wellbeing/protecting-staff-and-preventing-ill-health/how-are-you-feeling-nhs-toolkit



20th Jan 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what referrals concerning pneumococcal disease the Secretary of State for Health has made to the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation in the last five years; and on what dates those were made.

The Secretary of State has not requested a recommendation about immunisation against pneumococcal disease from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) under the terms of the Health Protection (Vaccination) Regulations 2009 in the last five years.

Departmental officials requested advice from the JCVI in early 2014 about the use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV). At its meeting on 4 June 2014, the minutes of which are available on GOV.UK, the JCVI concluded that PCV13 should remain the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine of choice for infants in the United Kingdom at this time. We have accepted this advice.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
20th Jan 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether, following completion of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) pneumococcal sub-committee's review of pneumococcal disease and the main JCVI meeting of June 2015, they will implement any recommendations made by the JCVI on the pneumococcal disease immunisation programme from winter 2015–16.

The Secretary of State has not requested a recommendation about immunisation against pneumococcal disease from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) under the terms of the Health Protection (Vaccination) Regulations 2009.

We will consider carefully any advice received from the JCVI about immunisation against pneumococcal disease in due course.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
20th Jan 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government when the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation pneumococcal sub-committee plans to complete its review of pneumococcal disease immunisation.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation concluded a review of the adult pneumococcal vaccination programme in 2012. The Committee started a new review at its meeting on 28 January, taking into account the latest information on the epidemiology, cost-effectiveness and impact of adult pneumococcal vaccination. It is anticipated that the review will take six months to complete, subject to the availability of the necessary evidence.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
20th Jan 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government which recommendations made by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) have been implemented by the Secretary of State for Health since May 2010; and in each case, on what date the recommendation was made and on what date it was implemented.

The information requested is shown in the following table.

Recommendation from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation

Date of recommendation

Date of implementation

The use of rotavirus vaccine in the routine infant immunisation programme, if vaccine prices were much less than those at which they are currently being offered, so that such an immunisation programme is cost-effective.

February 2009

July 2013

The use of herpes zoster (shingles) vaccine vaccination programme for adults aged 70 years up to and including 79 years provided that a vaccine is available at a cost effective price.

March 2010 (full statement)

September 20131

The use of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) prophylactic medicine Palivizumab to prevent serious RSV disease in at risk pre-term infants.

October 2010

October 20102

The annual influenza vaccination programme be extended to include children aged 2 to under 17 years of age.

July 2012

September 20133

Notes

  1. This programme is being phased in with 71-79 year-olds being offered shingles vaccines on a “catch-up” basis alongside the routine cohort of 70 year-olds. In 2013, vaccine was offered to 70 and 79 year-olds.

  1. This programme is to protect at-risk pre-term infants for whom RSV infection is likely to cause serious illness or death. It is not managed centrally but commissioned through specialised commissioning. Guidance was provided to the National Health Service in “Immunisation against Infectious Disease” following this recommendation in 2010.

  1. The extension programme for children will be phased in over a number of years. This extension began in 2013-14 with all two and three year-olds being offered vaccination through general practitioner surgeries, and 5-11 year old children in seven areas being offered vaccination through pilot programmes.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
2nd Dec 2014
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether the indicators measuring under-75 mortality rates in (1) the NHS Outcomes Framework, and (2) the Clinical Commissioning Groups Outcomes Indicator Set, are compatible with the obligations against age discrimination under the Equality Act 2010.

One of the underpinning principles of the NHS Outcomes Framework is to ensure that it encourages the promotion of equality in line with the Equality Act 2010.

The Domain 1 premature mortality indicators in the NHS Outcomes Framework and Clinical Commissioning Groups Outcomes Indicator Set are capped at age 75 because the attribution of the cause of death is more vexed for older people, who often have co-morbidities. Therefore, including those aged 75 and above could lead these indicators to become misleading.

However, to ensure all age groups are covered equally, ‘Life Expectancy at 75’ is an overarching indicator in Domain 1 of the NHS Outcomes Framework. This indicator captures ages 75 and over and all conditions.

The above information is contained in the NHS Outcomes Framework 2011-12 Equalities Impact Assessment and the NHS Outcomes Framework 2011-12, both of which have already been placed in the Library.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
24th Nov 2014
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have any plans to increase the extent of community healthcare coverage to conditions, such as frontotemporal dementia, which to date they have considered highly socially complex, rather than medically complex, and not deemed a primary health care need.

Health and Wellbeing Boards in each upper-tier Local Authority are responsible for the development of Joint Strategic Needs Assessments to identify the current and future health and wellbeing needs of the local population and a Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy that sets the strategic direction for local commissioning decisions. This may include assessment of the prevalence and impact of dementia, and appropriate actions for prevention, diagnosis and care.

The healthcare provided is inclusive of all types of dementia including frontotemporal dementia.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
18th Nov 2014
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the financial impact on the National Health Service of poor health caused by cold homes.

The annual cost to the National Health Service in England of cold housing is reported to be between £850 million1 and £1.36 billion2.This does not include additional spending by social services, or economic losses through absences from work. Total costs to the NHS and the country are unknown3.

The Cold Weather Plan for England 3 is a framework intended to protect the population from harm to health from cold weather, including vulnerable older people. It aims to prevent the major avoidable effects on health during periods of cold weather in England by alerting people to the negative health effects of cold weather, and enabling them to prepare and respond appropriately.

Help is available through Cold Weather Payments which provide more targeted support for vulnerable low-income groups. The Government has permanently increased Cold Weather Payments from £8.50 to £25 for the duration of this Parliament for each qualifying period of cold weather.

This winter over 2 million low income households, including over 1.4 million poorer pensioners, will receive a discount of £140 off their electricity bill through the Warm Home Discount scheme.

Winter Fuel Payments also provide assurance to older people, who may suffer the worst impacts of a progressive condition, so that they can keep warm during the winter months. In addition, around 482,000 low income and vulnerable homes have received energy efficiency measures under Energy Companies Obligation.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change have commissioned work that will allow them to model the potential cost-savings to health and social care services from energy efficiency measures and other interventions.

Notes:

1. Department of Health (2010) ‘Winter kills’, in 2009 Annual Report of the Chief Medical Officer

2. The Cost of Cold: Why we need to protect the health of older people in winter

3. Public Health England (2014) The Cold Weather Plan for England. Making the case: why long-term strategic planning for cold weather is essential to health and wellbeing

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
18th Nov 2014
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions have taken place internally within the Department of Health regarding the impact of cold homes on the health of older people.

The impact of cold homes on the health of older people has been discussed internally within the Department (DH) during the development of policy initiatives to prevent major avoidable effects on health during periods of cold weather. These initiatives include the The Cold Weather Plan for England, Keep Warm Keep Well leaflet and the Get Ready For Winter campaign hosted by the Met Office.

Further discussions were held at the Annual Cold Weather Plan seminarthis stakeholder event brings together colleagues from the DH, Local Government Association, NHS England, Public Health England, academia and the voluntary and community sector to discuss issues around the cold weather plan and how to best support local action. In addition, discussions were held at the Health officials working group – this is a regular meeting attended by the Department of Energy and Climate Change, DH and Public Health England. The aim of this group is to share information on cold weather, fuel poverty and health impacts with a view to ensure the fuel poverty strategy is aligned with health policy.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
30th Jul 2014
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps have been taken to explore the feasibility of replicating the Liverpool STARS programme for people at the end of life elsewhere in England.

There are currently no plans to explore the feasibility of replicating the Liverpool STARS programme for people at the end of life elsewhere in England. This is a local initiative and it is for commissioners in other localities to determine how best to improve the provision of end of life care services in their areas, based on the needs of their populations.

NHS England is responsible for improving end of life care services nationally and has established, and is supporting, palliative care networks across England. Through these networks and the work of NHS Improving Quality, NHS England is continuing to support improvements in palliative care services and sharing of good practice. The Transforming End of Life Care in Acute Hospitals programme is also helping to drive improvements for people in hospitals.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
30th Jul 2014
NHS
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Ministerial Statement by the Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt MP on 22 July (HC Deb, col 119WS), at what point the Department of Health decided on a "commitment to stability" for the NHS Mandate 2015–16 and whether this commitment will prevent changes to the Mandate ahead of its publication.

The Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt MP, announced the Government’s intention to maintain a stable Mandate for 2015-16 at the same time as publishing the first Annual Assessment of NHS England. The Annual Assessment, and NHS England’s first Annual Report, describe an organisation that has established itself and made progress, but has more to do to deliver all of its objectives. The decision to propose a stable Mandate for 2015-16 was taken in view of the importance of continuity of purpose for NHS England in the final year of the current spending review cycle. The priorities for the National Health Service remain those described in the current Mandate for 2014-15, and the Government wants NHS England to make further progress still on the ambitious agenda already set.

As set out in my Written Ministerial Statement on 22 July (HL Deb, column WS124-5), the Department is engaging with key stakeholders on its proposed approach over the summer. The Government will consider views expressed before finalising the Mandate for publication in the autumn.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
5th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which Minister has responsibility for inclusive societies.

The FCDO Minister responsible for gender and equalities is Vicky Ford. I am the Minister responsible for open societies and human rights.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports of the use of chemical weapons in Northern Iraq by the government of Turkey.

The United Kingdom opposes the use of chemical weapons in all circumstances. We take seriously any credible evidence of the use of chemical weapons. We monitor closely allegations of chemical weapons use in northern Iraq. These remain unsubstantiated. Evidence of chemical weapons use should be provided through appropriate channels to the Technical Secretariat Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to assess the effectiveness of their Official Development Assistance disbursement in meeting the (1) rights, and (2) needs, of older women and men; and whether their new International Development Strategy will include specific recognition of the (a) contributions, (b) rights, and (c) needs, of older women and men.

The UK is committed to protecting the human rights of all people at all stages of their lives. FCDO programmes consider the needs of older people, such as through our health systems strengthening and assistive technology activities alongside smaller more targeted projects, such as on social protection. In line with FCDO's commitment to the Inclusive Data Charter, we aim to disaggregate programme data by age, sex and disability where possible, to help us understand the effectiveness and impact of our work.

The forthcoming International Development Strategy will establish an ambitious vision informed by the new global context, aligned with our strategic development goals and demonstrate how the UK plans to remain a global leader on development. The forthcoming refreshes of the Disability Inclusion Strategy and Strategic Vision for Gender Equality will retain a life cycle approach to deliver transformative change for all.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what aid and development programmes they have funded in China since 2016.

Details of UK bilateral Official Development Assistance (ODA) to China between 2009 to 2019 can be found in table A4b of the Statistics on International Development (SID), published on the gov.uk website at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/920048/Table-A4b.ods. Please note in line with SID revision policy there has been a minor revision to the 2019 SID dataset. A data processing error in reporting meant that the published 2019 figure of UK ODA spend in China was £500,000 lower than the actual spend [as the Grant in Aid ODA for the Great Britain-China Centre (GBCC) was mistakenly attributed to 'developing countries unspecified']

Further details on the programmes that underpin the figures in table A4b, including project titles and descriptions, can be found in the ODA activity level datasets published on gov.uk: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/921034/Data_Underlying_SID_2019.ods (for 2017-2019) and https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/695435/data-underlying-the-sid2017-revision-March.ods (for 2009 - 2016).

Her Majesty's Government's final 2020 ODA spend, including country data, will be published in the 'Statistics on International Development: Final UK Aid Spend' in autumn 2021.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to support the proposed United Nations Convention on the Rights of Older Persons; and what assessments they have made of the potential risks of ratifying this convention, including the risk that older people may be classified as having different human rights to other adults.

The UK is clear that human rights are universal and is committed to protecting the human rights of all persons, including older persons. The UK recognises that there can be barriers to the enjoyment of human rights associated with certain characteristics, including age, and we know that older persons often face serious human rights issues in many parts of the world. We are supportive, in principle, of a multilateral instrument dedicated to the rights of older persons, and welcome the UN Open Ended Working Group on Ageing's work to help deepen our understanding of the important issues, before we consider what might be the most appropriate solution. There is currently no draft Convention for the UK to consider ratifying. We will continue to work closely with Parliament, academia, civil society and national human rights institutions, to draw on their expertise and ensure that our approach takes account of their views.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultation they had, if any, with survivors of modern slavery prior to the (1) design, and (2) implementation, of the Recovery Needs Assessment, published on 8 November 2021.

The Government is committed to delivering tailored, needs-based support to assist victims of modern slavery in their recovery.

The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) was introduced on 27 September 2019. Throughout the design and implementation of the Recovery Needs Assessment we engaged with our primary support provider, The Salvation Army, and our network of specialist support providers who work closely with victims on a daily basis.

We are committed to embedding survivor voice in our policy development. In 2020 we undertook work engaging with survivors directly, to better understand their recovery needs and their experiences of the National Referral Mechanism.

We are engaging with survivors, as well as the broader sector, on a new government strategy to tackle modern slavery, alongside ongoing work to improve the victim journey through the RNA process.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
26th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultations they had, if any, with survivors of modern slavery prior to the (1) design, and (2) implementation, of the Recovery Needs Assessment, published on 8 November 2021.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Dec 2021
PKK
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made as to whether the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) poses a terrorist threat to the UK; and what assessment they have made of the ruling by the Court of Cassation in Belgium that the PKK is not a terrorist organisation.

Partiya Karkeren Kurdistani (PKK) has been proscribed as a terrorist organisation in the UK since 2001. The Government does not routinely comment on intelligence matters, including the threat posed by specific proscribed organisations.

The Terrorism Act 2000 allows the Home Secretary to proscribe a group if she has a reasonable belief that it is currently concerned in terrorism and proscription is proportionate action to take. It is this statutory test which the Government applies when considering whether to proscribe an organisation or maintain an extant listing.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with police forces in England and Wales about ensuring that all police officers undertake unconscious bias training.

The public rightly expect police officers to meet high standards of professional conduct. In this country, the power of the police to fulfil their duties is wholly dependent on public approval of their existence, actions and behaviour and on their ability to secure and maintain this public respect.

The College of Policing, which sets and maintains training standards for policing, published the Code of Ethics in 2014. This includes a set of principles for policing, including that all officers and staff should take active steps to oppose discrimination and make their decisions free from prejudice. This is a cornerstone of police training and development.

The College of Policing’s foundation training for all those entering the service includes substantial coverage of police ethics and self-understanding, including the effects of personal conscious and unconscious bias. Initial training covers hate crimes, ethics and equalities, and policing without bias.

Forces also provide local training and development at several different levels ranging from initial entry, leadership and ongoing development to reflect and reinforce organisational values.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that financial pressures on local authorities as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic do not lead to cuts to local police force funding.

The Government has been clear that the police will get the financial support they need to keep our communities safe through the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government took immediate steps to increase the availability of funding for forces to meet cashflow pressures caused by the pandemic. We flexed half of the £168 million Police Uplift ringfenced grant to include expenditure on COVID-19 related pressures for the first six months of the financial year. We also brought forward payment of the £142.6 million police pensions grant, which forces received in April this year.

The Government also recently announced that council tax and business rates collection fund deficits accumulated 2020-21 can be phased over three years rather than paid off in 2021-22. This will give police and other local authorities in England a breathing space when setting their budgets for next year.

The Home Office continues to gather evidence of forces’ additional Covid-19 related expenditures since the introduction of social distancing measures, de-veloped in close consultation with policing sector finance leads. We will use this evidence base to inform cross-Government decisions on the police’s fu-ture funding needs.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Jul 2014
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether there are identified points of contact for employers who wish to offer work opportunities to returning injured military personnel.

A career in the Armed Forces equips service leavers with a wide range of specialist and transferable skills. Such a career will also have instilled and developed characteristics such as leadership, initiative and tenacity, which is why this group of people are in high demand in the public, private, voluntary and community sectors.

The Ministry of Defence prepares personnel through the Career Transition Partnership (CTP) in providing them advice, guidance, vocational training and job finding support to help them secure an appropriate and sustainable career after leaving the Armed Forces. The CTP is a partnering arrangement between the MOD and Right Management Limited and engages with industry and public/charity/voluntary sector organisations to best match work and employment opportunities with personnel leaving the Armed Forces. We work with all industry sectors to offer Service Leavers a range of employmnet options and positions through the creation of partnerships with major organisations such as BAE Systems, Jaguar, Siemens, Google and BT Openreach. The CTP helped 85 per cent of Service Leavers find sustainable employmnet within six months of leaving the Armed Forces in 2013/14.

Those who are medically discharged are entitled to the full range of resettlement provision, regardless of how long they have served or the nature and cause of injuries. We also offer specialised support for wounded, injured and sick personnel and those with the most complex barriers to employment to ensure they receive the most appropriate employment and recovery pathway. This is delivered through the Recovery Career Services in conjunction with the MOD and key charities.

16th Jul 2014
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to respond to offers of employment for returning injured military personnel.

A career in the Armed Forces equips service leavers with a wide range of specialist and transferable skills. Such a career will also have instilled and developed characteristics such as leadership, initiative and tenacity, which is why this group of people are in high demand in the public, private, voluntary and community sectors.

The Ministry of Defence prepares personnel through the Career Transition Partnership (CTP) in providing them advice, guidance, vocational training and job finding support to help them secure an appropriate and sustainable career after leaving the Armed Forces. The CTP is a partnering arrangement between the MOD and Right Management Limited and engages with industry and public/charity/voluntary sector organisations to best match work and employment opportunities with personnel leaving the Armed Forces. We work with all industry sectors to offer Service Leavers a range of employmnet options and positions through the creation of partnerships with major organisations such as BAE Systems, Jaguar, Siemens, Google and BT Openreach. The CTP helped 85 per cent of Service Leavers find sustainable employmnet within six months of leaving the Armed Forces in 2013/14.

Those who are medically discharged are entitled to the full range of resettlement provision, regardless of how long they have served or the nature and cause of injuries. We also offer specialised support for wounded, injured and sick personnel and those with the most complex barriers to employment to ensure they receive the most appropriate employment and recovery pathway. This is delivered through the Recovery Career Services in conjunction with the MOD and key charities.

21st May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they will take to ensure that public toilets reopen after the COVID-19 pandemic.

The government has published guidance (attached) on safer public spaces. It includes advice, information and examples of the potential interventions that can be used in public places to facilitate social distancing in areas of higher footfall such as in parks (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/safer-public-places-urban-centres-and-green-spaces-covid-19). Owners and operators are advised to implement cleaning protocols to limit coronavirus transmission in public places. It is advised that touch points (e.g. handrails and gates) should be particular areas of focus for increased cleaning.

To help everyone maintain good hygiene, consideration should be given to: configuration of toilet facilities to ensure they are kept clean, with social distancing achieved as far as possible and with best practice handwashing followed; where possible, providing hand towels as an alternative to hand dryers in handwashing facilities; signs at public toilets for queuing, social distancing and automatic sanitising; using signs and messages to build awareness of good handwashing technique and other respiratory hygiene behaviours, e.g. around coughing and sneezing in public places; where possible, providing hand towels as an alternative to hand dryers in handwashing facilities; and queue marking indicators at main entrance, popular park destinations and toilets.

We have now made £3.2 billion available to local authorities through an unringfenced grant so they can address pressures they are facing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The package recognises the additional costs and pressures on finances councils are facing as a result of the current crisis. It demonstrates the Government’s commitment to making sure councils, including upper and lower tier authorities, have the resources they need to support their communities through this challenging time.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
9th Apr 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultation they have carried out with (1) local authorities, and (2) others, including providers of specialist housing for older people, about guidance to local authorities under the Neighbourhood Planning Act 2017 on the provision of specialist housing for older people.

In the revised National Planning Policy Framework, published in July 2018, we strengthened policy to create a clear expectation that all local authorities have policies in place for addressing the housing needs of older people. We will publish further planning guidance, to assist councils to put these policies in place, in accordance with the Neighbourhood Planning Act commitment. We have undertaken extensive engagement in relation to the guidance. This includes discussions with a range of local authorities, charities, house builder representatives, and providers of specialist housing for older people, to identify and discuss the key issues. We will publish the guidance in due course.

9th Apr 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish guidance for local authorities under the Neighbourhood Planning Act 2017 on the provision of specialist housing for older people.

In the revised National Planning Policy Framework, published in July 2018, we strengthened policy to create a clear expectation that all local authorities have policies in place for addressing the housing needs of older people. We will publish further planning guidance, to assist councils to put these policies in place, in accordance with the Neighbourhood Planning Act commitment. We have undertaken extensive engagement in relation to the guidance. This includes discussions with a range of local authorities, charities, house builder representatives, and providers of specialist housing for older people, to identify and discuss the key issues. We will publish the guidance in due course.

14th Oct 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what checks and balances are in place to ensure that the 2015–16 Disabled Facilities Grant allocation is spent in the prescribed areas.

Helping disabled people to live independently in their own homes for longer through adaptations remains a key priority for this Government. The Government will have invested just over a billion pounds into the Disabled Facilities Grant between 2011-12 and 2015-16. This has delivered around 200,000 adaptations to the homes of disabled people. The Disabled Facilities Grant is a non-ringfenced capital grant paid via the Better Care Fund to local housing authorities. Better Care Fund commissioners are required to confirm they have passed the Disabled Facilities Grant funding on to local housing authorities in their quarterly returns to NHS England. This enables local housing authorities to continue to meet their statutory duty to provide adaptations to the homes of those disabled people who qualify.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Oct 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government when there will be further announcements regarding the future development of the Disability Facilities Grant.

Helping disabled people to live independently in their own homes for longer through adaptations remains a key priority for this Government. The Government will have invested just over a billion pounds into the Disabled Facilities Grant between 2011-12 and 2015-16. This has delivered around 200,000 adaptations to the homes of disabled people. Future funding for the Disabled Facilities Grant is a matter for the Spending Review.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Jul 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the number of older people involved in house fires with an electrical source of ignition in England and Wales in the last five years for which figures are available<i>.</i>

The Department has policy responsibility for England only.

The following table shows the number of casualties aged 65 years old and over who were involved in dwelling fires attended by fire and rescue services in England, where there was reported to have been an electrical power source involved in ignition of the fire. There was incomplete data for 2009/10 so this has not been included:

Year

Casualties aged 65 and over

2010/11

1,116

2011/12

1,132

2012/13

1,062

2013/14

949

Casualties include fatalities, hospital admissions, and cases where first aid was administered or precautionary checks recommended. The ages of people involved are only reported when they are casualties, and so we do not hold information on the total number of fires involving older people.

An electrical source of ignition has been interpreted as where the power source involved in the fire was reported as being electricity, although these figures will include incidents where the cause of the fire was not necessarily a direct result of the electrical source – for example, including careless handling, placing articles too close to appliances, and cooking.

Data are as reported on the Incident Recording System (IRS) by fire and rescue authorities. 2009/10 was the first year of the IRS and totals are slightly underreported.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Jul 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they plan to take to reduce the number of elderly people involved in domestic fires, and what consideration they have given to the case for awareness campaigns for older people on domestic electrical safety.

The Department’s Fire Kills campaign, run in close partnership with fire and rescue authorities, promotes a range of fire safety messages to the public and especially to those most vulnerable to fire, including older people. Although accidental fire deaths in the home in 2013/14 were at an historic low level, over half of fatalities were aged 65 or over.

Recent campaigns have targeted older people, as well as encouraged others to look out for the safety of older neighbours, friends and family. Fire Kills and Electrical Safety First have a longstanding and close partnership to promote electrical fire safety messages, including through the annual Electrical Fire Safety Week, which runs in November each year. The Department continues to explore with other relevant agencies how to expand this element of the Fire Kills programme

In addition, the Department is funding the Royal College of General Practitioners to develop with the Chief Fire Officers’ Association an e-learning tool for GPs to help them consider the risk from fire to their patients. This will help GPs to better identify those at particular risk from fire and to refer them to the local fire and rescue service for tailored fire safety advice, and, if necessary, equipment.

We very much welcome the Chief Fire Officers’ Association current work with NHS England and on behalf of fire and rescue authorities in England which is designed to improve the availability of data about those aged 65 and over and support a more targeted local approach.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)