Baroness Blower Portrait

Baroness Blower

Labour - Life peer

Became Member: 15th October 2019


Education for 11–16 Year Olds Committee
31st Jan 2023 - 23rd Nov 2023
Children and Families Act 2014 Committee
19th Jan 2022 - 21st Nov 2022
National Plan for Sport and Recreation Committee
15th Oct 2020 - 24th Nov 2021
Youth Unemployment Committee
22nd Jul 2021 - 16th Nov 2021


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Baroness Blower has voted in 415 divisions, and 3 times against the majority of their Party.

21 Jan 2021 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Blower voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Labour Aye votes vs 116 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 29 Noes - 440
8 Dec 2021 - Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Blower voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 59 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 82
16 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Blower voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 24 Labour No votes vs 51 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 145 Noes - 179
View All Baroness Blower Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(58 debate interactions)
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
(30 debate interactions)
Lord Sharpe of Epsom (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
(22 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Education
(58 debate contributions)
Home Office
(31 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(27 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Schools Bill [HL] 2022-23
(6,121 words contributed)
Public Order Act 2023
(4,514 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Baroness Blower's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Blower, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


1 Bill introduced by Baroness Blower


A Bill to prohibit state-funded schools from admitting students wholly or partially on the basis of criteria relating to ability or aptitude; and for connected purposes

Lords - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 2nd December 2022

Baroness Blower has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 39 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
7th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government (1) how many, and (2) what percentage, of levy-paying employers have spent more than half the funds in their apprenticeship levy account, for each of the past five financial years.

UK employers with an annual pay bill above £3 million pay the apprenticeship levy, which is collected by HM Revenue & Customs. The government introduced the apprenticeship levy to incentivise larger businesses to develop and invest in their own apprenticeship programmes whilst ensuring the availability of funding for smaller employers wanting to offer apprenticeships. Through the levy, the government is increasing investment in the apprenticeships system in England to £2.7 billion in the 2024/25 financial year to support employers of all sizes build their workforces. As the apprenticeships levy is UK wide, income from the levy also supports the Devolved Administrations to invest in their skills programmes.

In England, employers can use their levy funds for apprenticeships in their own business or transfer their funds to support apprenticeships in other businesses. Funds that levy payers do not draw on is used to fund apprenticeships in small and medium sized businesses. Levy payers are not expected to use all funds available to them, though they are able to do so.

Employers in England who pay the apprenticeship levy can access funds for apprenticeship training and assessment by registering for an apprenticeship service account. The funds in employers’ accounts reflect the ‘English percentage’ of an employer’s levy contribution and include a 10% top-up from the government.

The funds available to levy-paying employers through their apprenticeship service accounts does not represent the total spend on apprenticeships for levy-paying empoyers and is not the same as the apprenticeships budget which funds apprenticeships for employers of all sizes. On average, 98% of the apprenticeships budget has been spent in the last two financial years.

The table below shows the number of levy-paying employers that have spent more than 50% of the funds declared in their apprenticeship service accounts, including the 10% top-up from the government, in each financial year from 2018/19 to 2022/23.

FY

Number of employers who spent more than 50% of levy funds

Percentage of total employers who spent more than 50% of levy funds

2018/19

4,210

27%

2019/20

6,000

36%

2020/21

6,080

35%

2021/22

6,580

35%

2022/23

6,970

35%

The department is supporting employers to make greater use of their levy and have improved the transfer system to make it easier to find other employers who wish to take on apprentices with transferred funds. In April 2019, the department increased the transfer allowance from 10% to 25%, so levy-paying employers could transfer more of their annual funds to support any employer. Since September 2021, over 500 employers, including ASDA, HomeServe, and BT Group, have pledged to transfer over £33 million to support apprenticeships in businesses of all sizes. The table below shows the number of levy-paying employers who spent all of their transfer allowance in each financial year from 2018/19 to 2022/23.

FY (of allowance calculation)

Employers who used all their transfer allowance

Percentage of total employers who used all their transfer allowance

2018/19

70

0.4%

2019/20

170

1.0%

2020/21

280

1.6%

2021/22

370

2.0%

2022/23

270

1.4%

With regard to allowing levy-paying employers to use their funds on non-apprenticeship training schemes and courses, I refer the noble lady to the answer of 10 November 2023 to Question 614.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government (1) how many, and (2) what percentage, of levy-paying employers have transferred the maximum 25 per cent of apprenticeship levy funds to other businesses, for each of the past five financial years.

UK employers with an annual pay bill above £3 million pay the apprenticeship levy, which is collected by HM Revenue & Customs. The government introduced the apprenticeship levy to incentivise larger businesses to develop and invest in their own apprenticeship programmes whilst ensuring the availability of funding for smaller employers wanting to offer apprenticeships. Through the levy, the government is increasing investment in the apprenticeships system in England to £2.7 billion in the 2024/25 financial year to support employers of all sizes build their workforces. As the apprenticeships levy is UK wide, income from the levy also supports the Devolved Administrations to invest in their skills programmes.

In England, employers can use their levy funds for apprenticeships in their own business or transfer their funds to support apprenticeships in other businesses. Funds that levy payers do not draw on is used to fund apprenticeships in small and medium sized businesses. Levy payers are not expected to use all funds available to them, though they are able to do so.

Employers in England who pay the apprenticeship levy can access funds for apprenticeship training and assessment by registering for an apprenticeship service account. The funds in employers’ accounts reflect the ‘English percentage’ of an employer’s levy contribution and include a 10% top-up from the government.

The funds available to levy-paying employers through their apprenticeship service accounts does not represent the total spend on apprenticeships for levy-paying empoyers and is not the same as the apprenticeships budget which funds apprenticeships for employers of all sizes. On average, 98% of the apprenticeships budget has been spent in the last two financial years.

The table below shows the number of levy-paying employers that have spent more than 50% of the funds declared in their apprenticeship service accounts, including the 10% top-up from the government, in each financial year from 2018/19 to 2022/23.

FY

Number of employers who spent more than 50% of levy funds

Percentage of total employers who spent more than 50% of levy funds

2018/19

4,210

27%

2019/20

6,000

36%

2020/21

6,080

35%

2021/22

6,580

35%

2022/23

6,970

35%

The department is supporting employers to make greater use of their levy and have improved the transfer system to make it easier to find other employers who wish to take on apprentices with transferred funds. In April 2019, the department increased the transfer allowance from 10% to 25%, so levy-paying employers could transfer more of their annual funds to support any employer. Since September 2021, over 500 employers, including ASDA, HomeServe, and BT Group, have pledged to transfer over £33 million to support apprenticeships in businesses of all sizes. The table below shows the number of levy-paying employers who spent all of their transfer allowance in each financial year from 2018/19 to 2022/23.

FY (of allowance calculation)

Employers who used all their transfer allowance

Percentage of total employers who used all their transfer allowance

2018/19

70

0.4%

2019/20

170

1.0%

2020/21

280

1.6%

2021/22

370

2.0%

2022/23

270

1.4%

With regard to allowing levy-paying employers to use their funds on non-apprenticeship training schemes and courses, I refer the noble lady to the answer of 10 November 2023 to Question 614.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government (1) how many, and (2) what percentage, of levy paying employers have spent all funds in their apprenticeship levy account, for each of the past five financial years.

UK employers with an annual pay bill above £3 million pay the apprenticeship levy, which is collected by HM Revenue & Customs. Employers in England who pay the apprenticeship levy can access funds for apprenticeship training and assessment by registering for an apprenticeship service account. The funds in employers’ accounts reflect the ‘English percentage’ of an employer’s levy contribution and include a 10% top-up from the government.

While levy-paying employers in England can use all their levy funds the majority do not, which allows these funds from the apprenticeship budget to fund apprenticeship training for small and medium sized businesses, so all companies can benefit from training apprentices.

The table below shows the number of levy-paying employers that have spent all the funds declared in their apprenticeship service accounts, including the 10% top-up from the government, in each financial year from 2018/19 to 2022/23.

Number of employers who spent all levy funds

Percentage of total employers who spent all levy funds

2018/19

1,620

10%

2019/20

2,530

15%

2020/21

2,520

15%

2021/22

2,620

14%

2022/23

2,540

13%

The funds in levy-paying employers’ apprenticeship service accounts do not represent the total spend on apprenticeships for levy paying employers and are not the same as the total annual apprenticeships budget. The ring-fenced apprenticeships budget for England is set by HM Treasury and, although closely linked, is distinct from the total levy income collected. In the last two financial years, on average 98% of the English apprenticeships budget was spent.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what is the average training cost of a traineeship.

In the 2022/23 financial year, the average cost of a traineeship was £2,700. This includes the costs of training and outcome payments, but excludes the cost of the £1,000 incentive payments, introduced in response to COVID-19. As of August 2023, the government has integrated the traineeship programme into the 16-19 study programme and adult education provision.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what is the average cost of a Higher Technical Qualification at (1) Level 4, and (2) Level 5.

Higher Technical Qualifications (HTQs) started being taught in providers in England in September 2022. At this time, the department does not hold data on the average cost of HTQs across all providers.

The government sets maximum fee limits for providers registering with the Office for Students as Approved (Fee Cap) Providers who can charge up to £9,250 for a full-time course leading to an HTQ and up to £6,935 for a part-time course leading to an HTQ in the 2023/24 academic year.

Eligible students, who are starting designated full-time and part-time courses leading to an HTQ in the 2023/24 academic year, qualify for up-front fee loans to meet the full cost of their tuition and partially means-tested loans for living costs.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what is the average cost of a National Vocational Qualification at (1) Level 2, and (2) Level 3.

The Adult Education Budget (AEB) fully funds or co-funds skills provision for eligible adults aged 19 and above from pre-entry to Level 3. About 60% of the AEB has been devolved to nine Mayoral Combined Authorities and the Mayor of London and these authorities are now responsible for, and determine, the funding rates for the provision in their areas. The Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) provides the remaining funding for learners who live in non-devolved areas. Within the ESFA AEB, the department funds qualifications on the programme weighting of the qualification and its size. It is up to providers to decide what provision they offer and then claim the funding rate and therefore the department does not hold the information regarding the cost of delivering specific National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs).

For 16 to 19 year olds, the department calculates funding for institutions using national funding rates, which depend on the overall size of students’ programmes, rather than funding based on specific qualifications. Therefore, the department does not hold information regarding the costs of delivering specific NVQs.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether schools or local authorities that commission unregistered alternative providers require checks on the proprietor and staff before placing pupils in their care.

The department does not hold information about the mean and median amounts spent by a school or local authority on an unregistered alternative provider place in England for (a) pupils with an Education, Health and Care Plan, (b) pupils classified as a Child In Need, (c) Pupil Premium Pupils, and (d) pupils excluded from school. Commissioning arrangements are managed directly by schools and local authorities who require the provision, and they do not report their expenditure at the level of detail requested.

The department also does not routinely collect data on the number of safeguarding concerns that have taken place in unregistered APs. Commissioners are responsible for the AP they use and ensuring that it is safe.

The Alternative Provision (AP) statutory guidance is clear that AP, including unregistered AP, should be good quality, registered where appropriate, and delivered by high quality staff with suitable training, experience and safeguarding checks. The guidance can be found in the attached document. Responsibility for the AP used rests with the commissioner. The nature of the intervention, its objectives and the timeline to achieve these objectives should be agreed and clearly defined.

Some local authorities or partnerships of schools have developed a local directory of ‘approved’ provision, which meets clearly defined standards, including registration where necessary, safeguarding, health and safety, quality of accommodation, quality of education etc. These lists, where they exist, can provide a helpful starting point. However, prior to placement, commissioners should still assess whether the provision offers high quality education and is suitable for the pupil’s individual needs.

‘Keeping children safe in education’ is statutory guidance to which all schools and colleges must have regard when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, and can be found in the attached document. The guidance states that where a school places a pupil in AP, the school continues to be responsible for the safeguarding of that pupil and should be satisfied that the provider meets the needs of the pupil. Schools should obtain written confirmation from the AP that appropriate safeguarding checks have been carried out on individuals working at the establishment, for example, those checks that the school would otherwise perform in respect of its own staff.

Ofsted does not inspect individual unregistered AP settings unless they are part of a criminal investigation where there are concerns that the provider may be operating illegally as an independent school. Any provider of AP must be registered as an independent school if it caters full time for five or more pupils of compulsory school age, or one pupil who is looked after or has an education, health and care plan. Under Section 97 of the Education and Skills Act 2008, the Unregistered Schools Team does not inspect the quality of the provision or the safeguarding arrangements.

The School Inspection Handbook states that during school inspections, inspectors will evaluate how well a school continues to take responsibility for its pupils who attend AP, including in unregistered AP. The Handbook can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-inspection-handbook-eif/school-inspection-handbook-for-september-2023. Inspectors will normally visit a sample of any part-time unregistered AP during the inspection. This is to assess the adequacy of the school’s quality assurance process. A school is likely to be judged inadequate for leadership and management if it is making ineffective or inappropriate use of AP, failing to ensure the suitability of a provision, being unaware of the number of their pupils attending AP or not taking responsibility for their pupils who attend AP.

From January 2023, Ofsted is inspecting the local authority commissioning of AP as part of Area Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) inspections. The Area SEND inspection Handbook states that in doing so inspectors will consider whether the local authority’s use of unregistered and online provision is lawful and appropriate to children and young people’s needs. The Handbook can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/area-send-framework-and-handbook/area-send-inspections-framework-and-handbook.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how often Ofsted inspect unregistered alternative providers that provides education placements for school-aged pupils in England.

The department does not hold information about the mean and median amounts spent by a school or local authority on an unregistered alternative provider place in England for (a) pupils with an Education, Health and Care Plan, (b) pupils classified as a Child In Need, (c) Pupil Premium Pupils, and (d) pupils excluded from school. Commissioning arrangements are managed directly by schools and local authorities who require the provision, and they do not report their expenditure at the level of detail requested.

The department also does not routinely collect data on the number of safeguarding concerns that have taken place in unregistered APs. Commissioners are responsible for the AP they use and ensuring that it is safe.

The Alternative Provision (AP) statutory guidance is clear that AP, including unregistered AP, should be good quality, registered where appropriate, and delivered by high quality staff with suitable training, experience and safeguarding checks. The guidance can be found in the attached document. Responsibility for the AP used rests with the commissioner. The nature of the intervention, its objectives and the timeline to achieve these objectives should be agreed and clearly defined.

Some local authorities or partnerships of schools have developed a local directory of ‘approved’ provision, which meets clearly defined standards, including registration where necessary, safeguarding, health and safety, quality of accommodation, quality of education etc. These lists, where they exist, can provide a helpful starting point. However, prior to placement, commissioners should still assess whether the provision offers high quality education and is suitable for the pupil’s individual needs.

‘Keeping children safe in education’ is statutory guidance to which all schools and colleges must have regard when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, and can be found in the attached document. The guidance states that where a school places a pupil in AP, the school continues to be responsible for the safeguarding of that pupil and should be satisfied that the provider meets the needs of the pupil. Schools should obtain written confirmation from the AP that appropriate safeguarding checks have been carried out on individuals working at the establishment, for example, those checks that the school would otherwise perform in respect of its own staff.

Ofsted does not inspect individual unregistered AP settings unless they are part of a criminal investigation where there are concerns that the provider may be operating illegally as an independent school. Any provider of AP must be registered as an independent school if it caters full time for five or more pupils of compulsory school age, or one pupil who is looked after or has an education, health and care plan. Under Section 97 of the Education and Skills Act 2008, the Unregistered Schools Team does not inspect the quality of the provision or the safeguarding arrangements.

The School Inspection Handbook states that during school inspections, inspectors will evaluate how well a school continues to take responsibility for its pupils who attend AP, including in unregistered AP. The Handbook can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-inspection-handbook-eif/school-inspection-handbook-for-september-2023. Inspectors will normally visit a sample of any part-time unregistered AP during the inspection. This is to assess the adequacy of the school’s quality assurance process. A school is likely to be judged inadequate for leadership and management if it is making ineffective or inappropriate use of AP, failing to ensure the suitability of a provision, being unaware of the number of their pupils attending AP or not taking responsibility for their pupils who attend AP.

From January 2023, Ofsted is inspecting the local authority commissioning of AP as part of Area Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) inspections. The Area SEND inspection Handbook states that in doing so inspectors will consider whether the local authority’s use of unregistered and online provision is lawful and appropriate to children and young people’s needs. The Handbook can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/area-send-framework-and-handbook/area-send-inspections-framework-and-handbook.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether there are any safeguarding checks or requirements for an unregistered alternative provider that provides education placements for school-aged pupils in England.

The department does not hold information about the mean and median amounts spent by a school or local authority on an unregistered alternative provider place in England for (a) pupils with an Education, Health and Care Plan, (b) pupils classified as a Child In Need, (c) Pupil Premium Pupils, and (d) pupils excluded from school. Commissioning arrangements are managed directly by schools and local authorities who require the provision, and they do not report their expenditure at the level of detail requested.

The department also does not routinely collect data on the number of safeguarding concerns that have taken place in unregistered APs. Commissioners are responsible for the AP they use and ensuring that it is safe.

The Alternative Provision (AP) statutory guidance is clear that AP, including unregistered AP, should be good quality, registered where appropriate, and delivered by high quality staff with suitable training, experience and safeguarding checks. The guidance can be found in the attached document. Responsibility for the AP used rests with the commissioner. The nature of the intervention, its objectives and the timeline to achieve these objectives should be agreed and clearly defined.

Some local authorities or partnerships of schools have developed a local directory of ‘approved’ provision, which meets clearly defined standards, including registration where necessary, safeguarding, health and safety, quality of accommodation, quality of education etc. These lists, where they exist, can provide a helpful starting point. However, prior to placement, commissioners should still assess whether the provision offers high quality education and is suitable for the pupil’s individual needs.

‘Keeping children safe in education’ is statutory guidance to which all schools and colleges must have regard when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, and can be found in the attached document. The guidance states that where a school places a pupil in AP, the school continues to be responsible for the safeguarding of that pupil and should be satisfied that the provider meets the needs of the pupil. Schools should obtain written confirmation from the AP that appropriate safeguarding checks have been carried out on individuals working at the establishment, for example, those checks that the school would otherwise perform in respect of its own staff.

Ofsted does not inspect individual unregistered AP settings unless they are part of a criminal investigation where there are concerns that the provider may be operating illegally as an independent school. Any provider of AP must be registered as an independent school if it caters full time for five or more pupils of compulsory school age, or one pupil who is looked after or has an education, health and care plan. Under Section 97 of the Education and Skills Act 2008, the Unregistered Schools Team does not inspect the quality of the provision or the safeguarding arrangements.

The School Inspection Handbook states that during school inspections, inspectors will evaluate how well a school continues to take responsibility for its pupils who attend AP, including in unregistered AP. The Handbook can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-inspection-handbook-eif/school-inspection-handbook-for-september-2023. Inspectors will normally visit a sample of any part-time unregistered AP during the inspection. This is to assess the adequacy of the school’s quality assurance process. A school is likely to be judged inadequate for leadership and management if it is making ineffective or inappropriate use of AP, failing to ensure the suitability of a provision, being unaware of the number of their pupils attending AP or not taking responsibility for their pupils who attend AP.

From January 2023, Ofsted is inspecting the local authority commissioning of AP as part of Area Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) inspections. The Area SEND inspection Handbook states that in doing so inspectors will consider whether the local authority’s use of unregistered and online provision is lawful and appropriate to children and young people’s needs. The Handbook can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/area-send-framework-and-handbook/area-send-inspections-framework-and-handbook.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether there are any minimum standards for an unregistered alternative provider which provides education placements for school-aged pupils to operate in England.

The department does not hold information about the mean and median amounts spent by a school or local authority on an unregistered alternative provider place in England for (a) pupils with an Education, Health and Care Plan, (b) pupils classified as a Child In Need, (c) Pupil Premium Pupils, and (d) pupils excluded from school. Commissioning arrangements are managed directly by schools and local authorities who require the provision, and they do not report their expenditure at the level of detail requested.

The department also does not routinely collect data on the number of safeguarding concerns that have taken place in unregistered APs. Commissioners are responsible for the AP they use and ensuring that it is safe.

The Alternative Provision (AP) statutory guidance is clear that AP, including unregistered AP, should be good quality, registered where appropriate, and delivered by high quality staff with suitable training, experience and safeguarding checks. The guidance can be found in the attached document. Responsibility for the AP used rests with the commissioner. The nature of the intervention, its objectives and the timeline to achieve these objectives should be agreed and clearly defined.

Some local authorities or partnerships of schools have developed a local directory of ‘approved’ provision, which meets clearly defined standards, including registration where necessary, safeguarding, health and safety, quality of accommodation, quality of education etc. These lists, where they exist, can provide a helpful starting point. However, prior to placement, commissioners should still assess whether the provision offers high quality education and is suitable for the pupil’s individual needs.

‘Keeping children safe in education’ is statutory guidance to which all schools and colleges must have regard when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, and can be found in the attached document. The guidance states that where a school places a pupil in AP, the school continues to be responsible for the safeguarding of that pupil and should be satisfied that the provider meets the needs of the pupil. Schools should obtain written confirmation from the AP that appropriate safeguarding checks have been carried out on individuals working at the establishment, for example, those checks that the school would otherwise perform in respect of its own staff.

Ofsted does not inspect individual unregistered AP settings unless they are part of a criminal investigation where there are concerns that the provider may be operating illegally as an independent school. Any provider of AP must be registered as an independent school if it caters full time for five or more pupils of compulsory school age, or one pupil who is looked after or has an education, health and care plan. Under Section 97 of the Education and Skills Act 2008, the Unregistered Schools Team does not inspect the quality of the provision or the safeguarding arrangements.

The School Inspection Handbook states that during school inspections, inspectors will evaluate how well a school continues to take responsibility for its pupils who attend AP, including in unregistered AP. The Handbook can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-inspection-handbook-eif/school-inspection-handbook-for-september-2023. Inspectors will normally visit a sample of any part-time unregistered AP during the inspection. This is to assess the adequacy of the school’s quality assurance process. A school is likely to be judged inadequate for leadership and management if it is making ineffective or inappropriate use of AP, failing to ensure the suitability of a provision, being unaware of the number of their pupils attending AP or not taking responsibility for their pupils who attend AP.

From January 2023, Ofsted is inspecting the local authority commissioning of AP as part of Area Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) inspections. The Area SEND inspection Handbook states that in doing so inspectors will consider whether the local authority’s use of unregistered and online provision is lawful and appropriate to children and young people’s needs. The Handbook can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/area-send-framework-and-handbook/area-send-inspections-framework-and-handbook.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many safeguarding concerns have been recorded regarding unregistered alternative providers in England.

The department does not hold information about the mean and median amounts spent by a school or local authority on an unregistered alternative provider place in England for (a) pupils with an Education, Health and Care Plan, (b) pupils classified as a Child In Need, (c) Pupil Premium Pupils, and (d) pupils excluded from school. Commissioning arrangements are managed directly by schools and local authorities who require the provision, and they do not report their expenditure at the level of detail requested.

The department also does not routinely collect data on the number of safeguarding concerns that have taken place in unregistered APs. Commissioners are responsible for the AP they use and ensuring that it is safe.

The Alternative Provision (AP) statutory guidance is clear that AP, including unregistered AP, should be good quality, registered where appropriate, and delivered by high quality staff with suitable training, experience and safeguarding checks. The guidance can be found in the attached document. Responsibility for the AP used rests with the commissioner. The nature of the intervention, its objectives and the timeline to achieve these objectives should be agreed and clearly defined.

Some local authorities or partnerships of schools have developed a local directory of ‘approved’ provision, which meets clearly defined standards, including registration where necessary, safeguarding, health and safety, quality of accommodation, quality of education etc. These lists, where they exist, can provide a helpful starting point. However, prior to placement, commissioners should still assess whether the provision offers high quality education and is suitable for the pupil’s individual needs.

‘Keeping children safe in education’ is statutory guidance to which all schools and colleges must have regard when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, and can be found in the attached document. The guidance states that where a school places a pupil in AP, the school continues to be responsible for the safeguarding of that pupil and should be satisfied that the provider meets the needs of the pupil. Schools should obtain written confirmation from the AP that appropriate safeguarding checks have been carried out on individuals working at the establishment, for example, those checks that the school would otherwise perform in respect of its own staff.

Ofsted does not inspect individual unregistered AP settings unless they are part of a criminal investigation where there are concerns that the provider may be operating illegally as an independent school. Any provider of AP must be registered as an independent school if it caters full time for five or more pupils of compulsory school age, or one pupil who is looked after or has an education, health and care plan. Under Section 97 of the Education and Skills Act 2008, the Unregistered Schools Team does not inspect the quality of the provision or the safeguarding arrangements.

The School Inspection Handbook states that during school inspections, inspectors will evaluate how well a school continues to take responsibility for its pupils who attend AP, including in unregistered AP. The Handbook can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-inspection-handbook-eif/school-inspection-handbook-for-september-2023. Inspectors will normally visit a sample of any part-time unregistered AP during the inspection. This is to assess the adequacy of the school’s quality assurance process. A school is likely to be judged inadequate for leadership and management if it is making ineffective or inappropriate use of AP, failing to ensure the suitability of a provision, being unaware of the number of their pupils attending AP or not taking responsibility for their pupils who attend AP.

From January 2023, Ofsted is inspecting the local authority commissioning of AP as part of Area Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) inspections. The Area SEND inspection Handbook states that in doing so inspectors will consider whether the local authority’s use of unregistered and online provision is lawful and appropriate to children and young people’s needs. The Handbook can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/area-send-framework-and-handbook/area-send-inspections-framework-and-handbook.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what are the (1) mean, and (2) median, amounts spent by a school or local authority on an unregistered alternative provider place in England for (a) pupils with an Education, Health and Care Plan, (b) pupils classified as a Child In Need, (c) Pupil Premium Pupils, and (d) pupils excluded from school.

The department does not hold information about the mean and median amounts spent by a school or local authority on an unregistered alternative provider place in England for (a) pupils with an Education, Health and Care Plan, (b) pupils classified as a Child In Need, (c) Pupil Premium Pupils, and (d) pupils excluded from school. Commissioning arrangements are managed directly by schools and local authorities who require the provision, and they do not report their expenditure at the level of detail requested.

The department also does not routinely collect data on the number of safeguarding concerns that have taken place in unregistered APs. Commissioners are responsible for the AP they use and ensuring that it is safe.

The Alternative Provision (AP) statutory guidance is clear that AP, including unregistered AP, should be good quality, registered where appropriate, and delivered by high quality staff with suitable training, experience and safeguarding checks. The guidance can be found in the attached document. Responsibility for the AP used rests with the commissioner. The nature of the intervention, its objectives and the timeline to achieve these objectives should be agreed and clearly defined.

Some local authorities or partnerships of schools have developed a local directory of ‘approved’ provision, which meets clearly defined standards, including registration where necessary, safeguarding, health and safety, quality of accommodation, quality of education etc. These lists, where they exist, can provide a helpful starting point. However, prior to placement, commissioners should still assess whether the provision offers high quality education and is suitable for the pupil’s individual needs.

‘Keeping children safe in education’ is statutory guidance to which all schools and colleges must have regard when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, and can be found in the attached document. The guidance states that where a school places a pupil in AP, the school continues to be responsible for the safeguarding of that pupil and should be satisfied that the provider meets the needs of the pupil. Schools should obtain written confirmation from the AP that appropriate safeguarding checks have been carried out on individuals working at the establishment, for example, those checks that the school would otherwise perform in respect of its own staff.

Ofsted does not inspect individual unregistered AP settings unless they are part of a criminal investigation where there are concerns that the provider may be operating illegally as an independent school. Any provider of AP must be registered as an independent school if it caters full time for five or more pupils of compulsory school age, or one pupil who is looked after or has an education, health and care plan. Under Section 97 of the Education and Skills Act 2008, the Unregistered Schools Team does not inspect the quality of the provision or the safeguarding arrangements.

The School Inspection Handbook states that during school inspections, inspectors will evaluate how well a school continues to take responsibility for its pupils who attend AP, including in unregistered AP. The Handbook can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-inspection-handbook-eif/school-inspection-handbook-for-september-2023. Inspectors will normally visit a sample of any part-time unregistered AP during the inspection. This is to assess the adequacy of the school’s quality assurance process. A school is likely to be judged inadequate for leadership and management if it is making ineffective or inappropriate use of AP, failing to ensure the suitability of a provision, being unaware of the number of their pupils attending AP or not taking responsibility for their pupils who attend AP.

From January 2023, Ofsted is inspecting the local authority commissioning of AP as part of Area Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) inspections. The Area SEND inspection Handbook states that in doing so inspectors will consider whether the local authority’s use of unregistered and online provision is lawful and appropriate to children and young people’s needs. The Handbook can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/area-send-framework-and-handbook/area-send-inspections-framework-and-handbook.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Barran on 20 February (HL5425), why they do not collate statistical data on the proportion of children with (1) special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), or (2) an Education, Health and Care plan (EHCP), receiving their education from unregistered providers.

The department does collect information on pupils in local authority placements who are placed with unregistered providers in the alternative provision (AP) census and, since 2022, arrangements made by schools via the schools’ census. This includes whether a child has an education, health and care (EHC) plan.

The department collects the number of sessions that children spend in their current placement during a reference week for the school and (AP) censuses, but not how much time in each location over a full academic year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Barran on 20 February (HL5424), why they do not collate statistical data on the proportion of children’s education spent with unregistered providers.

The department does collect information on pupils in local authority placements who are placed with unregistered providers in the alternative provision (AP) census and, since 2022, arrangements made by schools via the schools’ census. This includes whether a child has an education, health and care (EHC) plan.

The department collects the number of sessions that children spend in their current placement during a reference week for the school and (AP) censuses, but not how much time in each location over a full academic year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the 2022 School Census, how many children (1) who have an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP), or (2) are classified as Children In Need, were placed in unregistered alternative provision for (a) any part of their education, (b) a majority of their education, or (c) all of their education.

The department collects information on pupils in local authority placements who are placed with unregistered providers in the alternative provision census and, since 2022, arrangements made by schools via the schools census.

As of January 2022, there were 35,600 pupils in local authority placements, of which 2,800 were placements in unregistered providers. Data broken down by how many children were placed in these settings for any part of their education, a majority of their education, or all of their education is not available.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the 2022 School Census, how many children were placed in unregistered alternative provision by a local authority or a school for (1) any part of their education, (2) a majority of their education, or (3) all of their education.

The department collects information on pupils in local authority placements who are placed with unregistered providers in the alternative provision census and, since 2022, arrangements made by schools via the schools census.

As of January 2022, there were 35,600 pupils in local authority placements, of which 2,800 were placements in unregistered providers. Data broken down by how many children were placed in these settings for any part of their education, a majority of their education, or all of their education is not available.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, in respect of information gathered in the last School Census, how many children that were excluded from school were placed in an unregistered alternative provision for (1) any part of their education, (2) a majority of their education, or (3) all of their education.

The department collects information on pupils in local authority placements who are placed with unregistered providers in the alternative provision census and, since 2022, arrangements made by schools via the schools census.

As of January 2022, there were 35,600 pupils in local authority placements, of which 2,800 were placements in unregistered providers. Data broken down by how many children were placed in these settings for any part of their education, a majority of their education, or all of their education is not available.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how the membership of the Care Review National Implementation Board will be decided.

The department is now considering the recommendations of the Independent Review of Children’s Social care carefully with those with care experience and all interested stakeholders. We will publish an implementation strategy later this year, which will set out how the department will improve children’s social care. This will include establishing a National Implementation Board that includes people with their own experience of the care system.

In the meantime, the department is taking action, which includes:

  • Support for families with a multi-million-pound package to improve access to support, advice, and services from birth through to adulthood. This includes a total of £695 million for Supporting Families over the next three years. As such, up to 300,000 of the most vulnerable families can be helped before they hit crisis point.
  • Getting the right placements in the right places for children in care by investing £259 million to support provision and create additional places in children’s homes. This is the biggest package of investment in children’s social care placements since 2010. The department has also invested £142 million to introduce new national standards, Ofsted registration, and inspection for supported accommodation for young people. This provision that is currently unregulated.

As the department develops its implementation strategy, it will consider where legislation might be required.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the Care Review National Implementation Board will be established.

The department is now considering the recommendations of the Independent Review of Children’s Social care carefully with those with care experience and all interested stakeholders. We will publish an implementation strategy later this year, which will set out how the department will improve children’s social care. This will include establishing a National Implementation Board that includes people with their own experience of the care system.

In the meantime, the department is taking action, which includes:

  • Support for families with a multi-million-pound package to improve access to support, advice, and services from birth through to adulthood. This includes a total of £695 million for Supporting Families over the next three years. As such, up to 300,000 of the most vulnerable families can be helped before they hit crisis point.
  • Getting the right placements in the right places for children in care by investing £259 million to support provision and create additional places in children’s homes. This is the biggest package of investment in children’s social care placements since 2010. The department has also invested £142 million to introduce new national standards, Ofsted registration, and inspection for supported accommodation for young people. This provision that is currently unregulated.

As the department develops its implementation strategy, it will consider where legislation might be required.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the funding recommendations in The independent review of children’s social care: final report, published on 23 May; and what plans they have to invest in the care system in response to the report.

The department is now considering the recommendations of the Independent Review of Children’s Social care carefully with those with care experience and all interested stakeholders. We will publish an implementation strategy later this year, which will set out how the department will improve children’s social care. This will include establishing a National Implementation Board that includes people with their own experience of the care system.

In the meantime, the department is taking action, which includes:

  • Support for families with a multi-million-pound package to improve access to support, advice, and services from birth through to adulthood. This includes a total of £695 million for Supporting Families over the next three years. As such, up to 300,000 of the most vulnerable families can be helped before they hit crisis point.
  • Getting the right placements in the right places for children in care by investing £259 million to support provision and create additional places in children’s homes. This is the biggest package of investment in children’s social care placements since 2010. The department has also invested £142 million to introduce new national standards, Ofsted registration, and inspection for supported accommodation for young people. This provision that is currently unregulated.

As the department develops its implementation strategy, it will consider where legislation might be required.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to introduce legislation to implement the recommendations in The independent review of children’s social care: final report, published on 23 May.

The department is now considering the recommendations of the Independent Review of Children’s Social care carefully with those with care experience and all interested stakeholders. We will publish an implementation strategy later this year, which will set out how the department will improve children’s social care. This will include establishing a National Implementation Board that includes people with their own experience of the care system.

In the meantime, the department is taking action, which includes:

  • Support for families with a multi-million-pound package to improve access to support, advice, and services from birth through to adulthood. This includes a total of £695 million for Supporting Families over the next three years. As such, up to 300,000 of the most vulnerable families can be helped before they hit crisis point.
  • Getting the right placements in the right places for children in care by investing £259 million to support provision and create additional places in children’s homes. This is the biggest package of investment in children’s social care placements since 2010. The department has also invested £142 million to introduce new national standards, Ofsted registration, and inspection for supported accommodation for young people. This provision that is currently unregulated.

As the department develops its implementation strategy, it will consider where legislation might be required.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to improve outcomes for young people receiving social care; and how their plans fit within the levelling up agenda.

Local authorities have access to £54.1 billion core spending power this financial year to deliver their services, including for children and young people. This is £3.7 billion more than in 2021/22 and includes a £2.35 billion social care grant.

The department is also investing an additional £200 million in funding for the Supporting Families programme by 2024/25, taking planned investment across the next three years to £695 million.

In June 2021 the department extended the duties of Virtual School Heads to include all children with a social worker, backed by £16.6 million of new funding, which will continue in the 2022/23 financial year. This delivers a key recommendation of the Children in Need Review and now means there is a local champion for Children in Need in every local authority across England. Since May 2020 we have also made £26.6 million available to help boost the educational outcomes of children with a social worker and keep them safe from harm, including up to £20.3 million to place social workers in schools in 21 local authorities to support teachers to spot signs of abuse and neglect more quickly.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many civil servants are working on the Independent review of children’s social care.

The independent review of children’s social care is led by Josh MacAlister. The review team is made up of 20 civil servants from across government from a range of backgrounds and disciplines. It is led by a senior civil servant who is Head of the Review team. There are 4 Heads of Team covering: Analysis and Research; Engagement and Participation; Policy and Planning and Stakeholders and Public Engagement. Across these teams are 5 team leaders, five senior policy advisers, three policy advisers, a senior information officer and a senior research officer. Of these 20 civil servants, 5 work part-time.

13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the job titles of civil servants employed (1) full-time, and (2) part-time, on the Independent review of children’s social care.

The independent review of children’s social care is led by Josh MacAlister. The review team is made up of 20 civil servants from across government from a range of backgrounds and disciplines. It is led by a senior civil servant who is Head of the Review team. There are 4 Heads of Team covering: Analysis and Research; Engagement and Participation; Policy and Planning and Stakeholders and Public Engagement. Across these teams are 5 team leaders, five senior policy advisers, three policy advisers, a senior information officer and a senior research officer. Of these 20 civil servants, 5 work part-time.

14th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to assist in the protection of women and girls in the earthquake hit region of Northern Syria.

The UK responded swiftly and committed a significant package of aid to address urgent humanitarian needs to those affected by the earthquake in Syria. This included funding to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) to support immediate needs around childbirth, midwifery and reducing risk of violence against women and girls and support to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) for child protection activities. The UK has also delivered hygiene kits alongside other emergency relief items.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that relief materials reach the earthquake victims in Northern Syria.

In response to the devastating earthquakes, the UK has committed a significant package of aid. In Syria, we have delivered vital lifesaving items such as blankets and tents, and we are supporting trusted partners, including the UN and Syria Civil Defence (White Helmets). The UN-brokered agreement to open additional border crossings into north west Syria for an initial period of three months is welcome and we continue to work with the UN to ensure access is secured in the longer term to improve humanitarian conditions. As of 14 March, over 787 aid trucks provided by six UN agencies have crossed to north west Syria from Turkey.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what diplomatic efforts they are making to pursue a ceasefire in Northern Syria given the continuing clashes in that region.

The UK is closely monitoring developments in northern Syria, where security and stability are necessary to prevent the worsening of the already serious humanitarian situation, especially in the wake of the 6 February earthquakes. The UK continues to use our position at the UN Security Council to call on all parties to respect agreed ceasefires, de-escalate tensions and restrain from activity that could lead to further destabilisation or civilian loss of life. There can be no military solution to the Syrian conflict, only a political settlement on the basis of UNSCR 2254.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the recent police operation at the Kurdish Community Centre in London on relations with that community.

It is a fundamental principal of British Policing that the police are operationally independent of the government, and it is for them take decisions on enforcement action.

No assessment has been made at this time on community relations following the police operation at the Kurdish Community Centre in London.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government under what circumstances police officers are permitted to be in possession of (1) PAVA spray, and (2) TASER, when they are off duty.

Decisions around the equipping of police officers with PAVA spray and TASER are operational matters for Chief Constables.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
23rd Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when the annual report The UK's future nuclear deterrent: the 2022 update to Parliament will be published; and what is the reason for the delay in its publication.

The scheduled annual update to Parliament on the United Kingdom's future nuclear deterrent is undergoing final clearance procedures and will be published in due course.

17th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the current annual cost of the Ministry of Defence's nuclear enterprise.

The forecast cost of the Defence Nuclear Enterprise for financial year 2021-22 is £6.5 billion, around 14 per cent of the £46 billion Defence budget.

13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what studies they undertook to inform the decision to increase nuclear warhead numbers as announced in the policy paper, Global Britain in a Competitive Age: the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy, published on 16 March.

While undertaking the Integrated Review, the Government engaged with a variety of stakeholders with an interest in our nation's security and prosperity, and the global challenges the UK will face over the coming years. These included allies, partners, civil society organisations and businesses.

We remain committed to maintaining the minimum destructive power needed to guarantee that the UK's nuclear deterrent remains credible and effective against the full range of state nuclear threats. This judgement includes an assessment of the decision-making processes of future potential aggressors, and an analysis of the defensive measures that they might employ. Therefore, in recognition of the developing range of technological and doctrinal threats the UK will increase the overall nuclear weapon stockpile ceiling from no more than 225 to no more than 260 warheads, an increase of 15 per cent.

13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the last Trident D5 missile test took place; and how many Trident D5 missiles the UK has.

The last Trident D5 missile test took place as part of the Demonstration and Shakedown Operation with HMS Vengeance in 2016. The UK has sufficient Trident II D5 missiles for its needs.

The Dreadnought Class submarines will begin to enter service from the early 2030s. As announced in the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy we will no longer give public figures for our deployed missile numbers.

13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Trident D5 missiles will be on each Dreadnaught class submarine when this class of submarine enters service.

The last Trident D5 missile test took place as part of the Demonstration and Shakedown Operation with HMS Vengeance in 2016. The UK has sufficient Trident II D5 missiles for its needs.

The Dreadnought Class submarines will begin to enter service from the early 2030s. As announced in the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy we will no longer give public figures for our deployed missile numbers.

13th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bellamy on 6 March (HL5835), what is their timeline for the (1) development, and (2) delivery, of the model to deliver prison education when current contract arrangements for the Prison Education Framework end.

We are creating a Prisoner Education Service (PES) that will ensure prisoners improve skills such as literacy and numeracy, acquire relevant vocational qualifications, and access employment and training opportunities on release. We have already begun making investments including through the recruitment of new Heads of Education Skills and Work and Neurodiversity Support leads in prisons. We are also working with employers to improve skills training and deliver apprenticeships for prisoners.

New successor contracts to the current Prison Education Framework (PEF) arrangements will be an important part of PES. Early development of the successor contracts commenced back in April 2022 with a period of initial market consultation involving input from stakeholders and potential suppliers, to help shape thinking on the new procurement and contracting arrangements that will improve performance, quality learner engagement and value for money.

Additional market warming sessions were held in November 2022 and February 2023, with further feedback gathered. The procurement process for new successor contracts is due to commence in summer 2023. Contracts are due to be awarded to successful bidders in autumn 2024 and are expected to go live in April 2025.

Lord Bellamy
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
13th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bellamy on 6 March (HL5835), whether there will be a formal consultation over the model to deliver prison education when current contract arrangements for the Prison Education Framework end; and if so, when the consultation period will (1) start, and (2) end.

We want to develop a healthy market by encouraging the greatest variety of prison education suppliers possible to respond to our invitation to tender for new successor contracts to the current Prison Education Framework arrangements.

We have conducted extensive engagement with the market to communicate our vision for the future education service, demonstrate the range of opportunities available to suppliers across the education and skills sector, and to invite input into the future service design.

Our engagement with the market involved a launch event in April 2022, as well as subject-specific webinars and 1:1 meetings with attendees. Further market engagement events were held in November 2022 and February 2023, illustrating how market feedback is being used to shape service design. Participants were given the opportunity to provide their feedback regarding the proposed future prison education service model, with a deadline of 8 March 2023.

Other key stakeholders consulted during this period have included prisoners and those with lived experience; HMPPS operational staff; trade unions; and third sector organisations.

The procurement process for the new successor contracts is due to commence in summer 2023.

Lord Bellamy
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
13th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bellamy on 6 March (HL5835), when the tendering process for the delivery of prison education when the current contract for the Prison Education Framework ends will (1) start, and (2) end.

Following engagement with suppliers from the private, public and third sector, procurement for new successor contracts to the current Prison Education Framework arrangements is due to commence in Summer 2023, contracts are due to be awarded to successful bidders in autumn 2024. Contracts are expected to go live in April 2025.

Lord Bellamy
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
23rd Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the potential (1) costs, and (2) savings, that could be achieved for the public by bringing the delivery of prison education into the public sector.

Prison Education is delivered by a range of education suppliers (including public, private and third sector). We are focused on ensuring education meets prison learner needs, provides value for money and teaches the skills needed for prisoners to get employment on release. We are currently engaging with the market to develop the best model to deliver education when current contract arrangements end for the Prison Education Framework, which will focus on both quality and value for money. We fully recognise the value of prison education, but have not sought to quantify that in precise financial terms.

Lord Bellamy
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)