Alan Whitehead Portrait

Alan Whitehead

Labour - Southampton, Test

Shadow Minister (Climate Change and Net Zero)

(since December 2021)
Shadow Minister (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Oct 2016 - 4th Dec 2021
Environmental Audit Committee
12th Sep 2016 - 28th Nov 2016
Shadow Minister (Energy and Climate Change)
18th Sep 2015 - 28th Jun 2016
Energy and Climate Change Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 30th Nov 2015
Committee on Standards: Standards Review Sub-Committee
10th Jun 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Committee on Privileges
7th Jan 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Committee on Standards
7th Jan 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Environmental Audit Committee
26th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Energy and Climate Change Committee
19th Jan 2009 - 30th Mar 2015
Committee of Privileges
7th Jan 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Standards and Privileges
12th Jul 2005 - 7th Jan 2013
Justice Committee
6th Nov 2007 - 6th May 2010
Draft Marine Bill (Joint Committee)
8th May 2008 - 22nd Jul 2008
Constitutional Affairs
28th Jan 2003 - 6th Nov 2007
Draft Climate Change Bill (Joint Committee)
18th Mar 2007 - 3rd Aug 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Transport, Local Government and Regions)
11th Jun 2001 - 28th May 2002
Environment Sub-committee
15th Jul 1997 - 6th Dec 1999
Environment, Transport & Regional Affairs
14th Jul 1997 - 6th Dec 1999


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 26th January 2022
Business without Debate
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 144 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 176
Speeches
Tuesday 18th January 2022
Gas and Electricity Costs
The hon. Lady has anticipated exactly what I will say in a moment. One of the wider issues about the …
Written Answers
Friday 28th January 2022
Energy Company Obligation
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will commit to the planned uplift …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 21st July 2014
Energy (Buildings and Reduction of Fuel Use) Bill 2014-15
A Bill to require the Secretary of State to draw up and publish an Energy in Buildings Strategy; to require …
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
EDM signed
Thursday 28th October 2021
Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 19th June 2019
Nuclear Submarine Recycling (Reporting) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Alan Whitehead has voted in 409 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Alan Whitehead Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Rebecca Pow (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(130 debate interactions)
Greg Hands (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(60 debate interactions)
Nadhim Zahawi (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Education
(42 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(64 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(16 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Alan Whitehead's debates

Southampton, Test Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Southampton, Test signature proportion
Petition Debates Contributed

Current legislation allows for public use of fireworks 16 hours a day, every day, making it impossible for vulnerable groups to take precautions against the distress they can cause. Better enforcement of existing law is insufficient; limiting their sale & use to licensed displays only is necessary.

Every year more and more people, animals and wildlife get hurt by fireworks. It’s time something was fine to stop this. There are enough organised firework groups around for us to still enjoy fireworks safely so please help me stop the needless sale of them to the public!


Latest EDMs signed by Alan Whitehead

23rd September 2021
Alan Whitehead signed this EDM on Thursday 28th October 2021

Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall

Tabled by: Afzal Khan (Labour - Manchester, Gorton)
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; notes that this memorial now includes over 150,000 hand-painted hearts to symbolise all those who lost their lives during the coronavirus pandemic; praises the work of Covid-19 Bereaved Families for …
136 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 97
Scottish National Party: 15
Liberal Democrat: 10
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Conservative: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
19th December 2017
Alan Whitehead signed this EDM on Thursday 21st December 2017

NATIONAL SIKH WAR MEMORIAL

Tabled by: Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi (Labour - Slough)
That this House appreciates the extraordinary bravery and sacrifices of Sikh soldiers in service of Great Britain, including during both World Wars, and supports the erection of a permanent national monument in a prime central London location to commemorate and highlight these contributions; notes that for over a decade there …
265 signatures
(Most recent: 2 Feb 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 171
Conservative: 33
Scottish National Party: 26
Independent: 10
Liberal Democrat: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 9
Plaid Cymru: 3
Non-affiliated: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 2
Crossbench: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Alan Whitehead's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Alan Whitehead, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Alan Whitehead has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Alan Whitehead has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Alan Whitehead


A Bill to require the Secretary of State to draw up and publish an Energy in Buildings Strategy; to require the Secretary of State to take reasonable steps to implement that Strategy; to require the Secretary of State to set cost-effective targets to reduce fuel use; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Monday 21st July 2014

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to amend the Energy Act 2011 to enable residents of houses in multiple occupation to benefit from the provisions in the Act designed to increase energy efficiency; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 23rd January 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to promote energy efficiency and a reduction in energy costs; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 11th December 2012

283 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3 Other Department Questions
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the Government's response to the Future Homes Standard consultation, published in January 2021, whether his Department plans to fully implement the Future Homes Standard in 2025 as set out in that response.

From 2025, the Future Homes Standard will ensure that new homes are future-proofed with low carbon heating and high levels of energy efficiency to produce at least 75 per cent lower CO2 emissions compared to those built to current standards, which represents a considerable improvement in energy efficiency standards of new homes.

As set out in the Government response to the Future Homes Standard consultation, our work on a full technical specification for the Future Homes Standard has been accelerated and we will consult on this in 2023. We also intend to introduce the necessary legislation in 2024, ahead of implementation in 2025.

It is also worthy of note that later this year we will introduce an interim uplift in Part L standards that provides a stepping stone to the Future Homes Standard and will require new homes to produce 31% less CO2 emissions compared to current standards.

This timeline delivers on our net zero commitments, while ensuring that new homes are delivered in sufficient numbers in the places that we need them; providing the good quality, warm homes that consumers expect; and continuing to keep energy bills low.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the Government's response to the Future Homes Standard consultation, published in January 2021, whether he plans to bring forward the legislative proposals necessary for the Future Homes Standard in 2024 as set out in that response.

From 2025, the Future Homes Standard will ensure that new homes are future-proofed with low carbon heating and high levels of energy efficiency to produce at least 75 per cent lower CO2 emissions compared to those built to current standards, which represents a considerable improvement in energy efficiency standards of new homes.

As set out in the Government response to the Future Homes Standard consultation, our work on a full technical specification for the Future Homes Standard has been accelerated and we will consult on this in 2023. We also intend to introduce the necessary legislation in 2024, ahead of implementation in 2025.

It is also worthy of note that later this year we will introduce an interim uplift in Part L standards that provides a stepping stone to the Future Homes Standard and will require new homes to produce 31% less CO2 emissions compared to current standards.

This timeline delivers on our net zero commitments, while ensuring that new homes are delivered in sufficient numbers in the places that we need them; providing the good quality, warm homes that consumers expect; and continuing to keep energy bills low.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the President of COP26, if the Government will take steps to encourage world leaders attending COP26 to develop a global strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions caused by the intensive animal agriculture sector.

At COP26 in November, as part of our Nature Campaign, we will be hosting a World Leaders Summit to put forward high-level ambition, by pushing for ambitious commitments from countries to transition to sustainable agriculture and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Agriculture, forestry and other land-use accounts for 23% of global emissions, so action in this area is critical to keeping the goal of limiting global warming to 1.5° within reach.

Together with the World Bank, we are co-hosting an international policy dialogue on the Transition to Sustainable Agriculture and developing a Policy Action Agenda on this issue to be launched at COP26.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to help support every signatory to the Paris Climate Change Agreement in proposing updated intended nationally determined contributions in time for COP 26.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answers the Prime Minister gave on 5 February (Official Report Volume 671 col 306-314).

The UK will be encouraging all countries to submit increased Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) ahead of COP26. As part of this the UK will come forward with an enhanced NDC.

HM Government provides support in a number of ways to the development of new NDCs, including through our International Climate Finance Programme (IFCP), for which the Prime Minister has announced a doubling of support to £11.6 billion for the period 2021/22-2025/26. The IFCP also supports UK aid projects, including the protection and restoration of forests.

Discussions with delivery partners regarding costs for COP26 are ongoing, and final budgets are yet to be confirmed.

Further details will be announced in due course.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to introduce a global goal for tree planting and protection at COP 26 in late 2020.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answers the Prime Minister gave on 5 February (Official Report Volume 671 col 306-314).

The UK will be encouraging all countries to submit increased Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) ahead of COP26. As part of this the UK will come forward with an enhanced NDC.

HM Government provides support in a number of ways to the development of new NDCs, including through our International Climate Finance Programme (IFCP), for which the Prime Minister has announced a doubling of support to £11.6 billion for the period 2021/22-2025/26. The IFCP also supports UK aid projects, including the protection and restoration of forests.

Discussions with delivery partners regarding costs for COP26 are ongoing, and final budgets are yet to be confirmed.

Further details will be announced in due course.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of changing the location of COP 26 in late 2020.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answers the Prime Minister gave on 5 February (Official Report Volume 671 col 306-314).

The UK will be encouraging all countries to submit increased Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) ahead of COP26. As part of this the UK will come forward with an enhanced NDC.

HM Government provides support in a number of ways to the development of new NDCs, including through our International Climate Finance Programme (IFCP), for which the Prime Minister has announced a doubling of support to £11.6 billion for the period 2021/22-2025/26. The IFCP also supports UK aid projects, including the protection and restoration of forests.

Discussions with delivery partners regarding costs for COP26 are ongoing, and final budgets are yet to be confirmed.

Further details will be announced in due course.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the budget is for hosting COP 26.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answers the Prime Minister gave on 5 February (Official Report Volume 671 col 306-314).

The UK will be encouraging all countries to submit increased Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) ahead of COP26. As part of this the UK will come forward with an enhanced NDC.

HM Government provides support in a number of ways to the development of new NDCs, including through our International Climate Finance Programme (IFCP), for which the Prime Minister has announced a doubling of support to £11.6 billion for the period 2021/22-2025/26. The IFCP also supports UK aid projects, including the protection and restoration of forests.

Discussions with delivery partners regarding costs for COP26 are ongoing, and final budgets are yet to be confirmed.

Further details will be announced in due course.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will produce a report on progress made towards COP26.

COP26 is a priority for this Government. We have established a dedicated unit, in the Cabinet Office, to deliver the event and draw together all related UK policy.

The Unit is focused on operational delivery and developing policy goals.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has employed Boston Consulting Group in relation to Government preparations for the 26th session of the Conference of the Parties.

Boston Consulting Group is providing pro-bono strategic project support to the COP26 Unit.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will extend the Warm Home Discount scheme for the financial year 2022-23.

The Warm Home Discount is a key policy in the Government’s strategy to tackle fuel poverty and reduce the energy costs of low-income and vulnerable households, which is why the Government committed to extend the scheme until 2026 in the Energy White Paper. The Government consulted on expanding and reforming the Warm Home Discount from 2022. Under the plans, the total spending will increase from around £350 million to £475 million per year, and the value of the rebates will increase to £150. As a result of the additional funding, 780,000 more low-income and vulnerable households will receive rebates on their energy bills every winter, with the majority receiving the money automatically and without having to apply.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of his Department’s proposal to amend or end the Energy Company Obligation on (a) fuel poor households and (b) the UK’s climate obligations.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will commit to the planned uplift of the Energy Company Obligation (ECO4); and if he will ensure the implementation of ECO4 in April 2022 as stated in the Energy white paper.

The Government have committed to extending the Energy Company Obligation Scheme from 2022 to 2026,​ boosting its value to £1billion a year.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will commit to protecting the Energy Company Obligation (ECO).

The Government have committed to extending the Energy Company Obligation Scheme from 2022 to 2026,​ boosting its value to £1billion a year.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department conducted an impact assessment on vulnerable and protected groups for the Heat and Buildings Strategy, as required by the Equality Act 2010.

In the Heat and Buildings Strategy, the Government provides a strategic overview of the existing and planned policy interventions required to meet decarbonisation ambitions in heat and buildings. In this strategy, the Government detailed a coherent package of policies, comprising existing, planned and future policies which are yet to be fully developed. Each policy will undergo its own equalities impact assessment ahead of its final design.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment the Government has made of the capacity of infrared heating to support its policy to decarbonise homes.

Evidence to date suggests that there may be a role for alternative electric heating technologies, such as infrared heating, in decarbonising the way the United Kingdom heats its homes and businesses, but this should be limited to specific use cases, such as small flats with low heat demand.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 7 December 2021 to Question 85170, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that Springfields nuclear site continues producing nuclear fuel for plants in the UK.

The Springfields site sits at the heart of the UK’s nuclear fuel manufacturing capabilities, and we have a keen interest in its future. Earlier this month, I visited the site to see first-hand the important work taking place, including at the Oxide Fuels Complex. We have also established a working group attended by key stakeholders, including the site operator and unions. Proposals relating to the Springfields site and developing its capabilities, alongside sector co-investment, will be welcomed by the up to £75 million Nuclear Fuel Fund announced in the recent Spending Review.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 2 December 2021 to Question 82263, if he will list the various options available to Government for exiting the Special Administration Regime with Bulb energy.

There are a range of possible options that could be taken to end the Special Administration Regime. These include through a restructuring, a trade sale or transferring the customers to other suppliers.

The Government will work closely with the Energy Administrators to ensure that any exit from the SAR achieves the best result for Bulb’s customers, creditors, taxpayers and the wider energy sector.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to help ensure that the nuclear fuel required for future plants is produced in the UK.

The UK is a world leader in the nuclear fuel cycle, and this is testament to the highly skilled workforce currently employed at the Springfields and Capenhurst sites, and the wider UK supply chain. The Government recognises the importance of continued commercial operation of the UK’s fuel production facilities to deliver low carbon energy.

As such, in the recent Spending Review we confirmed up to £75 million, to be used alongside sector co-investment, to preserve and develop the UK’s nuclear fuel production capability. With this funding we will move a programme forward to address all our fuel-related priorities, helping to develop the UK fuel supply chain to power the reactors of today and advanced nuclear in the future.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the costs associated with Bulb Energy Limited being taken into the special administration regime will be (a) met from the public purse or (b) passed on to customers through energy bills.

The Government has made a £1.7 billion loan facility available to the energy administrators for Bulb Energy, to provide working capital for a six-month period. The value of this facility is a contingency - it gives confidence to the energy administrators to carry out their duties effectively – protecting Bulb customers and keeping costs to a minimum for consumers.

The Government will recoup costs through the administrators realising the value of Bulb's assets, or through the established shortfall recovery mechanism which will see a levy charged on industry.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the potential cost to the taxpayer of the collapse of Bulb Energy Ltd.

The Government has made a £1.7 billion loan facility available to the energy administrators for Bulb Energy, to provide working capital for a six-month period. The value of this facility is a contingency - it gives confidence to the energy administrators to carry out their duties effectively – protecting Bulb customers and keeping costs to a minimum for consumers.

The Government will recoup costs through the administrators realising the value of Bulb's assets, or through the established shortfall recovery mechanism which will see a levy charged on industry.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of extending the Warm Homes Discount scheme to a wider range of low income and vulnerable households.

The Government is committed to tackling fuel poverty and supporting low income and vulnerable households to heat their homes at an affordable cost. In the Energy White Paper published in December 2020, the Government committed to consult on the Warm Home Discount scheme up to 2025/26. The Government will increase the total spending to £475 million per year (in 2020 prices).

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether there is a threshold for the number of customers a company must have to be entered into the Special Administration Regime, rather than using the Supplier of Last Resort mechanism.

There is no set threshold at which a company would be entered into a Special Administration Regime. Ofgem consider the specifics of the failed supplier and the circumstances in the supply market at the time. If Ofgem considers a Special Administration Regime appropriate, it may make an application to the Court for a decision, with the consent of the Secretary of State.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of using the (a) Supplier of Last Resort or (b) Special Administration Regime process for energy companies that go out of business as a result of increases in wholesale energy prices.

This is a judgment for Ofgem, who assess the circumstances of the failed supplier and the supply market at the time. If Ofgem considers a Special Administration Regime appropriate, Ofgem will make an application, with the consent of the Secretary of State, to the Court for a decision to place a company into special administration.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the options are for exiting the Special Administration Regime undertaken with Bulb Energy Ltd.

Bulb Energy Ltd will only remain in the Special Administration Regime for as long as necessary. There are various options to exit this regime.

The Government will work closely with the Energy Administrators to ensure that the exit from the Special Administration Regime achieves the best results for customers and taxpayers.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether costs associated with Bulb Energy Ltd entering the special administration regime will be passed on to billpayers.

The Government will recover costs either by the special administration regime administrator realising the value of Bulb's assets, or through the established shortfall recovery mechanism, which will see a levy charged on industry. The details of this levy will be decided by the Government in consultation with Ofgem and industry.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact on customer engagement of requirements for multiple installations at a single property under the Energy Company Obligation 4 scheme for 2022-26.

The Government knows that customers are engaged under the Energy Company Obligation 4 scheme (ECO4) since households benefitting under the scheme already have multiple energy efficiency measures installed in their homes. The latest average number of measures delivered is 2.26 per home. The Government expects an average of 2.5 energy efficiency measures installed per home in houses rated band E to G under ECO4.

The Government’s Impact Assessment for ECO4 has considered likely consumer take up by assessing other multi measure schemes, including the Social Housing Demonstrator Fund project, and will be available to view once published in early 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether energy customers will be able to refuse any particular measure or installation at their property required under the Energy Company Obligation 4 scheme for 2022-26.

Households will be able to refuse any measure or installation at their property under ECO4.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the Energy Company Obligation 4 scheme for 2022-26 on other Government energy efficiency schemes including the proposed Home Upgrade Grant due to commence in 2022; and what steps his Department is taking to ensure integration of energy efficiency schemes.

The Government remains committed to improving the energy efficiency of homes as the most sustainable approach to tackling fuel poverty. The Government is investing over £2 billion through projects such as the Home Upgrade Grant (HUG), Local Authority Delivery Scheme, Sustainable Warmth Competition and the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund. In addition, the Energy Company Obligation supports home upgrades across Great Britain. These schemes are retrofitting low-incomes households with appropriate measures to make them more energy efficient and cheaper to heat.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of the vouchers issued to homeowners under the Green Homes Grant scheme have been extended past their original expiry date as a result of circumstances outside their control.

Under the Green Homes Grant Scheme vouchers are issued with a 90 day validity period.

The validity period of many vouchers has been extended on request. However, data on voucher extensions is not collected.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many green homes grants have been issued to landlords in each region of England.

The Green Homes Grant Voucher (GHGV) scheme launched in September 2020, to help householders and landlords with the cost of installing energy efficient improvements in their home.

Official statistics (https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/green-home-grant-statistics) published on 18 November for the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme describe the status of applications prior to 05 November. At present the release does not include further application details including how many were landlords, however it does show applications in each region of England.

The next statistical release will be published on 23 December 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Green Homes Grant scheme, how many homeowner requests for an extension to their voucher beyond the original expiry date have been rejected.

Under the Green Homes Grant Scheme vouchers are issued with a 90 day validity period.

The validity period of many vouchers have been extended on request. However, data is not collected on how many voucher extension requests have been accepted or rejected.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding each local authority received for the Local Authority Delivery element of the green homes grant scheme.

Attached is a list of the total funding allocated to each English Local Authority across Phase 1 of the Local Authority Delivery Scheme.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to Answer of 17 November 2021 to Question 76544, whether he will list the funding available for heat batteries.

Schemes like the Energy Company Obligation allow energy suppliers to deliver part of their obligation by installing innovative measures in eligible households. In addition, research and development funding is available for developing new alternative heating technologies, such as heat batteries, through programmes like the BEIS Energy Entrepreneurs Fund (EEF) and Clean Growth Fund (CGF).

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the cost of the public purse in the next (a) 3, (6) and (c) 9 months of his Department's implementation of a special administration regime on Bulb Energy Ltd.

The Government has made a £1.7 billion loan facility available to the energy administrators for Bulb Energy, to provide working capital for a six-month period. As my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State set out in the House of Commons last week, we intend for the SAR process to be temporary and has instructed officials, industry and Ofgem to work to that end.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of when final guidance for the Energy Company Obligation 4 scheme will be in place.

The Energy Company Obligation scheme (ECO) is an obligation that the Government has placed on larger energy suppliers to install energy efficiency and heating measures to low income and vulnerable households across Great Britain.

The current scheme ends in March 2022, followed by a successor scheme (ECO4). The publication of the government response to the ECO4 consultation is planned before the current scheme ends, followed by further guidance by Ofgem, who are the scheme administrators.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many off grid low income and vulnerable households have been helped by the Government’s Home Upgrade Grant in each month since that grant was announced.

The Government has so far allocated a total of £1.1 billion to the Home Upgrade Grant (HUG), with delivery taking place from early 2022 to March 2025. Funding for HUG Phase 1, worth £152m, is expected to be delivered from early 2022 to March 2023.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 November 2021 to Question 74871, what assessment he has made of the merits of developing floating wind energy projects in the Celtic Sea.

The Government considers floating offshore wind as a vital component of the UK’s energy mix. In addition to the test and demonstration floating projects already in early development, the Crown Estate has commenced work on a floating wind leasing round in the Celtic Sea which could bring forward up to 4GW of new projects. The leasing round will focus on early commercial scale projects of 300-350MW and full commercial scale projects of up to 1GW. The Government recently announced up to £160 million to support large-scale floating offshore wind ports and factories to be built across the UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason on-farm solutions, such as biomethane, are not included in the Green Gas Support Scheme.

The primary objectives of the GGSS are to reduce emissions of the gas grid and ensure value for money for the billpayer. Paying tariffs to biogas plants on farms that do not inject the biomethane they produce into the gas grid carries the risk of overcompensation and therefore poor value for money to the billpayer. Billpayers would be paying for renewable gas from which they, or the gas suppliers, would never actually benefit.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will develop an alternative scheme to support small off-grid biomethane supply on farms following their exclusion from the Green Gas Support Scheme.

The primary objectives of the Green Gas Support Scheme are to reduce emissions in the gas grid and ensure value for money for the billpayer. The Department does not currently have plans to develop an alternative scheme specifically to support small, off-grid biomethane supply on farms.

In late October, the Department published two consultations that set out proposals to phase out the installation of high carbon fossil fuel heating systems in homes, businesses, and office buildings off the gas grid during the 2020s, as committed to in the 2017 Clean Growth Strategy, and replace them with low carbon alternatives, in particular the use of heat pumps, where appropriate. Both consultations will close in January 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason farm biogas plants are not included in the Green Gas Support Scheme.

The primary objectives of the GGSS are to reduce emissions of the gas grid and ensure value for money for the billpayer. Paying tariffs to biogas plants on farms that do not inject the biomethane they produce into the gas grid carries the risk of overcompensation and therefore poor value for money to the billpayer. Billpayers would be paying for renewable gas, from which neither they, nor the gas suppliers, would ever benefit.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the future role of small-scale biogas plants in mitigating farm methane emissions.

The Department has not formally assessed the future role of small-scale biogas plants in mitigating farm methane emissions. The Green Gas Support Scheme, due to launch on 30 November 2021, will provide support for anaerobic digestion plants injecting biomethane into the grid, following the closure of the Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive in March 2021. The Government will continue to evaluate biogas and biomethane’s future role in reaching net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 18 November 2021 to Question 74867, what alternative approaches are being considered to maximise the delivery of home retrofits for consumers following the closure of the Green Homes Grant Scheme.

The Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme was designed as a short-term economic stimulus. It helped raise awareness of green home measures, and improved demand for a range of clean heat and energy saving installations.

In the Heat and Building Strategy, the Government outlines the new £450 million 3-year Boiler Upgrade Scheme which will provide grants of £5,000 from April next year to encourage homeowners to install more efficient, low carbon heating systems, such as heat pumps, that do not emit carbon when used. These grants mean that installing a heat pump will cost a similar amount to installing a traditional gas boiler.

The Government has committed a further £1.8bn over the next 3 years, targeting those in fuel poverty through the Home Upgrade Grant and Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund.

The Government has also expanded the Energy Company Obligation, under which energy companies have already installed 3.3 million measures in 2.3 million homes. We are increasing the amount energy suppliers invest in low-income households and have recently consulted on a new iteration of ECO which will run until 2026 and will see ECO’s value boosted from £640 million to £1 billion a year.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the future funding for the development of heat battery technology.

The Government continues to make funding available for both the development and deployment of innovative low-carbon heating technologies, such as heat batteries.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment has made of the potential merits of the use of heat batteries to absorb surplus renewable generation that may otherwise be wasted.

In July 2021, the Government published analysis as part of our Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan, which concluded that by managing the UK’s energy more flexibly, the UK could reduce the investment required in the electricity network and in new electricity generation capacity. In particular, the flexible use of heat – using technologies like heat batteries – could make an important contribution to this objective.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Future Homes Standard to rule out the installation of heat batteries as a future heating system in UK homes.

The building regulations are themselves technology-neutral; they do not mandate or ban the use of any specific technologies.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of heat batteries for the decarbonisation of off grid homes in the UK.

The Government is currently consulting on phasing out the installation of fossil fuel heating in homes off the gas grid in England from 2026. In this consultation, the Government proposes to adopt a ‘heat pump first’ approach to heat decarbonisation in off-grid properties based on extensive assessment of the cost effectiveness of heat pumps relative to other low-carbon heating technologies. The Government is also seeking views on the role of alternative low-carbon heating technologies, such as heat batteries.

Research published by the Department (www.gov.uk/government/publications/cost-optimal-domestic-electrification-code) suggests that alternative electric heating technologies could have a role to play in decarbonising buildings, but can lead to higher lifetime costs relative to heat pumps. The Government acknowledges the wider benefits that heat batteries provide in terms of their ability to support a smart and flexible energy system, therefore the Government is exploring this potential further.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 April 2021 to Question 173992, on the Green Homes Grant Scheme, if he will now publish the 10 performance indicators listed in the contract to ICF.

The top three performance indicators have been published in line with BEIS’s commitment to transparency on Key Performance Indicators for government’s most important contracts.

BEIS will publish the 10 Key Performance Indicators in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 148 of the Net Zero Strategy, whether the Fairness and Affordability Call for Evidence will cover both domestic and non-domestic consumers.

As set out in the Net Zero Strategy and Heat and Buildings Strategy, the Government is committed to ensuring that the costs of the UK’s transition to net zero is fair and affordable for all energy consumers. The Government’s upcoming Fairness and Affordability Call for Evidence will consider options covering both domestic and non-domestic consumers to shift or rebalance energy levies and obligations over this decade.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the assessment of options to shift or rebalance energy levies, such as the Renewables Obligation and Feed-in-Tariffs, and obligations, such as the Energy Company Obligation, away from electricity to gas over this decade as referenced in the Heat and Buildings Strategy will cover both domestic and non-domestic consumers.

As set out in the Net Zero Strategy and Heat and Buildings Strategy, the Government is committed to ensuring that the costs of the UK’s transition to net zero is fair and affordable for all energy consumers. The Government’s upcoming Fairness and Affordability Call for Evidence will consider options covering both domestic and non-domestic consumers to shift or rebalance energy levies and obligations over this decade.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many installers (a) have been and (b) are waiting to be paid for completed work under the Green Homes Grant scheme.

Official statistics published on 18 November for the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme describe the status of applications prior to 05 November.

As of 5 November, a total of 43,071 vouchers have been paid, with a Government contribution funding value of £197 million across 988 active installers. As of 5 November, 3,142 vouchers, where Green Home Grant measures have been installed, were awaiting payment.

Payment of the grant is a four-step process that requires the customer to confirm the work has been completed, the installer to lodge the work, the scheme administrator to undertake scheme checks, and then proceeding to payment. Timescales for this may vary.

The next statistical release will be published on 23 December 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of developing floating wind energy projects in the Celtic Sea.

Government sees floating offshore wind as a vital component of the UK’s energy mix as the UK moves towards net zero. The Government has committed to delivering at least 1GW floating capacity by 2030 as a steppingstone to larger scale deployment through the 2030s. In the draft budget notice for the 4th Contracts for Difference round, the Government announced ringfenced support for floating offshore wind.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of whether the funding in Contracts for Difference allocation round 4 will be sufficient to cover floating wind projects in both the North Sea and the Celtic Sea.

Government sees floating wind as a vital component of the UK’s energy mix as the UK moves towards net zero. Therefore, it has committed to delivering at least 1GW floating capacity by 2030. In the draft budget notice for the 4th Contracts for Difference round, the Government announced ringfenced support for floating offshore wind.

The UK is a global leader in this technology, with more installed capacity than any other country in the world. The Government believes there is a real opportunity to develop this position to create a strong domestic industry, generating high-skilled jobs and driving investment. The Government has committed up to £160m to develop UK ports and the floating wind supply chain, part of a £380m package over the next four years to support the development of the offshore wind industry in the UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the viability of creating a UK-based supply chain for floating wind technology.

Government sees floating wind as a vital component of the UK’s energy mix as the UK moves towards net zero. Therefore, it has committed to delivering at least 1GW floating capacity by 2030. In the draft budget notice for the 4th Contracts for Difference round, the Government announced ringfenced support for floating offshore wind.

The UK is a global leader in this technology, with more installed capacity than any other country in the world. The Government believes there is a real opportunity to develop this position to create a strong domestic industry, generating high-skilled jobs and driving investment. The Government has committed up to £160m to develop UK ports and the floating wind supply chain, part of a £380m package over the next four years to support the development of the offshore wind industry in the UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if the Government will increase the ring-fence for funding allocated to offshore floating wind in the forthcoming Contracts for Difference allocation round 4.

The draft parameters for the fourth Contracts for Difference (CfD) allocation round published on 13 September 2021 included ring-fenced support for floating offshore wind projects. The statutory notices confirming the parameters for the fourth allocation round will be published shortly, ahead of the round opening to applications on 13 December.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government plans to use public funding to stimulate the development of floating wind energy projects in the Celtic Sea.

The Government is committed to delivering up to 1GW of floating offshore wind capacity by 2030. The Government recently announced up to £160 million to support large-scale floating offshore wind ports and factories to be built across the UK. Further, the draft parameters for the fourth Contracts for Difference allocation round, published in September, included ring-fenced support for floating offshore wind projects.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many households with vouchers issued under the Green Homes Grant scheme are waiting for work to be completed.

Official statistics published on 18th November for the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme describe the status of applications prior to 5th November.

As of 5th November, out of 57,684 vouchers issued, 46,213 measures had been installed.

The next statistical release will be published on 23rd December 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will extend the deadline for the Green Homes Grant scheme beyond 30 November 2021 for households with a voucher waiting for work to be completed.

Under the Green Homes Grant Scheme vouchers are issued with a 90 day validity period. Many vouchers have been extended on request. In order to ensure the effective management of the end of the scheme, the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme closure date has been set at 30 November 2021 and this has been communicated to voucher holders and installers.

In the main, we do not anticipate allowing vouchers to be valid beyond this date.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the impact of supply chain issues on the construction industry's ability to complete work under the Green Homes Grant scheme.

BEIS officials are working with industry representatives to better understand the global supply chain issues which are affecting various sectors.

This will allow us to continue to support installers on the ground as well as informing further policies in future Government energy efficiency schemes.

Following the closure of the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme we are refocussing efforts and funding on alternative approaches that will maximise the delivery of home retrofits for consumers who are most in need and support the supply chain to keep delivering.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding has been allocated under the Green Homes Grant scheme, by region.

Official statistics published on 18 November for the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme describe the status of applications prior to 5th November. Statistics include figures on measures installed and vouchers paid by geographic region.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to paragraph 2.38 of the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021, what his timeframe is for association with Horizon Europe.

The UK and the EU agreed the terms for our association to Horizon Europe under the Trade and Cooperation Agreement. The UK stands ready to formalise our association to EU programmes at the earliest opportunity, but disappointingly there have been persistent delays from the EU.

We see no legal or practical reason why we should not be able to formalise our participation swiftly, and urge the EU to do so.

Our priority is to support our UK’s R&D sector and we will continue to do this in all future scenarios. We have been allocated funding for full association to Horizon Europe, as stated in the Spending Review. In the event that the UK is unable to associate, the funding put aside for Horizon association will go to UK government R&D programmes.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the steps people need to take to ensure that their home heating infrastructure can function with an air source heat pump.

There will be no single policy or technology that cuts carbon emissions to virtually zero, but a diverse mix of technology, such as heat pumps and potentially heating appliances fuelled by hydrogen, alongside green projects like heat networks, that will combine to decarbonise heat in buildings over the next three decades.

Our analysis of off gas grid homes suggests that around 80% of homes have sufficient energy efficiency and electrical connections to accommodate a low temperature heat pump system. This potentially rises to around 90% with fabric upgrades including draught-proofing, cavity wall insulation, floor and loft insulation, and external wall insulation. For homes on the gas grid, our analysis shows that 90% of homes have sufficient energy efficiency and electrical connections, which could increase further with fabric upgrades. However, in both off and on gas grid homes, our analysis does not account for noise and space considerations.

In some cases, accommodating a heat pump may also require changes to the size or specification of pipework and radiators to ensure they can deliver the levels of thermal comfort required by consumers. A qualified installer will be able to advise on the specific measures that might be needed to prepare a home for a heat pump.

Through the Government’s £14.6 million Electrification of Heat Demonstration Project and £60 million Heat Pump Ready Innovation Programme, we are exploring where innovation can help enable the deployment of heat pumps in a range of housing archetypes.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to raise awareness among consumers of the potential benefits of installing a heat pump.

Improving public awareness of the benefits of installing a heat pump will be a key enabler for the large-scale decarbonisation of heat. The Government are currently reviewing the provision of advice delivered through government-endorsed Simple Energy Advice Service, which offers impartial and independent information to consumers on a range of low-carbon heating and energy efficiency solutions.

The Government is also improving our evidence base and considering the best tools to raise public awareness, through the forthcoming £60m Heat Pump Ready Programme, which aims to develop approaches and products to engage effectively with home owners and other key stakeholders who can help to deliver high-density heat pump deployment across the UK. Additionally, the outputs of the ongoing £14.6m Electrification of Heat Demonstration Project, including case studies, will be used to raise consumer awareness of heat pumps.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish the results of the Electrification of Heat Demonstration Project.

As part of the Department’s £505 million Energy Innovation Programme, the Electrification of Heat Demonstration Project is showcasing the feasibility of installing heat pumps in a range of homes across the UK.

The installation phase of the Project is coming to a close and initial results, providing installation information, will be published later this year. The Project will continue to monitor performance data from the installed heat pumps over the winter period and further Project results and findings from that phase, including case studies, will be published.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will provide an update on the progress of Electrification of Heat Demonstration Project.

As part of the Department’s £505 million Energy Innovation Programme, the Electrification of Heat Demonstration Project is showcasing the feasibility of installing heat pumps in a range of homes across the UK.

The installation phase for all the Project’s heat pump systems will be completed shortly. The Project will continue to monitor performance data from the installed heat pumps over the winter period and further Project results and findings from that phase, including case studies, will be published.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure low income customers switched to a new energy company under the supplier of last resort mechanism do not lose the financial support given to them under the warm home discount.

The Warm Home Discount (WHD) scheme, introduced in 2011, places a legal obligation on medium and larger energy suppliers to deliver support to people living in fuel poverty or a fuel poverty risk group. Ofgem is the WHD scheme administrator.

All suppliers of last resort have agreed to provide Warm Home Discount rebates to the eligible customers of failing suppliers with over 150K domestic customer accounts, and the Government expects them to continue doing so.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many new (a) gas boilers and (b) heat pumps have been installed by each energy company under the Government’s Energy Company Obligation programme in the last financial year.

The Energy Company Obligation (ECO) is worth £640 million per annum and has been in place since January 2013.

The Government does not have figures on the number of gas boilers and heat pumps installed by each energy company in the last financial year. However, we do know that since ECO began, it has delivered around 3.3 million insulation and heating measures in around 2.3 million homes, up to the end of June 2021.

Obligated suppliers can deliver insulation and heating measures at any time during their obligation period.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what mechanisms the Government plans to implement to facilitate the decarbonisation of off-grid homes.

The Clean Growth Strategy committed to ‘phase out installation of high carbon fossil fuel heating in buildings not connected to the gas grid, starting with new build, during the 2020s’. As set out in the Energy White Paper and alongside the publication of the Heat and Building Strategy, we are planning to consult on new regulations to phase out heating systems using high carbon fossil fuels such as oil and coal in homes, businesses and public buildings off the gas grid during the 2020s.

The Government is also funding several schemes as part of its commitment to facilitate the decarbonisation of off-gas-grid homes and to make them greener on the path to Net Zero.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the report by the National Energy Action and Energy Action Scotland, entitled Maximising the smart meter rollout for prepayment customers, published in June 2021, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of the recommendation that the rollout of smart meters to prepayment customers should be sped up and prioritised.

Smart meters bring significant benefits to prepayment consumers and have been invaluable during the COVID-19 pandemic. Smart prepayment services enable consumers to top-up remotely without leaving home and without needing to reach inaccessible meters. They also allow consumers to track their balance easily so they do not unknowingly run out of credit. The Government welcomes the insights in the ‘Maximising the smart meter rollout for prepayment customers’ report and are pleased to see that it recognises the transformative experience that smart meters deliver to prepayment customers.

The rollout of smart prepayment meters continues to make good progress, and energy suppliers are installing second generation smart (SMETS2) meters in prepayment mode across Great Britain. The Government has taken a number of steps to ensure that consumers with prepayment meters can benefit from smart meters including, for example, putting in place an explicit objective for Smart Energy GB – the industry body responsible for leading national coordinated consumer engagement – to assist consumers with low incomes or prepayment meters.

The Government and Ofgem have been clear that we expect energy suppliers to ensure that their prepayment customers are able to receive smart meters as soon as practicable. We welcome recent commitments by energy suppliers covering over 90% of customers to support customers over winter, including stepping up smart meter installations for prepayment customers.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 5 July 2021 to Question 24871 on Energy: Meters, and with reference to paragraph 17 of Annex B of the Government’s response to the consultation on the smart meter policy framework post 2020: minimum annual targets and reporting thresholds for energy suppliers, dated June 2021, what policy measures the Government is planning to assess, develop and research to reach the very highest levels of coverage by the end of the Framework; and what estimate his Department had made of when that coverage will be reached.

A number of policy measures have been considered and are already being implemented. These include publishing guidance to construction companies and other parties to support installation of smart meters in domestic new builds; confirmation that recipients of future Warm Home Discount Industry Initiatives will be provided with smart meters advice; andtargeted funds to decarbonise the public sector and promote smart metering.

The Government will continue analysis of potential policy measures. We will seek input and ideas from stakeholders as the rollout progresses for possible future introduction later in the rollout where appropriate, and dependent on wider industry progress towards reaching high levels of operational fulfilment and delivery of consistently good customer service.

The Government’s new four-year smart metering policy Framework, which commences on 1 January 2022 introduces annual, minimum individual installation requirements for energy suppliers, on a trajectory towards 100% subject to annual tolerance levels which were confirmed for Years 1 and 2 of the Framework in June 2021. The Government will consult on the minimum installation requirements for Years 3 and 4 of the new Framework during 2023.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 5 July 2021 to Question 24871 on Energy: Meters, and with reference to paragraph 17 of Annex B of the Government’s response to the consultation on the smart meter policy framework post 2020: minimum annual targets and reporting thresholds for energy suppliers, dated June 2021, when the Government plans to define high levels of operational fulfilment and consistently good customer service.

The Government has worked with industry to identify, define and share good practice to help improve operational capabilities. We will continue to support energy suppliers to further improve operational fulfilment and customer experience.

The Government will engage with energy suppliers and other stakeholders in due course to help define more precisely the pre-conditions for the effective deployment of potential additional policy measures.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 5 July 2021 to Question 24872 on Energy: Meters, which consumer orientated policy measures the Government is considering to ensure households can realise the benefits of smart meters and drive completion of the rollout.

The Government is committed to ensuring that households can benefit from smart meters as soon as possible. The rollout is already making good progress, with 25.2 million smart and advanced meters across Great Britain, as of the end of June 2021.

A number of measures have been considered and are already being implemented. These include publishing guidance to construction companies and other parties to support installation of smart meters in domestic new builds; confirmation that recipients of future Warm Home Discount Industry Initiatives will be provided with smart meters advice; and targeted funds to decarbonise the public sector and promote smart metering.

The Government will continue analysis of potential further policy measures. We will seek input and ideas from stakeholders as the rollout progresses for possible introduction later in the rollout where appropriate, and dependent on wider industry progress towards reaching high levels of operational fulfilment and delivery of consistently good customer service.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government plans for consumer choice for low carbon heating systems to be part of its Heat and Building Strategy for off-grid homes.

As announced in the Ten Point Plan, we will bring forward regulations to phase out fossil fuel heating in off grid areas. We intend to consult on these plans in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of allowing operational renewable projects access to the Contracts for Difference scheme on the accelerated deployment of renewables needed for the UK to attain its net-zero goal.

The Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme is designed to encourage low carbon generation and is open to a wide range of eligible renewable technologies. Under current eligibility criteria, renewable projects are not eligible to receive CfD support if they have already commenced generating. In a Government Response to a consultation published in November 2020 the government clarified the eligibility of part-built projects, i.e. those which have begun construction but have not commenced generating, stating that these projects are eligible to compete in the 2021 allocation round. We consider this achieves the right balance between accelerating deployment of renewables, whilst providing value for money for consumers by ensuring scheme costs are limited to what is necessary to legitimately stimulate deployment. We will keep this position under review.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the Contracts for Difference scheme provides sufficient long-term visibility to investors making financial decisions.

The Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme has been successful in bringing forward renewable generation whilst also reducing the costs of technology and since its inception has become established as a route to bring forward investment at scale. As set out in my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Ministers’ Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution, we have committed to holding regular CfD allocation rounds approximately every two years, and the next round will open in December 2021. The Department continues to keep the scheme under review to ensure it maintains a focus on investment certainty and stability to enable renewable deployment at scale. We recently concluded a Call for Evidence on this topic, seeking views to inform the future design and evolution of the CfD and will publish a response shortly.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits for the UK’s net-zero ambitions of extending the Contracts for Difference scheme to cover renewable energy projects in Northern Ireland.

Decarbonisation of Northern Ireland’s electricity system will play a key role in achieving the UK’s 2050 net zero targets. Energy policy is devolved to Northern Ireland. In a consultation earlier this year, the Department for the Economy (DfE) put forward a range of potential policies that could form the basis of Northern Ireland’s new Energy Strategy. This included a proposal to explore the possibility of extending the Contracts for Difference scheme to Northern Ireland. In this context, officials from BEIS and DfE are working together to consider the options.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of Ofgem’s network charging reforms on the Government’s commitment to support greater deployment of renewable energy projects.

Network charges are one of many factors which developers will take into account in deciding whether, where and when to progress particular energy projects in Scotland and across Great Britain. The reforms which Ofgem is progressing are, amongst other things, designed to support decarbonisation and contribute to meeting net zero at lowest cost. While network charging is a matter for Ofgem as the independent energy regulator, Government recognises the significant role that electricity network charging reforms will have on the wider energy sector, including renewables, and will continue to engage with Ofgem, industry and other interested parties to consider the impacts of the reform proposals.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of Ofgem’s network charging reforms on levels of employment in the Scottish energy sector.

Network charges are one of many factors which developers will take into account in deciding whether, where and when to progress particular energy projects in Scotland and across Great Britain. The reforms which Ofgem is progressing are, amongst other things, designed to support decarbonisation and contribute to meeting net zero at lowest cost. While network charging is a matter for Ofgem as the independent energy regulator, Government recognises the significant role that electricity network charging reforms will have on the wider energy sector, including renewables, and will continue to engage with Ofgem, industry and other interested parties to consider the impacts of the reform proposals.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of Ofgem’s network charging reforms on levels of investment within the Scottish energy sector.

Network charges are one of many factors which developers will take into account in deciding whether, where and when to progress particular energy projects in Scotland and across Great Britain. The reforms which Ofgem is progressing are, amongst other things, designed to support decarbonisation and contribute to meeting net zero at lowest cost. While network charging is a matter for Ofgem as the independent energy regulator, Government recognises the significant role that electricity network charging reforms will have on the wider energy sector, including renewables, and will continue to engage with Ofgem, industry and other interested parties to consider the impacts of the reform proposals.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is making an assessment of the inclusion of infrared heating technology in the renewable heat incentive.

There are no plans to make an assessment of the inclusion of infrared heating in the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). In the first instance, the primary legislation that underpins the RHI, Section 100 of the Energy Act (2008), places strict parameters on the categories of technology that can be supported under the scheme. In addition, the non-domestic RHI has already closed to new applications, and the domestic RHI is scheduled to close to new applications at the end of March 2022. Before a new technology could be introduced into the domestic scheme a formal evidence review would be required, followed by a public consultation. Legislation would then need to be taken through Parliament. This would take longer than the remaining lifetime of the scheme.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish the Standard Assessment Procedure for Energy Rating of Dwellings.

The next version of SAP will come into force with the uplift to Part L of the Building Regulations next year. We published an early draft of it in 2018 (SAP 10) and will publish an updated version (SAP 10.2) shortly.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of using retired nuclear power stations for the development and production of hydrogen.

The Government believes that nuclear could have a role in low-carbon hydrogen production and is aware of industry proposals showing how current nuclear technologies could play a role during the 2020s, while small and advanced modular reactors could unlock further efficiencies in future hydrogen production.

In terms of using former nuclear sites, the first priority is to ensure their safety and continued decommissioning, however we regularly engage with opportunities for future re-use where appropriate and this does include alternative energy production.

The Government is developing the first ever UK Hydrogen Strategy which it aims to publish shortly. This will set out the key steps needed in the 2020s to deliver our 5GW ambition and set the context for further scale up on the way to net zero.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of providing Government financial support for the development of infrared heating systems.

Achieving net zero carbon emissions will require almost all UK homes to be supplied with low-carbon heating by 2050, and electrification will be an important part of that transition. Extensive government and independent analysis indicate that heat pumps are a cost-effective solution and will be a principal means of decarbonising heat in buildings through electrification over the next decade. There may be a role for alternative technologies, like infrared heating, but research to date – including our 2019 report ‘Evidence gathering for electric heating options in off gas grid homes’ – suggests this should be limited to specific use cases, such as smaller homes with low heat demand.

BEIS officials continue to assess the merits of different heating technologies and support to develop these technologies is available through schemes including the Energy Entrepreneurs Fund and Clean Growth Fund. I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I have given him today to Question 33096 for further information on these schemes.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department is providing to the development of infrared heating solutions.

Achieving net zero carbon emissions will require almost all UK homes to be supplied with low-carbon heating by 2050, and electrification will be an important part of that transition. Extensive government and independent analysis indicate that heat pumps are a cost-effective solution and will be a principal means of decarbonising heat in buildings through electrification over the next decade. There may be a role for alternative technologies, like infrared heating, but research to date – including our 2019 report ‘Evidence gathering for electric heating options in off gas grid homes’ – suggests this should be limited to specific use cases, such as smaller homes with low heat demand.

We continue to encourage innovation in new technologies. Support is available for developing technologies, such as infrared heating solutions, through programmes like the BEIS Energy Entrepreneurs Fund (EEF) and Clean Growth Fund (CGF). The EEF is a competitive grant funding scheme to support the development and demonstration of technologies, products and processes in power generation, energy efficiency and storage technologies, while the CGF aims to accelerate the deployment of innovative clean technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, by making direct investments in companies seeking to commercialise promising technologies.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of the Scottish Government’s Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) reform proposals that aim to ensure that EPCs are an indicator of energy efficiency, heating emissions and cost; and whether his Department has made an assessment of the viability of implementing such reforms throughout the UK.

As we continue to deliver the commitments within the EPC Action Plan, and develop policies that rely on EPCs as a measure of energy performance, we will monitor and assess relevant material such as the Scottish Government’s EPC proposals, to inform our decision-making in these areas.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that the cost of heat pumps is reduced in the short and medium term.

We expect the upfront costs of heat pump installations to reduce significantly as the scale of the UK market grows in line with the Government’s ambition for 600,000 heat pump installations per year from 2028.

We are taking a range of steps both to support the heat pump market to develop and to support consumers with the costs of installing a heat pump in the near term while the market builds. These include, for instance, the planned Clean Heat Grant and the Future Homes Standard, which will ensure that new homes are future-proofed with low-carbon heating from 2025.

We will set out further plans for developing the heat pump market in the Heat and Buildings Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department plans to take to support low income households with the higher running costs of air source heat pumps compared to traditional gas boilers.

The Government is planning to publish a Heat and Buildings Strategy in due course. This will include information on the Government’s approach to the transition to low carbon heating through a comprehensive policy package comprising targeted regulatory, market-based and public investment measures.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the supply chain for the creation of air and ground source heat pumps is located in the UK, rather than abroad.

Our plans to scale up heat pump deployment provide a huge opportunity to expand the UK heat pump manufacturing base and exploit future export potential. Published last year, our Heat Pump Manufacturing Supply Chain Research Project indicated that the heat pump market could be worth £5.5 billion to the UK economy by 2035.

In order to help accelerate investment in UK heat pump manufacturing capability and capacity, we are setting clear long-term policy through our forthcoming Heat and Buildings Strategy. The Government is also providing cross-sector fiscal support, including expanded export finance facilities, funding to support training in low-carbon technologies and manufacturing through the National Skills Fund, and a 130 per cent super-deduction capital allowance on qualifying plant and machinery investments. In addition, officials in BEIS, together with colleagues from the Department for International Trade, are working closely with heating appliance manufacturers to provide business investment support.

UK-based heat pump manufacturers – like Mitsubishi Electric, Kensa, Clade Engineering Systems, Star Renewable Energy, Global Energy Systems, Big Magic International – are investing to meet growing demand in the UK and internationally, and Vaillant recently announced plans to expand their UK boiler manufacturing facility in Belper, Derbyshire, to produce heat pumps from 2022. This demonstrates that the UK is an attractive place to invest and to do business.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the Government's timeframe is for implementing a prohibition on the connection of new-build homes to the gas grid.

When it is implemented in 2025, the Future Homes Standard will deliver new homes that are zero carbon ready, with low carbon heating and high levels of energy efficiency. In the 2020 Energy White Paper, we also committed to consulting on the feasibility of ending the connection of new build homes to the natural gas grid, in favour of clean energy alternatives. We expect to consult on this commitment later this year to gather further evidence before taking a decision.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the Scottish Government’s proposed EPC reform for ensure that EPCs are an effective indicator of (a) energy efficiency, (b) heating emissions and (c) cost; and what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on EPCs in England of that proposed EPC reform.

The Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) currently uses an energy cost based rating to encourage the implementation of energy performance improvements that reduce running costs. We are aware of the Scottish Government’s proposal to increase the number of metrics on the EPC. We have consulted recently on regulatory proposals that would use EPCs to support improvement to homes. In these consultations, we have sought views on what EPC metric or metrics are most aligned with our overall policy goals. This included a cost-based rating (Energy Efficiency Rating) and a carbon-based rating (Environmental Impact Rating) alongside seeking views on other options. Furthermore, we are continuing to deliver the commitments in our EPC Action Plan, published last year, to maximise the effectiveness of EPCs in improving the energy performance of buildings.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government’s response to the Consultation on the Smart Meter Policy Framework Post-2020, published in June 2021, what proportion of premises taking up the installation of a smart meter his Department would define as a market-wide rollout.

The Government wants to ensure that households and small businesses in Great Britain can benefit from smart metering. Therefore, we have confirmed that a new four-year smart metering policy Framework will set energy suppliers annual, individual minimum installation targets on a trajectory to 100%, subject to annual tolerance levels which were confirmed for Years 1 and 2 of the Framework in June 2021. The Government will consult on the targets for Years 3 and 4 of the new Framework during 2023.

The new Framework will commence on 1 January 2022.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of residents in England his Department has estimated will take up voluntary installation of smart meters; and what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing new policies to help incentivise the take-up of smart meters by all households.

Smart meters are replacing traditional gas and electricity meters in Great Britain as part of an essential infrastructure upgrade to make the energy system more efficient and flexible, enabling the cost-effective delivery of net zero greenhouse gas emissions.

The Government is committed to ensuring that households and small businesses can benefit from smart meters as soon as possible. Evidence shows that consumer attitudes to smart meters are not fixed and change over time and as such we do not hold an estimate of total consumer acceptance in England. Consumer demand remains strong with around 18,000 smart meters being installed on average each working day.

The Government recognises more may need to be done to engage consumers to reach the very highest levels of smart meter coverage by the end of the rollout. The Government will continue to consider further consumer-orientated policy measures to ensure households can realise the benefits of smart meters and drive completion of the rollout.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to paragraph 173 of the Government’s response to the Consultation on Smart Meter Policy Framework Post-2020, published in June 2021, which policy measures designed to increase consumer uptake of smart meters are being progressed (a) immediately and (b) at an appropriate time.

Smart meters are replacing traditional gas and electricity meters in Great Britain as part of an essential infrastructure upgrade to make the energy system more efficient and flexible, enabling the cost-effective delivery of net zero greenhouse gas emissions. The rollout is making good progress, with 24.2 million smart and advanced meters in homes and small businesses across Great Britain.

The Government wants to ensure that households and small businesses in Great Britain can benefit from smart metering and recognises that reaching this goal will involve continued collaboration between government, industry and Smart Energy GB and their partner organisations over the next phase of the rollout.

Further detail on activity that is seeking to drive consumer uptake of smart meters, including steps that have already been taken, is included in Annex B of the Government's recent response to the consultation on the smart meter policy framework post 2020: minimum annual targets and reporting thresholds for energy suppliers.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government’s response on the Consultation on Smart Meter Policy Framework Post-2020, published in June 2021, what the scope will be of the mid-point review that was set out in that response; and at what point during the second year of the new framework that mid-point review will take place.

The Government wants to ensure that households and small businesses in Great Britain can benefit from smart metering. Therefore, we have confirmed a new four-year smart metering policy Framework with fixed annual installation targets for energy suppliers will commence on 1 January 2022 to drive the consistent, long-term investment needed to achieve market-wide rollout.

A mid-point review of the Framework will take place during 2023. The review will consider the tolerance methodology, including the forecasting model, as well as the latest available evidence on the progress of the rollout in line with developments in market conditions, consumer attitudes and energy supplier performance. Tolerance levels for Year 3 (2024) and Year 4 (2025) will be consulted upon following that review point and in advance of the start of Year 3.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 4 June 2021 to Question 7076, what steps his Department is taking to support the 20 per cent of off-gas grid homes that are not suited to being heated by a heat pump.

Support to transition away from fossil fuel heating is currently available through the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (DRHI). Eligible technologies include biomass boilers and pellet stoves, as well as heat pumps. The DRHI is scheduled to close in 2022, however we have consulted on plans for a Clean Heat Grant (CHG) scheme, that will provide upfront grants for the installation of low carbon heating systems, including biomass boilers. Further information on scheme design and eligibility criteria will be set out in the government response to the consultation later this year.

Support for high temperature heat pumps is also available through the DRHI and the planned CHG. High temperature heat pumps may be suitable for use in properties that have a higher heat demand or where it is not appropriate to change the radiators or use under-floor heating.

From early 2022, the Home Upgrade Grant (HUG) will provide support to low income off gas grid households by installing energy efficiency upgrades and low carbon heating. The Sustainable Warmth Competition guidance sets out the expected approach for Local Authorities installing low carbon heating using HUG funding. Where low temperature heat pumps are unsuitable, alternative low carbon heating technologies may be installed if justification can be provided as to how they meet deliverability, value for money, affordability, sustainability, and air quality considerations.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 4 June 2021 to Question 7077, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of expanding the Clean Heat Grant Scheme to incentivise the deployment of BioLPG in off grid homes where heat pumps are either unsuitable or cost prohibited.

BioLPG is not widely available to domestic consumers at present. The Clean Heat Grant aims to provide support that will maintain existing low-carbon heat supply chains from April 2022 and so the technologies it will support need to be readily deployable now. It will take time to gather the evidence needed to consider what future role biofuels could play in the decarbonisation of heat, and to develop the policy framework which would support such a role. This process is underway though the Biomass Strategy call for evidence. Biomass boilers are being supported as an alternative to heat pumps within the Clean Heat Grant, providing certain eligibility requirements are met.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 4 June 2021 to Question 7075, was estimate he has made of the average cost of installing a heat pump to a typical rural off gas grid domestic property.

BEIS analysis indicates that air source heat pumps would currently cost around £12,000 to install for an average fossil fuel heated home off the gas grid. This includes the upfront cost of the heat pump unit, tanks and cylinders, controls, retrofit of radiators, and installation costs.

Evidence from market research and industry engagement suggests that mass deployment of heat pumps in the UK could lead to a significant reduction in upfront costs for domestic-sized systems due to economies of scale and other efficiencies.

In order to ease consumer costs, the Government has been providing financial support through schemes such as the domestic Renewable Heat Incentive. In addition, from April 2022, the Clean Heat Grant will provide support to off gas grid households switching to low carbon heating, and the Home Upgrade Grant scheme will provide support to low income off grid households installing energy efficiency upgrades and low carbon heating.

The Government is developing options for how a long-term framework of policy approaches, including regulation, can combine to provide a clear direction-of-travel for industry and accelerate the uptake of low-carbon heat, including growing the heat pump market to 600,000 installations per year by 2028. Alongside the publication of the Heat and Building Strategy, we are planning to consult on new regulations to phase out fossil fuel heating in homes, businesses, and public buildings off the gas grid.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to develop a Contract for Difference focused solely on green hydrogen.

We will consult shortly on our preferred hydrogen business model, or models, for low carbon hydrogen aimed at supporting delivery of our 5GW hydrogen production capacity. Our business model will be designed to support a range of low carbon hydrogen production technologies, including electrolysis using renewable electricity and methane reformation with carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS).

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 7 June 2021 to Question 7070, what assessment he has made of the effect of the absence of a minima or maxima for wave and tidal stream technologies within Contract for Difference auctions on those technologies' ability to compete successfully in those auctions.

The Government recently ran a Call for Evidence inviting views on what scope there is for marine technologies across the UK including how the Contract for Difference competitive allocation process could most effectively support early commercial deployments of innovative marine technologies. This concluded on 30th September 2020 and we are now considering policy related to wave and tidal stream energy in light of the information received from the Call for Evidence.

We will publish specific allocation round parameters in advance of the next auction. This will include the details of whether any technology-specific minima will apply.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2021 to Question 2860, what number of wave and tidal stream technologies have been successful in competing in previous Contracts for Difference auctions.

The CfD scheme’s success has in part been down to the competitive nature of auctions. To date, no wave or tidal stream projects have been successful in a Contracts for Difference allocation round.

The Low Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC) keeps a register which contains a record of all projects which have been successful in previous allocation rounds. This can be found at https://www.lowcarboncontracts.uk/cfds.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2021 to Question 2860, whether the parameters for the next allocation round of Pot 2 Contracts for Difference auctions will change to support the development of wave and tidal stream technologies.

Wave and tidal stream projects remain eligible to compete in Pot 2 for Contracts for Difference auctions. We will publish specific allocation round parameters in advance of the next auction, including consideration of technology-specific minima.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2021 to Question 2856, what assessment his Department has made of the potential pipeline of floating wind projects which could be developed by (a) 2030 and (b) 2040.

The Government has a target of 1GW of floating wind by 2030.

In addition to the (operational) Hywind and (under construction) Kincardine projects, there are a number of projects at an earlier stage of development – Blyth, Erebus and Pentland.

The current ScotWind seabed leasing process is expected to result in a number of potential floating wind projects. The number, size and locations of potential projects will not be known until the ScotWind process is completed.

The Crown Estate is currently designing new seabed leasing for floating wind projects in the Celtic Sea, focusing on projects of 300MW. The number, size and locations of potential projects will not be known until the process is completed.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many applicants submitted proposals to the offshore wind manufacturing investment scheme.

On 6 October my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister announced £160m to support offshore wind and infrastructure across the UK. We announced in March an investment of up to £75m for developing port infrastructure on the Humber and up to £20m for further investment on Teesside.

The UK Government also launched the Offshore Wind Investment Programme on the 22 February to support the delivery of manufacturing investment in the offshore wind supply chain. Whilst the scheme is still running I cannot comment further.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will adopt the Institution of Civil Engineers' recent recommendation that increased funding should be made available for the National Digital Twin Programme.

The Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) are widely recognised for providing leadership to the increased digitalisation of the construction sector and the wider built environment. Innovative digital and information management techniques have already proven to deliver improved sector performance and operational efficiency from our national infrastructure. In future, these will significantly contribute to delivering our Net Zero Carbon commitments.

This is why, in collaboration with industry and academia, the Department is supporting programmes to develop new digital techniques, standards and guidance including funding the National Digital Twin Programme (NDTP). Therefore, we welcome ICE’s support for the NDTP, and we will continue to work with them and other stakeholders to take this forward.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of rural domestic properties off the gas grid that are not suited to being heated by a heat pump.

The evidence received from stakeholders in response to our 2018 call for evidence highlighted that electrification of heat is the one pathway to net zero proven to work at scale in homes off the gas grid. This is reinforced by BEIS modelling which suggests around 80% of off gas grid homes currently have sufficient energy efficiency and internal electrical limits to accommodate a heat pump. Our analysis also shows that this figure potentially rises to around 90% with fabric upgrades including draught-proofing, cavity wall insulation, floor, and loft insulation, and / or more major upgrades such as external wall insulation. From 2022, the Clean Heat Grant will provide support to off grid households switching to low carbon heating, and the Home Upgrade Grant scheme will provide support to low income off grid households by installing energy efficiency upgrades and low carbon heating.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate his Department has made of the average cost of installing a heat pump to a typical rural off gas grid domestic property.

Evidence from market research and industry engagement suggests that mass deployment of heat pumps in the UK could lead to a significant reduction in upfront costs for domestic-sized systems due to economies of scale and other efficiencies.

In order to ease consumer costs, the Government has been providing financial support through schemes such as the domestic Renewable Heat Incentive. In addition, from April 2022, the Clean Heat Grant will provide support to off gas grid households switching to low carbon heating, and the Home Upgrade Grant scheme will provide support to low income off grid households installing energy efficiency upgrades and low carbon heating.

The Government is developing options for how a long-term framework of policy approaches, including regulation, can combine to provide a clear direction-of-travel for industry and accelerate the uptake of low-carbon heat, including growing the heat pump market to 600,000 installations per year by 2028. Alongside the publication of the Heat and Building Strategy, we are planning to consult on new regulations to phase out fossil fuel heating in homes, businesses, and public buildings off the gas grid.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department provides to assist off gas grid households to purchase low carbon gas to heat their homes as an alternative to heating oil and where heat pumps are either unsuitable or cost prohibitive.

The Government recognises that biofuels such as bioLPG and bioliquid alternatives to heating oil may play a role in future off-gas-grid decarbonisation, particularly for those properties that are not suitable for a heat pump. The Department has recently published a Call for Evidence to inform the development of a Biomass Strategy. This strategy will review the amount of sustainable biomass available to the UK, including liquid biofuels, and how this could be best used across the economy to achieve our net zero target. It will also assess the UK’s current biomass sustainability standards, which are some of the most stringent in the world, to see where and how we can improve them even further.

The Department also provides, and will continue to provide, support for households that are off the gas grid to switch to low carbon heating, including in homes where heat pumps are unsuitable. The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (DRHI) is targeted at (though not limited to) homes that are off the gas grid, and supports biomass boilers and pellet stoves, and solar thermal (for hot water) systems as well as heat pumps. The DRHI is scheduled to close in 2022, but the successor scheme to the DRHI, the Clean Heat Grant scheme is scheduled to launch in 2022, and will provide upfront capital grants for the installation of low carbon heat systems in domestic and small non-domestic buildings. The scheme will support homes off the gas grid to transition from high carbon fossil fuel heating sources such as oil to low carbon alternatives including biomass boilers where heat pumps are unsuitable.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of fuel poor households living off the gas grid.

The most recent estimates for fuel poverty in England are for 2019. An estimated 542,000 fuel poor households in 2019 did not have a gas grid connection.

This figure can be found in Table 10 of the fuel poverty detailed tables statistics: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fuel-poverty-detailed-tables-2021.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the floating wind industry on the potential economic benefits of setting a target of 16GW of floating wind by 2040.

One of the key priorities of this Government is putting in place policies to support a significant growth of offshore wind to 2030 and beyond. Within this, we are committed to supporting the development of floating offshore wind, as reflected by our ambitious target of 1GW of floating wind by 2030.

The Department has regular discussions with members of the floating offshore wind sector. Floating offshore wind projects will be eligible to bid in the next Contract for Difference allocation round, which will open in December 2021. This approach will provide the foundation for investment in a sustainable, competitive UK based supply chain from which we will learn to help plan our future approach and the feasible scale of ramp up of deployment.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the feasibility of developing (a) 2GW of floating wind by 2030 and (b) 16GW of floating wind by 2040.

One of the key priorities of this Government is putting in place policies to support a significant growth of offshore wind to 2030 and beyond. Within this, we are committed to supporting the development of floating offshore wind, as reflected by our ambitious target of 1GW of floating wind by 2030.

The Department has regular discussions with members of the floating offshore wind sector. Floating offshore wind projects will be eligible to bid in the next Contract for Difference allocation round, which will open in December 2021. This approach will provide the foundation for investment in a sustainable, competitive UK based supply chain from which we will learn to help plan our future approach and the feasible scale of ramp up of deployment.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the onshore wind industry on their supply chains.

Onshore wind is a key part of the Government’s strategy for low-cost decarbonisation of the energy sector. Achieving our ambitious 2050 Net Zero target will require significant increases in renewable electricity generation, and we will need to increase deployment across a range of technologies, including onshore wind.

The BEIS ministerial team and officials have regular discussions with the onshore wind industry about how we can achieve this, including the role of supply chains.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what actions he is taking to support the development of wave and tidal stream technologies.

The Government has a long history of supporting the development and deployment of wave and tidal stream technologies in the UK. To date, we have provided sustained and targeted support enabling the wave and tidal stream sectors to move from initial concept onto prototypes and now the first arrays. Since 2003, various bodies across Government have provided innovation funding of £175m to the wave and tidal sectors. Wave and tidal stream projects remain eligible to compete in Pot 2 for Contracts for Difference auctions, with the next allocation round commencing December 2021.

The Government recently ran a Call for Evidence inviting views on the scope for marine technologies across the UK. This concluded on 30th September 2020 and we are currently reviewing the responses received.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total (a) financial and (b) tCO2 per annum savings projected were for all grants issued through the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme.

Grants issued through Phase 1 of the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme are projected to reduce carbon emissions by around 100,000 tCO2e per annum.

The Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme is not designed to produce financial savings, so although some projects may result in financial savings, no projection has been made of total financial savings.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what actions he is taking to increase investment in the onshore wind supply chain.

The UK Government at this present time is not undertaking any direct actions to increase investment specifically in the onshore wind supply chain. The BEIS ministerial team and officials meet a wide range of developers and manufacturers in the course of our work, and the Department is always seeking to ensure that we make the most of the economic opportunities created by our world-leading decarbonisation commitments.

The Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme is the Government’s main mechanism for supporting new renewable electricity generation projects in Great Britain, and in March 2020 we announced that onshore wind would be able to bid in the Contracts for Difference allocation round 4, which is planned to open in December 2021. In parallel, we have also consulted on proposals to strengthen our Supply Chain Plan policy to ensure that developers who bid into the Contracts for Difference allocation round 4 deliver on their commitments to build strong, competitive supply chains for all eligible technologies.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which Minister will be responsible for reviewing the application for development consent on the Aquind Interconnector Pipeline between the UK and France.

The decision to grant or refuse development consent for the proposed Aquind Interconnector will be taken by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on the role of green hydrogen in decarbonising transport between 2021 and 2024.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy meets with my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Transport regularly to discuss all aspects of transport decarbonisation including the role for green hydrogen.

Officials from both departments work together bilaterally and through formal governance.

A good example of cross departmental working is the announcement of £3 million to support the development of the UK’s first Hydrogen Transport Hub in Tees Valley.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of how much of the Government’s hydrogen production targets of (a) 1GW by 2025 and (b) 5GW by 2030 will be met by green hydrogen.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan confirmed our aim, working with industry, for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy. As we progress towards this ambition, we would hope to see around 1GW of hydrogen production capacity by 2025.

The levels of green and blue hydrogen production that make up the 5GW will depend on market developments in the 2020s.

Further details will be set out in the forthcoming UK Hydrogen strategy which will be published this year.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the level of carbon emissions produced via the production of (a) green hydrogen and (b) blue hydrogen.

The greenhouse gas emissions associated with different hydrogen production methods depend on a wide range of factors such as the feedstock energy, the efficiency of the hydrogen production plant and the CO2 capture rate for carbon capture utilisation and storage (CCUS) enabled blue hydrogen production.

BEIS is working with industry, academia and regulators on understanding and comparing options for an emissions standard that will define low carbon hydrogen. As part of this work, we have been assessing emissions associated with a range of hydrogen production methods, including CCUS enabled blue hydrogen and electrolytic green hydrogen.

We will be releasing further detail on this work in the coming months and intend to consult on a UK Low Carbon Hydrogen Standard alongside the UK Hydrogen Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on financial support for (a) green hydrogen and (b) blue hydrogen projects.

I meet with my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer regularly to discuss all aspects of my portfolio.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan confirmed our aim, working with industry, for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy.

The UK has expertise and assets to support both electrolytic (green) and Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage (CCUS) enabled (blue) hydrogen.

This ambition will be supported by a range of measures, including a £240 million Net Zero Hydrogen Fund and our hydrogen business models and a revenue mechanism to bring through private sector investment.

We will be consulting shortly on these measures, alongside the publication of the UK’s first ever Hydrogen Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 April 2021 to Question 173996, how much of the £171 million announced by the Government for hydrogen projects in the Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy is planned to be allocated to projects that include green hydrogen.

The Government announced £171m of funding to support nine projects looking to decarbonise activity across five industrial clusters through the Industrial Decarbonisation Challenge. Projects in Scotland, South Wales, Humberside, Teesside and the North West will all receive government support to deploy a range of low-carbon infrastructure and technologies, including but not limited to, low carbon hydrogen. The hydrogen projects supported in these cluster locations will be enabled by the development of the CO2 transport and storage network (blue hydrogen),and will in turn enable decarbonisation across the cluster in line with the objectives of the fund.

The UK has expertise and assets to support both electrolytic (green) and Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage (CCUS) enabled (blue) hydrogen. Our twin track approach to enable both routes will drive cost effective supply volumes in the 2020s in line with our 2030 5GW ambition, whilst scaling up green hydrogen. Government support for hydrogen production, through the Net Zero Hydrogen Fund and business models is intended to support both green and blue hydrogen projects.

We will publish the first ever UK Hydrogen Strategy this year which will set out the key steps needed in the 2020s to deliver our 5GW ambition and set the context for further scale up on the way to net zero, this will include further details on the role of green hydrogen.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 April 2021 to Question 173996, what assessment his Department has made of the role of green hydrogen in its Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy.

The Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy set out that to be on track to deliver net zero, we expect that the minimum, in all future scenarios, is 20 TWh per year of fossil fuel use replaced with low carbon alternatives in 2030. Hydrogen, electrification and bioenergy all have a role to play, including green hydrogen. Further details will be set out in the forthcoming Hydrogen Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what funding his Department is providing to advance green hydrogen projects; when that funding (a) started and (b) is due to end; and what the (i) names and (ii) locations are of those funded projects.

The Government is providing significant amounts of support to green hydrogen projects. We are investing up to £33m to support the development of a range low carbon hydrogen supply solutions, including green hydrogen projects, through the Hydrogen Supply competition. This includes:

o The Dolphyn project, led by ERM, received £3.1m to develop green hydrogen production from floating offshore wind. The project is due to complete in summer 2021.

o The Gigastack project, led by ITM Power, received £7.5m to further the development of hydrogen production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane electrolysis. The project is due to complete in summer 2021.

o Four projects received funding to complete green hydrogen feasibility studies, which were completed in 2019.

o Phase 1 of the Green Distilleries Competition has funded a variety of hydrogen projects to complete a feasibility study on their technology. Nine of the 17 feasibility studies funded at Phase 1 are for low carbon hydrogen-related projects, including a novel electrolyser for the production of hydrogen

The forthcoming £240m Net-Zero Hydrogen Fund is intended to support both green and blue hydrogen production. We will be consulting on the design of the fund alongside publication of the first ever UK Hydrogen Strategy set to be published in Q2 of this year. We will also be considering what support is required for green hydrogen as part of developing long term, sustainable business models and the revenue mechanism, to stimulate private investment in new low carbon projects.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the levels of (a) green, (b) blue and (c) grey hydrogen that will be produced in the UK from 2021 to 2024.

The UK is aiming for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy, and we expect this to come from a combination of green and blue hydrogen production methods. The UK currently produces around 10 – 27TWh of hydrogen, most of which is not low carbon (‘grey’) for use in the petrochemical sector.

Production of large-scale blue hydrogen requires the necessary carbon capture and storage infrastructure to be in place, so we do not expect this to come forwards until the mid-2020s. The majority of low carbon hydrogen production during 2021 – 2024 is therefore likely to be green hydrogen, with end use focussed on sectors with existing demand such as transport and industry, with use in heat and power developing over time. To achieve our legally binding net zero commitments we will also need a complete switch to low carbon production, as addressed in our recent Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy.

Further details on how we will scale up production of low carbon hydrogen through the 2020s, as well as decarbonise existing grey hydrogen production, will be set out in the UK Hydrogen Strategy, which will be published in the coming months alongside further detail on the Net Zero Hydrogen Fund and business models to support hydrogen and industrial decarbonisation.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential to produce and use (a) green hydrogen and (b) blue hydrogen from 2021 to 2024.

The UK is aiming for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy, and we expect this to come from a combination of green and blue hydrogen production methods. The UK currently produces around 10 – 27TWh of hydrogen, most of which is not low carbon (‘grey’) for use in the petrochemical sector.

Production of large-scale blue hydrogen requires the necessary carbon capture and storage infrastructure to be in place, so we do not expect this to come forwards until the mid-2020s. The majority of low carbon hydrogen production during 2021 – 2024 is therefore likely to be green hydrogen, with end use focussed on sectors with existing demand such as transport and industry, with use in heat and power developing over time. To achieve our legally binding net zero commitments we will also need a complete switch to low carbon production, as addressed in our recent Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy.

Further details on how we will scale up production of low carbon hydrogen through the 2020s, as well as decarbonise existing grey hydrogen production, will be set out in the UK Hydrogen Strategy, which will be published in the coming months alongside further detail on the Net Zero Hydrogen Fund and business models to support hydrogen and industrial decarbonisation.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the £320 million for the Green Homes Grant scheme announced by the Chancellor of Exchequer in the Spending Review 2020 will be allocated to the Local Authority Delivery element of that scheme.

In his Spending Review 2020, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced £320 million of funding for the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme for use in financial year 21/22. Following a review, the voucher scheme closed to new applications on 31 March 2021. All valid applications made to the scheme up to 31st March 2021 will be processed, and all vouchers issued will be honoured – currently estimated as £220 million of expenditure.

The Government will be expanding its funding commitment for both the Local Authority Delivery element of the Green Homes Grant scheme and the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund with £300 million of new funding and up to £100 million of recycled funding from the Green Homes Grant Vouchers, depending on take up. The funding will be granted in financial year 21/22, with delivery continuing through financial year 22/23.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much and what proportion of the funding allocated to the Local Authority Delivery element of the Green Homes Grant scheme has been paid to contractors for completed work.

The Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery scheme will deliver energy efficiency upgrades to low-income households via Local Authorities, using existing, or newly procured services from certified installers. All procurement or contracts to supply services under the GHG LAD scheme will be carried out at Local Authority level.

The full £500m has now been granted to Local Authorities in Phase 1 and Local Energy Hubs for Phase 2 and delivery has begun. We will be receiving further information on overall spend as the scheme progresses, however at this time the specific breakdown of payment to contractors is not available.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much of the £171 million announced by Government for hydrogen projects in the Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy is allocated for blue hydrogen projects.

The Government announced £171m of funding to support nine projects looking to decarbonise activity across five industrial clusters through the Industrial Decarbonisation Challenge. Projects in Scotland, South Wales, Humberside, Teesside and the North West will all receive government support to deploy a range of low-carbon infrastructure and technologies, including but not limited to, hydrogen.

Specific projects that will be supporting and exploring the use of blue hydrogen include:

  • The Northern Endurance Partnership (£24m of IDC funding). Creation of an offshore CO2 transport and storage system connecting two innovative onshore capture projects into one initial geological store, enabling blue hydrogen production.
  • Scotland Net Zero (£33.3m for onshore and offshore elements). Blue hydrogen is one element of carbon capture and storage plans, to help provide a tangible path to the decarbonisation of the Scottish industrial cluster.
  • Net Zero Teesside (£28m). Project includes exploring ways to produce large scale blue hydrogen through the cluster plan project.
  • Zero Carbon Humber Partnership (£21.5m). Delivering low-carbon infrastructure, comprising CO2 and hydrogen transmission pipelines linking the region's major emitters, providing a pathway to deliver at-scale decarbonisation. Includes development of a blue hydrogen production facility to enable large industrial energy customers across the Cluster to switch from natural gas to hydrogen.
  • South Wales (£20m). Blue hydrogen forms one part of their sustainable clean growth plan.
Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 22 February 2021 to Question 152400, on Green Homes Grant Scheme, if he will publish the (a) contract and (b) top three performance indicators in the contract to ICF for administering the Green Homes Grant voucher scheme before the end of the financial year 2020-21.

In line with government best practice, BEIS published the contract and legally required information on 17 March. The top three performance indicators have been redacted as they are commercially sensitive, and their publication would be inappropriate at this time.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether ICF will be responsible for the administration of the Green Homes Grant scheme in the financial year 2021-2022.

Following a review, the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme closed to new applications on 31 March 2021. BEIS expects ICF to honour their contractual commitments. All compliant applications made to the scheme up to 31st March 2021 will be processed, and all vouchers issued will be honoured.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Clean Growth Grand Challenge Missions that flowed from the Industrial Strategy remain Government policy.

'Build Back Better: our plan for growth’ sets out the Government’s new framework for how the UK will build back better and drive longer-term growth following COVID-19. The plan, and its range of supporting strategies, take forward the best elements of the Industrial Strategy within a new approach that reflects the changed context since 2017. As part of this transition, we will consider how best to evolve the 2017 Grand Challenges and missions within a forthcoming Innovation Strategy; ensuring any renewed approach is responsive to, and able to effectively deliver current priorities – including our climate and clean growth commitments.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to allocate the remaining £300 million from the Local Authority Delivery scheme to local energy hubs.

The remaining £300 million of funding for the Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery scheme will be transferred to the five local Energy Hubs before the end of March 2021.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of Local Authority Delivery funding has been allocated to each region of the UK.

Phase 1A of the Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery (LAD) scheme saw over £74million of funding being allocated to 55 Local Authorities in October 2020 across England.

Under Phase 1B, around £126million of grant offers were made to 81 Local Authorities in January 2021. Further details of these allocations will be announced in the coming weeks once Memorandums of Understanding with individual Local Authorities have been signed.

Phase 2 of LAD will see funding of £300m allocated to the five Local Energy Hubs this financial year who will work with Local Authorities in their region to deliver energy efficiency projects.

Further details of how the allocation of all this funding is spread geographically within England will be announced shortly, once all of the relevant legal processes and transactions have been completed as appropriate.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many applications from local authorities for the Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery (LAD) scheme were received for (a) Phase 1a and (b) Phase 1b.

Phase 1A of the Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery scheme received 70 applications from Local Authorities. Phase 1B received 108 applications from Local Authorities.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many applications from local authorities were rejected due to the Local Authority Deliver scheme for (a) Phase 1a and (b) Phase 1b being oversubscribed.

Phase 1A of the Green House Grant Local Authority Delivery Scheme was not over-subscribed – although some applications were rejected which did not meet the eligibility criteria for the scheme or where the deliverability or value for money assessment did not meet the required standard.

Phase 1B was over-subscribed. We assessed all applications according to the same criteria and eligibility requirements. This resulted in 23 bids not being successful – 17 because they did not meet the eligibility criteria for the scheme.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of Local Authority Delivery funding has been allocated to projects compared with that allocated for the Green Homes Grant voucher scheme.

The £2 billion pledged to the Green Homes Grant (GHG) is comprised of £500m of funding for the Local Authority Delivery (LAD) element and £1.5 billion of funding originally allocated to the Voucher Scheme for use in the 2020/21 financial year.

All £500m LAD funding is planned to be allocated to Local Authorities and Regional Energy Hubs, as appropriate, before the end of March 2021. This will be delivered in three phases:

  • Phase 1A: over £74 million was allocated in October 2020 to fund energy efficiency projects in over 100 Local Authorities by June 2021.
  • Phase 1B: around £126 million of grant offers were made to 81 Local Authorities in January 2021, for delivery of energy efficiency projects by September 2021.
  • Phase 2: will see funding of £300m allocated to the five Local Energy Hubs this financial year, to deliver energy efficiency projects by December 2021.

The Voucher Scheme was designed to provide a short-term economic stimulus while tackling our contribution to climate change. However, the prevalence of Covid-19 since the scheme’s launch in September last year has led to an understandable reluctance on the part of the public to welcome tradespeople into their homes. We will continue to work with the scheme’s administrator to ensure voucher applications are processed as quickly as possible. As of 22 February 2021, 25,770 vouchers have been issued. £320 million of funding was announced for the Voucher Scheme for 2021/22 in the November 2020 Spending Review.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 22 February 2021 to Question 151583 on the Green Homes Grant Scheme, what proportion of the £320 million allocated for that scheme for the 2021-22 financial year will be allocated to (a) the Green Homes Grant Scheme specifically and (b) the Local Authority Delivery element of the scheme.

In the 2020 Spending Review, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced £320 million of funding for the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme for 2021/22, as part of funding allocated to make homes and buildings more energy efficient and less carbon intensive.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much of the £500m local authority delivery element of Green Homes Grant voucher scheme has been used to date.

The Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery scheme will upgrade the energy efficiency of around 50,000 homes of low-income households across England. The scheme is being delivered in three phases:

- Phase 1A: over £74million was allocated to 55 Local Authorities in October 2020 to fund energy efficiency projects in over 100 Local Authorities by June 2021.

- Phase 1B: £126million of grant offers were made to 81 Local Authorities in January 2021, for delivery of energy efficiency projects by September 2021. Further details of these allocations will be announced in the coming weeks once Memorandums of Understanding with individual Local Authorities have been signed.

- Phase 2: will see funding of £300m allocated to the five Local Energy Hubs this financial year who will work with Local Authorities in their region to deliver energy efficiency projects by December 2021. Further information on how these funds are being allocated within each region will be confirmed in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the local authority delivery element of the Green Homes Grant voucher scheme (a) will end on 31 March 2021 and (b) is part of the £320 million of funding for 2021-22 announced for that scheme in the 2020 Spending Review.

The Green Homes Grant Local Authority Delivery scheme will upgrade the energy efficiency of around 50,000 homes of low-income households across England. The scheme is being delivered in three phases:

- Phase 1A; over £74million was allocated to 55 Local Authorities in October 2020 to fund energy efficiency projects in over 100 Local Authorities by June 2021.

- Phase 1B:  around £126million of grant offers were made to 81 Local Authorities in January 2021, for delivery of energy efficiency projects by September 2021. Further details of these allocations will be announced in the coming weeks once Memorandums of Understanding with individual Local Authorities have been signed.

- Phase 2:  will see funding of £300m allocated to the five Local Energy Hubs this financial year who will work with Local Authorities in their region to deliver energy efficiency projects by December 2021. Further information on how these funds are being allocated within each region will be confirmed in due course.

The 2020 Spending Review saw £320 million allocated to the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme for 2021-22; this is independent of the £500m allocated to the Local Authority Delivery scheme in July 2020.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how long it is taking on average for a homeowner to receive a voucher under the Green Homes Grant scheme after making an application.

We have designed the voucher process to automate checks where possible and minimise the time taken for voucher approval. However, applications must be thoroughly checked for compliance with the scheme rules to help ensure value for money, consumer protection, and detect malpractice. As such, waiting times can vary.

We continue to work to reduce the time between application and issuance, where possible.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homeowners (a) have applied for vouchers under the Green Homes Grant scheme and (b) are on the waiting list for that scheme

Homeowners and landlords submit grant applications for energy efficiency and clean heat measures they want to install in their properties, under the scheme. Once approved, vouchers are issued for each measure that has been applied for.

As of 4pm on 12th February, 74,317 applications have been received for the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme, with 23,553 vouchers issued.

BEIS will continue to monitor application data as the scheme progresses.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what allocation of funding has been made under the Green Homes Grant scheme by region.

As of 4pm on 12th February, 23,553 vouchers have been issued to customers under the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme. The value of these vouchers is currently £101.15 million.

BEIS will continue to monitor application data as the scheme progresses.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to question 148670, if he will publish the individual performance indicators in each of those four major areas in the contract to ICF for carrying out the Green Homes Grant scheme.

In line with Government best practice, we will be publishing the top three performance indicators, outlined in the contract with ICF. BEIS will be publishing the contract and legally required information in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to £1 billion of funding set out under Point 7: Greener Buildings of the Government's Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution, published in November 2020, how much of that funding will be allocated to the (a) Green Homes Grant, (b) Public Sector Decarbonisation scheme, (c) Homes Upgrade Grant and (d) Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund.

As part of my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister's Ten Point Plan, £320 million of funding has been allocated the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme for 21/22 to make homes and buildings more energy efficient and less carbon intensive.

The Government is committed to delivering our net zero target and will take further steps to decarbonise the UK economy. The Prime Minister recently set out in his Ten Point Plan a £1bn investment to make our homes, schools, and hospitals greener, warmer and energy efficient. Further details on funding will be announced in due course.

In November 2020, the Prime Minister’s Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution announced the introduction of the Home Upgrade Grant. We are committing £150 million through the Home Upgrade Grant to help some of the poorest homes become more energy efficient and cheaper to heat with low-carbon energy. The Home Upgrade Grant will support low-income households with upgrades to the worst-performing off-gas-grid homes in England. These upgrades will create warmer homes at lower cost and will support low-income families with the switch to low-carbon heating, contributing to both fuel poverty and net zero targets. The Home Upgrade Grant is due to commence in early 2022.

The Autumn 2020 Spending Review committed a further £60million of funding for the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund to continue upgrading the least efficient social housing. This funding will support the Government’s 10-point plan and makes further progress towards delivering the Government’s commitment to invest in the energy performance of homes.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what sanctions have been agreed within the contract to ICF for failure to meet performance indicators as part of administering the Green Homes Grant scheme.

The Department contracted ICF to administer the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme. In line with government best practice, further information about the contract will be made available in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether management of the new £320m Green Homes Grant scheme for the financial year 2021-2022 will be put out to tender to competing businesses.

There is no new £320m Green Home Grant scheme.

My Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced this funding for the existing scheme in the Spending Review for the next financial year (2021-2022).

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of the £2 billion of funding allocated to the Green Homes Grant scheme he plans to spend by the end of the allocation period 2020-2021.

The Green Homes Grant Scheme is made up of the Voucher Scheme and the Local Authority Delivery (LAD) Scheme, allocated £1.5bn and £0.5bn, respectively, for the 2020-21 financial year.

Under the LAD scheme, Local Authorities bid for funding to support low-income households in their region. £74million has already been allocated; the remainder of the budget will be allocated this financial year to 5 Local Energy hubs and over 200 Local Authorities, delivering energy efficient upgrades to around 55,000 homes.

As of 8th February, the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme has received 71,953 applications. 22,165 vouchers have been approved and issued to customers; the value of these vouchers is £94.1 million.

Official statistics for the Green Home Grant Voucher Scheme will be published in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to improve the roll-out rate of the Green Homes Grant scheme.

We are engaging with and listening to feedback from customers and installers and based on this we have already made changes to the scheme to improve the roll-out rate. These include allowing subcontractors to more easily take part in the scheme, reducing the cost of accreditation by 50% for Green Homes Grant scheme installers on the cost of purchasing some PAS standards, streamlining certification processes where possible for installers and making the application process easier for customers.

We have numerous channels for dialogue with the supply chain and consumer groups, including roundtables with certification bodies, trade bodies and representatives from the industry. In December the Department held its first installer Webinar, taking questions and walking through the scheme details and processes with over 150 installers in attendance.

We continue to work with Trustmark and the scheme administrator to ensure as many companies as possible can take part in the scheme and increase the roll-out rate. The £6.9m skills competition we launched in September will provide training opportunities for energy efficiency and low carbon heating supply chains to deliver works and scale up to meet additional consumer demand.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether work undertaken under the Green Homes Grant scheme in financial year 2020-21 and completed in financial year 2021-22, will be funded out of the original allocation of £2 billion.

The original funding of up to £1.5 billion for the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme was announced as a short-term stimulus, for use in the 2020/21 financial year. In the 2020 Spending Review, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced £320 million of funding for the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme for 2021/22, as part of funding allocated to make homes and buildings more energy efficient and less carbon intensive.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason funding allocated to the Green Homes Grant scheme in financial year 2020-21 will not be rolled over to the extended scheme for use in 2021-22 in the event that funding is not used by the original deadline.

The original funding of up to £1.5 billion for the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme was announced as a short-term stimulus, for use in the 2020/21 financial year. In the 2020 Spending Review, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced £320 million of funding for the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme for 2021/22, as part of funding allocated to make homes and buildings more energy efficient and less carbon intensive.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which industries were consulted in the development of the Green Homes Grant.

The Department consulted the construction, insulation, energy and heating industries in the development of the Green Home Grant Voucher Scheme.

We continue to listen to and act upon feedback from stakeholders as we have done since the formation of the scheme.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to review the scope of the Green Homes Grant in response to low take-up rates to date.

The Green Homes Grant scheme is an energy efficiency retrofit scheme, focussing on insulation and low carbon heating. The scope of technologies currently included reflects our assessment of the best balance between economic stimulus and maximising value for householders and taxpayers.

Outside of the voucher scheme the Local Authority Delivery (LAD) element is in place to raise the energy efficiency of low income and low EPC rated homes in order to lift households out of fuel poverty whilst delivering progress towards our commitment to net zero by 2050.

We are listening to feedback on the scheme and are keeping the scope of eligible technologies under review.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the assessment criteria was for defining the primary and secondary measures within the Green Homes Grant; and when those measures will be reviewed.

The Primary measures in the scheme were chosen because they support jobs, are cost effective and have a large impact on carbon emissions. These measures tend to be those that householders would not install in the absence of the scheme and so government intervention through the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme will increase uptake. The Secondary measures are those that have a more limited impact on carbon emissions, but which still offer benefits in terms of energy efficiency.

We are keeping the scheme eligibility including eligible measures under review.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 3 February 2021 to Question 145730, what the 10 Key Performance Indicators were in the contract awarded to ICF for administering the Green Homes Grant scheme.

The contract has 10 Key Performance Indicators, which cover four major areas: Digital Platform; Customer Journey and Payment; Fraud and Audit; and Call Centre.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
29th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what fulfilment indicators were agreed in the contract awarded to ICF for administering the Green Homes Grant scheme.

The contract has 10 Key Performance Indicators, supported by Service Credits covering the major areas of the contract.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
29th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what guidelines on payment arrangements for contractor his Department has given to ICF for the Green Homes Grant scheme.

The payment process for the Green Homes Grant is a four-step process that requires: the customer to confirm the work has been completed, the installer to record the work on the TrustMark database, the scheme administrator to check the conditions of the voucher issued have been met, and then the scheme administrator to make the payment.

To ensure consumer protection and value for money, the scheme administrator may be required to undertake fraud checks, for example a voucher may be randomly chosen for an on-site audit. The scheme administrator aims to pay as soon as possible after this process is complete.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to support the future of the UK's hydropower industry as part of the UK's renewable energy mix.

The Government acknowledges the valuable contribution of hydropower to the UK energy mix over many decades, including at times when other renewables do not generate. Most hydro capacity was installed in Scotland last century, with a smaller amount in Wales and England, and most of these installations are still operating. Potential for further development is limited to small-scale projects. We met our projections five years early from the 2012 comprehensive review for hydro deployment by 2020.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the role that tidal range energy can play in the UK's future energy mix.

The Government recently ran a Call for Evidence inviting views on what scope there is for marine technologies across the UK, including examining what additional support could move tidal range and other technologies towards commercialisation. This concluded on 30th September 2020 and BEIS officials are currently reviewing the responses received.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the introduction of a revenue floor mechanism to support long duration energy storage.

As we set out in the Energy White Paper in December 2020, we will outline our next steps for addressing barriers to energy storage in our new Smart Systems Plan – to be published in spring 2021 in partnership with Ofgem.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will place in the Library the contract with ICF for the management of the Green Homes Grant Scheme.

The Department contracted ICF to administer the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme. In line with government best practice, further information about the contract will be made available in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the contract awarded to ICF to manage the Green Homes Grant Scheme was issued on a competitive basis.

The Department contracted ICF to administer the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme, following a compliant competition, using the Crown Commercial Grants and Programme Services framework. The contract went out to tender on 13th August 2020 and ICF were awarded the contract.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many vouchers have been (a) issued and (b) redeemed under the Green Homes Grant scheme.

As of 26 January, 17,618 vouchers have been issued under the Green Homes Grant. Vouchers will become redeemable once scheduled works are completed.

Official scheme statistics will be published in due course. BEIS will continue to monitor application data as the scheme progresses.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many installers (a) have been and (b) are waiting to be paid for completed work under the Green Homes Grant Scheme.

Official scheme statistics will be published in due course. BEIS will continue to monitor application data as the scheme progresses.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how long on average it takes for installers to paid for work after completion of that work under the Green Homes Grant scheme.

The payment process for Green Homes Grant scheme vouchers is a four step process that needs the customer to confirm the work has been completed, the installer to lodge the work with Trustmark, the scheme administrator to undertake scheme checks, and then proceeding to payment. In some cases, there will be a randomly selected on-site audit which will need to be carried out before the payment can be processed. As such the time it takes to process payments can vary.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on contractors of the time being taken for payments to be made to those contractors under the Green Homes Grant scheme.

The scheme administrator is prioritising the payment of vouchers and we are continuing to see an increase in the number of vouchers being paid out to installers once work is complete.

We are continuously listening to feedback from customers and installers and making improvements based upon it. We are working with consumers and installers to ensure they are clear on the information and checks required, so that vouchers can be paid as quickly as possible.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the Building and Heat Strategy.

The Government is planning to publish a Heat and Buildings Strategy in the coming months, which will set out the immediate actions we will take for reducing emissions from buildings.

These actions include the deployment of energy efficiency measures and low carbon heating as part of an ambitious programme of work required to enable key strategic decisions on how we achieve the mass transition to low-carbon heat and set us on a path to decarbonising all homes and buildings.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the long-term funding measures needed to support the decarbonisation and retrofit of the UK’s existing social housing stock.

Our Manifesto committed to a £3.8billion Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund over 10 years.

The Summer Economic Update announced a £50 million fund to demonstrate innovative approaches to retrofitting social housing at scale. The Demonstrator project is a short-term investment to learn lessons and innovate. A further £60 million has been allocated at the Spending Review (SR) to continue the development of the scheme into next year, in line with Manifesto commitments, and further funding will be confirmed at the multi-year SR.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what meetings his Department has had with social housing providers on what is required to decarbonise the UK’s existing social housing stock.

The Department has had a number of meetings at both a Ministerial and official level with individual social landlords, local and regional networks, and representative bodies to discuss improving the energy performance of social housing, including as part of Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund demonstrator and the Green Homes Grant scheme.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with Ofgem on (a) energy losses in the transmission and distribution system and (b) how those energy losses can be reduced.

For electricity, the network companies have specific licence obligations placed on them by Ofgem to ensure that losses are as low as reasonably practicable, and are set incentives under the network price control framework. It is now widespread practice across Great Britain to replace ‘high-loss’ cables with newer ‘low-loss’ substitutes, where this is efficient. Distribution Network Operators are also undertaking a program of replacing pre-1960s transformers with newer more efficient types.

For Gas, the Health and Safety Executive’s Iron Mains Risk Reduction Programme (IMRRP) is the biggest contributor to reducing losses on the gas network. This involves replacing old, corroded iron pipes with polyethylene (plastic) pipes. In order to support this work, Ofgem are consulting on allowing gas network companies over £8.5bn to invest and run their networks over the next 5 years and to help meet our net zero target. Through the IMRRP, the proportion of iron pipes has fallen from 80% of the distribution network in the mid-1970s to around 20% today, and is forecast to fall further to around 10% by 2026 and 5% by 2032.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of private rented households that will benefit from the Green Homes Grant.

We have estimated that the Green Homes Grant scheme, which is open to all homeowners including landlords, could support improvements in up to 600,000 homes. We do not collect information on whether applicants who are landlords let their property to private residential or social tenants as part of the scheme.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to record the tenure of the properties that use the Green Homes Grant.

The following information relating to the tenure type of the property is collected through the application process of the Green Homes Grant (GHG) Voucher Scheme.

Property owner:

  • Owner-occupier
  • Landlord

If the property is owned by a landlord, the following information is also collected:

  • Individual (whether sole or in a group)
  • Trustee
  • Corporate entity (including company, LLP, CIC, Corporation sole)
  • Overseas companies
  • Charities

As part of the application process for the Voucher Scheme, we do not ask landlords to declare if they let their property to private residential or social tenants. Therefore we are unable to provide information on the tenure types of landlord-let properties.

Similarly, for the Local Authority Delivery (LAD) element of the GHG, applications for funding under Phase 1 of the scheme do not require local authorities to submit specific details on the types of properties they plan to upgrade. However, it is a requirement of the scheme that local authorities will submit regular GHG LAD data reports to the Household Energy Efficiency Statistics team throughout the project delivery period, and these will include data on property tenures of the homes they are working to upgrade.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of exemptions on levels of fuel poverty.

The minimum standard energy efficiency regulations provide a limited number of temporary exemptions for privately rented properties with an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating of F or G, where it is not technically advisable or financially feasible to bring those properties up to an EPC E rating. The majority of exemptions available under these regulations are valid for a period of five years, effective from their date of registration.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many letters have been issued under section 188 of the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 in the last 12 months by employers informing employees of a reduction in their conditions and terms of employment in the event that they are rehired.

The Government and its agencies do not have this information.

Terms and conditions of employment are for negotiation and agreement between employers and employees (or their representatives). Once agreed, these form a legally binding contract of employment. If the employer changes any of the terms without the employee’s agreement, the employee may be entitled to seek legal redress. Where the employer recognises a trade union, consent for the changes can be facilitated through collective bargaining.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total value is of Government contracts delivered by Centrica and its subsidiaries for service provision since 2015.

This information is not held centrally and can only be obtained disproportionally.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the results of his Department's June 2019 consultation on a Regulated Asset Base model for new nuclear projects.

The Government is looking at options for the financing of new nuclear projects. In 2019, we consulted on a Regulated Asset Base as a possible funding model that could improve value for money and reduce the cost of capital of future nuclear projects. We will respond in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
15th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with Ofgem on a programme of expanded rollout of collective switching for the most disengaged customers.

BEIS has regular discussions with Ofgem, including on what measures might be needed to help remove the barriers to consumer engagement. This includes the potential for collective switching and consideration of the results from Ofgem’s previous trials. The Government will set out more details in due course.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
4th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Oil and Gas Authority's mandate to Maximise Economic Recovery of oil and gas will be within scope of the review of policy on the future UK offshore oil and gas licensing regime.

The Oil and Gas Authority’s (OGA) mandate to maximise economic recovery of oil and gas (MER UK) is not within scope for this review. This review will look at policy on the future UK offshore oil and gas licensing regime as part of the wider aim of achieving net zero emissions by 2050. The review will consider whether regulators have the right powers and processes in place to effect any changes to our future licensing regime.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
4th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the terms of reference for the review of policy on the future UK offshore oil and gas licensing regime.

On 3 September, the Government announced that it would conduct a review of policy on the future UK offshore oil and gas licensing regime. Details of that announcement can be seen on gov.uk at https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-launches-review-into-future-offshore-oil-and-gas-licensing-regime. Terms of reference and emerging findings from this review will be published in due course.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure the new Green Homes Grant scheme complements the existing Energy Company Obligation scheme without competing against or effecting the Energy Company Obligation supply chain.

The requirements for tradespeople completing work under the scheme are in line with the requirements for the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme, requiring similar high standards of work, such as Publicly Available Specification (PAS) 2030 certification. Multiple measures can be installed in one home from both ECO and the Green Homes Grant (GHG) schemes.

Millions of additional homes that would not be covered by ECO will be eligible to benefit from the GHG to deliver significant carbon reductions and thermal savings. The GHG will also build capacity and skills in the supply chain for longer-term decarbonisation objectives.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he will take to ensure the quality of work undertaken under the Green Homes Grant scheme is consistent with that carried out under the Energy Company Obligation scheme; and who will monitor that work.

The requirements for works carried out under the Green Homes Grant scheme are in line with those carried out under the Energy Company Obligation scheme and must be to Publicly Available Specification 2030 standards. Tradespeople must be registered with TrustMark, and certified with the Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) where installing heating measures. Under TrustMark and MCS, installer organisations have their work regularly inspected to ensure that works achieve consistent quality.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of merging the Green Homes Grant and the Energy Company Obligation schemes to enable cost efficiencies to co-fund energy efficiency updates.

The Green Homes Grant and the Energy Company Obligation schemes both have different objectives, target audiences, eligibility criteria and funding mechanisms, therefore, it would not be appropriate for the schemes to be merged.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the take up of the Renewable Heat Incentive scheme has been in each year since the scheme opened in 2011.

The Government publishes monthly deployment statistics for both Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (DRHI) and the Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (NDRHI), available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/renewable-heat-incentive-statistics. The table below provides data correct as of July 2020.

DRHI

NDRHI

Year

Total Accredited Applications

Year

Total Accredited Applications

2011

NA

2011

2

2012

NA

2012

694

2013

NA

2013

2,109

2014

16,381

2014

4,282

2015

23,491

2015

6,216

2016

7,941

2016

2,571

2017

7,831

2017

1,871

2018

6,946

2018

1,238

2019

11,574

2019

831

2020

6,209 (up to the end of July)

2020

575 (up to the end of July)

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the decision not to extend the non-domestic Renewable Heat Incentive scheme on (a) jobs and (b) businesses in the heating industry.

The Non-Domestic RHI has provided support for over 20,000 renewable heating installations, creating green jobs, and helping to develop the GB renewable heating industry.

The breadth and cost of an extension to the Non-Domestic RHI means that to provide good value for money for the taxpayer, we are applying a targeted approach in continuing support for the Non-Domestic low carbon heating industry.

The Green Gas Support Scheme, due to launch Autumn 2021, is expected to help treble the level of green gas in the grid by 2030, creating further green jobs, particularly in rural areas. Sustained support for the industry will be provided through the new allocation of Tariff Guarantees, incentivising the more cost-effective Non-Domestic projects.

We have also been keen to avoid potential job losses and damage to the industry that might result from delays due to Covid-19. Recently announcing an extension of 6 months for eligible NDRHI projects, that may struggle to meet the 31st March 2021 application deadline.

Additionally, the soon to be launched Green Homes Grant Scheme which will fund up to two thirds of the cost of home improvements for over 600,000 homes, supporting over 80,000 jobs in green construction.

For more information on these proposals please see the below links:

GOV.UK page for information on the Green Homes Grant Scheme

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/green-homes-grant-scheme-register-as-a-certified-tradesperson-or-business;

Consultation and Impact Assessment on Future Support for Low Carbon Heat

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/future-support-for-low-carbon-heat;

Consultation and Impact Assessment NDRHI: Ensuring a Sustainable Scheme

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/non-domestic-renewable-heat-incentive-ensuring-a-sustainable-scheme;

Announcements and Impact Assessment relating to further changes to RHI support and Covid-19 response

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/changes-to-the-renewable-heat-incentive-rhi-schemes.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Energy White Paper will include an assessment of the role of flexibility in meeting net zero climate targets.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has set out his intention to publish the Energy White Paper this Autumn.

The Energy White Paper will address the transformation of our energy system as we deliver net-zero emissions by 2050, including the importance of flexibility.

We have taken clear actions to enable flexibility through our Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan, including reforming markets so that they properly reward flexibility, removing barriers for flexible technologies, and investing in flexible innovation.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the role of energy flexibility in managing local constraints resulting from increased electric vehicle charging.

The Government is working on a range of measures to realise the benefits of a smarter and more flexible energy system. We are delivering the actions in the Government’s Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan to remove barriers to smart technologies such as storage and improve access to energy markets for new business models.

Smart charging of electric vehicles during off-peak periods when electricity demand is low can help avoid triggering unnecessary network reinforcement. Furthermore, this technology helps utilise renewable energy and can benefit consumers with cheaper electricity. The Future Energy Scenarios (FES) 2019 produced by National Grid predicts that smart charging could by 2030 shift nearly 50% of EV demand away from peak times. Vehicle-to-Grid technology, where electric vehicles provide power back to local networks, presents an opportunity for EVs to be a significant electricity storage resource.

Next year we intend to mandate that all new private chargepoints must have smart functionality and in 2018 we invested £30 million to support vehicle-to-grid technology. The Electric Vehicle Energy Taskforce reported in January 2020, making 21 proposals on how we can maximise the uptake of smart charging and ensure the energy system is ready for electric vehicles.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what research his Department has undertaken on the technical and regulatory requirements of replacing natural gas with hydrogen to help the UK meet its decarbonisation targets.

Hydrogen is one of a number of options with the potential to play an important role in decarbonising heat, including heat networks, heat pumps, hydrogen and biogas.

Further work is needed to assess the safety and feasibility case and better understand the costs and benefits of using hydrogen in place of methane in the gas grid. We are working with industry to define and take forward a full programme of work to achieve this.

The Government is also currently investing up to £121m in a range of innovation programmes to explore and develop the potential of low carbon hydrogen for end uses sectors. This includes £25m on the Hy4Heat programme which is seeking to investigate if it is technically possible and safe to replace methane with hydrogen in appliances for residential and commercial buildings and evaluate the likely costs and performance.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department’s policy is on mandating hydrogen ready boilers.

Hydrogen could play a key role in eliminating our contribution to climate change by 2050 and is one of the options being explored to decarbonise heat in the UK alongside heat pumps, heat networks and biogas. Further work is required to fully test and assess the potential of hydrogen as an option for decarbonising heating.

Prototype ‘hydrogen-ready boilers’ are being developed under the £25m BEIS Hy4Heat programme. This programme is seeking to investigate if it is technically possible and safe to replace methane with hydrogen in appliances for residential and commercial buildings and evaluate the likely costs and performance. The programme is due to be completed in 2021, and the Department will be reviewing the outputs from this technical work as it progresses.

On 12 June the Department published a Call for Evidence on Energy-related Products. This consultation invites views on how to maximise the energy savings potential of boilers and alternative heating systems, and if this would help bring to market low-carbon heating technologies including hydrogen.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department’s policy is on hydrogen and biomethane blending with natural gas.

Biomethane is currently injected into the gas grid, supported in part by the Renewable Heat Incentive. The Government is currently consulting on the creation of a Green Gas Support Scheme to increase the amount of biomethane in the grid.

Blending low carbon hydrogen with natural gas has the potential to lower carbon emissions. The HyDeploy project has been commissioned by Gas Network Operators to investigate the option of blending up to 20% hydrogen with natural gas in the gas grid. The Health and Safety Executive have granted an exemption to the current Gas Safety and Management Regulation to the hydrogen content limit of 0.1% for the duration of the HyDeploy project. This is subject to strict safety arrangements being in place. BEIS will continue to pay close attention to the results from this project, and will take these into account in any future policy development.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of a whole energy systems approach to reaching the UK’s decarbonisation targets.

The Government is committed to delivering clean growth and reaching our net zero target.

We are already making good progress in decarbonising the power sector. More than half of our electricity (54%) was generated from low-carbon sources in 2019 and renewables’ share of generation now stands at a record 37%. Meanwhile, the use of coal in our electricity mix has dropped from 39% in 2012 to just 2% in 2019. Recently we celebrated a two-month milestone of coal-free power generation.

We must continue to embrace the opportunities offered by technology to accelerate the transition to a cleaner future including innovations in energy storage technologies, smart and no-waste electricity grids, zero-emission vehicles, and eco-friendly buildings.

That is why, at the Spring Budget, we announced an ambitious support package worth over £2bn for our low carbon economy, including £270m new exchequer funding for heat networks, £100m for heat pumps and biomass and a commitment to at least double the size of the Energy Innovation Programme.

The Government recognises the need to fully consider the complex interactions between different sectors of the economy, as it progresses on its ambitious programme of decarbonisation, and the potential benefits that systems-based thinking can bring to this.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the reports submitted to him by local authorities in 2019 under the Home Energy Conservation Act 1995.

In 2019 BEIS introduced standardised digital platform in 2019 which was used for Home Energy Conservation Act responses to be collected and collated in consistent way. In addition, local authorities are required under the legislation to publish their report.

BEIS is exploring options on the best use of the submitted data, particularly to inform policy thinking on energy efficiency, and to build an ongoing picture of local and national energy efficiency policy delivery.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to provide funding for energy efficiency projects highlighted in the reports submitted to him by local authorities in 2019 under the Home Energy Conservation Act 1995.

We are supporting local authorities, local areas and local economies through a range programmes. Our Local Energy programme is supporting Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs), local authorities and communities in England to play a leading role in decarbonisation and clean growth. Almost £20 million has been invested and the programme has funded a range of measures designed to build local capacity and capability and encourage joined-up working between local areas, investors and central government, including:

  • Five Local Energy Hubs, which have been established across England to provide local authorities and LEPs with access to expertise to help develop and secure investment in low carbon projects;
  • Good practice guidance, tools and resources for use by local authorities and LEPs; and
  • An online communications platform for local authorities and LEPs to share information and learn from each other.

In addition to direct funding, local authorities can voluntarily participate under the ‘LA Flex’ mechanism of ECO. This allows local authorities to identify low income and vulnerable households in their area and refer them to the larger energy suppliers, who have an obligation target to deliver energy efficiency measures under ECO.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to extend the Development Consent Order for Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon after the expiry date of 30 June 2020.

There are no plans to extend the Development Consent Order for the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon which was granted on 9 June 2015.

The Government remains open to consideration of marine energy technologies, provided they can demonstrate that they represent value for money to the taxpayer and consumer.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will undertake a consultation on how clean hydrogen can help cost-effectively decarbonise the UK economy.

The Government is committed to exploring the development of hydrogen as a strategic decarbonised energy carrier, alongside electricity and other decarbonised gases.

There are a number of workstreams underway in this area, involving regular engagement with industry and academic stakeholders across the hydrogen value chain to understand the potential of hydrogen deployment across the energy system, in line with our net zero commitments. A recent example is the newly formed Expert Group advising on the development of sustainable business models to support low carbon hydrogen production.

Specific policies and programmes may be subject to consultation in due course. We are currently considering options for formalising regular engagement between Government and Industry on hydrogen, with the key aim of stimulating activity in the 2020s that will test potential of hydrogen in meeting net zero.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to include support for smart controls for domestic properties in his forthcoming heat strategy.

The Government is planning to publish a Heat and Buildings Strategy in due course, which will set out the immediate actions we will take for reducing emissions from buildings as part of an ambitious programme of work to enable key strategic decisions to set us on a path to decarbonising all homes and buildings.

Smart heating controls/smart thermostats are already a feature of existing heat and energy efficiency policy; for example, they are eligible for the Energy Company Obligation (ECO). Some variants, with additional features, have been approved under the ‘innovation’ element of ECO which means there is a greater incentive to install them.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many times decisions by Ofgem have been subject to judicial review in (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) 2020; and what the subjects were of those reviews.

The information is provided below:

  • 2018 – challenge concerned GEMA’s decision in relation to changing the charges for certain generators to access the electricity network. Judgement in favour of GEMA in summer 2018

  • 2018 – challenge by licensee to a direction that had been issued to them by GEMA (to take specified steps in the context of a randomised controlled collective switch trial). Concluded in 2018. Judgement in favour of GEMA in 2018.

  • 2018 – challenge brought in Scotland against GEMA’s rejection of an application for accreditation under the Feed-in Tariffs Scheme. Judgement in favour of GEMA in 2018.

  • 2019 – challenge to GEMA decision by an offshore wind generator that the physical failure of one of the offshore transmission owner’s (OFTO) subsea electricity cables should be treated as an Income Adjusting Event under the OFTO licence. Judgement in 2019 against GEMA.

  • 2019 – challenge by a licensee against GEMA’s retail price cap decision. Judgement in 2019 against GEMA.

  • 2019 – challenge relating to whether GEMA had certain powers under the Domestic Renewable Heat Scheme. GEMA were co-defendants with BEIS. Judgement in November 2019 in favour of GEMA. Application for permission to appeal was refused in 2020.

To date, no judicial reviews have been carried out in 2020.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of requesting that Ofgem extend their Metering and Monitoring Service Package to include sensors in fossil fuel boilers for those with a hybrid heating configuration to collect data useful to the management of the energy system.

To date, there has been low uptake of hybrid installations with Metering and Monitoring Service Packages (MMSPs) in the domestic RHI. The domestic RHI, including MMSPs, will close to new applications in March 2022. Therefore, the Government does not consider that extending the MMSP requirements to include sensors in fossil fuel boilers in hybrid installations would provide significant useful data on the overall performance of hybrid heating systems.

The Government will be gathering further evidence on the performance of hybrid heating systems as part of the £16.5m Electrification of Heat Demonstration Project. The project is expected to run until March 2022.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to establish a (a) unified or (b) nodal offshore wind transmission system.

The current approach to offshore wind development allows developers to choose where and when to construct windfarms. Developers can also choose to build the associated transmission assets to bring the energy to shore, before they are tendered by Ofgem to a third party to own and operate. This developer led and competitive approach has led to significant savings for the consumer.

This approach was designed at a time when offshore wind was a nascent sector and industry expectation for deployment was much lower. However, in the context of increasingly ambitious targets for offshore wind the current approach to development of transmission assets may not be appropriate and could become a major barrier to delivery.

BEIS officials are working together with key stakeholders, including Ofgem, National Grid Electricity System Operator and The Crown Estate, to consider an appropriate framework for offshore transmission to support increased ambition for offshore wind.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to undertake works to increase the energy efficiency of public sector buildings whilst they have reduced occupancy.

BEIS provides funding for energy efficiency projects in the public sector through the Public Sector Energy Efficiency Loan Scheme. This funding, managed by Salix Finance, has delivered over 17,000 projects since the scheme started in 2004, significantly improving energy performance in the public sector. The capital pot for England totals £385 million at the end of 2020/21.

Salix have continued to operate the scheme during the Covid-19 lockdown period and public sector organisations are still able to apply for zero interest loans to cover their energy efficiency work.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to publish an Energy Performance Certificate action plan in 2020.

We will set out a summary of responses to Call for Evidence on Energy Performance Certificates in Buildings, alongside an action plan to enhance and strengthen the current EPC framework, later this year.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to replace the fuel cost per square metre criteria in the banding methodology for the Energy Performance Certificate with a critieria based on energy efficiency per square metre.

Energy Performance Certificates display both an Energy Efficiency Rating (EER), an indicator of the assumed energy cost per square metre of a home, and the Environmental Impact Rating (EIR), an indicator of the carbon dioxide emissions intensity per square metre of a home.

The Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) and Reduced Data SAP (RDSAP) methodologies which underpin Energy Performance Certificates for homes, and the SBEM methodology for non-domestic premises, are updated regularly in line with updates to Part L of the Building Regulations.

We will keep it under review as we develop policies and plans for decarbonising buildings and reducing fuel poverty.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made the potential effect of the rating methodology for the Energy Performance Certificate based on fuel cost on the installation of low carbon heating in rural homes.

The Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) and Reduced Data SAP (RDSAP) methodologies which underpin Energy Performance Certificates are updated regularly in line with updates to Part L of the Building Regulations. We will keep it under review as we develop policies and plans for decarbonising buildings and reducing fuel poverty. Assessments of impact on installation of low carbon heat will be made on a policy by policy basis.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the rating methodology for the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) based on fuel cost on progress towards meeting the target in the Clean Growth Strategy for homes to be EPC band C by 2035.

We remain committed to delivering the aspiration set out in the Clean Growth Strategy for as many homes as possible to reach EPC Band C by 2035 where practical, cost effective and affordable.

How EPCs are used in the policy package to meet the target in the Clean Growth Strategy for homes to be EPC band C by 2035 and the consequent impacts, will continue to be tested as part of individual policy consultations. We will keep the underlying methodology for calculating EPC ratings under review as we develop policies and plans for decarbonising homes and for reducing fuel poverty.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the fuel cost EPC rating methodology on the potential to reach UK carbon budgets.

We remain committed to delivering the aspiration set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, our strategy for meeting the UK carbon budgets, for as many homes as possible to reach EPC Band C by 2035, and fuel poor homes by 2030, where practical, cost effective and affordable.

How EPCs are used in the policy package to reach UK carbon budgets and the consequent impacts, will continue to be tested as part of individual policy consultations. We will keep the underlying methodology for calculating EPC ratings under review as we develop policies and plans for decarbonising buildings and for reducing fuel poverty.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he has taken to introduce carbon emissions limits in the capacity market.

In July 2019, the Department introduced within the Capacity Market, through the Capacity Market (Amendment) (No. 5) Rules 2019,[1] the carbon emissions limits contained in the recast “Electricity Regulation” (Regulation (EU) 2019/943. These changes ensure that new capacity, which started commercial production on, or after 4 July 2019, and which does not comply with the emission limits, cannot be awarded capacity agreements in capacity auctions held from 2020 onwards, or receive capacity payments.

The Department ran two further consultations, between 22 July 2019 and 13 September 2019[2] and between 3 February and 2 March 2020,[3] on legislative changes intended to apply these limits to capacity which existed before 4 July 2019. The Government Response to these consultations, published on 20 May 2020,[4] outlines a system for monitoring and verifying compliance with the emissions limits, as well as confirming the intention to apply the limits to existing capacity from 1 October 2024.

The Department will make the necessary changes to the Capacity Market Rules ahead of the opening of the prequalification period for the capacity auctions scheduled for early 2021.

[1]https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/818851/Capacity_Market__Amendment___No._5__Rules_2019.pdf

[2] https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/829746/proposals-capacity-market-emissions-limits-consultation.pdf

[3] https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/862674/capacity-market-consultation-future-improvements.pdf

[4]https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/886147/Future_improvements__emission_limits_and_coronavirus_easements_-_government_response_to_consultations.pdf

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to include hydropower schemes in the terms of the Feed in Tariff Order of 30 March 2020.

Hydropower schemes with accreditation deadlines falling between 1 March and 30 September 2020 are within the scope of the Feed-In Tariffs (Amendment) (Coronavirus) Order 2020.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to consult the Committee on Climate Change on the UK's Nationally Determined Contribution under the Paris Agreement 2015.

The UK’s NDC will be based on robust analysis undertaken for domestic climate change mitigation policy which, in line with the requirements of the Climate Change Act, is informed by advice from the independent Committee on Climate Change.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of effect of the fifth carbon budget on progress towards net zero emissions.

Our existing carbon budgets are amongst the most ambitious targets in the world. We have met our first two carbon budgets and our latest emissions projections show that we are on track to meet the third. However, we recognise the need for further action to meet the fourth and fifth carbon budgets.

2020 will be a Year of Climate Action, and we will bring forward ambitious new plans throughout the year to reduce emissions across key sectors of the economy – including an Energy White Paper and Transport Decarbonisation Plan.

The Committee on Climate Change will advise on the level of the sixth carbon budget in September this year.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his policy is on maintaining UK participation in EU Emissions Trading Scheme mechanisms after the transition period.

The UK has long been a leader in carbon pricing policy – introducing the world’s first multi-industry carbon trading system in 2002. Carbon pricing is a crucial tool in decarbonising energy and carbon intensive industries, as well as supporting our net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 commitment.

Whatever our future relationship with the EU, we will seek to ensure that our future approach is at least as ambitious as the existing scheme and provide a smooth transition for the relevant sectors.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking with Ofgem to ensure investment decisions of the Distribution Network Operators are based on comprehensive and whole life cost benefit assessments.

Network regulation is a matter for the independent regulator, Ofgem. Under its RIIO price control framework, Ofgem’s cost benefit assessments take into account the whole life costs and impacts of Distribution Network Operator (DNO) investments. In addition, DNOs are funded and incentivised to maintain existing assets to ensure their longer-term resilience.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what meetings his Department has held with Ofgem on the importance of individual Distribution Network Operator supply chain strategies.

Network regulation is a matter for the independent regulator, Ofgem. Under the RIIO price control, Ofgem provides Distribution Network Operators (DNOs) with sufficient allowances to finance and develop their networks to meet the needs of current and future consumers. Ofgem also incentivises DNOs to deliver cost efficiencies and maintain service quality which guides DNO procurement and supply chain strategies. The Department has not held any meetings with Ofgem on DNO supply chain strategies.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the process is for the UK establishing its intended nationally determined contributions.

Following our departure from the EU, the UK will be bringing forward its own, increased NDC well ahead of COP26. The UK NDC will be built on the foundations of well-established UK analysis and policy development for domestic climate change mitigation, used to set the UK’s fifth carbon budget (2028-32) under the Climate Change Act.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what responsibilities the Committee on Climate Change will have in establishing the UK's intended nationally determined contributions.

The Committee on Climate Change (CCC) was established by the Climate Change Act 2008, as the independent statutory body that provides expert advice to the Government and the Devolved Administrations on climate change mitigation and adaptation. This includes advice on the level of each carbon budget, the respective contributions that different sectors could make and the extent to which carbon budgets could be met through the use of flexibilities. The target year for the UK’s upcoming Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) falls within the UK’s fifth carbon budget period (2028-32). We will be bringing forward a UK NDC well ahead of COP26, which will be built on the foundations of the well-established UK analysis and policy development that informed the setting of the fifth carbon budget. The CCC published its advice to Government on the level of the fifth carbon budget in November 2015 and the budget was set in June 2016, in line with the requirements of the Climate Change Act.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether she plans to align the UK's intended nationally determined contributions with Government policy on achieving net zero emissions by 2050.

In June 2019, the UK government set a legally binding target to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions from across the UK economy by 2050. We are the first major economy in the world to legislate for a net zero target, which will end the UK’s contribution to climate change. 2020 will be a vital Year of Climate Action across the UK, and we will be setting out ambitious plans in the run-up to COP26 to deliver on our world-leading net zero ambition.

Following our departure from the EU, the UK will be bringing forward its own, increased NDC well ahead of COP26. The UK NDC will be built on the foundations of well-established UK analysis and policy development for domestic climate change mitigation, used to set the UK’s fifth carbon budget (2028-32) and described in the Clean Growth Strategy. In its Net Zero advice, the Committee on Climate Change was clear that the Clean Growth Strategy continues to offer the right framework for the ambitious action needed to deliver net zero.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans she has to maintain the Renewable Heat Incentive after March 2021.

The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) has budget confirmed until March 2021. We are considering a full range of options for successor arrangements to the RHI, in line with the Government’s commitment to achieving net zero.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate she has made of the (a) additional grid capacity and (b) electricity generating requirements that will be needed to achieve the ban of internal combustion engine sales by 2035.

We are consulting on bringing forward the end of the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles; including hybrids under this definition for the first time, to 2035, or earlier if feasible. We will be engaging with stakeholders, including those in the energy sector, to understand what support will be required to enable this transition, and minimise the impact on businesses, workers and consumers across the UK, building on the significant demand and supply side measures in place.

Our analysis suggests limited additional impact on electricity generation capacity up to 2030. The electricity market is already set up to promote investment in generation capacity to meet demand; for example, the Contracts for Difference scheme facilitates significant investment in low-carbon generation. This complements numerous measures to ensure a smarter, more flexible energy system, increasing the efficiency of the electricity system to prepare for electric vehicles. Ofgem, the independent energy regulator, is developing its next set of energy network price controls to incentivise network companies to be ready for the future needs of the energy system, including the required capacity required to support EVs.

‘Smart’ charging of electric vehicles (at off-peak times) can reduce demand from Electric Vehicle charging at peak times. Government has taken powers in the Automated and Electric Vehicles Act to mandate that all charge points sold or installed in the UK must be smart enabled and has recently consulted on secondary regulations. Government has also invested £30 million to support vehicle-to-grid technology, where the storage capability of electric vehicle batteries provides electricity back to the grid.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the (a) most expensive and (b) cheapest form of electricity to produce is.

We are currently undertaking a review of our evidence on levelised costs of electricity generation, which will be published in due course. BEIS’s most recent published assessment of electricity generation costs can be found in the generation costs report (2016)[1].

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/beis-electricity-generation-costs-november-2016

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress has been made against the Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan since 2018.

The July 2017 Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan set out 29 specific actions for BEIS, Ofgem and industry to deliver in order to remove barriers to smart technologies such as storage, enable smart homes and businesses, and to ensure markets reward the value that flexibility provides to the system. In October 2018 we published a Progress Update with nine new actions.

We have now implemented 18 of the original 29 actions, five of the nine new actions and, as per the original plan, we are committed to delivering the remainder by 2022.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether she plans to provide further support for the development of flexible electricity markets.

Government is supporting the development of flexibility markets through the delivery of the actions in the Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan and continued innovation funding for flexibility market platforms.

The Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan set out a number of actions to ensure that markets fairly reward flexibility for the value it provides to the system. As part of this plan, network operators are taking action to develop local flexibility markets and the Electricity System Operators work to reform the balancing services markets is opening up access to a wider range of flexible technologies. We are now considering the next phase of this work and will work closely with Ofgem and industry to develop this throughout 2020. ​​

In 2019, we launched the “FleX” innovation competition, which will support the development and demonstration of innovative solutions to value and trade flexibility in the energy system. Details of winning projects will be formally announced in due course.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when her Department plans to announce the results of its competition to fund projects exploring the creation of market platforms for flexibility.

We welcome interest in the FleX Competition which was launched by BEIS in 2019 to support the development and demonstration of innovative solutions to value and trade flexibility in the energy system. Following selection and detailed due diligence of the project teams which will be supported by the FleX Competition, details of winning projects will be formally announced in due course.

In line with the FleX Competition guidance, the projects are due to be completed by end December 2021 with dissemination activities led by the individual project teams also taking place during the project delivery period.

Details of the FleX Competition can be found on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/flexibility-exchange-demonstration-projects-flex-competition.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to help improve soil health on UK farms.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is one of three new schemes that reward farmers and land managers for producing public goods. The other, future, schemes are Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery, both of which we will begin piloting next year. These schemes will operate together and pay for sustainable farming practices, improve animal health and welfare, improve environmental outcomes, and reduce carbon emissions. They will create habitats for nature recovery and make landscape-scale changes, such as establishing new woodland and other ecosystem services, providing key means to deliver against our 25 Year Environment Plan goals and carbon net zero targets.

Our approach to environmental land management is the cornerstone of our new agricultural policy and will be realised through a combination of schemes, using public money to reward farmers and land managers for delivering environmentally sustainable actions. The schemes are intended to provide a powerful vehicle for achieving the goals of the 25 Year Environment Plan and commitment to net zero emissions by 2050, while supporting our rural economy.

We agree that healthy soils should be a priority outcome for our new environmental land management schemes in England, and to help achieve our commitment to sustainably managed soils by 2030, we are already taking action to support land managers and farmers to achieve sustainable soil management. Firstly, we are focusing on soil in two of the first standards to be rolled out under the Sustainable Farming Incentive scheme next year – the Improved Grassland Soils and Arable and Horticultural Soils standards. Recently published details on the Sustainable Farming Incentive set out for which sustainable farming actions to improve soil health farmers will be rewarded, such as the introduction of herbal leys and the use of grass-legume mixtures and cover crops.

It makes sense to start the early roll out of the Sustainable Farming Incentive with these soils standards because healthy soils are the foundation of sustainable farming and underpin a range of environmental benefits, as well as production. The soil standards will be widely applicable and will therefore provide opportunity for many farmers to be rewarded for sustainable soil management. The standards and the overall scheme are designed to support a range of farmers; including those who are beginning to adopt sustainable practices as well as those who are already experienced in these, who will be rewarded for increasing the ambition of their land management. We will test these standards in the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot and release further information on our plans for the Sustainable Farming Incentive on gov.uk in December 2021.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to encourage local action by farmer groups to improve soil and water resource management in rural areas.

Supporting sustainable farming is a fundamental part of our Agricultural Transition Plan published last year. As part of that, we are introducing three schemes that reward the delivery of environmental benefits: the Sustainable Farming Incentive, the Local Nature Recovery scheme and the Landscape Recovery scheme.  Together, they will be an important vehicle in delivering our 25 Year Environment Plan ambitions and our carbon net zero goals. The schemes will reward farmers for, for example, sustainable farming practices, improving animal health, welfare, and creating, managing, and preserving habitats including freshwater habitats and habitats that store water.

We have already confirmed that the Sustainable Farming Incentive will pay farmers for management practices that improve soil health by improving soil structure, soil organic matter, and soil biology. More detail on the Local Nature and Landscape Recovery schemes will be published shortly.

Through our new Farming Transformation Fund, Water Management Theme, we are offering support for farmers to secure their water supplies though the construction of on-farm reservoirs. We will also help improve the more efficient use of water through irrigation, by offering support for best-practice application equipment, such as boom or trickle irrigators.

We are exploring the approaches to how best to support collaboration, learning from examples such as the Countryside Stewardship Facilitation Fund.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans his Department has to reduce rural methane emissions from farms.

Greenhouse gas emissions from UK agriculture are predominantly associated with methane and nitrous oxide. The UK has a strong record on reducing emissions from methane, one of the main greenhouses gases warming our planet, with around13% of methane emissions cut from the agricultural sectors compared to 1990 levels. Since 1990 we are now producing a litre of milk with 21% less GHG emissions. However, we are not resting on this progress, and we will continue to take action to reduce UK methane emissions even further.

For example, livestock feed additives with methane inhibiting properties have the potential to reduce emissions, especially from housed cattle. Whilst this is an emerging technology, the Government is actively investigating the promising role these products may have in delivering emissions savings in the medium term.

As announced at COP26, the UK is also proud to be one of the first signatories of The Global Methane Pledge, a commitment to take voluntary actions to reduce global methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030, against 2020 levels. More broadly our recently published Net Zero Strategy outlined our commitment for 75% of farmers in England to be engaged in low carbon practices by 2030, rising to 85% by 2035.

The Government will support the agricultural sector to reduce all emissions through the schemes set out in the Agricultural Transition Plan. We are introducing three schemes that reward environmental benefits: the Sustainable Farming Incentive, Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery. Together, these schemes are intended to provide a powerful vehicle for achieving the goals of the 25 Year Environment Plan and our commitment to net zero emissions by 2050, while supporting our rural economy.

Our plans include a range of policies and actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. For example, our recently launched Sustainable Farming Incentive standards for soils can help create conditions for farmers to reduce the requirement to apply mineral fertilisers, so helping reduce emissions of nitrous oxide. In the future we are intending to introduce a Standard for Nutrient Management which will further incentivise reductions in the application of mineral fertilisers.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to encourage UK farmers to invest in on-farm methane reduction.

Greenhouse gas emissions from UK agriculture are predominantly associated with methane and nitrous oxide. The UK has a strong record on reducing emissions from methane, one of the main greenhouses gases warming our planet, with around13% of methane emissions cut from the agricultural sectors compared to 1990 levels. Since 1990 we are now producing a litre of milk with 21% less GHG emissions. However, we are not resting on this progress, and we will continue to take action to reduce UK methane emissions even further.

For example, livestock feed additives with methane inhibiting properties have the potential to reduce emissions, especially from housed cattle. Whilst this is an emerging technology, the Government is actively investigating the promising role these products may have in delivering emissions savings in the medium term.

As announced at COP26, the UK is also proud to be one of the first signatories of The Global Methane Pledge, a commitment to take voluntary actions to reduce global methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030, against 2020 levels. More broadly our recently published Net Zero Strategy outlined our commitment for 75% of farmers in England to be engaged in low carbon practices by 2030, rising to 85% by 2035.

The Government will support the agricultural sector to reduce all emissions through the schemes set out in the Agricultural Transition Plan. We are introducing three schemes that reward environmental benefits: the Sustainable Farming Incentive, Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery. Together, these schemes are intended to provide a powerful vehicle for achieving the goals of the 25 Year Environment Plan and our commitment to net zero emissions by 2050, while supporting our rural economy.

Our plans include a range of policies and actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. For example, our recently launched Sustainable Farming Incentive standards for soils can help create conditions for farmers to reduce the requirement to apply mineral fertilisers, so helping reduce emissions of nitrous oxide. In the future we are intending to introduce a Standard for Nutrient Management which will further incentivise reductions in the application of mineral fertilisers.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential for farm conversion of agri-food bio-wastes into bioenergy in the UK.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only. We are interpreting this question as a request for information on the Government’s assessment of the role that anaerobic digestion (AD) can play in both treating food wastes and generating bioenergy.

I recognise the valuable contribution that wastes, including food derived wastes, can make towards our carbon targets when used in AD to produce biogas and biomethane.

The recently closed non-domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (NDRHI) provided financial support for AD plants, including on farms. As of December 2020, the NDRHI has supported 95 biomethane to grid plants and in 2019 supported the production of ~3.6TWh of biomethane injected into the gas grid. In 2018, the NDRHI changed to include a waste feedstock minimum threshold of 50%, to incentivise the use of wastes in the production of biomethane. The Green Gas Support Scheme, due to launch on 30 November 2021, is a successor to the biomethane element of the NDRHI and will maintain this minimum threshold.

Evidence indicates that the existing stock of AD plants, including on farms, may have the capacity to treat more food waste. As such, we are assessing the potential to increase waste that goes to AD.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent estimate he has made of the amount of SF6 gas that is (a) manufactured in the UK, (b) imported in to the UK and (c) exported from the UK.

Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6) is a potent fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-gas) that contributes to climate change. F-gases currently represent about 3% of UK greenhouse gas emissions, with SF6 emissions representing around 3% of those F-gas emissions. The UK has made significant progress in reducing and controlling the use of F-gases, highlighted by the 34.3% reduction in UK emissions of all F-gases since 1995 levels.

Compliance with the F-gas Regulation 2014 is how the UK currently controls SF6 emissions. Under the Regulation, equipment containing SF6 is subject to requirements on leak reduction, checking and rapid repair using appropriately qualified personnel. The intentional release of SF6 is also prohibited and steps must be taken to minimise unintentional release.

We are currently reviewing the provisions of the F-gas Regulation which we are required to complete by no later than 2022. As part of the review, we will consider how we can go further in support of the UK's net zero target. We will be assessing all parts of the Regulation, including the provisions relating to SF6 use, in light of this.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of (a) trends in SF6 gas emissions and (b) the effect of the continued use of SF6 gases in electrical switchgear on SF6 gas accumulation in the atmosphere.

Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6) is a potent fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-gas) that contributes to climate change. F-gases currently represent about 3% of UK greenhouse gas emissions, with SF6 emissions representing around 3% of those F-gas emissions. The UK has made significant progress in reducing and controlling the use of F-gases, highlighted by the 34.3% reduction in UK emissions of all F-gases since 1995 levels.

Compliance with the F-gas Regulation 2014 is how the UK currently controls SF6 emissions. Under the Regulation, equipment containing SF6 is subject to requirements on leak reduction, checking and rapid repair using appropriately qualified personnel. The intentional release of SF6 is also prohibited and steps must be taken to minimise unintentional release.

We are currently reviewing the provisions of the F-gas Regulation which we are required to complete by no later than 2022. As part of the review, we will consider how we can go further in support of the UK's net zero target. We will be assessing all parts of the Regulation, including the provisions relating to SF6 use, in light of this.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to recommendation in the report published in July 2021 by the National Food Strategy that meat consumption in the UK should be reduced by 30 per cent by 2030 to protect people's health, the environment and the planet, whether his Department plans to take steps to (a) incentivise investment in alternatives to animal-based foods and (b) support business innovation in the plant-based protein sector.

We are grateful to Henry Dimbleby and his team for their work on this independent review examining our food system and the vital role it plays in all our lives. We are committed carefully to consider the Independent Review and its recommendations and will be responding in full with a White Paper in the next six months. The White Paper will set out the Government’s ambition and priorities for a food system that will deliver for people, nature and climate, and support our farmers to produce the high-quality, high-welfare produce for which they are renowned.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of pelagic supertrawlers in UK offshore Marine Protected Areas with the Government's commitment to protecting 30 per cent of oceans by 2030 as a member of the Global Ocean Alliance.

Marine protection is a devolved matter and the information below relates to England only.

The Marine Management Organisation (MMO) has developed an ambitious three-year programme to manage fishing activity in English offshore Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). We recognise the urgency to establish management measures to protect the marine environment and proposals for the first four MPAs have been published for consultation. The consultation closed on 28 March and the MMO is currently reviewing the responses.

The Government is currently reviewing its policy on large pelagic trawlers. However, these vessels target fish within the water column and are unlikely to damage the seabed habitats, such as reef and sediment habitats, for which most MPAs are designated. The MMO will assess the impact of all fishing types and consider if management measures are required. Not all fishing activities in MPAs will require management, only those likely to damage the designated features, as assessed on a site by site basis.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether, following the decision to ban electric pulse fishing in UK waters, the Government plans to make further use of its powers under the Fisheries Act 2020 to restrict fishing vessel licenses from the most destructive industrial vessels in offshore Marine Protected Areas.

Marine protection is a devolved matter and the information below relates to England only.

The Marine Management Organisation (MMO) has developed an ambitious three-year programme to manage fishing activity in English offshore Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). We recognise the urgency to establish management measures to protect the marine environment and proposals for the first four MPAs have been published for consultation. The consultation closed on 28 March and the MMO is currently reviewing the responses.

The Government is currently reviewing its policy on large pelagic trawlers. However, these vessels target fish within the water column and are unlikely to damage the seabed habitats, such as reef and sediment habitats, for which most MPAs are designated. The MMO will assess the impact of all fishing types and consider if management measures are required. Not all fishing activities in MPAs will require management, only those likely to damage the designated features, as assessed on a site by site basis.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the economic benefits to UK coastal communities of banning (a) bottom trawlers and (b) pelagic supertrawlers that are over 100 metres in length from the UK's marine protected areas.

Marine protection is a devolved matter and the information below relates to England only.

For Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in England, an assessment of impacts is prepared when sites are designated. The assessment assesses the costs and benefits of designating a site but does not include specific details on the benefits to coastal communities. It is difficult to quantify such benefits accurately.

The costs and benefits would only apply where an activity has been restricted. The appropriate regulator will assess sites and propose appropriate management of fishing activity where required. Management may not be required for all fishing gears because only those which are likely to damage the protected features of a site need to be managed. Large pelagic trawlers target fish within the water column and are unlikely to damage the seabed habitats, such as reef and sediment habitats, for which most MPAs are designated.

The Government is currently reviewing its policy on large pelagic trawlers operating in UK waters. Any action needs to be evidence-based and in line with the UK/EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential effect on consumer vehicular emissions of his proposals on a deposit return scheme in comparison to existing kerbside collections.

The Government’s proposals to introduce a deposit return scheme for drinks containers recognise the need to ensure convenience and wide availability of return points for consumers, ensuring they can easily fit the scheme into their everyday lives. With this in mind, our current analysis has been designed with sufficient return points in place to reflect the policy proposal that deposits can be redeemed in settings that fit different consumer daily routines, thus avoiding the need for consumers to make additional journeys purely for the sake of returning their drinks containers. On this basis, there is no intention to carry out further assessment of consumer vehicular emissions at this time.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if his Department will make an assessment of the effect on people on lower incomes of his proposed deposit return scheme compared to using existing kerbside collections.

The Government is committed to introducing a deposit return scheme which is based on the principles of accessibility and convenience for all members of society. While all deposits placed on in-scope drinks containers will be redeemable, we do recognise the potential for an increased burden this could place on some consumers, particularly in lower income groups, to collect and return their containers to redeem their deposits. To ensure this activity and behaviour change is accurately accounted for in our analysis, the Government intends to carry out further research this year on the effect a deposit return scheme might have on specific groups in society, including those on lower incomes.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to (a) reduce the amount of flat glass going to landfill and (b) increase the quantity being recycled in the UK.

Defra has funded Environment Agency/WRAP guidance on the proper collection and reprocessing of flat glass with the aim of increasing recycling rates. The Environment Agency is set to review this in May 2021.

The Environmental (England and Wales) Permitting Regulation 2016 includes a statutory permit condition for landfill and incineration permit holders, placing a restriction on plastic, metal, paper or glass separately collected for reuse or recycling from being accepted for landfill or incineration unless it is the result of treatment operations and delivers the best environmental outcome in accordance with the waste hierarchy.

Flat glass is a common waste product from construction and demolition. In the Resources & Waste Strategy 2018, we committed to increasing resource efficiency and minimising waste in the construction sector, through working with the Green Construction Board.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has modelled the financial effect on local authority budgets of including (a) glass and (b) aluminium drinks containers in a proposed Deposit Return Scheme.

The Government's commitment to introducing a DRS is part of our commitment to reform producer responsibility systems to incentivise producers to take greater responsibility for the environmental impacts of their products.

The Government is keen to avoid any unintended consequences of introducing a DRS. We have consulted widely with industry stakeholders on the design and delivery of our proposed DRS and intend to continue engagement this year. An Impact Assessment will be published alongside the second consultation in 2021 which assesses the costs and benefits of a DRS, including the costs to business and the expected impact a DRS will have on kerbside recycling rates. No specific assessment has been made of the potential effect on food and drink manufacturers choosing to switch to plastic and other cheaper packaging materials as a result of the DRS. We intend to carry out a new burdens assessment to reflect the impact on local authority budgets stemming from the waste reforms policies, which will include DRS.

We recognise that the introduction of a DRS will remove in-scope materials from existing local authority waste streams as they become part of the DRS. However, we propose local authorities will be reimbursed for the costs incurred in managing any DRS materials that do still end up in these waste streams where consumers choose to forego the deposit on containers. Funding options for local authorities in this scenario are explored further in our forthcoming consultation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential effect on food and drink manufacturers choosing to switch to using (a) plastic and (b) other cheaper packaging materials in the event that a proposed Deposit Return Scheme includes provision for glass drinks containers.

The Government's commitment to introducing a DRS is part of our commitment to reform producer responsibility systems to incentivise producers to take greater responsibility for the environmental impacts of their products.

The Government is keen to avoid any unintended consequences of introducing a DRS. We have consulted widely with industry stakeholders on the design and delivery of our proposed DRS and intend to continue engagement this year. An Impact Assessment will be published alongside the second consultation in 2021 which assesses the costs and benefits of a DRS, including the costs to business and the expected impact a DRS will have on kerbside recycling rates. No specific assessment has been made of the potential effect on food and drink manufacturers choosing to switch to plastic and other cheaper packaging materials as a result of the DRS. We intend to carry out a new burdens assessment to reflect the impact on local authority budgets stemming from the waste reforms policies, which will include DRS.

We recognise that the introduction of a DRS will remove in-scope materials from existing local authority waste streams as they become part of the DRS. However, we propose local authorities will be reimbursed for the costs incurred in managing any DRS materials that do still end up in these waste streams where consumers choose to forego the deposit on containers. Funding options for local authorities in this scenario are explored further in our forthcoming consultation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has modelled the potential effect on levels of kerbside recycling rates in the event that a proposed Deposit Return Scheme includes provision for glass drinks containers.

The Government's commitment to introducing a DRS is part of our commitment to reform producer responsibility systems to incentivise producers to take greater responsibility for the environmental impacts of their products.

The Government is keen to avoid any unintended consequences of introducing a DRS. We have consulted widely with industry stakeholders on the design and delivery of our proposed DRS and intend to continue engagement this year. An Impact Assessment will be published alongside the second consultation in 2021 which assesses the costs and benefits of a DRS, including the costs to business and the expected impact a DRS will have on kerbside recycling rates. No specific assessment has been made of the potential effect on food and drink manufacturers choosing to switch to plastic and other cheaper packaging materials as a result of the DRS. We intend to carry out a new burdens assessment to reflect the impact on local authority budgets stemming from the waste reforms policies, which will include DRS.

We recognise that the introduction of a DRS will remove in-scope materials from existing local authority waste streams as they become part of the DRS. However, we propose local authorities will be reimbursed for the costs incurred in managing any DRS materials that do still end up in these waste streams where consumers choose to forego the deposit on containers. Funding options for local authorities in this scenario are explored further in our forthcoming consultation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the average length of time was for the Environment Agency to process a waste permit application from point of first application to final determination in each of the last two years; and what proportion of waste permit applications took longer than six months to process.

The Environment Agency prepares data for reports by Financial Year and this response includes information between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2020.

Cumulatively, over the last two years, 6.3% (166 of 2,639) of waste permit applications took longer than 12 months to determine.

Between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019, 6.5% (85 of 1,308) of waste permit applications took longer than 12 months to determine.

Between 1 April 2019 and 31 March 2020, 6.1% (81 of 1,331) of waste permit applications took longer than 12 months to determine.

Cumulatively, over the last two years the average length of time taken to determine a waste permit application is 129 days. This is broken down by reporting year as follows:

Between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019 it was 131 days. Between 1 April 2019 and 31 March 2020 it was 128 days.

Cumulatively, over the last two years 21.2% (560 of 2,639) of waste permit applications took longer than six months to determine. This is broken down by reporting year as follows.

Between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019, 21.9% (287 of 1,308) of waste permit applications took longer than six months to determine.

Between 1 April 2019 and 3 March 2020, 20.5% (273 of 1,331) of waste permit applications took longer than six months to determine.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the (a) length of potential delays in processing waste permit applications at the Environment Agency and (b) potential effect of those delays on investment in new waste processing facilities.

No assessment has been made of potential delays in processing waste permit applications at the Environment Agency or the potential effect of those delays on investment in new waste processing facilities. Each application is considered on its own merit and discussed with the individual applicant, and it is important they are assessed thoroughly.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many and what proportion of waste permit applications have taken longer than 12 months to process from point of first application to final determination in each of the last two years.

The Environment Agency prepares data for reports by Financial Year and this response includes information between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2020.

Cumulatively, over the last two years, 6.3% (166 of 2,639) of waste permit applications took longer than 12 months to determine.

Between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019, 6.5% (85 of 1,308) of waste permit applications took longer than 12 months to determine.

Between 1 April 2019 and 31 March 2020, 6.1% (81 of 1,331) of waste permit applications took longer than 12 months to determine.

Cumulatively, over the last two years the average length of time taken to determine a waste permit application is 129 days. This is broken down by reporting year as follows:

Between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019 it was 131 days. Between 1 April 2019 and 31 March 2020 it was 128 days.

Cumulatively, over the last two years 21.2% (560 of 2,639) of waste permit applications took longer than six months to determine. This is broken down by reporting year as follows.

Between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019, 21.9% (287 of 1,308) of waste permit applications took longer than six months to determine.

Between 1 April 2019 and 3 March 2020, 20.5% (273 of 1,331) of waste permit applications took longer than six months to determine.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which UK recycling plants are equipped to accept and recycle (a) PET plastic waste, (b) HDPE waste, (c) polyvinyl chloride waste, (d) polypropeline waste, (e) polystyrene waste and (f) low density polyethylene waste.

Defra does not hold this information. A list of accredited plastic reprocessors is available on the National Packaging Waste Database at the link below, but this does not provide details of the type of plastics dealt with by a site:

https://npwd.environment-agency.gov.uk/PublicRegister.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fPackagingPublicRegisterLinks.aspx%3fReturnUrl%3d%252fdefault.aspx.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she plans to take to ensure that UK exports of plastic waste to OECD countries within the EU are not re-exported to non-OECD countries within the EU single market.

The UN Basel Convention and an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Council Decision (C(2001)107 FINAL) provide a system of international rules on waste shipments. These control regimes have been fully implemented in EU law through the EU Waste Shipment Regulations (Regulation (EC) 1013/2006). The EU’s control system for intra-EU shipments of waste is a shared regime that all EU member states must abide by. It does not draw a distinction between member states which are adherents to OECD Decision and member states which are not. Recent amendments made to the annexes of the Basel Convention will increase controls on the shipment of plastic waste. These will come into force globally on 1 January 2021.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of whether OECD countries have internal validation systems that ensure that imported plastic waste is treated for recycling purposes to a level equivalent to that of the UK.

The Secretary of State has not assessed validation systems operated by other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries for imports of waste. Movements of waste between countries of the OECD have been supervised and controlled under an intra-OECD Control System since 1992. The OECD Council Decision C(2001)107 FINAL provides a legal framework for the control of movements of wastes within the OECD area to ensure the environmentally sound and economically efficient recovery of wastes.

Countries apply to the OECD Council to become a member of the OECD. A technical review is then carried out to evaluate the country’s policies and practices and its ability to implement OECD standards, including the Council Decision that controls intra-OECD movements of waste. This review process will normally result in a number of measures a country must implement to demonstrate alignment with OECD requirements.

The UK cannot ultimately dictate how its waste is managed once that waste leaves the UK. There is a system of international rules on shipments which must be followed. UK businesses involved in the export of wastes are required to take all necessary steps to ensure that the waste they ship is managed in an environmentally sound manner throughout its shipment and during its recycling. Any operators found to be illegally exporting waste can face severe sanctions - from financial penalties to imprisonment for a period of up to two years.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to take to ensure that the contents of the 42 containers of plastic being returned by the Malaysian Government are recycled in the UK.

Thirty-five of the containers have already arrived in England and the remaining seven were scheduled to leave Malaysia before the end of January. The Environment Agency, as competent authority of England, is overseeing the voluntary return of all 42 containers of waste. The return of these containers is being managed and financed by the parties involved in the original export to Malaysia as it is their responsibility. The Environment Agency is closely monitoring their return to England and subsequent lawful recovery or disposal of the waste in the UK.

The Government is deeply concerned about the illegal trade in waste, including reports of illegal plastic waste exported from the UK to Malaysia. Recognising the difficulties experienced by some countries in managing imports of plastic waste, the Queen’s Speech on 19 December last year included a commitment to ban the export of polluting plastic wastes to countries that are not members of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. We will consult this year on the date by which this should be achieved.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will undertake an investigation into the reasons that plastic waste declared illegal by the Malaysian Government was granted permission to be exported.

The UK authorities did not authorise this shipment. Under the current EU legislation there is no obligation on the exporter to obtain permission for this type of waste prior to its export. As part of the Resources and Waste Strategy, the Government has committed to review the regulatory framework covering waste shipments to ensure that we improve the quality of UK waste exports.

In this case the paperwork necessary to allow the import of the 42 containers had not been put in place by the importer. UK exporters have an obligation to ensure appropriate permissions from overseas authorities have been obtained prior to export of any waste. The 42 containers of waste, which are in the process of being returned to England, were exported to Malaysia without an “Approved Permit” import licence from the Malaysian Department of National Solid Waste Management. The return of these containers is being managed and financed by the parties involved in the original export to Malaysia as it is their responsibility.

The Government is deeply concerned about the illegal trade in waste, including reports of illegal plastic waste exported from the UK to Malaysia. Recognising the difficulties experienced by some countries in managing imports of plastic waste, the Queen’s Speech on 19 December last year included a commitment to ban the export of polluting plastic wastes to countries that are not members of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. We will consult this year on the date by which this should be achieved.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to support rural production of (a) biogas and (b) biomethane on farms for use as a vehicle fuel to replace red diesel.

Recognising the potential environmental benefits of biomethane, the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation scheme was amended in 2015 to reward biomethane used in transport and non-road mobile machinery on the basis of its energy content rather than volume. As a consequence biomethane is eligible to receive 1.9 RTFCs per kg, an increase on 1 RTFCs per kg, and double that number when produced from wastes such as manure.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of the use of biomethane to replace diesel in the rural haulage sector.

The Low Emission Freight and Logistics Trials funded by the department included emissions testing on a range of dedicated gas heavy goods vehicles and compared emissions to equivalent diesel models. This research estimates the use of biomethane could reduce CO2 emissions from between 67-85%, however emissions of harmful air pollutant emissions were in some cases higher than the diesel comparators they were tested against.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on the use of biomethane and hydrogen in rural areas that are not connected to the gas grid.

Renewable fuels such as biomethane and green hydrogen for use in transport are supported by the Department’s Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO).

The use of biomethane and hydrogen in applications outside transport would be a matter for the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an assessment of the potential effect that the Solent Freeport will have on existing (a) road, (b) rail and (c) ports infrastructure.

I would like to congratulate the Solent Freeport on its successful bid. My Department recognises that appropriate links will be vital to ensure the success of the UK’s newly established Freeports. My Department will consider the implications of the Freeport business cases for our transport networks and future infrastructure investment decisions.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether it is his policy to (a) make electric vehicle charge point payments payable by debit or credit card or (b) continue the existing subscription system.

A good consumer experience is vital to ensure electric vehicle (EV) uptake and drivers should find the charging experience as easy as refuelling an internal combustion engine car. We want drivers to be able to make quick and easy payments at rapid and high-powered chargers to help make ad-hoc, longer journeys fast and hassle free.

Last year the Government announced that we wanted to see all new rapid and higher powered chargepoints provide debit or credit card payment by spring 2020. We also announced that we wanted to see industry work together to deliver a roaming solution across the charging network, allowing EV drivers to use any public chargepoint through a single payment method without needing multiple smartphone apps or membership cards.

We are clear that we expect the market to respond, and follow the lead of those chargepoint operators, including BP Chargemaster, the largest chargepoint operator in the UK, who have already made a commitment that they will provide this facility at their chargepoints. The Government took powers through in the Automated and Electric Vehicles Act (AEVA) to regulate the EV infrastructure market. If the market does not make sufficient progress in this area quickly Government stands ready to require chargepoint operators to do so through regulation.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effect on climate change of (a) particulate matter effecting air quality and (b) greenhouse gasses created by ships whilst in port.

Assessment of the climate change and air quality impacts arising from shipping emissions are undertaken on both a national and international basis.

Nationally the UK’s National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory incorporates an assessment of emissions from ships, including those in port. The inventory includes both particulate matter and greenhouse gases. Additionally the Department published targeted research on shipping emissions in July 2019.

Internationally the UK provides fuel sales and consumption data to both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the International Maritime Organization, which informs international assessments of greenhouse gas emissions from shipping. The UK has also provided financial support to the IMO to progress this work.

5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to ensure the adequate availability of fast charging points to meet demand for electric vehicles between 2020-30.

Our vision is to have one of the best infrastructure networks in the world for electric vehicles, and we want chargepoints to be accessible, affordable and secure. The number of rapid chargepoints is increasing quickly, with 2,400 devices currently publicly available, but we recognise there is more to do. Along with the private sector the Government will invest £1 billion in charging infrastructure – making sure that everyone is within 30 miles of a rapid charging station for electric vehicles.

Our grant schemes and the £400m Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund will see thousands more electric vehicle charge-points installed across the UK. In particular, the first £70 million of the Charging Infrastructure Investment fund is expected to deliver an additional 3,000 rapid chargepoints by 2024.

In July last year, work commenced to determine a vision for a core rapid charger network on England’s strategic road network. This will report in Spring 2020. Highways England has already committed £15m to ensure there are chargepoints (rapid where possible) every 20 miles on 95% of the Strategic Road Network by the end of 2020.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to introduce standards for availabililty of fast charging points for electric vehicles by (a) distance between points and (b) availability for public charging without subscription.

Our vision is to have one of the best infrastructure networks in the world for electric vehicles, and we want chargepoints to be accessible, affordable and secure. The number of rapid chargepoints is increasing quickly, with 2,400 devices currently publicly available, but we recognise there is more to do. Along with the private sector the Government will invest £1 billion in charging infrastructure – making sure that everyone is within 30 miles of a rapid charging station for electric vehicles.

Our grant schemes and the £400m Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund will see thousands more electric vehicle charge-points installed across the UK. In particular, the first £70 million of the Charging Infrastructure Investment fund is expected to deliver an additional 3,000 rapid chargepoints by 2024.

In July last year, work commenced to determine a vision for a core rapid charger network on England’s strategic road network. This will report in Spring 2020. Highways England has already committed £15m to ensure there are chargepoints (rapid where possible) every 20 miles on 95% of the Strategic Road Network by the end of 2020.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the cost to the NHS of patient transport for people receiving dialysis in treatment centres.

The National Health Service is preventing unnecessary patient journeys through improved preventative medicine and enhanced digital care. As set out in Delivering a Net Zero National Health System, patient travel accounts for 5% of all NHS emissions. The Improving Non-Emergency Patient Transport Services (NEPTS) report published in August 2021 estimates that NEPTS journeys emit approximately 51,000-58,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent annually. This constitutes approximately 20% of NHS direct travel emissions. NEPTS deliver 11-12 million journeys a year with approximately 37% for patients requiring renal dialysis. Each year, approximately £460 million is spent on NEPTS with the average cost per patient journey at £38.

No such assessment has been made on the proportion of greenhouse gas emissions or the cost of patient transport attributed to patients receiving in-centre dialysis.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of (a) the proportion of NHS greenhouse gas emissions attributed to patient transport and (b) what proportion is attributed to patients receiving in-centre dialysis.

The National Health Service is preventing unnecessary patient journeys through improved preventative medicine and enhanced digital care. As set out in Delivering a Net Zero National Health System, patient travel accounts for 5% of all NHS emissions. The Improving Non-Emergency Patient Transport Services (NEPTS) report published in August 2021 estimates that NEPTS journeys emit approximately 51,000-58,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent annually. This constitutes approximately 20% of NHS direct travel emissions. NEPTS deliver 11-12 million journeys a year with approximately 37% for patients requiring renal dialysis. Each year, approximately £460 million is spent on NEPTS with the average cost per patient journey at £38.

No such assessment has been made on the proportion of greenhouse gas emissions or the cost of patient transport attributed to patients receiving in-centre dialysis.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to prevent unnecessary patient journeys as set out in the NHS's plan for Delivering a Net Zero National Health Service, published on 1 October 2020.

The National Health Service is preventing unnecessary patient journeys through improved preventative medicine and enhanced digital care. As set out in Delivering a Net Zero National Health System, patient travel accounts for 5% of all NHS emissions. The Improving Non-Emergency Patient Transport Services (NEPTS) report published in August 2021 estimates that NEPTS journeys emit approximately 51,000-58,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent annually. This constitutes approximately 20% of NHS direct travel emissions. NEPTS deliver 11-12 million journeys a year with approximately 37% for patients requiring renal dialysis. Each year, approximately £460 million is spent on NEPTS with the average cost per patient journey at £38.

No such assessment has been made on the proportion of greenhouse gas emissions or the cost of patient transport attributed to patients receiving in-centre dialysis.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with healthcare experts on the merits of commissioning therapeutic plasma exchange (PLEX) for neurological conditions.

Any decision to commission specialised interventions such as therapeutic plasma exchange (PLEX) for neurological conditions is a matter for NHS England. All decisions on treatment are made by clinical experts, informed by a patient's individual clinical needs. Wherever clinically appropriate, use of alternative therapies to immunoglobulin treatment for patients with neurological conditions, including PLEX, is stated in the current commissioning guidance which is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/PSS9-Immunoglobulin-Commissioning-Guidance-CQUIN-1920.pdf

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing specialised commissioning for therapeutic plasma exchange for neurological conditions.

Any decision to commission specialised interventions such as therapeutic plasma exchange (PLEX) for neurological conditions is a matter for NHS England. All decisions on treatment are made by clinical experts, informed by a patient's individual clinical needs. Wherever clinically appropriate, use of alternative therapies to immunoglobulin treatment for patients with neurological conditions, including PLEX, is stated in the current commissioning guidance which is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/PSS9-Immunoglobulin-Commissioning-Guidance-CQUIN-1920.pdf

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many and what proportion of UK diplomats have been directly tasked with encouraging strong Nationally Determined Contributions from countries participating in COP 26 in November 2021.

Tackling climate change in collaboration with international partners is a high priority for this government, and COP26 will require a whole-of-government effort, including strong diplomatic engagement. All Heads of Mission have been instructed by the Foreign Secretary to make climate change a top priority and, supported by around 180 diplomatic staff in embassies around the world, four regional COP26 ambassadors and the 24 staff in the Climate Diplomacy Team in FCO, encouraging strong Nationally Determined Contributions from countries is a major part of that work.

5th Feb 2020
To ask the Prime Minister, when he plans to hold the first meeting of the Cabinet sub-committee on climate change.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave to the Hon. Member the Member for Oxford East on 7 January 2020, UIN 224.

https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2019-12-19/224/

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 22 November 2021 to Question 76540 on Heating: VAT, for what reason heat batteries are not considered to be an Energy Saving Material.

Heat batteries are not defined as energy-saving materials in VAT legislation. Although the Government keeps all taxes under review, there are no plans to extend this definition.

However, the installation of a battery may benefit from the 5% reduced rate of VAT if it is ancillary to the installation of a qualifying energy-saving material (for example, solar panels) in residential accommodation. Further information can be found in VENSAV3200 and 3210 in HMRC guidance, which is available on GOV.UK.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to reduce the VAT on heat batteries to five per cent as part of the transition to a net zero energy system.

The Government maintains a reduced rate of VAT of 5 per cent on the installation of many Energy Saving Materials, subject to certain conditions.

Going further would impose additional pressure on the public finances, to which VAT makes a significant contribution. VAT raised around £130 billion in 2019/20, and helps to fund key spending priorities, including on health, education, and defence.

The Government keeps all taxes under review.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the level of support required to develop the UK's green hydrogen economy.

As outlined in BEIS’ Energy White Paper, the Government intends to take a ‘twin-track’ approach to developing a hydrogen economy, focusing efforts on both “blue” and “green” hydrogen. This is expected to grow the UK’s hydrogen supply chain, build sector confidence, and enable scaling up to ensure the longevity of a hydrogen economy.

Furthermore, the Prime Minister’s Ten Point Plan highlighted the significance of hydrogen as a priority technology and the Government recognises the key role it could play in the transition to a net zero economy by 2050. Therefore, the Government has committed to work with industry to aim for 5GW of hydrogen capacity by 2030.

At the 2020 Spending Review, the Chancellor provided £240m for a Net Zero Hydrogen Fund to further the development of a hydrogen economy. The Government is also in the process of developing business models to support the creation of a hydrogen market. Further details of these support mechanisms will be provided in the summer alongside a Hydrogen Strategy.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the Solent Freeport on employment levels at operators of lifeline ferry services to the Isle of Wight.

The government is pleased to have announced the locations of 8 new English Freeports at Budget, including Solent. These new Freeports will create jobs in deprived communities across the country.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much of the £200m his Department allocated to the UK Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund remains to be disbursed.

The UK Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund (CIIF) was launched in August 2019, and Zouk Capital LLP was appointed to manage £200m of Treasury funds and raise matching funds from private investors.


The CIIF has made two investments so far. The first investment was into Instavolt in August 2019. Instavolt is the UK’s largest owner and operator of a nationally distributed rapid EV charging network. The second investment was into Liberty Charge which focuses on providing on-street charging facilities in large cities and towns where many residents have no access to off-street parking.


Zouk is working on a number of other investment opportunities and further capital injections will be made into Instavolt and Liberty Charge. The investment amounts are confidential.

13th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what performance metrics his Department uses to assess the UK Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund.

The UK Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund (CIIF) was launched in August 2019, and Zouk Capital LLP was appointed to manage £200 million of Treasury funds and raise matching funds from private investors.

The aim of using this model of a commercially managed fund is to catalyse private sector investment into the electric vehicle charging sector in order to accelerate the roll-out of publicly accessible charging infrastructure. Treasury funds are provided on a pari passu basis with private sector investors, with the intention of all limited partners, including Treasury, earning a commercial return. Zouk has made two investments so far, and despite the challenges of the pandemic, has maintained its momentum of fund raising. So far, it is therefore meeting the objectives of catalysing private sector investment and accelerating the roll-out of publicly accessible charging infrastructure.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will place in the Library the contract the Government has with Zouk Capital for the management of the UK Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund.

The UK Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund was launched in August 2019, and Zouk Capital LLP was appointed to manage £200m of Treasury funds and raise matching funds from private investors. The contract between the Government and Zouk Capital is confidential.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what investments the UK Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund, managed by Zouk Capital, has made to date; in which companies those investments were made; and the amount of each investment.

The CIIF was launched in August 2019, and Zouk Capital LLP was appointed to manage £200m of Treasury funds and raise matching funds from private investors. The aim of the CIIF is to accelerate the roll-out of publicly accessible charging infrastructure by investing in new and existing companies and projects that produce and install charge points; this is so that charging infrastructure is not an impediment to the growth of the electric vehicle market in the UK.

The fund's first investment in August 2019 was into InstaVolt, the UK’s largest owner and operator of rapid EV charging stations with plans to nationally bolster rapid charge points to a total of 5,000. The second investment in May 2020 focuses on providing on-street charging facilities in large cities and towns where many residents have no access to off-street parking; Liberty Charge, a joint venture between multinational telecommunications company Liberty Global and Zouk Capital, will roll out on-street residential electric vehicle charging points in the UK to address this shortage.

The investment amounts are commercially sensitive and therefore confidential.

26th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of removing VAT on domestic renewables and installations for a period on 10 years from 1 January 2021.

The installation of many energy saving materials, including solar panels, that generate domestic renewable energy, are already subject to the reduced rate of VAT of 5 per cent when certain conditions are met.

The Government currently has no plans to change the VAT treatment of renewables. However, all taxes are kept under review.

4th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what quantity of diesel has been subsidised through his heavy mineral oil excise duty reclamation scheme H049.

HMRC estimates that around 13 million litres of diesel is sold under the horticultural producers’ relief per year.

The relief exists because of the particular climatic conditions within the UK, allowing UK producers to compete with producers from more temperate climates. In allowing them to compete on this basis, the UK is less reliant on food imports, with transportation having its own environmental costs.

The horticultural producers’ relief scheme has carried a negligible cost to the Exchequer for the last six years, reflecting the very small amount of diesel used under this relief. HMRC publishes estimated costs of non-structural reliefs here: https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/Pages/TaxAndDutybulletins.aspx

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
4th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of the heavy mineral oil excise duty reclamation scheme H049 with the Government's climate change policies.

HMRC estimates that around 13 million litres of diesel is sold under the horticultural producers’ relief per year.

The relief exists because of the particular climatic conditions within the UK, allowing UK producers to compete with producers from more temperate climates. In allowing them to compete on this basis, the UK is less reliant on food imports, with transportation having its own environmental costs.

The horticultural producers’ relief scheme has carried a negligible cost to the Exchequer for the last six years, reflecting the very small amount of diesel used under this relief. HMRC publishes estimated costs of non-structural reliefs here: https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/Pages/TaxAndDutybulletins.aspx

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the effect on carbon emissions of the heavy mineral oil excise duty reclamation scheme H049.

The horticultural producers’ relief scheme has carried a negligible cost to the Exchequer for the last six years, reflecting the very small amount of diesel used under this relief. HMRC publishes estimated costs of non-structural reliefs here: https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/Pages/TaxAndDutybulletins.aspx

The purpose of this relief is to support businesses in the horticulture sector with their fuel costs as horticulturists make a valuable contribution to the UK food supply.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the (a) carbon emissions from and (b) cost to the tax payer of the H049 heavy oil excise duty reclamation scheme in each year since its introduction.

The horticultural producers’ relief scheme has carried a negligible cost to the Exchequer for the last six years, reflecting the very small amount of diesel used under this relief. HMRC publishes estimated costs of non-structural reliefs here: https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/Pages/TaxAndDutybulletins.aspx

The purpose of this relief is to support businesses in the horticulture sector with their fuel costs as horticulturists make a valuable contribution to the UK food supply.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, by what criteria he plans to measure the carbon output of the recommendations in the Government's forthcoming National Infrastructure Strategy.

The Government takes its environmental responsibilities seriously and remains committed to meeting our climate change and wider environmental targets, including our commitment to net zero by 2050, and our intermediate carbon budgets.

The Government will publish a landmark National Infrastructure Strategy in the Autumn which will set out plans for a once in a generation transformation of the UK’s economic infrastructure to help level up the United Kingdom and decarbonise our economy.

The Green Book requires that environmental impacts, including on the legal Net Zero obligation, are considered in all government investment decisions.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to bring forward proposals to match the EU action plan on sustainable finance.

The UK shares the aims of the EU’s Sustainable Finance Action Plan. The three new pieces of legislation that followed the EU’s Sustainable Finance Action Plan, were all supported by the UK.

The UK’s Green Finance Strategy set out our ambition to align private sector financial flows with clean, environmentally sustainable and resilient growth. Further, hosting COP26 in November will provide a unique opportunity to pursue our green finance goals in partnership with many countries around the world, including the EU.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the (a) electricity cost of perimeter floodlighting of military bases and (b) potential cost saving of moving to LED or other energy efficient bulbs for such floodlighting.

Energy usage of perimeter floodlighting of military bases is not metered separately and no estimate of costs are held.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is committed to improving energy efficiency across the defence estate in line with the Net Zero ambition. Energy efficient lighting is one aspect of this and there is a proactive programme to transition to LED lighting. However, as MOD is not able to baseline the cost of perimeter floodlighting, potential cost savings cannot be provided.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will make it is Department's policy to implement energy efficient lighting across the MoD estate.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is committed to improving energy efficiency across the defence estate in line with the Net Zero ambition. Energy efficient lighting is one aspect of this and there is a proactive programme to transition to LED lighting.

For new builds the MOD policy is to achieve an excellent rating under the Defence Related Environmental Assessment Methodology (DREAM) which requires the use of energy efficient fittings.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to make (a) heat pumps, (b) solar panels and (c) other domestic renewable technologies compulsory for new housing in future planning regulations.

Mandating a particular renewable technology may not be appropriate for all dwellings in all areas. National planning policy encourages the use of renewables without requiring any particular technology. In the case of the Building Regulations, the Government sets minimum energy performance standards for new homes and non-domestic buildings. These are expressed in performance terms and do not prescribe the technologies, materials or fuels to be used. This allows builders and homeowners the flexibility to innovate and select the most practical and cost-effective solutions appropriate in any development. Not all dwellings may be suitable for solar panels because of their orientation and other reasons such as structural strength of the roof.

In October 2019, we launched the first stage of a two-part consultation that proposed changes to Part L of the Building Regulations for new homes. We proposed an ambitious uplift in the energy efficiency of new homes through the introduction of a Future Homes Standard. We expect that homes built to the Future Homes Standard will have carbon dioxide emissions 75-80 per cent lower than those built to current Building Regulations standards This means they will be fit for the future, with low carbon heating and very high fabric standards.

We committed in Planning for the Future to review the roadmap to the Future Homes Standard to ensure that implementation takes place to the shortest possible timeline. We will be publishing the Government response to the Future Homes Standard interim uplift consultation as soon as possible. This will set out a roadmap to the Future Homes Standard.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will make it his policy to introduce planning regulations to require new build homes to (a) be zero carbon and (b) have built in domestic renewables which generate at least 50 per cent of that home's energy needs by December 2023.

I refer the Hon. Member to my answer to Question 121115 on 1 December. I will add that the Government remains committed to meeting its target of net zero emissions by 2050 and recognises the important contribution that the energy efficiency of buildings has to make in meeting it. National Planning Policy expects that local authorities should adopt proactive strategies to reduce carbon emissions, recognising the objectives and provisions of the Climate Change Act 2008. There are provisions in the Planning and Energy Act 2008 that allow development plan policies to impose reasonable requirements for renewable energy use. This means that a proportion of energy used in development in their areas can be energy from renewable sources and/or be low carbon energy from sources in the locality of the development.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect of the Government's proposed changes in the use of timber in construction on trends in the level of carbon emissions.

Timber is a way of ensuring the long-term storage of carbon where it can be used safely in buildings.

The consultation following the review of the ban on the use of combustible materials in and on the external walls of buildings closed on 25 May 2020 and we are now analysing the results of the consultation. As part of the next step of the development of the policy, we will produce a detailed impact assessment. No specific assessment of the effect of the proposed changes on trends in the level of carbon emissions has been made.

However, we published an impact assessment when the original ban was first introduced. This document is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ban-on-combustible-materials-in-external-wall-systems-impact-assessment

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)