Lord Bishop of Bristol Portrait

Lord Bishop of Bristol

Bishops - Bishops

Became Member: 2nd October 2018


1 APPG membership (as of 13 May 2024)
Safeguarding in Faith Communities
Lord Bishop of Bristol has no previous appointments


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Bishop of Bristol has voted in 64 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
(8 debate interactions)
Lord Markham (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
(4 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(4 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Home Office
(19 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(5 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(4 debate contributions)
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Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Bishop of Bristol, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Lord Bishop of Bristol has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Bishop of Bristol has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 29 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
13th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Historic England register Heritage at Risk, published on 9 November, what steps they are taking to support, repair and maintain new entries on that register.

Once a new entry is added to the Heritage at Risk Register, Historic England offers public funding for the repair and conservation of the asset at risk. It focuses its grants on those sites which are most in need of repair and which, without additional investment, would be at risk of deterioration. The National Lottery Heritage Fund will also factor the Heritage at Risk Register into its assessments of applications for its National Lottery Grants for Heritage. The work supported by such funding results in assets at risk being taken off the register – including, this year, ecclesiastical heritage sites such as Sheerness Dockyard Church, Sheffield General Cemetery, and St. John The Evangelist, Rutland.

Historic England offers grants to enable churches to employ support officers, who work locally to help those responsible for places of worship which are at risk to plan repairs, manage projects, and fundraise. Since 2008, more than 40 posts have been funded through this programme.

Historic England also works with other bodies which award grants to help avert harm to our heritage, advising them on where to focus their resources so that they have the greatest impact for historic places and the people that benefit from them. Partnerships with owners, organisations, local authorities, and community groups are vital in making these projects successful.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the government of Uganda about reports (1) of intimidation, (2) that that government restricted access to online services and social media, and (3) of other irregularities, during the general election in that country on 14 January.

The UK has significant concerns which remain unaddressed including the treatment of opposition candidates in the run-up to and since the elections, the internet shutdown during the elections and subsequent restrictions on social media, and the treatment of journalists throughout this period. The Minister for Africa raised the importance of British officials being accredited to observe the elections with Ugandan Foreign Minister Sam Kutesa and with the Ugandan High Commission on 12 January 2021. The UK deployed 51 Election Observers across Uganda on election day, covering over 120 polling stations. They observed and evaluated the elections and reported back to the British High Commission in Kampala. We have been consulting with the diplomatic community in Kampala, civil society actors, other international observers, and the Government of Uganda to ensure we have a comprehensive and accurate picture of the elections. We have also urged the Government of Uganda to respond to the concerns raised. As the Minister for Africa and the British High Commissioner stated in their tweets on 14 January, we are concerned that the internet shutdown in Uganda impacted the transparency of the elections and broader freedom of expression. The British High Commission Kampala raised their concerns on the internet shutdown with the Government of Uganda which was eventually lifted on 18 January. Following the Presidential election results on 16 January, the Minister for Africa set out in a statement our significant concerns about the overall political climate surrounding the elections and has urged the Government of Uganda to meet its international human rights commitments.

The treatment of opposition figures post-election including Robert Kyagulanyi is unacceptable and the Minister for Africa expressed his concerns about this in his tweet on 19 January. We welcome the High Court of Uganda's decision of 25 January that the de facto house arrest of Kyagulanyi was unlawful and unconstitutional and that these restrictions have now been lifted. The British High Commission Kampala pressed the Ugandan authorities to end these unacceptable restrictions on Robert Kyagulanyi's liberty. Our High Commissioner in Kampala continues to meet political actors from all parties and met Kyagulanyi on 27 January 2021. They discussed the political situation in Uganda, the restrictions to political freedoms before and after the elections and the concerns raised over electoral processes. The High Commissioner urged all parties to reject violence, engage in peaceful dialogue and follow due process to address any electoral irregularities. As a long-standing partner to Uganda, and a steadfast advocate for Ugandan democracy, the United Kingdom will continue to follow post-election developments closely.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how much revenue is raised from (1) local churches, chapels and meeting houses, and (2) all places of worship, from Insurance Premium Tax.

HMRC does not hold the information requested.

Insurance Premium Tax returns do not include a breakdown of the tax due on specific products, as this may impose an excessive administrative burden on customers.

Baroness Penn
Minister on Leave (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State)
15th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report Car Wash Code of Practice Project Report: Home Office Modern Slavery Prevention Fund, published by Nottingham Trent University and submitted to the Home Office in October 2022.

The Home Office funded the evaluation report conducted by the Responsible Car Wash Scheme and Nottingham Trent University, as part of its grant funding under the Modern Slavery Prevention Fund, a one-off pot of funding to build the evidence base on what interventions work to prevent modern slavery.

The Home Office has shared the evaluation of this project with the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority so the lessons from this project can be incorporated into operational activity to improve standards within the hand car wash sector. The Government has no plans to respond directly to the report.

In addition, the Director of Labour Market Enforcement (DLME) sets out the scale and nature of labour exploitation in their annual strategy to ensure the three labour market enforcement bodies are targeting the highest-risk industries. The most recent 23-24 DLME strategy highlights hand car washes as a sector at risk of labour exploitation.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government when they will respond to the report Car Wash Code of Practice Project Report: Home Office Modern Slavery Prevention Fund, published by Nottingham Trent University and submitted to the Home Office in October 2022.

The Home Office funded the evaluation report conducted by the Responsible Car Wash Scheme and Nottingham Trent University, as part of its grant funding under the Modern Slavery Prevention Fund, a one-off pot of funding to build the evidence base on what interventions work to prevent modern slavery.

The Home Office has shared the evaluation of this project with the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority so the lessons from this project can be incorporated into operational activity to improve standards within the hand car wash sector. The Government has no plans to respond directly to the report.

In addition, the Director of Labour Market Enforcement (DLME) sets out the scale and nature of labour exploitation in their annual strategy to ensure the three labour market enforcement bodies are targeting the highest-risk industries. The most recent 23-24 DLME strategy highlights hand car washes as a sector at risk of labour exploitation.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many individuals referred to the National Referral Mechanism for modern slavery after arriving in the UK irregularly since January 2022 were referred because of (1) exploitation which happened in the UK, and (2) trafficking to the UK.

The Home Office publishes statistics on irregular arrivals to the UK, including those arriving via small boats, in the ‘Irregular migration to the UK statistics’ release on gov.uk. Data on National Referral Mechanism (NRM) referrals from small boat arrivals and the outcomes of these referrals is published in tables Irr_D04 and Irr_D05 of the ‘Irregular migration to the UK detailed datasets’, with the latest data up to the end of May 2023.

The Home Office does not publish data on modern slavery referrals for other irregular arrivals, or data on the nature or location of the exploitation.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many individuals referred to the National Referral Mechanism for modern slavery after arriving in the UK irregularly since January 2022 have been given (1) a positive reasonable grounds decision, (2) a negative reasonable grounds decision, (3) a positive conclusive grounds decision, and (4) a negative conclusive grounds decision.

The Home Office publishes statistics on irregular arrivals to the UK, including those arriving via small boats, in the ‘Irregular migration to the UK statistics’ release on gov.uk. Data on National Referral Mechanism (NRM) referrals from small boat arrivals and the outcomes of these referrals is published in tables Irr_D04 and Irr_D05 of the ‘Irregular migration to the UK detailed datasets’, with the latest data up to the end of May 2023.

The Home Office does not publish data on modern slavery referrals for other irregular arrivals, or data on the nature or location of the exploitation.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
24th Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many people who have arrived into the UK illegally since 1 January 2022 and who would therefore be eligible for removal to Rwanda have been referred to the National Referral Mechanism for modern slavery.

The Home Office publishes statistics on detected irregular arrivals to the UK in the ‘Irregular migration to the UK statistics’ release on gov.uk. Data on NRM referrals from small boat arrivals and the outcomes of the NRM referrals is published in tables Irr_D04 and Irr_D05 respectively of the ‘Irregular migration to the UK detailed datasets’ with the latest data up to the end of May 2023.

Information on NRM referrals from people who have arrived through other irregular routes is not published.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
17th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government when they will appoint the next Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner.

The role of the Anti-Slavery Commissioner (IASC), as set out in the 2015 Modern Slavery Act, is to encourage good practice in the prevention, detection, investigation and prosecution of slavery and human trafficking offences and the identification of victims.

The process to recruit a new IASC follows the principles set out within the Cabinet Office Governance Code on Public Appointments.

A decision on the appointment is under consideration.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many bids were received from organisations to provide information sessions on employment rights for overseas domestic workers; whether any of the bids have been successful; and when they expect the sessions to begin.

Following extensive market engagement, a full commercial tender exercise was conducted, which attracted only two bids to provide the information and advice sessions for Overseas Domestic Workers. Neither bid was successful.

All domestic workers are though provided with an information leaflet explaining their rights and how to access help should they need it. Further help and information is also available online at:

http://www.gov.uk/domestic-workers-in-a-private-household-visa/your-employment-rights

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
1st Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Home Office on 7 October 2020 (96911), what further plans they have to publish guidance on what constitutes reasonable grounds for missing the deadline for the EU Settlement Scheme.

In line with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, the Government has made clear, where a person eligible for leave under the EU Settlement Scheme has reasonable grounds for missing the 30 June 2021 deadline for applications by those resident in the UK by the end of the transition period, they will be given a further opportunity to apply.

We will publish clear, non-exhaustive guidance in the near future on what constitutes reasonable grounds for missing the deadline. Yet our focus remains on communicating information about the scheme and helping people to apply within the deadline.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend (1) to extend the duration, and (2) to increase the budget, of the Support for Migrant Victims Scheme pilot, in the event that demand outstrips the existing level of support provided.

We very much welcome, and are now reviewing, feedback from the sector on the draft prospectus for the Support for Migrant Victims scheme, including the duration of the pilot. We will consider all options, including future sustainability, should demand for the scheme outstrip the budget already allocated.

As well as providing support to migrant victims of domestic abuse, one of the key objectives of the scheme is to gather more information on the scale of the problem, and on which types of migrants it most significantly affects. Therefore, while we recognise that information being shared with the Home Office may deter some victims from seeking support, it will not be possible to measure the effectiveness of the scheme, or develop long term policy solutions, if there is no such exchange of information.

We are, however, reconsidering the proposals to provide as much reassurance as possible that information will be shared securely and will not routinely be shared with other parts of the Home Office. In developing the scheme we engaged with 24 specialist organisations and groups.

These were: Amnesty International, The Angelou Centre, Asiana Women’s Project, BAWSO Wales, End Violence Against Women Campaign, The Equality and Human Rights Commission, Imkaan, Kurdish and Middle Eastern Women’s Organisation, Latin American Women’s Rights Service, Liberty, London Black Women’s Project, Middle Eastern Women and Society Organisation, Migrants’ Rights Network, Project 17, Refuge, Refugee Women, Rights of Women, Safety 4 Sisters Manchester, Sisters for Change, Southall Black Sisters, Step Up Migrant Women Coalition, Welsh Women’s Aid, Women for Refugee Women and Women’s Aid. The second phase of the review consisted of a series of focus groups and meetings with organisations that specialise in providing support to migrant victims of domestic abuse with no recourse to public funds.

Since then, we have held an engagement webinar with the sector on 22 October and are reviewing the feedback from sector organisations. At the webinar we consulted with Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation, Latin American Women’s Rights Organisation, End Violence Against Women, Southall Black Sisters, Imkaan, Karma Nirvana, Hestia, Women’s Aid Scotland, The Angelou Centre, Women’s Aid, Catch 22, We Care Housing and Support, Victim Support and SafeLives. We are currently giving thought to the evaluation process, and will look to share findings with the wider sector soon.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Minister for Safeguarding) on 4 September (HC77656), to what extent they consulted non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on the design and delivery of the Support for Migrant Victims scheme; which NGOs they engaged with; and whether they intend to engage with NGOs during the evaluation of the pilot.

We very much welcome, and are now reviewing, feedback from the sector on the draft prospectus for the Support for Migrant Victims scheme, including the duration of the pilot. We will consider all options, including future sustainability, should demand for the scheme outstrip the budget already allocated.

As well as providing support to migrant victims of domestic abuse, one of the key objectives of the scheme is to gather more information on the scale of the problem, and on which types of migrants it most significantly affects. Therefore, while we recognise that information being shared with the Home Office may deter some victims from seeking support, it will not be possible to measure the effectiveness of the scheme, or develop long term policy solutions, if there is no such exchange of information.

We are, however, reconsidering the proposals to provide as much reassurance as possible that information will be shared securely and will not routinely be shared with other parts of the Home Office. In developing the scheme we engaged with 24 specialist organisations and groups.

These were: Amnesty International, The Angelou Centre, Asiana Women’s Project, BAWSO Wales, End Violence Against Women Campaign, The Equality and Human Rights Commission, Imkaan, Kurdish and Middle Eastern Women’s Organisation, Latin American Women’s Rights Service, Liberty, London Black Women’s Project, Middle Eastern Women and Society Organisation, Migrants’ Rights Network, Project 17, Refuge, Refugee Women, Rights of Women, Safety 4 Sisters Manchester, Sisters for Change, Southall Black Sisters, Step Up Migrant Women Coalition, Welsh Women’s Aid, Women for Refugee Women and Women’s Aid. The second phase of the review consisted of a series of focus groups and meetings with organisations that specialise in providing support to migrant victims of domestic abuse with no recourse to public funds.

Since then, we have held an engagement webinar with the sector on 22 October and are reviewing the feedback from sector organisations. At the webinar we consulted with Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation, Latin American Women’s Rights Organisation, End Violence Against Women, Southall Black Sisters, Imkaan, Karma Nirvana, Hestia, Women’s Aid Scotland, The Angelou Centre, Women’s Aid, Catch 22, We Care Housing and Support, Victim Support and SafeLives. We are currently giving thought to the evaluation process, and will look to share findings with the wider sector soon.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact that sharing the immigration status of a migrant victim of domestic abuse with the Home Office may have on (1) a victim’s ability to report any such abuse; and (2) the effectiveness of the Support for Migrant Victims scheme.

We very much welcome, and are now reviewing, feedback from the sector on the draft prospectus for the Support for Migrant Victims scheme, including the duration of the pilot. We will consider all options, including future sustainability, should demand for the scheme outstrip the budget already allocated.

As well as providing support to migrant victims of domestic abuse, one of the key objectives of the scheme is to gather more information on the scale of the problem, and on which types of migrants it most significantly affects. Therefore, while we recognise that information being shared with the Home Office may deter some victims from seeking support, it will not be possible to measure the effectiveness of the scheme, or develop long term policy solutions, if there is no such exchange of information.

We are, however, reconsidering the proposals to provide as much reassurance as possible that information will be shared securely and will not routinely be shared with other parts of the Home Office. In developing the scheme we engaged with 24 specialist organisations and groups.

These were: Amnesty International, The Angelou Centre, Asiana Women’s Project, BAWSO Wales, End Violence Against Women Campaign, The Equality and Human Rights Commission, Imkaan, Kurdish and Middle Eastern Women’s Organisation, Latin American Women’s Rights Service, Liberty, London Black Women’s Project, Middle Eastern Women and Society Organisation, Migrants’ Rights Network, Project 17, Refuge, Refugee Women, Rights of Women, Safety 4 Sisters Manchester, Sisters for Change, Southall Black Sisters, Step Up Migrant Women Coalition, Welsh Women’s Aid, Women for Refugee Women and Women’s Aid. The second phase of the review consisted of a series of focus groups and meetings with organisations that specialise in providing support to migrant victims of domestic abuse with no recourse to public funds.

Since then, we have held an engagement webinar with the sector on 22 October and are reviewing the feedback from sector organisations. At the webinar we consulted with Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation, Latin American Women’s Rights Organisation, End Violence Against Women, Southall Black Sisters, Imkaan, Karma Nirvana, Hestia, Women’s Aid Scotland, The Angelou Centre, Women’s Aid, Catch 22, We Care Housing and Support, Victim Support and SafeLives. We are currently giving thought to the evaluation process, and will look to share findings with the wider sector soon.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
15th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish further details about any changes to the routes of entry to the UK for overseas domestic workers.

Our broad approach for January 2021 will be to maintain the existing provisions for overseas domestic workers, expanding this route to include EU citizens.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
15th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish the results of the seasonal workers pilot.

The outcome of the Seasonal Workers Pilot will be announced in due course.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
15th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether overseas domestic workers will still be eligible for visas to work and reside in the UK after 1 January 2021.

Our broad approach for January 2021 will be to maintain the existing provisions for overseas domestic workers, expanding this route to include EU citizens.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what long-term support services they plan to provide to survivors of trafficking to protect them from being re-trafficked and to ensure that they are supported when the COVID-19 lockdown ends.

This Government is committed to stamping out modern slavery and providing victims with the support they need to rebuild their lives.

The Victim Care Contract aims to lift victims of modern slavery out of exploitation and establish a pathway to rebuild their lives. The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) informs a tailored move-on plan for confirmed victims, with the aim of establishing longer-term stability by helping victims transition out of VCC support and back into a community, as appropriate. Where this is not possible, VCC support will continue to meet the victim’s ongoing recovery needs.

The safety and security of those supported through the modern slavery Victim Care Contract (VCC) is a top priority during the COVID-19 pandemic.

We are continually reviewing how essential services can best be maintained and delivered to ensure victims receive and have the means to access the support they need at this time. To ensure our support system remains robust, we have adapted the method by which victims receive financial support. A new card payment solution has been rolled out to allow victims to receive their payments without requiring a cash transaction or a face-to-face meeting with a support worker. These pre-paid cards for users can be used online, in shops or in cash machines.

The policy change announced on 6 April mean individuals who are accommodated in the VCC, will have continued access to this accommodation until at least the 6 July 2020. The policy will be reviewed before the end of June in respect of the Government’s latest covid-19 advice. This change, alongside the existing support mechanisms within the contract will ensure that vulnerable individuals are not left without the essential support they need at this challenging time.

As the public health restrictions are lifted, we are committed as ever, to support victims and protect them from re-trafficking.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure that the level of subsistence support given to victims of modern slavery during the COVID-19 pandemic is sufficient to meet essential needs.

This Government is committed to stamping out modern slavery and providing victims with the support they need to rebuild their lives.

The Victim Care Contract aims to lift victims of modern slavery out of exploitation and establish a pathway to rebuild their lives. The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) informs a tailored move-on plan for confirmed victims, with the aim of establishing longer-term stability by helping victims transition out of VCC support and back into a community, as appropriate. Where this is not possible, VCC support will continue to meet the victim’s ongoing recovery needs.

The safety and security of those supported through the modern slavery Victim Care Contract (VCC) is a top priority during the COVID-19 pandemic.

We are continually reviewing how essential services can best be maintained and delivered to ensure victims receive and have the means to access the support they need at this time. To ensure our support system remains robust, we have adapted the method by which victims receive financial support. A new card payment solution has been rolled out to allow victims to receive their payments without requiring a cash transaction or a face-to-face meeting with a support worker. These pre-paid cards for users can be used online, in shops or in cash machines.

The policy change announced on 6 April mean individuals who are accommodated in the VCC, will have continued access to this accommodation until at least the 6 July 2020. The policy will be reviewed before the end of June in respect of the Government’s latest covid-19 advice. This change, alongside the existing support mechanisms within the contract will ensure that vulnerable individuals are not left without the essential support they need at this challenging time.

As the public health restrictions are lifted, we are committed as ever, to support victims and protect them from re-trafficking.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
12th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in their proposal to provide places of safety for victims of modern slavery.

Places of safety’ would provide support to adult victims of modern slavery leaving situations of immediate exploitation. They would receive accommodation, assistance and advice for up to 3 working days, allowing them time to consider if they wish to be referred to the National Referral Mechanism. A provision for Places of Safety has been included in the tender for The Modern Slavery Victim Care Contract (MSVCC) which will replace the current contract. We are nearing the end of the tender process, and the contract will be awarded in due course.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
16th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 9 March (HL1722), when they will publish an impact assessment for the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill 2020; and whether any such assessment will consider the relationship between changes in low-skilled migration and labour exploitation.

An impact assessment is being developed and will be published in due course.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the risk of labour shortages in the event of changes to immigration rules, and (2) the possibility of the exploitation of workers as a consequence of these shortages; and what steps they intend to take to ensure that workers are protected.

The Government has been clear free movement is ending, and a new immigration system will be introduced from January 2021. The independent Migration Advisory Committee has been clear immigration is not the solution to addressing shortages in the labour market.

The Government is committed to tackling labour exploitation across all sectors of the labour market and protecting workers’ rights. Through the Immigration Act 2016, we have widened the remit of the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority giving it new powers under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (PACE) 1984 to investigate serious labour market offences.

We recently ran a public consultation on the establishment of a new Single Enforcement Body for employment rights. We will publish a response to this consultation in due course.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of a reduction in low-skilled migration on the incidence of modern slavery.

The Government has been clear that free movement is ending, and a new immigration system will be introduced from January 2021.

We recognise this represents significant change. The Government is committed to eradicating exploitation within the labour market and migrant workers are no exception. The Government is committed to identifying potential victims of modern slavery and will continue to ensure needs-based support is available, regardless of an individual’s immigration status.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
11th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to enable local communities to safeguard places of worship through the Community Ownership Fund.

The £150 million Community Ownership Fund helps communities across England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland to take ownership of assets at risk of closure.

Current and former places of worship and their attached community hubs are one of the many asset types that the fund supports, though not specifically recorded as such. We recognise the important role these places have in building our social fabric and boosting pride in place by bringing people together. Some of the great projects we have already supported include The Light Church Bradford, The Open House in Sheffield, and The Old Synagogue in Belfast – all of which are providing valuable services to their community.

A full list of successful projects is available on GOV.UK at: Community Ownership Fund: successful bidders - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Baroness Swinburne
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
11th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government which places of worship have received support from the Community Ownership Fund.

The £150 million Community Ownership Fund helps communities across England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland to take ownership of assets at risk of closure.

Current and former places of worship and their attached community hubs are one of the many asset types that the fund supports, though not specifically recorded as such. We recognise the important role these places have in building our social fabric and boosting pride in place by bringing people together. Some of the great projects we have already supported include The Light Church Bradford, The Open House in Sheffield, and The Old Synagogue in Belfast – all of which are providing valuable services to their community.

A full list of successful projects is available on GOV.UK at: Community Ownership Fund: successful bidders - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Baroness Swinburne
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
11th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how much funding has been awarded in total from the Community Ownership Fund to communities seeking to turn places of worship into assets of community value.

The £150 million Community Ownership Fund helps communities across England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland to take ownership of assets at risk of closure.

Current and former places of worship and their attached community hubs are one of the many asset types that the fund supports, though not specifically recorded as such. We recognise the important role these places have in building our social fabric and boosting pride in place by bringing people together. Some of the great projects we have already supported include The Light Church Bradford, The Open House in Sheffield, and The Old Synagogue in Belfast – all of which are providing valuable services to their community.

A full list of successful projects is available on GOV.UK at: Community Ownership Fund: successful bidders - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Baroness Swinburne
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
16th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, following the publication of the Long-Term Plan for Towns on 1 October, what plans they have to develop representation from faith groups on Town Boards.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Baroness Swinburne
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
16th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to church buildings in the delivery of the Long-Term Plan for Towns.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Baroness Swinburne
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)