Baroness Wilcox of Newport Portrait

Baroness Wilcox of Newport

Labour - Life peer

Opposition Whip (Lords)

(since March 2020)

Shadow Spokesperson (Wales)

(since May 2021)

Shadow Spokesperson (Education)

(since May 2021)

Shadow Spokesperson (Work and Pensions)

(since May 2021)
Shadow Spokesperson (Equalities and Women's Issues)
30th Sep 2020 - 17th May 2021


Scheduled Event
Tuesday 6th September 2022
14:30
Oral questions - Main Chamber
6 Sep 2022, 2:30 p.m.
Devolved nations and the potential merits of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund
View calendar
Department Event
Wednesday 14th September 2022
Department for Education
Legislation - Main Chamber
Schools Bill - third reading
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Monday 18th July 2022
Schools Bill [HL]
The amendments in this group have attendance at their core, and nothing is more important. In addition to being directly …
Written Answers
Friday 22nd April 2022
Schools: Air Pollution
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to make changes to (1) standards, or (2) guidance, for the …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Baroness Wilcox of Newport has voted in 285 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Baroness Wilcox of Newport Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Greenhalgh (Conservative)
(35 debate interactions)
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
(18 debate interactions)
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(16 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department for Education
(45 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(35 debate contributions)
Home Office
(21 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Schools Bill [HL] 2022-23
(8,105 words contributed)
Domestic Abuse Bill 2019-21
(4,009 words contributed)
Skills and Post-16 Education Act 2022
(3,544 words contributed)
Business and Planning Act 2020
(3,391 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Baroness Wilcox of Newport's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Wilcox of Newport, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Wilcox of Newport has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Wilcox of Newport has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Baroness Wilcox of Newport has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Wilcox of Newport has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


23 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to make changes to (1) standards, or (2) guidance, for the (a) construction, and (b) specification, of new school buildings, in respect of either (i) classroom ventilation, or (ii) air purification, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Schools should always create a healthy indoor environment for occupants, this includes keeping spaces ventilated to reduce the concentration of pathogens in the air, such as COVID-19. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the department have emphasised the importance of ventilation and provided guidance to settings on ventilation requirements.

In 2018, the department published Building Bulletin 100, guidance for school design on ventilation, thermal comfort, and indoor air quality. This includes the World Health Organisation’s air quality guidelines and Air Quality Standards Regulation 2010 for indoor air quality. The full publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/building-bulletin-100-design-for-fire-safety-in-schools.

Furthermore, the department sets environmental standards for centrally delivered new schools and sets a minimum specification for ventilation to address healthy indoor air quality.

The current version was updated recently and published in November 2021. This can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/output-specification-generic-design-brief-and-technical-annexes.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made, in pounds, of the total cost of the higher energy use in schools as a result of following their advice to keep windows in classrooms open as a form of ventilation; and what estimate they have made of the average extra cost for each (1) primary school, and (2) secondary school.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the government has provided schools with guidance on how to manage ventilation, in addition to providing over 360,000 CO2 monitors to state-funded education providers in England. As well as helping to identify areas that are poorly ventilated, CO2 monitors can be useful to help schools balance good ventilation with keeping classrooms warm.

Ensuring adequate ventilation does not need to be at the expense of keeping classrooms warm. Schools do not need to keep windows fully open at all times. Opening windows regularly for 10 minutes, or a small amount continuously can still improve ventilation substantially. The department's guidance has also been clear that when CO2 monitors indicate good ventilation, there is no need to open additional windows.

Maintaining adequate ventilation remains the responsibility of individual providers. The department does not hold the information requested on the increase in energy usage or costs due to opening windows, as this will vary according to a range of factors including how individual schools manage ventilation in their estate.

The department recognises that schools will be facing cost pressures in the coming months, particularly due to the increase in energy prices. The department is looking carefully at how this will impact schools. All schools can access a range of school resource management tools to help them get the best value from their resources, including two Schools Commercial Team recommended deals for energy costs and ancillary services relating to energy, which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/find-a-dfe-approved-framework-for-your-school.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made, in kWh, of the total amount of higher energy consumption in schools as a result of their advice to keep windows in classrooms open as a form of ventilation; and what estimate they have made of the average extra consumption for each (1) primary school, and (2) secondary school.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the government has provided schools with guidance on how to manage ventilation, in addition to providing over 360,000 CO2 monitors to state-funded education providers in England. As well as helping to identify areas that are poorly ventilated, CO2 monitors can be useful to help schools balance good ventilation with keeping classrooms warm.

Ensuring adequate ventilation does not need to be at the expense of keeping classrooms warm. Schools do not need to keep windows fully open at all times. Opening windows regularly for 10 minutes, or a small amount continuously can still improve ventilation substantially. The department's guidance has also been clear that when CO2 monitors indicate good ventilation, there is no need to open additional windows.

Maintaining adequate ventilation remains the responsibility of individual providers. The department does not hold the information requested on the increase in energy usage or costs due to opening windows, as this will vary according to a range of factors including how individual schools manage ventilation in their estate.

The department recognises that schools will be facing cost pressures in the coming months, particularly due to the increase in energy prices. The department is looking carefully at how this will impact schools. All schools can access a range of school resource management tools to help them get the best value from their resources, including two Schools Commercial Team recommended deals for energy costs and ancillary services relating to energy, which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/find-a-dfe-approved-framework-for-your-school.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made on their trial in Bradford of air purification technology suitable for classroom contexts.

The study of air cleaning units in primary schools, funded by the Department of Health and Social Care, is run by the class-ACT (air cleaning technology) consortium and led by the Centre for Applied Educational Research at the University of Leeds.

The trial has provided valuable informal interim feedback on the practicalities of introducing ACT in schools. These interim findings have been published by the Class-ACT consortium as a 10-step guide for schools, published in the Times Educational Supplement on 27 January. This article can be found here: https://www.tes.com/magazine/analysis/general/covid-schools-ventilation-10-step-guide-using-air-cleaning-units.

The study of air cleaning technologies is still ongoing, findings are planned to be published in late 2022.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have undertaken any (1) engagement, or (2) analysis, of the impact of a free school meals programme for all primary school pupils.

The provision of free school meals to children from out-of-work or low income families is of the utmost importance to this government.

Under the benefits-related criteria, the department provides a free healthy meal to around 1.7 million children. This ensures they are well nourished and can concentrate, learn, and achieve in the classroom.

The department spends around £600 million per year to ensure an additional 1.3 million infants enjoy a free, healthy, and nutritious meal at lunchtime, following the introduction of the universal infant free school meal (UIFSM) policy in 2014.

Under this government, eligibility for free school meals has been extended several times to more groups of children than any other government over the past half a century. This includes the introduction of UIFSM and further education free meals.

We think it is right that provision is aimed at supporting the most disadvantaged, those out of work or on the lowest incomes. We do not have any plans to extend universal provision. but we will continue to keep all free school meal eligibility under review, to ensure that these meals are supporting those who most need them.

The department is also permanently extending free school meal eligibility to children from all groups with no recourse to public funds. This will come into effect for the start of the 2022 academic year summer term.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many schools have met the threshold specified in the Department for Education document Contingency framework: education and childcare settings for further steps to reduce the spread of COVID-19 within schools since the beginning of the academic year; and whether they will publish regular updates on this.

The department does not collect the data in question and does not currently have any plans to publish regular updates on this. However, we closely review data, analysis and advice from a number of different sources – including the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, and the Office for National Statistics. We also continue to work closely with local authorities and their Directors of Public Health to inform our planning and response.

The contingency framework describes the principles of managing local outbreaks of COVID-19 in education and childcare settings and sets out the measures that settings should be prepared for if they were advised to take extra measures to help break chains of transmission. It also sets out thresholds for managing COVID-19 cases and when settings should consider seeking public health advice.

As the guidance outlines, local authorities, Directors of Public Health (DsPH) and health protection teams (HPTs) can recommend measures described in the framework in individual education and childcare settings as part of their outbreak management responsibilities.

We have worked with the UKSHA to develop the thresholds outlined in the contingency framework. These are designed to help settings identify when it might be sensible to seek public health advice when it appears that COVID-19 might be spreading between people who closely mix in the setting. Identifying a group that is likely to have mixed closely will be different for each setting.

DsPH or HPTs will give settings advice reflecting the local situation. In areas where rates are high, this may include advice that local circumstances mean that the thresholds for extra action can be higher than set out in the contingency framework. This will take into account a range of factors reflecting the setting’s particular situation and local circumstances. If they judge that additional action should be taken, they might advise the setting to take some or all of the other measures described in the contingency framework.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many schools do not have a qualified teacher in a subject they offer.

Legislation does not specify that teachers must have a degree in a particular subject or discipline. It is the Teachers’ Standards that specify the subject knowledge required for the award of qualified teacher status. All trainee teachers must meet these by the time they complete their training.

Of the 2,957 state-funded secondary schools in England that supplied data on curriculum subjects taught and the subject of qualifications held by their teachers, there were 1,256 schools, equivalent to 42%, where at least one subject was taught for which none of its teachers held a relevant post A level qualifications in that subject.

The most common subjects where no teachers in a school held a relevant post A level qualification in the subject were: computing (293 schools); Spanish (271); media studies (225); ICT (206); religious education (153); citizenship (105) and engineering (105).

To reduce burden during the COVID-19 outbreak, schools were not required to provide information on teacher qualifications in 2020. Therefore, the information provided relates to the November 2019 School Workforce Census.

Information on subjects taught and teacher post A level qualifications is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of how much poverty will rise in the worst-case scenario from any modelling they have conducted on the impact of ending the £20 uplift for Universal Credit.

It is not possible to produce a robust estimate of the impact of removing the Universal Credit uplift on poverty or related issues. This is particularly the case at the moment given the uncertainty around the speed of the economic recovery, and how this will be distributed across the population.

The latest poverty figures (2019/20) demonstrate that absolute poverty rates (both before and after housing costs) for working-age adults in working families have fallen since 2009/10. In 2019/20, 8% of working age adults in working families were in absolute poverty (before housing costs), compared to 9% in 2009/10.

The Chancellor announced a temporary six-month extension to the £20 per week uplift at the Budget on 3 March to support households affected by the economic shock of Covid-19. Universal Credit has provided a vital safety net for six million people during the pandemic, and the temporary uplift was part of a COVID support package worth a total of £407 billion in 2020-21 and 2021-22.

There have been significant positive developments in the public health situation since the uplift was first introduced. With the success of the vaccine rollout and record job vacancies, it is right that our focus is on helping people back into work.

Through our Plan for Jobs, we are targeting tailored support schemes of people of all ages to help them prepare for, get into and progress in work. These include: Kickstart, delivering tens of thousands of six-month work placements for Universal Credit claimants aged 16-24 at risk of unemployment; Restart, which provides 12 months’ intensive employment support to Universal Credit claimants who are unemployed for a year; and JETS, which provides light touch employment support for people who are claiming either Universal Credit or New Style Jobseekers Allowance, for up to 6 months, helping participants effectively re-engage with the labour market and focus their job search. We have also recruited an additional 13,500 work coaches to provide more intensive support to find a job. In total, our Plan for Jobs interventions will support more than two million people.

This Government is wholly committed to supporting those on low incomes, and continues to do so through many measures, including by increasing the living wage, and by spending over £111 billion on welfare support for people of working age in 2021/22.

This year, we are also investing up to £220m in the Holiday Activities and Food programme, which has been expanded to every Local Authority across England. Participating children will benefit from a range of support, including a healthy and nutritious meal as well as fun and engaging activities covering the Easter, summer and Christmas holidays in 2021. We also increased the value of Healthy Start Food Vouchers from £3.10 to £4.25 in April, which helps eligible low income households buy basic foods like milk, fruit and vitamins.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of how much homelessness will rise in the worst-case scenario from any modelling they have conducted on the impact of ending the £20 uplift for Universal Credit.

No impact assessments have been made.

Discretionary Housing Payments provide critical support to vulnerable claimants, including those who are at risk of homelessness, that need help with their housing costs.

For 2021-22 the Government has made available £140m in Discretionary Housing Payments funding for local authorities in England and Wales. In 2020-21 we boosted investment in the Local Housing Allowance by almost £1 billion and have maintained rates in cash terms for 2021-22. In addition, earlier this year we extended the exemptions from the shared accommodation rate of Local Housing Allowance for care leavers and those who have spent at least three months in a homeless hostel. From 31st May 2021 the care leavers exemption applies up to age 25 and the homeless hostel exemption applies up to age 35.

The Chancellor announced a temporary six-month extension to the £20 per week uplift at the Budget on 3 March to support households affected by the economic shock of Covid-19. Universal Credit has provided a vital safety net for six million people during the pandemic, and the temporary uplift was part of a COVID support package worth a total of £407 billion in 2020-21 and 2021-22.

There have been significant positive developments in the public health situation since the uplift was first introduced. With the success of the vaccine rollout and record job vacancies, it is right that our focus is on helping people back into work.

Through our Plan for Jobs, we are targeting tailored support schemes of people of all ages to help them prepare for, get into and progress in work. These include: Kickstart, delivering tens of thousands of six-month work placements for Universal Credit claimants aged 16-24 at risk of unemployment; Restart, which provides 12 months’ intensive employment support to Universal Credit claimants who are unemployed for a year; and JETS, which provides light touch employment support for people who are claiming either Universal Credit or New Style Jobseekers Allowance, for up to 6 months, helping participants effectively re-engage with the labour market and focus their job search. We have also recruited an additional 13,500 work coaches to provide more intensive support to find a job. In total, our Plan for Jobs interventions will support more than two million people.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of how much food bank usage will rise in the worst-case scenario from any modelling they have conducted on the impact of ending the £20 uplift for Universal Credit.

No assessment has been made. Foodbanks are independent, charitable organisations and the Department for Work and Pensions does not have any role in their operation. There is no consistent and accurate measure of food bank usage at a constituency or national level.

The Chancellor announced a temporary six-month extension to the Universal Credit uplift at the Budget on 3 March to support households affected by the economic shock of Covid-19. Universal Credit has provided a vital safety net for six million people during the pandemic, and the temporary uplift was part of a COVID support package worth a total of £407billion in 2020-21 and 2021-22.

There have been significant positive developments in the public health situation since the uplift was first introduced with the success of the vaccine rollout. Now the economy is reopening and as we continue to progress with our recovery our focus is on helping people back into work.

Through our Plan for Jobs, we are targeting tailored support schemes of people of all ages to help them prepare for, get into and progress in work. These include: Kickstart, delivering tens of thousands of six-month work placements for Universal Credit claimants aged 16-24 at risk of unemployment; Restart, which provides 12 months’ intensive employment support to Universal Credit claimants who are unemployed for a year; and JETS, which provides light touch employment support for people who are claiming either Universal Credit or New Style Jobseekers Allowance, for up to 6 months, helping participants effectively re-engage with the labour market and focus their job search. We have also recruited an additional 13,500 work coaches to provide more intensive support to find a job. In total, our Plan for Jobs interventions will support more than two million people.

This Government is wholly committed to supporting those on low incomes, and continues to do so through many measures, including by increasing the living wage, and by spending over £111 billion on welfare support for people of working age in 2021/22.

This year, we are also investing up to £220m in the Holiday Activities and Food programme, which has been expanded to every Local Authority across England. Participating children will benefit from a range of support, including a healthy and nutritious meal as well as fun and engaging activities covering the Easter, summer and Christmas holidays in 2021. We also increased the value of Healthy Start Food Vouchers from £3.10 to £4.25 in April, which helps eligible low income households buy basic foods like milk, fruit and vitamins.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many jobs have been created by the Kickstart Scheme in (1) England, and (2) each English region.

We are pleased to say that, as of the 8th September, over 69,000 young people have started Kickstart jobs. Over 188,000 jobs have been made available for young people to apply for through the Kickstart Scheme with over 281,000 jobs approved for funding by the Scheme.

In England, over 163,000 jobs have been made available for young people to apply for as well as over 59,000 starts. The table below lists the number of Kickstart jobs which have been made available and started by young people to date by English region. The figures used are correct as of the 8th September and these figures have been rounded according to departmental standards.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system, which has been developed quickly.

The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics, but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.

Location

Jobs Made Available

Total Jobs Started

East Midlands

11,900

4,170

East of England

14,900

4,870

London

38,400

15,170

North East

7,500

3,170

North West

24,000

8,830

South East

21,700

7,460

South West

14,000

4,660

West Midlands

16,900

6,150

Yorkshire and The Humber

14,600

5,250

*These numbers are rounded and so may not match provided totals. Jobs Made Available include 1,000 non-grant funded vacancies and Total Starts include around 900 starts to non-grant funded jobs

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what modelling they have conducted on the impact of ending the £20 uplift for Universal Credit on (1) homelessness, (2) poverty, and (3) food bank usage; and what the modelling predicted the impact would be for each issue.

It is not possible to produce a robust estimate of the impact of removing the £20 uplift on poverty or related issues. This is due to the uncertainty around the speed and distribution of the economic recovery.

The Chancellor announced a temporary six-month extension to the £20 per week uplift at the Budget on 3 March to support households affected by the economic shock of Covid-19. Universal Credit has provided a vital safety net for six million people during the pandemic, and the temporary uplift was part of a COVID support package worth a total of £407 billion in 2020-21 and 2021-22.

The latest poverty figures (2019/20) demonstrate that absolute poverty rates (both before and after housing costs) for working-age adults in working families have fallen since 2009/10. In 2019/20, 8% of working age adults in working families were in absolute poverty (before housing costs), compared to 9% in 2009/10.

There have been significant positive developments in the public health situation since the uplift was first introduced. With the success of the vaccine rollout and record job vacancies, it is right that our focus is on helping people back into work. This approach is based on clear evidence about the importance of employment, particularly where it is full-time, in substantially reducing the risks of poverty.

Through our Plan for Jobs, we are targeting tailored support schemes of people of all ages to help them prepare for, get into and progress in work. Our Plan is working, as we see record numbers of job vacancies and numbers of employees on payrolls back at pre-pandemic levels.

However, we recognise that some people may require extra support over the winter as we enter the final stages of recovery, which is why vulnerable households across the country will now be able to access a new £500 million support fund to help them with essentials. The Household Support Fund will provide £421 million to help vulnerable people in England and allocations to individual local authorities are set out below. The Barnett Formula will apply in the usual way, with the devolved administrations receiving almost £80 million (£41m for the Scottish Government, £25m for the Welsh Government and £14m for the NI Executive), for a total of £500 million.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money in total they have paid to employers through a Kickstart Scheme grant.

Information relating to Kickstart grants will be published by the Cabinet Office on the Government website in due course, as is standard practice for all Government general grants. This information is normally published about a year after the financial year end and includes grant value and recipients.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they contract any company (1) to run part of, or (2) to approve applications for, the Kickstart Scheme; if so, what are the names of those companies; what are their roles and responsibilities; and how much are the contracts worth.

No companies are contracted to run part of, or approve applications for, the Departments’ Kickstart Scheme.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the name of (1) each individual employer, and (2) each employer which is part of a Kickstart gateway, which has had applications approved through the Kickstart Scheme; and how many jobs has each named employer made available through the Scheme.

Organisations in receipt of a Kickstart grant will have their details published on the Government website in due course, as is standard practice for all organisations in receipt of a Government grant. This information has not been published yet as organisations are still applying and being approved for Kickstart funding.


For applications approved between the start of the scheme in September 2020 through to June 2021, there have been, on average, 14 Kickstart jobs available for young people to apply to per Kickstart employer (this includes individual employers and those that have applied through a Kickstart gateway).

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system which has been developed quickly. The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics, but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) women, and (2) men, have started Kickstart jobs.

As of 27th May 2021, there have been over 29,000 job placement starts to the Kickstart Scheme.

As the Kickstart Scheme had to be launched quickly to support eligible 16 to 24 year olds on Universal Credit who were at risk of long-term unemployment, a means of recording the number of participating young people from ethnic minorities or by gender was not prioritised in the initial design. Ethnicity and gender are recorded on the wider Universal Credit systems and will be used in the evaluation of the Scheme.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people who have started jobs through the Kickstart scheme were (1) black, (2) Asian; (3) other ethnic minority, and (4) white.

As of 27th May 2021, there have been over 29,000 job placement starts to the Kickstart Scheme.

As the Kickstart Scheme had to be launched quickly to support eligible 16 to 24 year olds on Universal Credit who were at risk of long-term unemployment, a means of recording the number of participating young people from ethnic minorities or by gender was not prioritised in the initial design. Ethnicity and gender are recorded on the wider Universal Credit systems and will be used in the evaluation of the Scheme.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Kickstart placements have been created with oil and gas companies; and which oil and gas companies such placements have been created with.

Kickstart jobs are categorised into broad sectors when vacancies details are made available for work coaches to encourage young people to apply for them. The sector category relates to the job type, rather than the nature of the main activities undertaken by the employer. This means for example, that an administrative job within an oil company would be categorised as ‘administrative’, rather than ‘oil & gas’.

A breakdown of jobs started and made available by sector, this could include any jobs with Oil and Gas employers, is available here: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2021-05-20/hl457

As of 20th May, almost 8,000 Kickstart Scheme applications from employers and Gateways (each representing a number of employers) had been approved. To establish which employers associated with the Oil and Gas industry have approved Kickstart jobs would require reviewing all these approved applications to consider the principal activities of each employer, this information could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system which has been developed quickly. The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics, but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government in which sectors Kickstart placements have been created; and how many Kickstart placements have been (1) created, and (2) filled, in each sector.

As of the 27th May 2021, over 133,000 jobs have been made available for young people to apply for through the Department for Work and Pensions’ (DWP) Kickstart Scheme. This includes over 29,000 jobs started by young people.

There have been over 219,000 jobs approved for funding through the scheme.

The tables below show figures split by job sector (rather than the sector of the employer), the data has been rounded according to DWP statistical rounding convention.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system which has been developed quickly. The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics, but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.

Sector

Jobs Made Available

Total Jobs Started

Administration

33,630

7,480

Animal Care

600

240

Beauty & Wellbeing

930

230

Business & Finance

4,830

1,000

Computing, Technology & Digital

10,050

2,770

Construction & Trades

4,360

990

Creative & Media

10,040

3,070

Delivery & Storage

4,020

870

Emergency & Uniform Services

320

20

Engineering & Maintenance

4,740

780

Environment & Land

2,500

540

Government Services

310

50

Healthcare

4,800

800

Home Services

1,000

120

Hospitality & Food

11,140

1,760

Law & Legal

320

110

Managerial

930

170

Manufacturing

3,250

800

Retail & Sales

21,720

4,910

Science & Research

630

130

Social Care

3,270

400

Sports & Leisure

3,020

640

Teaching & Education

5,760

1,110

Transport

450

60

Travel & Tourism

500

80

Figures may not add up to provided totals due to rounding. 1,000 non-grant funded jobs are included in Jobs Advertised but not included under Jobs Started. Total jobs started includes those which have been completed or ended early.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to raise awareness of the Domestic Abuse Act 2021; and what plans they have to work with the White Ribbon charity as part of that work.

The ground-breaking Domestic Abuse Act received Royal Assent in April of this year. The Act will provide further protection to the millions of people who experience domestic abuse, strengthens the measures to bring perpetrators to justice and transforms the support we give to victims ensuring they have the protection they deserve.

The Home Office has worked with the sector to keep them appraised of the implementation of the Act. The Violence Against Women and Girls Strategy, published in July of this year and informed by the 180,000 responses we received to our Call for Evidence also makes a commitment to a national communications campaign. We are also publishing a Domestic Abuse Strategy this year, to complement the Tackling Violence Against Women and Girls Strategy.

The Home Office is continually working across government to champion and coordinate with the charity sector on such vital issues.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent discussions they have had with the First Minister of Wales regarding the Shared Prosperity Fund.

The UK Government has regular contact with the First Minister of Wales on a range of issues, including how the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) will help to level up communities in Wales.

Through its share of the £2.6 billion UKSPF, we will boost productivity, jobs and living standards right across Wales whilst empowering local leaders to restore local pride and a sense of community. This is in addition to the investment Wales will receive though other local growth funds such as the Levelling Up Fund and the Community Ownership Fund.

Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)