Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top Portrait

Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top

Labour - Life peer

2 APPG memberships (as of 22 Jul 2022)
Complex Needs and Dual Diagnosis, Kinship Care
3 Former APPG memberships
Complex Needs, Medomsley Detention Centre, Northern Powerhouse
EU External Affairs Sub-Committee
12th Jun 2015 - 2nd Jul 2019
European Union Committee
8th Jun 2015 - 1st Jul 2019
Draft Domestic Abuse Bill (Joint)
6th Mar 2019 - 14th Jun 2019
Soft Power Committee
16th May 2013 - 11th Mar 2014
Adoption Legislation Committee
29th May 2012 - 26th Feb 2013
Minister (Cabinet Office) and Minister (Social Exclusion) and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
5th May 2006 - 28th Jun 2007
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury (Chief Whip)
8th Jun 2001 - 5th May 2006
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Transport and the Regions) (Local Government)
6th May 1997 - 8th Jun 2001
Shadow Spokesperson
1st Jan 1995 - 1st Jan 1997
Shadow Spokesperson
1st Jan 1994 - 1st Jan 1995
Shadow Spokesperson
1st Jan 1988 - 1st Jan 1992


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 7th September 2022
15:00
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 14th September 2022
15:00
Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Tuesday 12th July 2022
International Development Strategy: Volunteering
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what consideration they have given to the role of volunteering within the United Kingdom’s international …
Written Answers
Thursday 21st July 2022
Asylum: Middle East and Somalia
To ask Her Majesty's Government what they consider safe, legal routes to be for asylum seekers from (1) Afghanistan, (2) …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top has voted in 223 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(13 debate interactions)
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(12 debate interactions)
Lord Greenhalgh (Conservative)
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(20 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(7 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(6 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Domestic Abuse Bill 2019-21
(1,923 words contributed)
Health and Care Act 2022
(171 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


27 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what are the current rules on (1) eligibility, and (2) sponsorship of Parliamentary passes for lobbyists.

Nobody is entitled to a parliamentary pass by virtue of being a lobbyist. Any passholder who has an external lobbying role separate to their parliamentary role is not permitted to use their pass for lobbying purposes. The rules governing the sponsorship of passes by members of the House of Lords, which were recently amended, say: "Such passholders must use their Parliamentary pass only to provide Parliamentary support to the sponsor and other members of the House, and not in furtherance of any other interests of their own or of other organisations for which they work. Members may not sponsor a pass for anybody whose primary role is to support an All-Party Parliamentary Group."

The Code of Conduct for House of Lords Members’ Staff requires them to register their outside interests, including "any … financial interest in businesses or organisations involved in parliamentary lobbying".

Anybody who has evidence that an individual is breaching any of these rules may complain to the independent Commissioner for Standards at lordsstandards@parliament.uk.

24th Nov 2020
To ask the Leader of the House whether any current Lords Ministers sponsor Parliamentary passes for individuals other than (1) family members, (2) civil servants, (3) carers, and (4) special advisors; and if so, what the reasons are for the sponsorship of those Parliamentary passes.

One Lords Minister sponsors a pass for a member of staff who does not fall into any of the four categories listed in the question and who provides non-government administrative support.

In line with the Code of Conduct and the Code of Conduct for House of Lords Members' Staff, there is an entry in the Register of Interests - Members of the House of Lords staff. The register can be found at:

https://members.parliament.uk/members/lords/interests/register-of-interests-of-lords-members-staff

Baroness Evans of Bowes Park
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
23rd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which Cabinet committees are responsible for (1) the recovery of public services following the COVID-19 pandemic, and (2) co-ordinating the delivery of public services across Government; and which Ministers chair these committees.

There are a number of Cabinet Committees that could take issues related to public service delivery and recovery. These include, for example; the Domestic and Economic (Operations), the Government Priorities Delivery Committee, Covid-19 Operations, the Health Promotion Taskforce and the Crime and Justice Taskforce. All of these are listed on GOV.UK along with their membership and Terms of Reference. This list of Cabinet Committees on GOV.UK is updated regularly.

It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
17th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many of the people appointed to (1) arms-length bodies, and (2) other public bodies, since 1 January have a political affiliation; and which political parties they were affiliated to in each case.

The government publishes annual data reports on public appointments, including information on gender, ethnic background and political affiliation. The latest report published on 21 October provides data on those appointed during the 2020-21 financial year and appointees in post on 31 March 2021. Data on those appointed during the 2021-22 financial year and those in post on 31 March 2022 will be published next year.

Latest figures show that in 2020-21, 44% of appointees were women and 10% were from an ethnic minority background. 6% stated they had taken part in political activity in the past five years across a range of political parties.

Public appointments are announced on the HM Government Public Appointments website https://publicappointments.cabinetoffice.gov.uk.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
17th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government who they have appointed to (1) arms-length bodies, and (2) other public bodies, since 1 January; and how many of these appointments were (a) women, or (b) people from a minority background.

The government publishes annual data reports on public appointments, including information on gender, ethnic background and political affiliation. The latest report published on 21 October provides data on those appointed during the 2020-21 financial year and appointees in post on 31 March 2021. Data on those appointed during the 2021-22 financial year and those in post on 31 March 2022 will be published next year.

Latest figures show that in 2020-21, 44% of appointees were women and 10% were from an ethnic minority background. 6% stated they had taken part in political activity in the past five years across a range of political parties.

Public appointments are announced on the HM Government Public Appointments website https://publicappointments.cabinetoffice.gov.uk.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
21st Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 28 September (HL2731), what commitments they have to ensure diversity of public appointments.

On 21st October, the Government published the Public Appointments Data Report 2021. This set out the diversity data for public appointments held and made. The Government previously published a plan for increasing diversity in public appointments, the Public Appointments Diversity Action Plan, available on GOV.UK. We are keeping the plan under review to ensure that we continue to attract a broad range of talented people from across the UK to these roles.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
15th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the process for appointing the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

The role was advertised on the Government’s Public Appointments website and also through a number of other channels and networks. Applications were assessed by a panel, which included an independent member, against the advertised criteria. Shortlisted candidates were interviewed and the panel recommended to ministers which candidates they found appointable. Subject to consideration by Ministers of the select committee’s report, the formal appointment will be made by Order in Council.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
14th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to support manufacturing in the North East of England.

The Government recognises the importance of manufacturing to the North East and to the economy. Through the North East Local Enterprise Partnership Growth Deal, we are supporting job growth and economic development with £379.6 million of funding from the Local Growth Fund. This includes £42 million of funding for the International Advanced Manufacturing Park (IAMP) in Sunderland. Sunderland Council estimates that the IAMP will attract £300 million of private sector investment to help grow local manufacturing sectors.

We are also giving over £600 million to support the High Value Manufacturing Catapult network; their Centre for Process Innovation at Wilton focuses on the commercialisation of innovation, research and development, helping North East manufacturers to develop and adopt cutting edge technology.

1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what concerns relating to problem gambling and women they intend to address in their Review of the Gambling Act 2005.

The Gambling Commission is continuing to monitor gambling behaviour during the Covid-19 period. Survey data published by the Commission in January indicated that 87% of women gamblers have gambled the same amount or less during the pandemic than they had previously. The Commission recently wrote to operators to remind them of its guidance issued in May 2020, which requires them to increase protections for those who may be at heightened risk of gambling harm. That guidance directed operators to monitor customer behaviour more closely to identify signs of potential harm, and banned mechanisms by which customers could cancel requests to withdraw money from their account.

The Gambling Commission also conducts a quarterly telephone survey of gambling behaviours which collects data about problem gambling prevalence. The most recent wave of that survey was carried out in September, and aggregated results for the year to September 2020 estimated the problem gambling rate amongst women to be 0.3%. This is higher than the rate estimated for the year to September 2019 (0.1%), but lower than the rate estimated for the year to March 2020 (0.4%). Caution should be used when interpreting these figures due to the low numbers of respondents involved. Much of the data for the year to September 2020 was collected prior to the Covid-19 period, and problem gambling is measured using questions which ask about past year experiences and behaviours, so it is not possible to accurately assess the relative impact of the pandemic on fluctuations in currently available data. The Commission will publish the next wave of telephone survey data later this month, which will give figures for the year to December 2020.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8th December with the publication of a call for evidence. The Review will be wide-ranging and evidence-led, and aims to make sure we have the right balance for regulation and appropriate protections for all vulnerable people.



Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the levels of problem gambling among women.

The Gambling Commission is continuing to monitor gambling behaviour during the Covid-19 period. Survey data published by the Commission in January indicated that 87% of women gamblers have gambled the same amount or less during the pandemic than they had previously. The Commission recently wrote to operators to remind them of its guidance issued in May 2020, which requires them to increase protections for those who may be at heightened risk of gambling harm. That guidance directed operators to monitor customer behaviour more closely to identify signs of potential harm, and banned mechanisms by which customers could cancel requests to withdraw money from their account.

The Gambling Commission also conducts a quarterly telephone survey of gambling behaviours which collects data about problem gambling prevalence. The most recent wave of that survey was carried out in September, and aggregated results for the year to September 2020 estimated the problem gambling rate amongst women to be 0.3%. This is higher than the rate estimated for the year to September 2019 (0.1%), but lower than the rate estimated for the year to March 2020 (0.4%). Caution should be used when interpreting these figures due to the low numbers of respondents involved. Much of the data for the year to September 2020 was collected prior to the Covid-19 period, and problem gambling is measured using questions which ask about past year experiences and behaviours, so it is not possible to accurately assess the relative impact of the pandemic on fluctuations in currently available data. The Commission will publish the next wave of telephone survey data later this month, which will give figures for the year to December 2020.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8th December with the publication of a call for evidence. The Review will be wide-ranging and evidence-led, and aims to make sure we have the right balance for regulation and appropriate protections for all vulnerable people.



Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with churches and faith communities about the difficulties of obtaining broadband access for places of worship which do not have a postcode; and what plans they have to arrange a debate on this issue in the House.

The Government has been in discussion with representatives from the Church of England, in particular, regarding the issue of broadband access where places of worship do not have postcodes, or are otherwise missing from telecom provider databases. In some cases this leads to issues in identifying and providing service to such locations.

Over 31,000 premises are listed in relevant databases accessible to the Government as being used as places of worship. Of these, approximately 86% of premises used for religious purposes in Great Britain can access Superfast broadband speeds or better on fixed networks, compared to the UK average of 95%. Approximately 4% of premises used for religious purposes in Great Britain cannot access ‘decent broadband’ speeds of 10 Megabit/s on Fixed networks, compared to the UK average of 2%, largely due to their rurality. However, 4G data services are also widely available, and this reduces the number of such listed places of worship with no potential service to less than 0.2% of the total.

We are working with relevant stakeholders, including telecom operators (such as Openreach) and Ofcom, to ascertain the extent of this problem, and how many religious premises are still facing these barriers. This includes whether data used by operators is consistent with that available to the Government and to identify appropriate solutions, including ensuring that databases are up to date, but also that all broadband technology solutions that are available to places of worship are considered. Therefore, there are no current plans to debate the matter in the House.

We understand the importance for broadband access in places of worship to help improve connectivity for local communities, as well as practical benefits for such premises, including streaming services, security, and accepting contactless donations or administration.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what new deadlines the Department for Education has set to (1) evaluate tender bids, (2) hold clarification meetings, and (3) announce the preferred bidder of the tender process for the contract for "an information and advice service for families including kinship carers of children at risk or involved in the care system".

The department is in the process of tendering for an information and advice service for families including kinship carers of children at risk or involved in the care system.

Our intention remains to award this contract in March 2020 in order for the service to commence on 1 April 2020. As per our most recent indicative timeline, we hope to evaluate tender bids on 3 February 2020, hold clarification meetings between 14 February 2020 to 20 February 2020, and announce the preferred bidder soon after.

Any further unexpected delays will be communicated to all interested bidders. The department will work with any winning bidder, and the existing provider to ensure the service is not interrupted.

22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that information and advice services for families, kinship carers and special guardians of children at risk or involved in the care system in England can continue uninterrupted, following the reported delay in the procurement of this service.

The department is in the process of tendering for an information and advice service for families including kinship carers of children at risk or involved in the care system.

Our intention remains to award this contract in March 2020 in order for the service to commence on 1 April 2020. As per our most recent indicative timeline, we hope to evaluate tender bids on 3 February 2020, hold clarification meetings between 14 February 2020 to 20 February 2020, and announce the preferred bidder soon after.

Any further unexpected delays will be communicated to all interested bidders. The department will work with any winning bidder, and the existing provider to ensure the service is not interrupted.

15th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will publish the impact assessment for removing the £20 uplift to Universal Credit.

No impact assessment has been made.

The Chancellor announced a temporary six-month extension to the £20 per week uplift at the Budget on 3 March to support households affected by the economic shock of Covid-19. Universal Credit has provided a vital safety net for six million people during the pandemic, and the temporary uplift was part of a COVID support package worth a total of £407billion in 2020-21 and 2021-22.

There have been significant positive developments in the public health situation since the uplift was first introduced. With the success of the vaccine rollout and record job vacancies, it is right that our focus is on helping people back into work.

Through our Plan for Jobs, we are targeting tailored support schemes of people of all ages to help them prepare for, get into and progress in work. These include: Kickstart, delivering tens of thousands of six-month work placements for Universal Credit claimants aged 16-24 at risk of unemployment; we have also recruited an additional 13,500 work coaches to provide more intensive support to find a job; and introduced Restart which provides 12 months’ intensive employment support to Universal Credit claimants who are unemployed for a year. Our Plan for Jobs interventions will support more than two million people.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is (1) the number of people, and (2) the percentage of the total workforce, registered as unemployed in the (a) Bolsover, (b) Redcar, (c) Darlington, (d) Blyth, (e) Wolverhampton North East, (f) Bury South, (g) Bolton North East, (h) Heywood and Middleton, and (i) Ashfield, Parliamentary constituencies.

Estimates of the level and rate of unemployment are compiled by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) using the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Annual Population Survey (APS). The LFS provides national and regional unemployment estimates whilst the APS, which boosts the sample of the LFS, allows more local analysis.

Estimates are based on a sample of cases and therefore subject to sampling uncertainty. Unemployment estimates at geographies below regions, such as local authorities and parliamentary constituencies, can be more statistically uncertain. The confidence intervals given in Table 2 in the Annex reflect the level of uncertainty around the rates given, with confidence intervals (and therefore uncertainty in the figure) generally increasing as the underlying sample size decreases.

The Annex sets out the constituency level information asked for. All estimates of unemployment and the claimant count used the Annex are also publicly available on the NOMIS website (https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/).

Table 1 of the Annex gives the latest figures from the LFS on the unemployment levels and rates for the relevant regions for the named constituencies.

Table 2 of the Annex gives the latest estimate from the APS on the levels and rates of unemployment for the named constituencies. These figures, where available, should be treated as indicative, rather than precise, due to the heightened level of sample variability of estimates at this level of geography due to the small sample of people the estimate is based upon. Where the sample is too small to derive an estimate, figures are not given. The rates given express the proportion of the economically active population (those in work plus those seeking and available to work) who are unemployed, in line with the International Labour Organization definition of unemployment.

Table 3 of the Annex gives the latest figures on the Claimant Count for the named constituencies. The Claimant Count is based on administrative data and can be broken down robustly to constituency level, and as such, there are no confidence intervals around the figures. The Claimant Count is the number of people claiming Jobseeker's Allowance plus those who claim Universal Credit who are out of work. The rates given express the number of claimants as a percentage of the population aged 16-64.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is (1) the number of people, and (2) the percentage of the total workforce, registered as unemployed in the (a) Rother Valley, (b) Newcastle-under-Lyme, (c) Leigh, (d) Don Valley, (e) Wakefield, (f) Bishop Auckland, (g) Sedgefield, (h) North West Durham, (i) Bassetlaw, and (j) Great Grimsby, Parliamentary constituencies.

Estimates of the level and rate of unemployment are compiled by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) using the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Annual Population Survey (APS). The LFS provides national and regional unemployment estimates whilst the APS, which boosts the sample of the LFS, allows more local analysis.

Estimates are based on a sample of cases and therefore subject to sampling uncertainty. Unemployment estimates at geographies below regions, such as local authorities and parliamentary constituencies, can be more statistically uncertain. The confidence intervals given in Table 2 in the Annex reflect the level of uncertainty around the rates given, with confidence intervals (and therefore uncertainty in the figure) generally increasing as the underlying sample size decreases.

The Annex sets out the constituency level information asked for. All estimates of unemployment and the claimant count used the Annex are also publicly available on the NOMIS website (https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/).

Table 1 of the Annex gives the latest figures from the LFS on the unemployment levels and rates for the relevant regions for the named constituencies.

Table 2 of the Annex gives the latest estimate from the APS on the levels and rates of unemployment for the named constituencies. These figures, where available, should be treated as indicative, rather than precise, due to the heightened level of sample variability of estimates at this level of geography due to the small sample of people the estimate is based upon. Where the sample is too small to derive an estimate, figures are not given. The rates given express the proportion of the economically active population (those in work plus those seeking and available to work) who are unemployed, in line with the International Labour Organization definition of unemployment.

Table 3 of the Annex gives the latest figures on the Claimant Count for the named constituencies. The Claimant Count is based on administrative data and can be broken down robustly to constituency level, and as such, there are no confidence intervals around the figures. The Claimant Count is the number of people claiming Jobseeker's Allowance plus those who claim Universal Credit who are out of work. The rates given express the number of claimants as a percentage of the population aged 16-64.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is (1) the number of people, and (2) the percentage of the total workforce, registered as unemployed in the (a) Richmond (Yorkshire), (b) Uxbridge and Ruislip, (c) Esher and Walton, (d) Witham, (e) Surrey Heath, (f) Swindon South, (g) Wyre and Preston, (h) West Suffolk, (i) Reading West, and (j) South West Norfolk, Parliamentary constituencies.

Estimates of the level and rate of unemployment are compiled by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) using the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Annual Population Survey (APS). The LFS provides national and regional unemployment estimates whilst the APS, which boosts the sample of the LFS, allows more local analysis.

Estimates are based on a sample of cases and therefore subject to sampling uncertainty. Unemployment estimates at geographies below regions, such as local authorities and parliamentary constituencies, can be more statistically uncertain. The confidence intervals given in Table 2 in the Annex reflect the level of uncertainty around the rates given, with confidence intervals (and therefore uncertainty in the figure) generally increasing as the underlying sample size decreases.

The Annex sets out the constituency level information asked for. All estimates of unemployment and the claimant count used the Annex are also publicly available on the NOMIS website (https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/).

Table 1 of the Annex gives the latest figures from the LFS on the unemployment levels and rates for the relevant regions for the named constituencies.

Table 2 of the Annex gives the latest estimate from the APS on the levels and rates of unemployment for the named constituencies. These figures, where available, should be treated as indicative, rather than precise, due to the heightened level of sample variability of estimates at this level of geography due to the small sample of people the estimate is based upon. Where the sample is too small to derive an estimate, figures are not given. The rates given express the proportion of the economically active population (those in work plus those seeking and available to work) who are unemployed, in line with the International Labour Organization definition of unemployment.

Table 3 of the Annex gives the latest figures on the Claimant Count for the named constituencies. The Claimant Count is based on administrative data and can be broken down robustly to constituency level, and as such, there are no confidence intervals around the figures. The Claimant Count is the number of people claiming Jobseeker's Allowance plus those who claim Universal Credit who are out of work. The rates given express the number of claimants as a percentage of the population aged 16-64.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is (1) the number of people, and (2) the percentage of the total workforce, registered as unemployed in the (a) Suffolk Coastal, (b) South Staffordshire, (c) Cambourne and Redruth, (d) Newark, (e) Welwyn Hatfield, (f) Great Yarmouth, (g) Hertsmere, (h) Berwick-upon-Tweed, (i) Cannock Chase, and (j) Wolverhampton South West, Parliamentary constituencies.

Estimates of the level and rate of unemployment are compiled by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) using the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Annual Population Survey (APS). The LFS provides national and regional unemployment estimates whilst the APS, which boosts the sample of the LFS, allows more local analysis.

Estimates are based on a sample of cases and therefore subject to sampling uncertainty. Unemployment estimates at geographies below regions, such as local authorities and parliamentary constituencies, can be more statistically uncertain. The confidence intervals given in Table 2 in the Annex reflect the level of uncertainty around the rates given, with confidence intervals (and therefore uncertainty in the figure) generally increasing as the underlying sample size decreases.

The Annex sets out the constituency level information asked for. All estimates of unemployment and the claimant count used the Annex are also publicly available on the NOMIS website (https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/).

Table 1 of the Annex gives the latest figures from the LFS on the unemployment levels and rates for the relevant regions for the named constituencies.

Table 2 of the Annex gives the latest estimate from the APS on the levels and rates of unemployment for the named constituencies. These figures, where available, should be treated as indicative, rather than precise, due to the heightened level of sample variability of estimates at this level of geography due to the small sample of people the estimate is based upon. Where the sample is too small to derive an estimate, figures are not given. The rates given express the proportion of the economically active population (those in work plus those seeking and available to work) who are unemployed, in line with the International Labour Organization definition of unemployment.

Table 3 of the Annex gives the latest figures on the Claimant Count for the named constituencies. The Claimant Count is based on administrative data and can be broken down robustly to constituency level, and as such, there are no confidence intervals around the figures. The Claimant Count is the number of people claiming Jobseeker's Allowance plus those who claim Universal Credit who are out of work. The rates given express the number of claimants as a percentage of the population aged 16-64.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what research they have commissioned into the most common pathways to gambling disorder for women.

Public Health England is currently carrying out an evidence review on the prevalence, determinants and harms associated with gambling, and the social and economic burden of gambling-related harms. This includes reviewing the evidence on young people, men and women. The review is expected to be completed in March 2021.

15th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of proposals of the new government to Israel for the reconstruction of Gaza while isolating Hamas.

We welcome Foreign Minister Lapid's speech on 12 September, proposing positive policy suggestions to support economic development in Gaza and greater security for Israel. A long-term solution for Gaza is needed to prevent further conflict and make progress towards a two-state solution. The UK will continue to urge the parties to prioritise progress towards reaching a durable solution for Gaza and to take the necessary practical steps to ensure Gaza's reconstruction and economic recovery.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of how long the policy of removing asylum seekers to Rwanda will take to reduce significantly the illegal activity of people traffickers; and whether they will publish the risk assessment for this policy.

This Migration and Economic Development Partnership with Rwanda is part of a suite of measures aimed at breaking the business model of evil people smuggling gangs and as with all policies, its impact will be kept under review.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what language support is available to those women in Hassockfield Immigration Removal Centre who do not have English as a first language.

The Detention Centre Rules 2001 regulate how immigration removal centres are operated, with the overall purpose of the rules being to ensure a secure and humane environment. The safety, security and welfare of staff and detained individuals are of vital importance in the operation of the immigration removal estate, and this includes the strict regulation of those entering and working in immigration removal centres, under Rule 53 of the Detention Centre Rules.

Members of Independent Monitoring Boards, who are appointed by the Home Secretary under section 152 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999, are required to sign the Official Secrets Act as part of the Home Office clearance process. The published Detention Services Order (DSO) ‘Whistleblowing – The Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (c.23)’ sets out guidance for Home Office staff, our suppliers and visitors on whistleblowing procedures.

All those detained in immigration removal centres (IRCs), including Derwentside IRC, have access to independent interpreting services. As set out in DSO 06/2013 “Reception, Induction and Discharge’, professional interpreting facilities must be used whenever language barriers are identified on reception, induction, or discharge. New operational guidance, Detention Services Order ‘Interpretation Services and use of Translation Devices’ will be published shortly. This guidance will set out the provisions, including interpretation services and translation devices, available for individuals held in immigration detention and the circumstances in which these should be used.

All IRCs have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS, or appropriate providers, and deliver trauma informed mental health services, where appropriate. A range of trauma informed services are provided at Derwentside IRC, including trauma stabilisation, trauma informed cognitive behavioural therapy and services for sexual abuse crisis. The services available are supplemented by guidance and advice on trauma informed restorative practice being provided to onsite staff, from a specialist external organisation.

In addition to published guidance, staff at all centres are also given training and support to proactively identify and act upon indicators of vulnerability at the earliest opportunity and Detainee Custody Officers at Derwentside IRC receive trauma informed training as part of their induction and refresher training courses, to ensure effective and supportive engagement with residents. Welfare teams are onsite at every IRC to assist detained individuals in accessing support specific to their needs.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what access the residents of Hassockfield Immigration Removal Centre have to trauma-informed counselling.

The Detention Centre Rules 2001 regulate how immigration removal centres are operated, with the overall purpose of the rules being to ensure a secure and humane environment. The safety, security and welfare of staff and detained individuals are of vital importance in the operation of the immigration removal estate, and this includes the strict regulation of those entering and working in immigration removal centres, under Rule 53 of the Detention Centre Rules.

Members of Independent Monitoring Boards, who are appointed by the Home Secretary under section 152 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999, are required to sign the Official Secrets Act as part of the Home Office clearance process. The published Detention Services Order (DSO) ‘Whistleblowing – The Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (c.23)’ sets out guidance for Home Office staff, our suppliers and visitors on whistleblowing procedures.

All those detained in immigration removal centres (IRCs), including Derwentside IRC, have access to independent interpreting services. As set out in DSO 06/2013 “Reception, Induction and Discharge’, professional interpreting facilities must be used whenever language barriers are identified on reception, induction, or discharge. New operational guidance, Detention Services Order ‘Interpretation Services and use of Translation Devices’ will be published shortly. This guidance will set out the provisions, including interpretation services and translation devices, available for individuals held in immigration detention and the circumstances in which these should be used.

All IRCs have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS, or appropriate providers, and deliver trauma informed mental health services, where appropriate. A range of trauma informed services are provided at Derwentside IRC, including trauma stabilisation, trauma informed cognitive behavioural therapy and services for sexual abuse crisis. The services available are supplemented by guidance and advice on trauma informed restorative practice being provided to onsite staff, from a specialist external organisation.

In addition to published guidance, staff at all centres are also given training and support to proactively identify and act upon indicators of vulnerability at the earliest opportunity and Detainee Custody Officers at Derwentside IRC receive trauma informed training as part of their induction and refresher training courses, to ensure effective and supportive engagement with residents. Welfare teams are onsite at every IRC to assist detained individuals in accessing support specific to their needs.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government why those who have been approved as official visitors to Hassockfield Immigration Removal Centre in Country Durham are required to sign the Official Secrets Act, and how should any concerns be raised and people be held accountable if visitors are unable to report anything publicly.

The Detention Centre Rules 2001 regulate how immigration removal centres are operated, with the overall purpose of the rules being to ensure a secure and humane environment. The safety, security and welfare of staff and detained individuals are of vital importance in the operation of the immigration removal estate, and this includes the strict regulation of those entering and working in immigration removal centres, under Rule 53 of the Detention Centre Rules.

Members of Independent Monitoring Boards, who are appointed by the Home Secretary under section 152 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999, are required to sign the Official Secrets Act as part of the Home Office clearance process. The published Detention Services Order (DSO) ‘Whistleblowing – The Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (c.23)’ sets out guidance for Home Office staff, our suppliers and visitors on whistleblowing procedures.

All those detained in immigration removal centres (IRCs), including Derwentside IRC, have access to independent interpreting services. As set out in DSO 06/2013 “Reception, Induction and Discharge’, professional interpreting facilities must be used whenever language barriers are identified on reception, induction, or discharge. New operational guidance, Detention Services Order ‘Interpretation Services and use of Translation Devices’ will be published shortly. This guidance will set out the provisions, including interpretation services and translation devices, available for individuals held in immigration detention and the circumstances in which these should be used.

All IRCs have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS, or appropriate providers, and deliver trauma informed mental health services, where appropriate. A range of trauma informed services are provided at Derwentside IRC, including trauma stabilisation, trauma informed cognitive behavioural therapy and services for sexual abuse crisis. The services available are supplemented by guidance and advice on trauma informed restorative practice being provided to onsite staff, from a specialist external organisation.

In addition to published guidance, staff at all centres are also given training and support to proactively identify and act upon indicators of vulnerability at the earliest opportunity and Detainee Custody Officers at Derwentside IRC receive trauma informed training as part of their induction and refresher training courses, to ensure effective and supportive engagement with residents. Welfare teams are onsite at every IRC to assist detained individuals in accessing support specific to their needs.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what they consider safe, legal routes to be for asylum seekers from (1) Afghanistan, (2) Iraq, (3) Iran, and (4) Somalia.

The UK welcomes refugees and people in need of protection through its existing resettlement schemes. The government encourages eligible individuals to use established safe and legal pathways. These include the UK Resettlement Scheme, Community Sponsorship, Mandate Resettlement Scheme, the Afghanistan Citizens Resettlement Scheme, and the Afghanistan Relocations and Assistance Policy.

Individuals from the listed countries may be eligible for resettlement through these existing schemes.

In addition to our refugee resettlement schemes, family reunion policy allows a spouse/partner and the children under 18 of those granted protection in the UK to join them here if they formed part of the family unit before the sponsor fled their country.

Since 2015, we have resettled more than 27,000 refugees through safe and legal routes directly from regions of conflict and instability – around half of whom are children.

With worldwide displacement now standing at around 80 million people, we cannot help everyone. We will, however, continue to maintain clear, well-defined safe, and legal routes for people who need protection. Access to the UK’s asylum system should be based on need, not on the ability to pay people smugglers. Those already in a safe country should claim asylum there.

More information on safe and legal routes is available on GOV.UK

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what criteria were used in the Town Deals selection process in rejecting four of the eleven towns in the north east of England that had been recommended by officials to ministers.

Ministers considered a range of factors as part of the selection process for Town Deals, including income deprivation, productivity and exposure to economic shocks. We recognise that there are more towns in need than we were able to support through this first set of Town Deals and have committed to a further competitive element of the Towns Fund. More information will be provided in due course.