Theresa May Portrait

Theresa May

Conservative - Maidenhead

18,846 (33.4%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 1st May 1997


Theresa May is not a member of any APPGs
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service
13th Jul 2016 - 24th Jul 2019
Leader of the Conservative Party
11th Jul 2016 - 7th Jun 2019
Home Secretary
12th May 2010 - 13th Jul 2016
Minister for Women and Equalities
12th May 2010 - 15th Oct 2012
Shadow Minister (Women)
3rd Jul 2007 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
19th Jan 2009 - 6th May 2010
Modernisation of the House of Commons
16th Jan 2006 - 8th Apr 2010
Members Estimate Committee
10th Dec 2005 - 26th Jan 2009
House of Commons Commission
10th Dec 2005 - 26th Jan 2009
Members Estimate
10th Dec 2005 - 26th Jan 2009
Shadow Leader of the House of Commons
10th Dec 2005 - 19th Jan 2009
Shadow Secretary of State for the Family, Culture, Media and Sport
10th May 2005 - 10th Dec 2005
Shadow Secretary of State for the Family
14th Jun 2004 - 10th May 2005
Shadow Secretary of State for Environment and Transport
10th Nov 2003 - 14th Jun 2004
Party Chair, Conservative Party
23rd Jul 2002 - 6th Dec 2003
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
1st Jan 2002 - 31st Dec 2002
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions
1st Sep 2001 - 1st Jan 2002
Shadow Secretary of State for Education
15th Jun 1999 - 1st Sep 2001
Shadow Spokesperson (Women)
15th Jun 1999 - 1st Sep 2001
Shadow Spokesperson (Education)
1st Jul 1998 - 15th Jun 1999
Education Sub-committee
23rd Jul 1997 - 7th Dec 1998
Education & Employment
14th Jul 1997 - 7th Dec 1998


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Theresa May has voted in 537 divisions, and 4 times against the majority of their Party.

23 Jun 2020 - Independent Complaints and Grievance Scheme - View Vote Context
Theresa May voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 45 Conservative Aye votes vs 235 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 243 Noes - 238
30 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Theresa May voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 72 Conservative Aye votes vs 175 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 188
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Theresa May voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative No votes vs 281 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 285 Noes - 243
13 May 2024 - Risk-based Exclusion - View Vote Context
Theresa May voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 8 Conservative Aye votes vs 165 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 170 Noes - 169
View All Theresa May Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(28 debate interactions)
Robert Jenrick (Conservative)
(17 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(15 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(76 debate contributions)
Home Office
(46 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(15 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Illegal Migration Act 2023
(5,652 words contributed)
Domestic Abuse Bill 2019-21
(3,219 words contributed)
Social Housing (Regulation) Act 2023
(1,591 words contributed)
Nationality and Borders Act 2022
(1,376 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Theresa May's debates

Maidenhead Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Theresa May has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Theresa May

Theresa May has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Theresa May, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Theresa May has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Theresa May has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

16 Bills introduced by Theresa May

Introduced: 17th September 2015

A Bill To make provision about the law on immigration and asylum; to make provisionabout access to services, facilities, licences and work by reference to immigrationstatus; to make provision about the Director of Labour Market Enforcement; to makeprovision about language requirements for public sector workers; to make provisionabout fees for passports and civil registration; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 12th May 2016 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 10th June 2014

This Bill received Royal Assent on 26th March 2015 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 28th May 2015

This Bill received Royal Assent on 28th January 2016 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 5th June 2014

A Bill to Amend the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002, the Computer Misuse Act 1990, Part 4 of the Policing and Crime Act 2009, section 1 of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933, the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003, the Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation (Scotland) Act 2005 and the Terrorism Act 2006; to make provision about involvement in organised crime groups and about serious crime prevention orders; to make provision for the seizure and forfeiture of drug-cutting agents; to create an offence of communicating sexually with a child; to make it an offence to possess an item that contains advice or guidance about committing sexual offences against children; to create an offence in relation to controlling or coercive behaviour in intimate or family relationships; to make it an offence to possess a knife or offensive weapon inside a prison; to make provision for the prevention or restriction of the use of communication devices by persons detained in custodial institutions; to make provision approving for the purposes of section 8 of the European Union Act 2011 certain draft decisions under Article 352 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union relating to serious crime; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 3rd March 2015 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 10th October 2013

To make provision about immigration law; to limit, or otherwise make provision about, access to services, facilities and employment by reference to immigration status; to make provision about marriage and civil partnership involving certain foreign nationals; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 14th May 2014 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 9th May 2013

To make provision about anti-social behaviour, crime and disorder, including provision about recovery of possession of dwelling houses; to make provision amending the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, Schedules 7 and 8 to the Terrorism Act 2000 and the Extradition Act 2003; to make provision about firearms and about forced marriage; to make provision about the police, the Independent Police Complaints Commission and the Serious Fraud Office; to make provision about criminal justice and court fees; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 13th March 2014 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 10th May 2012

A Bill to establish, and make provision about, the National Crime Agency; to abolish the Serious Organised Crime Agency and the National Policing Improvement Agency; to make provision about the judiciary and the structure, administration, proceedings and powers of courts and tribunals; to make provision about border control; to make provision about drugs and driving; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 25th April 2013 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 11th February 2011

This Bill received Royal Assent on 1st May 2012 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 26th May 2010

This bill received Royal Assent on the 21 December 2010.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 21st December 2010 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 30th November 2010

This Bill received Royal Assent on 15th September 2011 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 26th November 2014

A Bill To make provision in relation to terrorism; to make provision about retention of communications data, about information, authority to carry and security in relation to air, sea and rail transport and about reviews by the Special Immigration Appeals Commission against refusals to issue certificates of naturalisation; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 12th February 2015 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 14th July 2014

To Make provision, in consequence of a declaration of invalidity made by the Court of Justice of the European Union in relation to Directive 2006/24/EC, about the retention of certain communications data; to amend the grounds for issuing interception warrants, or granting or giving certain authorisations or notices, under Part 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000; to make provision about the extra-territorial application of that Part and about the meaning of “telecommunications service” for the purposes of that Act; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 17th July 2014 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 22nd November 2012

Make provision about interviews held during certain investigations under Schedule 3 to the Police Reform Act 2002; and about the application of Part 2 of that Act to matters occurring before 1 April 2004.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 19th December 2012 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 23rd May 2011

This Bill received Royal Assent on 14th December 2011 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 5th July 2011

This Bill received Royal Assent on 12th July 2011 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to amend the Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988 to increase the maximum sentence for causing death by dangerous driving to life imprisonment; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 21st July 2020
(Read Debate)

Theresa May has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 5 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Government response to the Anthony Grainger public inquiry published on 19 May 2020, what role the College of Policing will play in implementing recommendation 1 of that inquiry.

The Anthony Grainger Inquiry identified important lessons to be learnt. The recommendations for policing and the effectiveness and safety of armed policing are welcome. Our sympathy is with Anthony Grainger’s family. My officials worked closely with NPCC and College of Policing, as well as Greater Manchester Police, following publication of the Anthony Grainger Inquiry Report last July. The National Armed Policing lead will hold the register of recommendations on behalf of National Police Chiefs Council. The College of Policing is represented on the organisational learning board, introduced by the NPCC lead for armed policing, which manages the national

register for all recommendations. This will ensure that the learning identified can be quickly reflected in the College’s authorised professional practice (APP) and national police firearms training curriculum (NPFTC). The implementation of the recommendation on Mobile Armed Support To Surveillance (MASTS) was complex and required a review of national armed policing policy and training. Hence it was considered right for NPCC to take the lead, with input from the College of Policing and Greater Manchester Police. The College of Policing has a team dedicated to armed policing which works very closely with the NPCC armed policing lead and other key stakeholders. The College is directly involved in progressing the recommendations that have specific implications for national guidance and training.

19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraph 28 of the Government response to the Anthony Grainger public inquiry published on 19 May 2020, what discussions (a) she and (b) the Policing Minister had with the (i) NPCC and (ii) College of Policing on the NPCC's decision to take responsibility for the implementation of recommendation 6 of that inquiry.

The Anthony Grainger Inquiry identified important lessons to be learnt. The recommendations for policing and the effectiveness and safety of armed policing are welcome. Our sympathy is with Anthony Grainger’s family. My officials worked closely with NPCC and College of Policing, as well as Greater Manchester Police, following publication of the Anthony Grainger Inquiry Report last July. The National Armed Policing lead will hold the register of recommendations on behalf of National Police Chiefs Council. The College of Policing is represented on the organisational learning board, introduced by the NPCC lead for armed policing, which manages the national

register for all recommendations. This will ensure that the learning identified can be quickly reflected in the College’s authorised professional practice (APP) and national police firearms training curriculum (NPFTC). The implementation of the recommendation on Mobile Armed Support To Surveillance (MASTS) was complex and required a review of national armed policing policy and training. Hence it was considered right for NPCC to take the lead, with input from the College of Policing and Greater Manchester Police. The College of Policing has a team dedicated to armed policing which works very closely with the NPCC armed policing lead and other key stakeholders. The College is directly involved in progressing the recommendations that have specific implications for national guidance and training.

19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Government response to the Anthony Grainger public inquiry published on 19 May 2020, what role the College of Policing will play in (a) implementing and (b) assessing lessons learnt from the implementation of the recommendations of that inquiry.

The Anthony Grainger Inquiry identified important lessons to be learnt. The recommendations for policing and the effectiveness and safety of armed policing are welcome. Our sympathy is with Anthony Grainger’s family. My officials worked closely with NPCC and College of Policing, as well as Greater Manchester Police, following publication of the Anthony Grainger Inquiry Report last July. The National Armed Policing lead will hold the register of recommendations on behalf of National Police Chiefs Council. The College of Policing is represented on the organisational learning board, introduced by the NPCC lead for armed policing, which manages the national

register for all recommendations. This will ensure that the learning identified can be quickly reflected in the College’s authorised professional practice (APP) and national police firearms training curriculum (NPFTC). The implementation of the recommendation on Mobile Armed Support To Surveillance (MASTS) was complex and required a review of national armed policing policy and training. Hence it was considered right for NPCC to take the lead, with input from the College of Policing and Greater Manchester Police. The College of Policing has a team dedicated to armed policing which works very closely with the NPCC armed policing lead and other key stakeholders. The College is directly involved in progressing the recommendations that have specific implications for national guidance and training.

19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Government response to the Anthony Grainger public inquiry published on 19 May 2020, which body will hold the register of recommendations on armed policing referred to in recommendation 1 of that inquiry.

The Anthony Grainger Inquiry identified important lessons to be learnt. The recommendations for policing and the effectiveness and safety of armed policing are welcome. Our sympathy is with Anthony Grainger’s family. My officials worked closely with NPCC and College of Policing, as well as Greater Manchester Police, following publication of the Anthony Grainger Inquiry Report last July. The National Armed Policing lead will hold the register of recommendations on behalf of National Police Chiefs Council. The College of Policing is represented on the organisational learning board, introduced by the NPCC lead for armed policing, which manages the national

register for all recommendations. This will ensure that the learning identified can be quickly reflected in the College’s authorised professional practice (APP) and national police firearms training curriculum (NPFTC). The implementation of the recommendation on Mobile Armed Support To Surveillance (MASTS) was complex and required a review of national armed policing policy and training. Hence it was considered right for NPCC to take the lead, with input from the College of Policing and Greater Manchester Police. The College of Policing has a team dedicated to armed policing which works very closely with the NPCC armed policing lead and other key stakeholders. The College is directly involved in progressing the recommendations that have specific implications for national guidance and training.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timeframe is for the publication of the report of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel.

The timeframe for the publication of the report of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel is a matter for the Panel and the Panel publishes information on its website: https://www.danielmorganpanel.independent.gov.uk/panels-remit/faq/