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Written Question
Naturalisation: Fees and Charges
20 Apr 2021

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to review the level of fees for applying for naturalisation as a British citizen.

Answered by Kevin Foster

The Home Office keeps fees for immigration and nationality applications under review and ensure they are within the parameters agreed with HM Treasury and Parliament, as set out in Section 68 (9) of the Immigration Act 2014 which can be viewed via the following link:

(http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2014/22/section/68).


Written Question
Naturalisation: Fees and Charges
20 Apr 2021

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much revenue her Department raised from fees for applications for naturalisation as a British citizen in 2019.

Answered by Kevin Foster

The Home Office does not hold the information in the format requested. We do not have a separate code or field for fees collected for naturalisation as British Citizens.

Immigration statistic, with volumes of applicants, are available at

Immigration statistics data tables, year ending December 2020 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Total visa and immigration income data is published annually in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts. See page 152 of the Home Office 2019-20 Annual Report and Accounts for the most recent disclosure of visa and immigration income.

Home Office annual report and accounts 2019 - 2020 (publishing.service.gov.uk)


Written Question
Visas: Coronavirus
9 Nov 2020

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

What assessment she has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the application process for visa extensions.

Answered by Kevin Foster

The global travel and health restrictions in the first lockdown impacted our application processes, especially the temporary closure of our biometric collection centres in the UK.

Subsequently, biometric capture services reopened in a phased and socially-distanced way and alongside this UKVI began reusing existing fingerprint biometrics for individuals where possible.


Written Question
Passports
1 Sep 2020

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to increase the number of passport applications that are processed in a timely manner.

Answered by Kevin Foster

Her Majesty’s Passport Office is increasing capacity for processing passport applications, while continuing to operate in line with public health advice and social distancing guidelines.

This includes the development of a new system which substantially increases the ability to process applications from home and occupying additional government office space to increase the number able to come into work.


Written Question
Passports
1 Sep 2020

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the performance of the Passport Office in processing passport renewals.; and if she will make a statement.

Answered by Kevin Foster

Her Majesty’s Passport Office has continued to operate throughout the coronavirus pandemic, however it had to scale back its work as a result of changed working practices designed to keep both customers and staff safe.

During this difficult time HM Passport Office has prioritised urgent and compassionate cases and is now working hard to get back to full capacity as soon as it is able to do so in line with public health guidance.


Written Question
Immigration Controls: Skilled Workers
16 Oct 2018

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for the publication of the review of the use of paragraph 322(5) of the Immigration Rules to refuse applications for leave to remain from highly skilled migrants.

Answered by Caroline Nokes

Officials have concluded the review and are now in the final stages of drafting the final report, which will be submitted shortly.


Written Question
Home Office: Standards
31 Oct 2017

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to (a) reduce the time taken for decisions to be made by her Department and (b) improve her Department's performance against its service standards.

Answered by Brandon Lewis

The Home Office regularly publishes performance data as part of the quarterly Home Office Transparency release, including elements such as performance against service standards and applicant satisfaction.

The Home Office regularly reviews its capacity plans and resources and redeploys staff where necessary to help meet and maintain service standards for individual services or routes, for example by bringing in extra staff to meet the recent increase in demand for our services from European citizens.

The Home Office has well developed transformation plans which will improve productivity and performance and further improve the quality and timeliness of services we provide for our customers


Written Question
Visas
1 Feb 2017

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for standard visitor visas her Department received in each year from 2006 to 2016; and how many such applications were (a) successful and (b) unsuccessful.

Answered by Robert Goodwill

Information on the number of all visit visa applications, grants, refusals, withdrawals and lapsed cases is published quarterly; latest data in the Home Office’s ‘Immigration Statistics, July – September 2016’, table vi_01_q (visa data tables volume 1), available at www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-july-to-september-2016/list-of-tables#visas


Written Question
Unmanned Air Vehicles
25 Apr 2016

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department plans to allocate additional resources to police forces to combat the risks posed by drones to aircraft.

Answered by Mike Penning

Overall police spending will be protected in real terms over the Spending Review period, when the locally funded police precept element of council tax is taken into account. This is an increase of up to £900 million in cash terms by 2019/20. Overall, the public should be in no doubt that the police will have the resources they need to respond to new threats rapidly and effectively to keep people safe.

Decisions on the how the funding is allocated to priorities within forces are for individual Chief Officers and Police and Crime Commissioners.


Written Question
Migrant Workers
1 Feb 2016

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will take steps to ensure that Intra Company Transfer Tier 2 visas cannot be used to replace a UK worker who has been made redundant.

Answered by James Brokenshire

Tier 2, the skilled worker route, is designed to fill roles which cannot be filled by a suitable resident worker. The immigration rules, and UK employment law, do not allow workers to be made redundant and directly replaced.

It is a decision for businesses whether to outsource certain functions. We are, however, mindful of concerns that use of the Intra-Company Transfer (ICT) category for third party contracting may undercut or displace resident workers.

That is why, in June last year, we commissioned the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) to examine the ICT category as part of its wider review on Tier 2. The MAC published its report on 19 January and it can be found on the gov.uk website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/migration-advisory-committee-mac-review-tier-2-migration

Chapter 6 of the report sets out the MAC’s findings on the ICT category, including its use for third party contracting, the salaries paid to IT workers and the impacts on the resident labour market. The MAC found that salaries for these transferees were clustered around the 25th percentile of earnings for resident workers in IT occupations (the current minimum permitted under the immigration rules).

The Government is currently considering the MAC’s findings carefully and will announce any changes in due course.


Written Question
Migrant Workers
1 Feb 2016

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect Tier 2 migration is having on the (a) pay and (b) terms and conditions of UK employees.

Answered by James Brokenshire

Tier 2, the skilled worker route, is designed to fill roles which cannot be filled by a suitable resident worker. The immigration rules, and UK employment law, do not allow workers to be made redundant and directly replaced.

It is a decision for businesses whether to outsource certain functions. We are, however, mindful of concerns that use of the Intra-Company Transfer (ICT) category for third party contracting may undercut or displace resident workers.

That is why, in June last year, we commissioned the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) to examine the ICT category as part of its wider review on Tier 2. The MAC published its report on 19 January and it can be found on the gov.uk website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/migration-advisory-committee-mac-review-tier-2-migration

Chapter 6 of the report sets out the MAC’s findings on the ICT category, including its use for third party contracting, the salaries paid to IT workers and the impacts on the resident labour market. The MAC found that salaries for these transferees were clustered around the 25th percentile of earnings for resident workers in IT occupations (the current minimum permitted under the immigration rules).

The Government is currently considering the MAC’s findings carefully and will announce any changes in due course.


Written Question
Migrant Workers: ICT
1 Feb 2016

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on what the average salary of a Tier 2 worker on an Intra Company Transfer visa is in the IT industry; and how this compares to the industry average.

Answered by James Brokenshire

Tier 2, the skilled worker route, is designed to fill roles which cannot be filled by a suitable resident worker. The immigration rules, and UK employment law, do not allow workers to be made redundant and directly replaced.

It is a decision for businesses whether to outsource certain functions. We are, however, mindful of concerns that use of the Intra-Company Transfer (ICT) category for third party contracting may undercut or displace resident workers.

That is why, in June last year, we commissioned the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) to examine the ICT category as part of its wider review on Tier 2. The MAC published its report on 19 January and it can be found on the gov.uk website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/migration-advisory-committee-mac-review-tier-2-migration

Chapter 6 of the report sets out the MAC’s findings on the ICT category, including its use for third party contracting, the salaries paid to IT workers and the impacts on the resident labour market. The MAC found that salaries for these transferees were clustered around the 25th percentile of earnings for resident workers in IT occupations (the current minimum permitted under the immigration rules).

The Government is currently considering the MAC’s findings carefully and will announce any changes in due course.


Written Question
Migrant Workers: ICT
1 Feb 2016

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential for Tier 2 Intra Company Transfer visas to be used to replace UK workers with outsourced overseas workers in the IT industry.

Answered by James Brokenshire

Tier 2, the skilled worker route, is designed to fill roles which cannot be filled by a suitable resident worker. The immigration rules, and UK employment law, do not allow workers to be made redundant and directly replaced.

It is a decision for businesses whether to outsource certain functions. We are, however, mindful of concerns that use of the Intra-Company Transfer (ICT) category for third party contracting may undercut or displace resident workers.

That is why, in June last year, we commissioned the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) to examine the ICT category as part of its wider review on Tier 2. The MAC published its report on 19 January and it can be found on the gov.uk website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/migration-advisory-committee-mac-review-tier-2-migration

Chapter 6 of the report sets out the MAC’s findings on the ICT category, including its use for third party contracting, the salaries paid to IT workers and the impacts on the resident labour market. The MAC found that salaries for these transferees were clustered around the 25th percentile of earnings for resident workers in IT occupations (the current minimum permitted under the immigration rules).

The Government is currently considering the MAC’s findings carefully and will announce any changes in due course.


Written Question
Worker Registration Scheme
27 Jan 2016

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to ensure that registration on the Worker Registration Scheme between 2009 and 2011 has no bearing on any subsequent application to naturalise as a British citizen.

Answered by James Brokenshire

The requirements for naturalisation are set out in the British Nationality Act 1981. There is no power in law to naturalise a person who does not meet the statutory requirements.

There are no specific provisions in place for those who were required to register on the Worker Registration Scheme between 2009 and 2011 but failed to do so.


Written Question
Refugees: Syria
26 Jan 2016

Questioner: Ruth Cadbury (LAB - Brentford and Isleworth)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that refugees admitted to the UK from Syria are provided with the necessary support to enable them to integrate into British society.

Answered by Richard Harrington

The Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement scheme is based on need and prioritises those who cannot be supported effectively in the region. Local authorities are expected to provide refugees that they resettle with a 12 month support package which is tailored according to their individual needs. As well as accommodation and addressing any medical and social care needs, this also includes cultural integration and English language tuition. This is funded using the overseas aid budget as it is giving support to refugees that would otherwise be provided overseas.

At the Spending Review, the Government committed £129 million to assist with local authority costs over years 2-5 of the scheme. This will be allocated on a tariff basis over four years, tapering from £5,000 per person in their second year in the UK, to £1,000 per person in year five. There will also be a special cases fund to assist the most vulnerable refugees. This is a substantial level of funding which will enable local authorities to support these vulnerable people as they rebuild their lives in safe and secure surroundings, among supportive communities in the UK.

We are working with offers of support from community groups and inidividuals to see how we can best take them up to further help people settle and integrate, and, where possible, find employment in the UK.