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Written Question
Motor Vehicles: Insurance
Thursday 25th January 2024

Asked by: Nadia Whittome (Labour - Nottingham East)

Question to the HM Treasury:

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a price cap on insurance premiums for elderly drivers.

Answered by Bim Afolami - Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)

Insurers make commercial decisions about the pricing of insurance based on their assessment of the likelihood and expected cost of a claim. The Government does not intervene in these commercial decisions by insurers as this could damage competition in the market.

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) is the independent regulator and responsible for supervising the insurance industry. The FCA have introduced several reforms, including the Consumer Duty rules, to ensure consumers are treated fairly in regard to pricing.

In 2012, the Government agreed the Age Agreement with the insurance sector. This signposts older consumers struggling to access motor insurance to specialist providers.


Written Question
Poverty: Government Assistance
Tuesday 9th January 2024

Asked by: Nadia Whittome (Labour - Nottingham East)

Question to the HM Treasury:

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will provide immediate additional funding to support people who are unable to pay for (a) energy, (b) food and (c) other essential items.

Answered by Nigel Huddleston - Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)

The Government recognises the challenges facing households due to elevated costs of living, so has taken further action at Autumn Statement 2023 to support vulnerable households. From 1 April 2024, the National Living Wage will increase by 9.8% for 2.7 million low paid workers. Local Housing Allowance rates will rise to the 30th percentile of local market rents in April 2024 for 1.6 million households. The Government will also uprate all working age benefits in full by September 2023 CPI of 6.7%, benefitting 5.5 million households in 2024-25.

This brings the total support over 2022-2025 to help households with the high cost of living to £104 billion – an average of £3,700 per UK household.


Written Question
Music Venues: Business Rates
Tuesday 24th October 2023

Asked by: Nadia Whittome (Labour - Nottingham East)

Question to the HM Treasury:

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to extend business rates relief to grassroots music venues.

Answered by Victoria Atkins - Secretary of State for Health and Social Care

At Autumn Statement 2022, an extended Retail, Hospitality and Leisure (RHL) relief worth £2.1 billion was announced for 2023-24. The relief provides a 75% discount for eligible RHL properties, including music venues, up to a cash-cap of £110,000 per business.

Grassroots music venues will also have benefitted from the decision to freeze the multiplier for a further year. This was a tax cut worth £9.3 billion to businesses over the next five years, and means all bills are 6% lower, before any reliefs or supplements are applied, than without the freeze.


Written Question
Cash Dispensing: Nottingham East
Monday 5th June 2023

Asked by: Nadia Whittome (Labour - Nottingham East)

Question to the HM Treasury:

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the availability of cash withdrawal facilities throughout the Nottingham East constituency.

Answered by Andrew Griffith - Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)

The government recognises that while the transition towards digital payments brings many opportunities, cash continues to be used by many people across the UK, including those who may be in vulnerable groups.

The government is currently legislating to protect access to cash across the UK as part of the Financial Services and Markets Bill 2022. The Bill establishes the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) as the lead regulator for access to cash with responsibility and powers to seek to ensure reasonable provision of withdrawal and deposit facilities. In recognition of the important role of cash for individuals, the government has tabled an amendment to the Bill that will require the FCA to seek to ensure that there is reasonable provision of free withdrawal and deposit facilities for holders of personal accounts.

The ATM network also plays a critical role in the availability of cash withdrawal facilities. LINK (the scheme that runs the UK's largest ATM network) has made commitments to protect the broad geographic spread of free-to-use ATMs and is held to account against these commitments by the Payment Systems Regulator. According to LINK data for March 2023, there were around 39,000 free-to-use ATMs across the UK, including 53 free-to-use ATMs in the constituency of Nottingham East. Further information is available at: https://www.link.co.uk/initiatives/financial-inclusion-monthly-report/


Written Question
Catering: Public Sector
Wednesday 1st February 2023

Asked by: Nadia Whittome (Labour - Nottingham East)

Question to the HM Treasury:

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department is taking steps to support public sector catering suppliers who are fulfilling their public sector contracts but servicing at a loss as a result of food inflation.

Answered by John Glen - Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office

Government departments manage their relationships with third-party suppliers in line the Sourcing Playbook, which sets out the core principles to successful outsourcing; achieving value for money and successful service delivery. Decisions on outsourcing are made according to Treasury guidance and the Sourcing Playbook, which focuses on setting our projects up for success, right from the start. The Government’s Contract Management Principles make clear that there should be flexible approaches to dealing with change through joint working with suppliers and that costs should be controlled with strong change control mechanisms.

As the Prime Minister has set out, one of the five immediate priorities for the government is to halve inflation this year to ease the cost of living and give people financial security.


Written Question
Child Benefit
Wednesday 16th March 2022

Asked by: Nadia Whittome (Labour - Nottingham East)

Question to the HM Treasury:

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans his Department has to ensure the equity of the High Income Child Benefit charge for single income households in the context of the application of that charge to households with two incomes below the threshold.

Answered by Lucy Frazer - Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport

The Government introduced the High Income Child Benefit Charge (HICBC) from January 2013 to ensure that support for families is targeted at those who need it most. The tax charge applies to anyone with an individual income over £50,000 who claims Child Benefit, or whose partner claims it, regardless of family make-up.

HICBC is calculated on an individual rather than a household basis, in line with other income tax policy. Basing HICBC on household incomes would mean finding out the incomes of everyone in each of the 7.8 million households currently registered for Child Benefit. This would effectively introduce a new means test, which would be costly to administer and create burdens on the majority of families who receive Child Benefit.

The Government has no current plans to review HICBC but, as with all elements of tax policy, keeps this under review as part of the annual Budget process.


Written Question
Social Services: Finance
Monday 31st January 2022

Asked by: Nadia Whittome (Labour - Nottingham East)

Question to the HM Treasury:

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a ring-fenced fund to support the provision of local authority social care.

Answered by Simon Clarke

The Spending Review provides local authorities with an additional £1.6 billion of grant funding in each of the next three years. The provisional Local Government Finance Settlement for 2022/23 confirmed that local authorities will have access to over £1 billion of additional resources next year specifically for social care. Ultimately, it is for local authorities to manage their budgets within the funding available and prioritise spending based on their own understanding of the needs of their local communities.


Written Question
Equitable Life Assurance Society: Compensation
Monday 13th December 2021

Asked by: Nadia Whittome (Labour - Nottingham East)

Question to the HM Treasury:

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that compensation is provided to Equitable Life Assurance Society policy holders.

Answered by John Glen - Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office

I refer the Honourable Member for Nottingham East to the answer I gave on the 19 April 2021. UIN: 179543


Written Question
Students: Housing
Tuesday 20th April 2021

Asked by: Nadia Whittome (Labour - Nottingham East)

Question to the HM Treasury:

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether student accommodation providers have been eligible for covid-19 business support and assistance during the outbreak.

Answered by Kemi Badenoch - President of the Board of Trade

The Government recognises that businesses up and down the UK are feeling the impact of this crisis. That is why the Government has put in place an economic package of support measures which are carefully designed to complement each other to ensure we provide businesses with certainty, even as measures to prevent further spread of the virus change.

UK businesses – including student accommodation providers where eligible – have benefitted from a range of these measures, including the generous Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and billions in government-backed loans.

In response to the current restrictions, and the Prime Minister’s roadmap to easing public health measures, the Chancellor announced further support at the recent Budget to businesses on top of our previous economic responses. This includes the extension of the CJRS until the end of September 2021, which provides a substantial grant for employers to cover 80% of the wages of their employees, and the new Recovery Loan Scheme (80% Government-guaranteed loans between £25,000 and £10 million), which opened on 6 April and will run until the end of the year.

We recognise that universities also rent accommodation to their students and are feeling the impact of this crisis. We have established the Higher Education (HE) Restructuring Regime, which may be deployed as a last resort, if a decision has been made to support a HE provider in England facing severe financial difficulties related to COVID-19. This is for when other steps to preserve its viability and mitigate the risks of financial failure have not proved sufficient. HE providers can also access the CJRS if they meet the published criteria.

As measures to control the virus change, it is right that Government support should also evolve. Because of this, we will continue to take a flexible but cautious approach as we review restrictions, ensuring support reflects the easing of restrictions to enable the private sector to bounce back as quickly as possible.


Written Question
Education: Finance
Tuesday 20th April 2021

Asked by: Nadia Whittome (Labour - Nottingham East)

Question to the HM Treasury:

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will confirm that the amount of funding allocated to education in 2022-23 will be at least that allocated in 2021-22.

Answered by Steve Barclay - Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Discussions on spending allocations for 2022-23 between the Treasury and other governmental departments, including the Department for Education, are ongoing. These will be decided at the Spending Review later this year. More details will be set out in due course.

The core schools budget for 2022-23 has already been agreed as part of the 3-year schools settlement announced at Spending Round 19. This represents a £7.1 billion increase in school funding compared to 2019-20 budgets.