Chris Grayling Portrait

Chris Grayling

Conservative - Epsom and Ewell

2 APPG memberships (as of 2 Jun 2021)
Formula One, International Conservation
Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament
13th Jul 2020 - 16th Sep 2020
Secretary of State for Transport
14th Jul 2016 - 24th Jul 2019
Palace of Westminster (Joint Committee)
16th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
8th May 2015 - 14th Jul 2016
Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority
18th May 2015 - 14th Jul 2016
Public Accounts Commission
8th May 2015 - 14th Jul 2016
House of Commons Commission
8th May 2015 - 14th Jul 2016
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
6th Sep 2012 - 8th May 2015
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th May 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)
19th Jan 2009 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
3rd Jul 2007 - 19th Jan 2009
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
8th Dec 2005 - 3rd Jul 2007
Modernisation of the House of Commons
15th Jul 2005 - 16th Jan 2006
Shadow Leader of the House of Commons
10th May 2005 - 8th Dec 2005
Shadow Minister (Education)
10th May 2003 - 10th May 2005
Shadow Minister (Health)
10th May 2002 - 10th May 2003
Opposition Whip (Commons)
10th Jul 2002 - 20th Dec 2002
Transport Committee
22nd Jul 2002 - 2nd Dec 2002
Transport, Local Government & The Regions
16th Jul 2001 - 22nd Jul 2002
Transport Sub-committee
16th Jul 2001 - 22nd Jul 2002
Urban Affairs Sub-Committee
16th Jul 2001 - 22nd Jul 2002


Scheduled Event
Wednesday 23rd June 2021
14:30
Westminster Hall debate - Westminster Hall
23 Jun 2021, 2:30 p.m.
Deforestation in the Amazon
View calendar
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Information Commissioner (Remuneration)
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 359 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 2
Speeches
Tuesday 22nd June 2021
Oral Answers to Questions

My hon. Friend knows of my concern about the protectionist attitude towards financial services that the European Union has shown …

Written Answers
Tuesday 22nd June 2021
Platinum Jubilee 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to issue guidance or other …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Tuesday 3rd November 2020
Food Labelling (Environmental Sustainability) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to require food manufacturers to label products to indicate the environmental sustainability of their origins; and for connected …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 14th September 2020
1. Employment and earnings
From 1 September 2020 to 31 August 2021, Strategic Adviser to Hutchison Ports Europe, of 5, Hester Road, London SW11 …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Chris Grayling has voted in 271 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

27 Apr 2021 - Delegated Legislation - View Vote Context
Chris Grayling voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Conservative No votes vs 222 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 89
View All Chris Grayling Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
(30 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(8 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(18 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(12 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(10 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Chris Grayling's debates

Epsom and Ewell Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Epsom and Ewell signature proportion
Petitions with most Epsom and Ewell signatures
Chris Grayling has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Chris Grayling

Chris Grayling has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Chris Grayling, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Chris Grayling has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Chris Grayling has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

19 Bills introduced by Chris Grayling

Introduced: 7th February 2018

A Bill to make provision about the international transport of goods by road; to make provision about the registration of trailers; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 19th July 2018 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 27th June 2017

A Bill to make provision about space activities and suborbital activities; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 15th March 2018 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 19th May 2016

A Bill to make provision about bus services; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 27th April 2017 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 24th February 2014

To make provision about how offenders are dealt with before and after conviction; to amend the offence of possession of extreme pornographic images; to make provision about the proceedings and powers of courts and tribunals; to make provision about judicial review; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 12th February 2015 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 24th February 2014

To make provision about how offenders are dealt with before and after conviction; to amend the offence of possession of extreme pornographic images; to make provision about the proceedings and powers of courts and tribunals; to make provision about judicial review; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 12th February 2015 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 9th May 2013

A Bill to make provision about the release, and supervision after release, of offenders, to make provision about the extension period for extended sentence prisoners, to make provision about community orders and suspended sentence orders, and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 13th March 2014 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 18th October 2017

A Bill to make provision about automated vehicles and electric vehicles.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 19th July 2018 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 19th December 2017

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 10th May 2018 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 22nd June 2017

To amend sections 71, 71A and 84 of the Civil Aviation Act 1982, and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 16th November 2017 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 12th June 2014

A Bill to make provision as to matters to which a court must have regard in determining a claim in negligence or breach of statutory duty.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 12th February 2015 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 30th July 2013

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 14th May 2014 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 26th November 2012

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 28th February 2013 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 10th October 2012

A Bill to promote the reform of the statute law by the repeal, in accordance with recommendations of the Law Commission and the Scottish Law Commission, of certain enactments which (except in so far as their effect is preserved) are no longer of practical utility.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 31st January 2013 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 25th April 2012

A Bill to amend the law relating to capital and income in trusts.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 31st January 2013 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 25th April 2012

A Bill to amend the law relating to capital and income in trusts.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 31st January 2013 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 17th July 2017

A Bill to make provision for a railway between a junction with Phase One of High Speed 2, near Fradley Wood in Staffordshire, and a junction with the West Coast Main Line near Crewe in Cheshire; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - Carry-Over Motion: House Of Lords
Monday 9th September 2019
(Read Debate)
Next Event - Committee Stage: House Of Lords
Date TBA
Introduced: 17th July 2017

A Bill to make provision for a railway between a junction with Phase One of High Speed 2, near Fradley Wood in Staffordshire, and a junction with the West Coast Main Line near Crewe in Cheshire; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - Bill Reintroduced: House Of Commons
Tuesday 3rd March 2020
(Read Debate)
Next Event - Committee Stage: House Of Lords
Date TBA
Introduced: 22nd February 2017

A Bill to make provision about automated vehicles, electric vehicles, vehicle testing and civil aviation; to create an offence of shining or directing a laser at a vehicle; and to make provision about fees for courses offered as an alternative to prosecution for road traffic offences.


Last Event - Committee Debate: 7th Sititing: House Of Commons
Thursday 23rd March 2017
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require food manufacturers to label products to indicate the environmental sustainability of their origins; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Tuesday 3rd November 2020
(Read Debate)

Chris Grayling has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


66 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
18th May 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, when he plans to publish the report of the Taskforce on Innovation, Growth, and Regulatory Reform.

The Government will publish the report and set out its response in due course.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the proportion of deaths recorded as covid-19 deaths which had a different, primary cause of death in each of the past six months.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether it is his policy to finance participation in Horizon Europe from the existing budgets for the UK Research and Innovation Fund.

I am pleased that the UK reached an agreement to take part in the Horizon Europe programme. Association to Horizon has been welcomed by businesses and the research community and will bring huge benefits to the UK.

The Government will be making available an additional £250m in 2021/22 for Horizon association. Also, £400m of funding announced at SR20 to support government priorities has been made available to help pay for our association to Horizon Europe. As a result, UK scientists will have access to more public funding than ever before.

This takes total Government investment in R&D to £14.9 billion in 2021/22 and follows four years of significant growth in R&D funding, including a boost of more than £1.5 billion in 2020/21. It will mean UK Government R&D spending is now at its highest level in four decades.

Amanda Solloway
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what obligation energy providers have to offer a service to business customers.

Unlike for domestic customers, energy suppliers are not obligated by their supply licence to offer a service to business customers. Contractual terms offered to businesses are a commercial matter for energy suppliers. An offer of a supply contract could depend upon a number of factors, such as the type of business, estimated amount and volatility of consumption, the customer’s credit score and length of contract required. We would encourage businesses to shop around to find the best deal.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will change covid-19 guidance to allow amateur choirs to rehearse together.

Non-professional groups of up to six people can now sing indoors, and can perform or rehearse in groups of up to 30 outdoors. In addition, multiple groups of 30 can now sing outdoors, provided the groups are kept separate throughout the activity. This is an important step forward in the return of non-professional performing arts activity from Step 2.

It is important that we take a cautious approach in easing restrictions. We will continue to keep guidance and restrictions under review, in line with the changing situation. Further detail on step 4 will be set out as soon as possible.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure that Parkrun can resume following the easing of covid-19 social distancing restrictions.

Government has prioritised the safe return of sport including team sports, contact combat sports and organised sports participation events. Organised outdoor sport, such as Parkrun, is exempt from legal gathering limits and can take place with any number of participants, as long as undertaken in line with published COVID-secure guidance. As such, Parkrun has been able to take place since 29 March as part of Step 1 of the government’s response to the Covid-19 Roadmap.

I met with ParkRun on 21 April to discuss their concerns regarding their return and my officials have engaged extensively on this issue over the past year . In addition, I have also issued a letter of support to ParkRun which they have sent on to landowners, clearly acknowledging that these events can take place. I have also raised my support in the House and through social media.

I am committed to supporting them to return as soon as possible. and I appeal to local authorities and landowners to work constructively with park run organisers on the safe return of park runs.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to commence applications for grants under the Youth Investment Fund.

Government recognises the significant impact of Covid-19 on young people, particularly the most vulnerable, and on the youth services that support them. A £16.5m Youth Covid-19 Support Fund has been announced which will protect the immediate future of grassroots and national youth organisations across the country.

This funding will be allocated from the Government’s unprecedented £750 million package of support which is benefiting tens of thousands of frontline charities, so they can continue their vital work. More than £60 million of this package has already been provided to organisations working with vulnerable children and young people.

The Youth Investment Fund remains a manifesto commitment for transformative levelling up across the country over the course of the parliament. In the recently announced Spending Review, £30m of this was committed as capital investment for 2021-22. This will provide a transformational investment in new and refurbished safe spaces for young people, so they can access support youth workers, and positive activities out of school, including sport and culture. Further details of the timetable for allocation will be announced in due course.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what his policy is on requiring farmers to protect land for wildlife at the edge of fields under cultivation.

Wildlife not only plays an important role in the health and abundance of our nation's natural resources but also assumes a crucial role in England's agricultural success. Defra has ensured that we have a policy package that includes both legal protections and funding enhancements. This dual approach supports the Government's deep commitment to the environment, reflected in the goals we have set through the 25 Year Environment Plan. Defra will support farmers in turning over fields to meadows rich in herbs and wildflowers, planting more trees, restoring habitats for endangered species, recovering soil fertility and attracting our wildlife back.

Following our exit from the EU, farmers and land managers continue to be required to comply with domestic legislation, including compliance with regulations that cover water courses, hedgerows, buffer strips for fertiliser and manure application. Farmers and land managers must comply with these regulations even after rules that relate to CAP payments cease to have effect.

Legal protection for hedgerows is provided by the Hedgerows Regulations 1997. These regulations prohibit the removal of most, or parts of, countryside hedgerows without first seeking approval from the local planning authority. We also currently have regulations which protect water courses under the Farming Rules for Water.

Regarding funding, the Countryside Stewardship scheme offers farmers funding for creating buffer strips on cultivated land. These grassy buffer strips not only create new habitat and prevent pollutants (such as pesticides and sediment) from entering aquatic systems, they also provide wildlife with much needed corridors to link existing habitat areas and aid dispersal.

Signing a Countryside Stewardship agreement over the next 2-3 years gives farmers and land managers a viable, long-term source of income for providing environmental benefits. Those who sign up to new Countryside Stewardship agreements will also be well-placed in the future to participate in our new Environmental Land Management (ELM) scheme, subject to successfully applying.

Additionally, under the ELM scheme, due to launch in 2024 as the cornerstone of our new agricultural policy, farmers and other land managers may enter into agreements to be paid for delivering public goods, including thriving plants and wildlife.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the total area of farmland is in (a) England and (b) the UK; and what estimate he has made of the proportion of that land that is put to agricultural use.

The total agricultural area in 2019 was 9,604,512 hectares in England and 18,848,943 hectares in the UK.

The utilised agricultural area accounts for 94% (9,059,462 hectares) of the total agricultural area in England and 93% (17,531,535 hectares) in the UK.

The utilised agricultural area includes all arable and horticultural crops, uncropped arable land, common rough grazing, temporary and permanent grassland and land used for outdoor pigs. It excludes woodland and other non-agricultural land (such as tracks, ponds and yards).

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the total area of undeveloped land in the UK available for agricultural, forestry, moorland or other countryside use.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only. The total area in England of non-developed land (agricultural, forest and open land only), which may be available for conversion to agricultural, forestry, moorland or other countryside uses, is 10,910,678 hectares (based on 2018 MHCLG Land Use data, the latest available). A proportion of this land will already comprise species rich or protected habitats or high grades of agricultural land so may not be suitable for conversion to other uses.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will limit the size of trawlers allowed to operate in marine protected areas.

Marine protection is a devolved matter and the information provided relates to England only.

The impact a fishing vessel has on a Marine Protected Area is determined by how damaging the fishing method is, rather than the size of the vessel. 'Supertrawlers' generally target pelagic species of fish within the water column and are unlikely to damage the seabed habitats, such as reef and sediment habitats, for which most Marine Protected Areas are designated.

A new power proposed in the Fisheries Bill will allow the Marine Management Organisation to protect offshore Marine Protected Areas from damaging fishing activity. We are prioritising those Marine Protected Areas most at risk and aim to make rapid progress as soon as the transition period ends.

Our Fisheries Bill prohibits any commercial fishing vessel from fishing in UK waters without a licence. It also provides powers to attach conditions (such as the areas that can be fished, species that can be caught and the type of fishing gear that can be used) to fishing vessel licences. Foreign vessels operating in UK waters will have to follow UK rules, including the conditions that are attached to their commercial fishing licence.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to increase funding support for anti-poaching projects in Africa during the covid-19 pandemic.

Between 2014 and 2024 the Government is investing over £66 million to crack down on the illegal trade of animals and plants, including activities to train rangers in Africa to help communities protect their wildlife from poaching.

We remain fully committed to protecting biodiversity and preventing the loss of species, which is why we are looking carefully at how we can contribute to the international response to the Covid-19 pandemic. This includes through our well respected Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund which has committed over £26 million to 85 projects since it was launched in 2014. The latest round opened for applications on 22 May 2020 and is available to support projects that respond to the emerging impacts of Covid-19 on the illegal trade in wildlife.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of trends in the number of trees growing in England in each of the last three decades.

The Forestry Commission produces statistics annually on woodland area in England but not by tree numbers. These are Official Statistics produced to meet the standards of the Code of Practice for Statistics. Woodland area statistics can be found on the Forest Research web site together with background information at https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/tools-and-resources/statistics/forestry-statistics/

The below figures are reported in Forestry Statistics and use data from the National Forest Inventory:

Year at 31 March | Thousand Hectares

1989

1,201

1994

1,224

1999

1,246

2004

1,272

2009

1,288

2014

1,302

2019

1,308

Source: Forestry Statistics 2019

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to the Answer of 12 March 2020 on Developing Countries: Forests, how much funding her Department allocated to each of those international forestry projects.

The total budgets allocated to the international forestry projects listed in the Answer of 12 March 2020 are provided in the table below.

Project

Duration of funding

Total budget allocated

Nepal Multi-Stakeholder Forestry Programme

2011-2016

£16,124,703

Forest Governance, Markets and Climate (Global)

2011-2023

£280,000,000

Investments in Forests and Sustainable Land Use (Global)

2015-2023

£ 102,596,352

International Forestry Knowledge programme (Global)

2012-2017

£36,987,765

Forestry, Land-use and Governance in Indonesia

2015-2020

£32,549,986

Improving Livelihoods and Land Use in Congo Basin Forests

2015-2020

£15,260,720

Green Economic Growth for West Papua (Indonesia)

2016-2022

£11,512,311

Supporting a Sustainable Future for West Papua’s Forests (Indonesia)

2018-2020

£6,200,000

Total

£501,231,837

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to the Answer of 16 January 2020 to Question 1890 on Developing Countries: Environment Protection, if she will list the international forestry projects that have received grants from her Department in each year since 2016.

The international forestry projects receiving funding since 2016 are as follows:

  • Nepal Multi-Stakeholder Forestry Programme
  • Forest Governance, Markets and Climate (global programme with governance and timber legality focus)
  • Investments in Forests and Sustainable Land Use (global programme with supply chains focus)
  • International Forestry Knowledge programme (KnowFor)
  • Forestry, Land-use and Governance in Indonesia
  • Improving Livelihoods and Land Use in Congo Basin Forests
  • Green Economic Growth for West Papua (Indonesia)
  • Supporting a Sustainable Future for West Papua’s Forests (Indonesia)

In addition, DFID supports forestry projects through its grant contributions to two multilateral funds, the Global Environment Facility and Green Climate Fund.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
29th Jan 2020
What recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of funding provided by his Department for environmental projects in the developing world.

Tackling climate change and environmental degradation are key priorities for DFID and this Government. At UNCAS in September, the PM announced a new £220m International Biodiversity Fund and that the UK will double our international climate finance to £11.6bn between 2021-2025, helping developing countries to take action in these areas.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
10th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what (a) grants and (b) other funding his Department has allocated to international re-greening projects in each of the last three years.

DFID supports activities related to re-greening in various areas. This includes forestry, where DFID contributes to the UK’s efforts to protect biodiversity, reduce carbon emissions and support the livelihoods of communities reliant on forests and agriculture. Between 2016-2019, DFID provided grants totalling £211 million (bi-lateral and multi-lateral) for international forestry projects.

The UK is also doubling its International Climate Finance to at least £11.6 billion over the period 2021-2025 to help developing countries take action on climate change. This will include a major uplift to support nature-based solutions to climate change.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to instruct South Western Railway to reinstate pre-covid-19 outbreak levels of service between Epsom to London Waterloo.

South Western Railway (SWR) has provided an increase in peak service between Epsom and London Waterloo from Monday 17 May, this represents an increase on previous service provision. SWR is currently running at 85% of pre-COVID levels, a 13% increase on the pre-17th May Timetable. Service levels will continue to be reviewed regularly to ensure the capacity provided continues to meet the demand.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will allow ground handlers eligible for support under the Airport and Ground Operations Support scheme to use the grant for fixed costs as well as business rates relief; and if he will make a statement.

The Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme (AGOSS) opened for applications on 29 January to provide support for eligible commercial airports and ground handlers in England. It will provide support up to the equivalent of their business rates liabilities or COVID-19 losses – whichever is lower – in the 2020/21 financial year, subject to certain conditions and a cap per claimant of £8m.

Grant payments made to successful applicants can be applied toward costs which are essential to enable the operation of a commercial airport or ground handling operations and falls within the list of eligible expenditure. Payments are not limited to use on business rates cost only.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, for what reason it is his Department's policy that airlines should be responsible for the incomplete completion by a passenger of a passenger locator form.

The Passenger Locator Form (PLF) is a key part of our Covid-19 strategy to ensure passengers who are required to self-isolate after travelling do so when they arrive in the UK, and passengers who have travelled near someone who tests positive can be contacted. Passengers are required to fill out a PLF before arrival in the UK.

Airlines are in an unparalleled position to assist in ensuring compliance away from the UK border, thereby facilitating a smooth arrivals process at UK ports.

The Government will continue to engage with industry on our proposals for ensuring passengers arrive at the border with a completed PLF.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether it is his policy to extend the school streets initiative outside London.

All local authorities in England are already able to install School Streets, as they consist of standard traffic management measures readily available to them.

The Active Travel Fund, announced on 9 May, is providing £225 million to local authorities to help them make changes to their road layouts to encourage active travel. Alongside this, the Department published additional Network Management Duty guidance providing advice on what changes the Government expected local authorities to make. School Streets are one of the measures listed.

‘Gear Change: A bold vision for cycling and walking’, published on 28 July, also includes a commitment to create more School Streets, to help deliver the ambition that half of all journeys in urban areas should be walked or cycled.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Jan 2021
What recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of local housing allowance; and if she will make a statement.

In April 2020 Local Housing Allowance rates were set at the 30th percentile of local rents, costing nearly £1 billion and providing - on average - 1.5 million households with an increase of £600 per year.

I can also confirm that the increase to Local Housing Allowance rates will be maintained in cash terms in the next financial year, to continue supporting our claimants to manage housing costs.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to Answer 2 November to Question 107609, if she will make an assessment of the number of properties on the rental market in Epsom and Ewell which fall into the lower quartile financial limits for housing support.

We do not currently hold information to make such an assessment.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent estimate she has made of the number of properties on the rental market in Epsom and Ewell which fall into the lower quartile financial limits for housing support.

There has been no such assessment.

In April we increased Local Housing Allowance rates for Housing Benefit and Universal Credit to the lowest 30 percent of local rents. This includes all rates in Outer South London and Outer South West London, the two Broad Rental Market Areas which fall within Epsom and Ewell. This significant investment of almost £1billion, ensures over 1 million households will see an increase, on average, of £600 this year.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many new GPs have entered primary care in the last two years.

As of March 2021, there were 536 more full time equivalent doctors working in general practice compared to March 2019.

NHS England and NHS Improvement and Health Education England are working with the profession to increase the general practice workforce in England. This includes measures to boost recruitment, address the reasons why doctors leave the profession and encourage them to return to practice. A record 3,793 doctors accepted a place in general practitioner (GP) specialty training in 2020/21, against a target of 3,500. From 2021, the Government has committed to increasing the number of GP training places to 4,000 a year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason Oman and the UAE are on the red list for travel with lower levels of covid-19 infection than European and North American countries on the amber list.

Decisions to place countries on the ‘red list’ are taken by the Government informed by evidence including the Joint Biosecurity Centre’s risks assessments alongside wider public health factors.

We are unable to provide information on the decisions on specific countries as this relates to the on-going development of Government policy. However, further information on the data informing international travel risk assessments is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/data-informing-international-travel-traffic-light-risk-assessments

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what arrangements he has put in place for the disposal or recycling of single use plastic swabs being used for covid-19 tests by the NHS.

Recycling is not currently an option for used plastic swabs and the associated lateral flow device test kit. The preferred waste management route is via energy recovery. However, landfill can be utilised if energy recovery is not available.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of using Invermectin to treat covid-19.

The Department has monitored a collection of small studies which have now completed and provided some positive signals on the use of ivermectin as a treatment for COVID-19. However, larger scale studies are still needed to confirm the effectiveness and safety of this treatment. The Therapeutics Taskforce is aware that several more studies into ivermectin are set to conclude in the next few months and will continue to monitor these ongoing trials to assess the evidence available on whether ivermectin is an effective treatment for COVID-19.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the proportion of patients who tested positive for covid-19 on admission to hospital but subsequently died with a primary cause of death other than covid-19.

This information is not collected in the format requested. Public Health England’s series counts deaths in people with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 but does not provide definitive information on the causal role of COVID-19 in relation to individual deaths.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 4 December 2020 to Question 110065 on Hospital Beds; whether information in the Covid-19 Situation Operational Dashboards beds analysis contains data on bed occupancy; and in what form his Department holds data about bed occupancy in the NHS.

NHS England and NHS Improvement publish key data on bed occupancy, including daily and weekly COVID-19 admissions and bed occupancy.

Quarterly bed numbers and occupancy, including general and acute beds is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/bed-availability-and-occupancy/

Data collection on critical care bed numbers has been suspended during the response to COVID-19.

Weekly critical care bed availability and occupancy for winter 2020/21 is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/uec-sitrep/

Daily and weekly COVID-19 admissions and bed occupancy is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-hospital-activity/

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the proportion of PCR covid-19 tests carried out that have produced a false positive result.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the average time between covid-19 infection and hospital admission for cases that require hospital treatment.

A large observational research study conducted by NHS Digital using data from Public Health England's dataset published in November 2020, found that that the average time from onset of COVID-19 symptoms to hospital admission was 4.6 days.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of people currently being treated in hospital with covid-19 were infected after admission to hospital.

Given the incubation period of the virus and local differences in application of testing protocols, it is not possible to definitively determine the number of people who contracted the virus while in hospital in England to date.

The published data shows that between 1 August and 3 November there were 33,719 estimated new hospital cases where the patient was admitted for the first time with COVID-19 or diagnosed in hospital. Of these 28,408 patients were admitted for the first time with COVID-19 or were diagnosed in hospital where the test was within seven days of admission and therefore hospital association is unlikely.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of people classified as covid-19 hospital admissions (a) had a positive test within 28 days of admission and (b) were tested positive after admission.

Given the incubation period of the virus and local differences in application of testing protocols, it is not possible to definitively determine the number of people who contracted the virus while in hospital in England to date.

The published data shows that between 1 August and 3 November there were 33,719 estimated new hospital cases where the patient was admitted for the first time with COVID-19 or diagnosed in hospital. Of these 28,408 patients were admitted for the first time with COVID-19 or were diagnosed in hospital where the test was within seven days of admission and therefore hospital association is unlikely.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the proportion of covid-19 infections which can be attributed to contact in a hospitality setting.

We publish weekly data on the number of incidents in each setting with at least one laboratory confirmed case of COVID-19.

This information is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/national-flu-and-covid-19-surveillance-reports

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will allow pubs and clubs to waive the covid-19 substantial meal rule if a customer can provide medical evidence of an eating disorder.

The concept of a substantial meal is long established in law, for example in the Licensing Act 2003, and in the practice of the hospitality industry and is readily familiar to those who operate and regulate licensed premises. There is no obligation on licensees or their staff to regulate the possible clinical aspects of their customers’ choice of meal.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of deaths taking place within 28 days of a positive covid test in each of the last six months had an unrelated primary cause of death.

Public Health England (PHE) COVID-19 death data series counts deaths in people with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and is not designed to provide definitive information on the causal role of COVID-19 in relation to individual deaths. A PHE analysis from 3 August found that 95% of deaths that occurred within 28 days of the first positive test had a mention of COVID-19 on the death certificate, further information is included in the PHE Technical Summary of 12 August 2020 which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/phe-data-series-on-deaths-in-people-with-covid-19-technical-summary

PHE does not hold data for what proportion of deaths within 28 days of a positive COVID-19 test in each of the last six months resulted from an infection acquired in a hospital or social care setting.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of deaths within 28 days of a positive covid-19 test in each of the last six months resulted from an infection acquired in a (a) hospital or (b) social care setting.

Public Health England (PHE) COVID-19 death data series counts deaths in people with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and is not designed to provide definitive information on the causal role of COVID-19 in relation to individual deaths. A PHE analysis from 3 August found that 95% of deaths that occurred within 28 days of the first positive test had a mention of COVID-19 on the death certificate, further information is included in the PHE Technical Summary of 12 August 2020 which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/phe-data-series-on-deaths-in-people-with-covid-19-technical-summary

PHE does not hold data for what proportion of deaths within 28 days of a positive COVID-19 test in each of the last six months resulted from an infection acquired in a hospital or social care setting.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will list by month total ICU bed occupancy in the NHS in each of the last three years, including the current year to date.

The information requested from November 2017 to February 2020 is shown in the following table.

% of Open beds occupied

Year

Period

Adult critical care beds

Paediatric intensive care beds

Neonatal critical care cots (or beds)

2017-18

November

84.6%

82.9%

74.0%

2017-18

December

82.2%

79.9%

70.9%

2017-18

January

86.6%

77.2%

71.5%

2017-18

February

85.4%

79.3%

69.7%

2017-18

March

82.6%

78.7%

72.3%

2018-19

April

81.9%

73.8%

72.2%

2018-19

May

79.9%

73.3%

72.9%

2018-19

June

79.6%

75.4%

74.2%

2018-19

July

78.3%

72.4%

69.8%

2018-19

August

78.4%

66.2%

70.1%

2018-19

September

80.0%

76.1%

69.3%

2018-19

October

80.8%

77.2%

73.8%

2018-19

November

82.7%

87.6%

72.5%

2018-19

December

75.4%

74.1%

67.4%

2018-19

January

85.3%

79.3%

70.1%

2018-19

February

81.5%

77.4%

70.1%

2018-19

March

80.7%

77.3%

71.2%

2019-20

April

80.8%

77.0%

70.2%

2019-20

May

79.2%

73.3%

70.8%

2019-20

June

80.6%

74.9%

73.3%

2019-20

July

79.6%

73.8%

69.9%

2019-20

August

79.4%

64.7%

69.4%

2019-20

September

80.8%

74.4%

69.9%

2019-20

October

80.9%

76.5%

69.7%

2019-20

November

82.9%

83.5%

73.0%

2019-20

December

75.3%

79.6%

71.5%

2019-20

January

83.0%

79.2%

71.2%

2019-20

February

81.1%

81.3%

69.3%


Notes:

  1. Data relating to the number of available and occupied critical care beds is a monthly snapshot taken at midnight on the last Thursday of each month and can fluctuate from month to month.
  2. Before February 2011, data on critical care beds were published bi-annually in a separate collection. Therefore, critical care data published until January 2011 should be treated with a degree of caution.
  3. 3. In November 2018, NHS England published refreshed guidance for MSitRep which provided clarification on the definition for Paediatric Intensive Care (PIC) bed availability and occupancy. This update was made to ensure definitions reflected the latest terminology and Paediatric Intensive Care Society (PICS) standards, to improve data quality and address overcounting of PIC beds (including possible inclusion of some high dependency unit (HDU, level 2) beds. Therefore, PIC bed availability data from November 2018 shows a step change, with the 339 reported beds in November 2018 being approximately 130 – 140 lower than previously in 2018-19 (around 460-470 available beds).

Due to COVID-19 and the need to release capacity across the National Health Service to support the response, NHS England have paused the monthly collection and publication of critical care bed capacity. However, from 12 November 2020, a separate weekly data update commenced which includes data on adult critical care capacity and occupancy. Data from 2 November to 15 November is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/uec-sitrep/urgent-and-emergency-care-daily-situation-reports-2020-21/

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of NHS bed occupancy rates in each month of (a) 2017, (b) 2018, (c) 2019 and (d) 2020.

Data is not available in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make further representations for an international investigation into the ongoing issues faced by the Tamil community in Sri Lanka.

In March 2014, the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) adopted resolution 25/1, which was led by the UK and other members of the Core Group on Sri Lanka. This resolution established the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Investigation on Sri Lanka (OISL), which reported in 2015. Since then, the UK has continued to lead efforts at the UNHRC to advance post-conflict accountability, reconciliation and human rights in successive UNHRC resolutions.

The UK government remains concerned about the human rights situation in Sri Lanka, including the issues faced by the Tamil community. The Minister for South Asia, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, set out our concerns in a statement at the UNHRC on 25 February. The UK, again alongside Core Group partner countries, has presented a new draft resolution at the UNHRC which aims to provide a framework for continued international engagement on human rights and post-conflict accountability in Sri Lanka. The draft text requests enhanced monitoring and reporting by OHCHR on the human rights situation and requests the UN to collect, preserve and analyse evidence which could be used in future accountability processes.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the hunger strike by Mrs Ambihai Selvakumar in protest at the issues facing the Tamil community in Sri Lanka.

The UK Government is aware of the hunger strike being carried out by Mrs Ambihai Selvakumar, and recognises the concerns she has raised regarding the issues faced by the Tamil community in Sri Lanka. We have highlighted similar concerns about the lack of progress towards post-conflict accountability and the wider human rights situation, including in statements to the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) in February, June and September 2020. The Minister of State for South Asia, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, also set out our serious concerns about human rights in Sri Lanka in a statement at the UNHRC on 25 February. He has raised the importance of accountability, justice and reconciliation on several occasions with the Sri Lankan High Commissioner and Sri Lankan Foreign Minister Dinesh Gunawardena, most recently during calls on 12 February and 22 January respectively.

The UK, alongside Core Group partner countries, is leading a new resolution on Sri Lanka at the current UNHRC session. The draft resolution provides a framework for continued international engagement on human rights and post-conflict accountability. It calls on the government of Sri Lanka to investigate and prosecute all allegations of gross human rights violations and serious violations of international law, and highlights concerns about the human rights situation, including particular concerns about the protection of minorities.

We will continue to press for a strong role for the UNHRC to help advance accountability, reconciliation and human rights in Sri Lanka. Lord Ahmad has also responded by letter to the organiser of a petition related to Mrs Ambihai Selvakumar's hunger strike.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations he has received on the potential merits of a 180 day limit for visa free travel in the EU; and what position the EU taken on that matter.

The Government understands concerns about the impact of the 90 days in a rolling 180-day visa-free travel limit on British Citizens who travel to the EU for extended periods of time, as reflected in representations over recent months, including from British Citizens who own second homes in EU Member States and the yachting/sailing community.

The Government discussed arrangements with the EU for British Citizens travelling to the Schengen Area. Regrettably, the EU consistently maintained that British Citizens will be treated as Third Country Nationals under the Schengen Borders Code from 1 January 2021. This means that British Citizens will be able to travel visa-free for short stays for up to 90 days in a rolling 180-day period. This is the standard length of stay that the EU offers to nationals of eligible third countries that offer visa-free travel for EU citizens, in line with existing EU legislation.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what plans he has to negotiate an extension to the 180 day limit on visa-free access for UK visitors to the EU with (a) individual member states and (b) The European Commission.

The Government discussed arrangements with the EU for British Citizens travelling to the Schengen Area. Regrettably, the EU consistently maintained that British Citizens will be treated as Third Country Nationals under the Schengen Borders Code from 1 January 2021. This means that British Citizens will be able to travel visa-free for short stays for up to 90 days in a rolling 180-day period. This is the standard length of stay that the EU offers to nationals of eligible third countries that offer visa-free travel for EU citizens, in line with existing EU legislation. British Citizens planning to stay longer will need permission from the relevant Member State.

The UK's Trade and Cooperation Agreement with the EU confirms that both the UK and EU currently provide for visa-free travel for short-term visits for each other's nationals in accordance with their respective laws. The detail of those arrangements is set by domestic law. The Government does not typically enter into bilateral agreements on visa-free travel.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether it is his policy to amend international travel advice in line with the new quarantine restrictions being introduced on 15 December 2020.

From 5 November, the FCDO stopped advising against all travel worldwide and reverted to country-based advice. FCDO travel advice remains under constant review and considers both epidemiological and non-epidemiological risks in each destination. When the FCDO no longer assesses the risks to British nationals to be unacceptably high, travel advice is updated accordingly.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 15 March 2021 to Question 163647, if he will publish information on the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme specifically in relation to theatrical freelances whose self-employment income was incorrectly classified as PAYE by the Royal Opera House.

The Government is unable to comment on specific cases due to taxpayer confidentiality.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether HMRC can use its discretion in individual cases when approving applications to the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

There is no legal right of appeal against decisions made in relation to the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS), and there is also no legal provision for ‘reasonable excuse’ within the legal framework for SEISS.

HMRC have limited discretion in operating the SEISS and any exercise of this discretion must be rational and justifiable on the grounds of good management and administration. This discretion can only be used in exceptional circumstances. Such circumstances could include situations where HMRC have made an error which has affected an individual’s eligibility for, or amount of, a SEISS grant.

The SEISS continues to be just one element of a substantial package of support for the self-employed. Those ineligible for the SEISS may still be eligible for other elements of the support available. The temporary £20 per week increase to the Universal Credit standard allowance has been extended for six months, and the Government has decided to extend the suspension of the Minimum Income Floor for three months, to the end of July 2021, so that where self-employed claimants' earnings have fallen significantly, their Universal Credit award will have increased to reflect their lower earnings. In addition to this, they may also have access to other elements of the package, including Restart Grants, the Recovery Loan scheme, business rates relief, and other business support schemes.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will enable theatrical freelances whose self-employment income was incorrectly classified as PAYE by the Royal Opera House to claim the full grants through the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

The Government announced at Budget 2021 that the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) will continue until September, with a fourth and a final fifth grant. This provides certainty to business as the economy reopens and means the SEISS continues to be one of the most generous schemes for the self-employed in the world.

HMRC work out SEISS eligibility based on information submitted by individuals on their Self-Assessment tax returns. As the deadline for 2019-20 tax returns has now passed, HMRC will now use these tax returns for the fourth and fifth grants, provided they were submitted by 2 March 2021.

This means more than 600,000 people are brought into scope who either became self-employed in 2019-20, or were ineligible for previous grants, but now may be eligible for the fourth grant on the basis of submitting their 2019-20 tax return.

The SEISS provides generous support to the self-employed, including freelancers who meet the eligibility criteria.

In addition, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) has been available to all employers with a PAYE system and all employees on PAYE regardless of their employment contract. As such, freelancers and those on short term contracts could be eligible for the CJRS if they are on PAYE and meet the eligibility criteria. The furloughing of staff through the CJRS is a voluntary arrangement, entered at the employers’ discretion and agreed by employees.

People who are ineligible for CJRS and the SEISS may qualify for other elements of the £407bn package of support the Government has made available.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the revenue from Stamp Duty has been in each of the last 15 years.

Data on Stamp Duty revenue up to 2019-20 is available in HM Revenue & Customs Annual Stamp Taxes publication: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/uk-stamp-tax-statistics.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the priority service for visa applications will be reinstated.

Priority Visa services are currently available in some locations overseas, but availability will differ by territory depending on Covid restrictions in place in a specific area at any one time. If available, customers are able to purchase these services when booking an appointment at a visa application centre.

Super Priority and Priority services have also been reinstated in the UK for Work and Study routes, including applications for Indefinite Leave to Remain. It is anticipated these services for Marriage and Settlement routes in the UK will be reinstated by the end of March 2021.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make it an offence to send a scamming email to a vulnerable person.

Direct marketing, including spam emails, are regulated by the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003 (PECR) which is enforced by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), the independent data protection regulator. PECR regulates unsolicited marketing emails and specifies organisations must only send these to individuals who have agreed to receive them, except where there is a clearly defined customer relationship.

The ICO has the powers to impose civil monetary penalties of up to £500,000 for serious contraventions of the PECR. In cases where a clear and serious breach of the legislation has taken place, the ICO will take direct action and/or enforcement action.

In a situation where someone sends a scam email with the intention of defrauding another person, this conduct is already likely to constitute an offence under the Fraud Act 2006.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of covid-related fines issued by the police have been collected.

The Home Office does not hold this data.

The National Police Chiefs’ Council publishes monthly fixed penalty notice statistics and crime trends and the latest analysis can be found here: https://news.npcc.police.uk/releases/crime-trends-and-penalty-notices-issued-under-covid-regulations-update

This shows in total, 42,675 fixed penalty notices were recorded as having been issued in England and Wales under coronavirus regulations between 27 March 2020 and 17 January 2021.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fines have been issued to people for refusing to wear a facemask in an indoor setting in each of the last six months.

In its most recent published statistics, the National Police Chiefs’ Council reported on 30 November that 641 Fixed Penalty Notices were issued between 15 June and 16 November for breaches of the Face Coverings Regulations across England and Wales. Of these FPNs:

  • 169 were issued against the regulations concerning wearing a face covering on public transport, across twelve forces (including British Transport Police in England and Wales).
  • 472 were issued against regulations concerning the wearing a face covering in a relevant place, such as a retail setting, across thirty-two forces (including British Transport Police in England and Wales).

The latest statistics published by NPCC can be found here:

https://news.npcc.police.uk/releases/more-fixed-penalty-notices-issued-since-national-coronavirus-restrictions-were-reintroduced-with-crime-9-per-cent-lower-than-last-year

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress she has made on resettling refugee families under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme; and how many people she plans to settle under that scheme in the next 12 months.

The Home Office is committed to publishing data in an orderly way as part of the regular quarterly Immigration Statistics, in line with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics. These can be found at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-statistics

To access the number of refugees resettled, access the latest statistical release using the link above, then “data tables”, “asylum and resettlement” and select either the summary or detailed resettlement tables. The latest set of figures were released on 26 November 2020.

We have been working closely with key domestic and international stakeholders on plans to safely resume UK resettlement arrivals against the backdrop of unprecedented restrictions and pressures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

As a result of this work the UK has restarted UK resettlement arrivals to fulfil our commitment of resettling 20,000 refugees affected by the conflict in Syria under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme (VPRS) and we are working closely with partners to deliver this commitment.

Decisions regarding resettlement beyond the completion of this scheme are yet to be made and will need to take account of the impact of COVID-19 and the ongoing pressures on the asylum system.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to issue guidance or other forms of support to local authorities to help them facilitate events to mark the Queen's Platinum jubilee.

A national programme of events and celebrations is being planned around the momentous occasion of Her Majesty the Queen's Platinum Jubilee. This will include a weekend of national street parties and the lighting of beacons across the whole of the United Kingdom. MHLCG has previously supported local celebrations for VE/VJ day and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee, and we are currently producing guidance for local authorities on how they may choose to mark the occasion which will include timelines, a variety of suggested activities, and a 'how to' guide on preparing for street parties and other public events.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when he plans to implement the Government's policy of requiring an electric car charging point at every new home.

I refer my Rt Hon Friend to the answer I gave to PQ UIN 157016 on 1 March 2021

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when he plans to implement the Government's policy of requiring solar panels on the roof of every new house.

The Government remains committed to meeting its target of net zero emissions by 2050 and recognises the important contribution that the energy efficiency of buildings has to make in meeting it. We must ensure that the energy efficiency standards we set through the Building Regulations for new homes put us on track to meet the 2050 target. From 2021, new homes will be expected to produce 31% less CO2 emissions compared to current standards, and from 2025, the Future Homes Standard (FHS) will ensure that new homes produce at least 75% lower CO2 emissions compared to those built to current standards. Homes built under the FHS will be ‘zero carbon ready’, which means that in the longer term, no further retrofit work for energy efficiency will be necessary to enable them to become zero-carbon homes as the electricity grid continues to decarbonise.

The Building Regulations set minimum energy performance standards for new homes and non-domestic buildings. They are couched in performance terms and do not prescribe the technologies, materials or fuels to be used, allowing builders and homeowners the flexibility to innovate and select the most practical and cost-effective solutions appropriate in any development. For example, many roofs are not suitable for solar photovoltaic (PV) panels because of the visual amenity, strength, or direction of the building.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether it is his policy to require local authorities to release green belt land for housing in the event that is the only developable land available to them.

The National Planning Policy Framework maintains a high level of protection for the Green Belt, and states that local authorities should propose to alter Green Belt boundaries only where they can demonstrate that there are exceptional circumstances and that they have examined all other reasonable options for meeting their identified development needs. They are expected to show that they have been using their brownfield and under-used land; optimising density; and exploring opportunities in neighbouring authority areas under the duty to cooperate. In examining local plans, a planning inspector will look for evidenced justification of any proposed change to a Green Belt, to check that all reasonable alternatives have been considered.

In line with our manifesto commitment, the reform proposals in Planning for the Future, currently out for consultation, do not affect the Framework’s strong protections for Green Belt land.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the housing need for each local authority is when calculated through the standard method.

To get enough?homes built in the places where people and communities need them,?a crucial first step is to plan for the right number of homes.??To support our overall aspirations, and to?target more homes into areas where they are least affordable, we are proposing to revise the number of homes authorities should plan for.

We have not published an authority by authority list of numbers generated by the formula. The formula uses variable?data?and it is down to local planning authorities to calculate their local housing need.

Paragraph 23-39 of the Changes to the current planning system consultation explains step-by-step the proposed calculation for the updated standard method.???

Lower household projections do not mean that fewer homes are needed?– in some cases they reflect existing under-supply, where lack of provision stops new households from forming.

Not all homes that are planned for are?built, so our proposed formula includes a buffer to account for the drop off rate between permissions and completions. This?gives the best opportunity to?deliver against our aspirations while also ensuring that the market offers?a good?choice of homes.??

The affordability adjustment used in the proposed standard method is based on the median house price to workplace-based earnings ratio, published annually by the Office for National Statistics.

The house price to workplace-based earnings ratio compares the median salary earnt in a local authority against the median house price in that same authority area. This ratio is used as people typically choose to live close to where they work – and therefore is a proxy for demand within the housing market.

Earnings data is taken from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) Release, which provides data on the levels, distribution and make-up of earnings and hours worked by UK employees. This data does not cover the self-employed.

The proposals were out for consultation until 1 October 2020. Following consideration of the consultation responses received, the Government will publish a response in due course. The response will set out any decisions and any associated proposed implementation.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, for what reasons his Department's consultation on changes to planning policy and regulations does not propose to include the income level of residents who live in one local authority but work in another local authority in the calculation of local housing need.

To get enough?homes built in the places where people and communities need them,?a crucial first step is to plan for the right number of homes.??To support our overall aspirations, and to?target more homes into areas where they are least affordable, we are proposing to revise the number of homes authorities should plan for.

We have not published an authority by authority list of numbers generated by the formula. The formula uses variable?data?and it is down to local planning authorities to calculate their local housing need.

Paragraph 23-39 of the Changes to the current planning system consultation explains step-by-step the proposed calculation for the updated standard method.???

Lower household projections do not mean that fewer homes are needed?– in some cases they reflect existing under-supply, where lack of provision stops new households from forming.

Not all homes that are planned for are?built, so our proposed formula includes a buffer to account for the drop off rate between permissions and completions. This?gives the best opportunity to?deliver against our aspirations while also ensuring that the market offers?a good?choice of homes.??

The affordability adjustment used in the proposed standard method is based on the median house price to workplace-based earnings ratio, published annually by the Office for National Statistics.

The house price to workplace-based earnings ratio compares the median salary earnt in a local authority against the median house price in that same authority area. This ratio is used as people typically choose to live close to where they work – and therefore is a proxy for demand within the housing market.

Earnings data is taken from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) Release, which provides data on the levels, distribution and make-up of earnings and hours worked by UK employees. This data does not cover the self-employed.

The proposals were out for consultation until 1 October 2020. Following consideration of the consultation responses received, the Government will publish a response in due course. The response will set out any decisions and any associated proposed implementation.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the affordability measure for local housing needs assessment in his Department's consultation on changes to planning policy and regulations takes into account self-employed incomes.

To get enough?homes built in the places where people and communities need them,?a crucial first step is to plan for the right number of homes.??To support our overall aspirations, and to?target more homes into areas where they are least affordable, we are proposing to revise the number of homes authorities should plan for.

We have not published an authority by authority list of numbers generated by the formula. The formula uses variable?data?and it is down to local planning authorities to calculate their local housing need.

Paragraph 23-39 of the Changes to the current planning system consultation explains step-by-step the proposed calculation for the updated standard method.???

Lower household projections do not mean that fewer homes are needed?– in some cases they reflect existing under-supply, where lack of provision stops new households from forming.

Not all homes that are planned for are?built, so our proposed formula includes a buffer to account for the drop off rate between permissions and completions. This?gives the best opportunity to?deliver against our aspirations while also ensuring that the market offers?a good?choice of homes.??

The affordability adjustment used in the proposed standard method is based on the median house price to workplace-based earnings ratio, published annually by the Office for National Statistics.

The house price to workplace-based earnings ratio compares the median salary earnt in a local authority against the median house price in that same authority area. This ratio is used as people typically choose to live close to where they work – and therefore is a proxy for demand within the housing market.

Earnings data is taken from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) Release, which provides data on the levels, distribution and make-up of earnings and hours worked by UK employees. This data does not cover the self-employed.

The proposals were out for consultation until 1 October 2020. Following consideration of the consultation responses received, the Government will publish a response in due course. The response will set out any decisions and any associated proposed implementation.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will publish a comparative assessment of his Department's housing targets and the Office for National Statistics projections of future household growth by each local planning authority area in England.

The Government does not set housing targets. It is for local planning authorities to determine how many homes they will plan for through the local plan making process. The national planning policy framework sets out that in doing this strategic plan making, authorities should use the standard method for assessing local housing need as the starting point in this process. The projections of future household growth are published by the Office of National Statistics and are available publicly online.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)