Lord Baker of Dorking Portrait

Lord Baker of Dorking

Conservative - Life peer

Lord Baker of Dorking is not a member of any APPGs
House Committee (Lords)
16th Apr 2007 - 21st May 2012
Information Committee (Lords)
25th Nov 2002 - 8th Nov 2006
Home Secretary
28th Nov 1990 - 9th Apr 1992
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
24th Jul 1989 - 28th Nov 1990
Party Chair, Conservative Party
24th Jul 1989 - 28th Nov 1990
Secretary of State for Education and Science
21st May 1986 - 23rd Jul 1989
Secretary of State for Environment
2nd Sep 1985 - 20th May 1986
Minister of State (Department of Environment) (Local Government)
11th Sep 1984 - 1st Sep 1985
Minister of State (Industry & Information Technology)
13th Jun 1983 - 10th Sep 1984
Minister of State (Department of Industry)
5th Jan 1981 - 12th Jun 1983
Procedure Committee
1st Nov 1978 - 9th Jun 1983
Parliamentary Secretary (Civil Service Department)
7th Apr 1972 - 4th Mar 1974


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Thursday 21st October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
voted Aye - against a party majority
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 125 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 180 Noes - 130
Speeches
Thursday 21st October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
My Lords, I will speak to Amendment 35A, which is in my name and those of others. Before explaining its …
Written Answers
Thursday 11th November 2021
T-levels
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many students were studying T Levels in the academic years beginning in (1) 2020, …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Baker of Dorking has voted in 102 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

12 Oct 2021 - Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Baker of Dorking voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 148 Noes - 129
21 Oct 2021 - Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Baker of Dorking voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 125 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 180 Noes - 130
View All Lord Baker of Dorking Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
(34 debate interactions)
Baroness Stedman-Scott (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
(4 debate interactions)
Lord Bates (Conservative)
(3 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for International Trade
(28 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(10 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(5 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Baker of Dorking's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Baker of Dorking, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Baker of Dorking has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Baker of Dorking has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Baker of Dorking has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Baker of Dorking has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


20 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
28th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many students were studying T Levels in the academic years beginning in (1) 2020, and (2) 2021.

Data from the Individualised Learner Record and School Census suggests that the number of students taking T Levels in the 2020/21 academic year was around 1,300. The department does not yet have confirmed student numbers for the 2021/22 cohort, but providers report that recruitment levels are positive. We expect to publish indicative student numbers for the 2021/22 academic year before the end of this year.

The department are introducing T Levels in a phased approach. The number of providers and courses will increase year on year, and we expect student numbers to grow significantly in line with the rollout. This managed introduction has meant T Levels got off to a high-quality start in 2020. Feedback from both providers and students has been positive.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the cost of all secondary schools in England extending the teaching day by 30 minutes in 2021–22.

The next stage of the Government's long term recovery plan will include a review of time spent in school and 16-19 further education colleges, and the impact this could have on helping children and young people to catch up.

This review will consider a wide range of evidence on the use of time in schools and 16-19 colleges, including costs. The findings of the review will be set out later in the year to inform the Spending Review. This is a potentially significant change to existing arrangements, and we plan to work closely with teachers, parents, and children to review the evidence and understand their views.

7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much they have spent on personal tutoring for students since March 2020.

In summer 2020 a £1 billion catch up package was announced to help to tackle the impact of lost teaching time as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, including a £350 million National Tutoring Programme (NTP) for disadvantaged students.

The NTP programme for 5–16-year-olds has two pillars:

  • Schools can access high quality, subsidised tuition support from approved Tuition Partners
  • Schools in the most disadvantaged areas have been supported to employ in house Academic Mentors to provide tuition to their pupils

In addition to the 5-16 programme, the government made available up to £96 million to support small group tuition for 16–19-year-olds, which is delivered through the 16-19 tuition fund, and £9 million to support the improvement of early language skills in reception classes this academic year.

Schools can choose from a variety of tuition models through Tuition Partners, including online, face-to-face, small-group and one-to-one tuition, dependent on the needs of pupils. Tuition is available in English, Mathematics, humanities, modern foreign languages, and science for secondary pupils, and literacy, numeracy, and science for primary aged pupils.

Since the launch of the NTP in November 2020, over 232,000 pupils have been enrolled to receive tutoring from over 5,400 schools. Our ambition is to offer tuition to 250,000 pupils. Of those enrolled, over 173,000 have already commenced tutoring.

The department estimates that over 400,000 young people will have been eligible for tuition through the 16-19 tuition fund in academic year 2020/21. The 16-19 tuition fund enables further education colleges and sixth forms, including independent training providers, to arrange one-to-one and small group tuition for disadvantaged students whose education has been disrupted because of the COVID-19 outbreak.

In February 2021, the department announced a £700 million plan to continue to support young people to catch up on lost education, including an £83 million expansion of the NTP for 5–16-year-olds. This brings the total funding for the next academic year to £215 million. We also announced an additional £102 million to extend the 16-19 tuition fund for next academic year.

As part of the education recovery plan announced on 2 June, the department shared plans to invest additional funding to help further expand tuition support. This includes:

  • £218 million of new funding to be directed to the Tuition Partner and Academic Mentor pillars of the NTP. This is in addition to the £215 million already announced to be invested in the academic year 2021/22
  • £579 million of funding will be provided to schools to develop localised school-led tutoring provision using new or existing school staff. This will work alongside the NTP offer and will see tutors directly employed by schools
  • £222 million to fund an extension to the 16-19 tuition fund for two further years from academic year 2022/23.
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many disadvantaged students they have funded personal tutoring for since March 2020; and (1) in what subjects, and (2) at what level, such tutoring has been provided.

In summer 2020 a £1 billion catch up package was announced to help to tackle the impact of lost teaching time as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, including a £350 million National Tutoring Programme (NTP) for disadvantaged students.

The NTP programme for 5–16-year-olds has two pillars:

  • Schools can access high quality, subsidised tuition support from approved Tuition Partners
  • Schools in the most disadvantaged areas have been supported to employ in house Academic Mentors to provide tuition to their pupils

In addition to the 5-16 programme, the government made available up to £96 million to support small group tuition for 16–19-year-olds, which is delivered through the 16-19 tuition fund, and £9 million to support the improvement of early language skills in reception classes this academic year.

Schools can choose from a variety of tuition models through Tuition Partners, including online, face-to-face, small-group and one-to-one tuition, dependent on the needs of pupils. Tuition is available in English, Mathematics, humanities, modern foreign languages, and science for secondary pupils, and literacy, numeracy, and science for primary aged pupils.

Since the launch of the NTP in November 2020, over 232,000 pupils have been enrolled to receive tutoring from over 5,400 schools. Our ambition is to offer tuition to 250,000 pupils. Of those enrolled, over 173,000 have already commenced tutoring.

The department estimates that over 400,000 young people will have been eligible for tuition through the 16-19 tuition fund in academic year 2020/21. The 16-19 tuition fund enables further education colleges and sixth forms, including independent training providers, to arrange one-to-one and small group tuition for disadvantaged students whose education has been disrupted because of the COVID-19 outbreak.

In February 2021, the department announced a £700 million plan to continue to support young people to catch up on lost education, including an £83 million expansion of the NTP for 5–16-year-olds. This brings the total funding for the next academic year to £215 million. We also announced an additional £102 million to extend the 16-19 tuition fund for next academic year.

As part of the education recovery plan announced on 2 June, the department shared plans to invest additional funding to help further expand tuition support. This includes:

  • £218 million of new funding to be directed to the Tuition Partner and Academic Mentor pillars of the NTP. This is in addition to the £215 million already announced to be invested in the academic year 2021/22
  • £579 million of funding will be provided to schools to develop localised school-led tutoring provision using new or existing school staff. This will work alongside the NTP offer and will see tutors directly employed by schools
  • £222 million to fund an extension to the 16-19 tuition fund for two further years from academic year 2022/23.
9th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many loans were taken out by students aged between 18 and 24 studying for (1) Higher National Certificates, and (2) Higher National Diplomas, for the years (a) 2017, (b) 2018, (c) 2019 and (d) 2020; and how many of these students also took out maintenance loans.

The Government recently outlined reforms which aim to increase the take-up of high-quality higher technical qualifications. We have introduced a new approval scheme to show which higher technical qualifications meet employers’ skills needs, and we will support providers in this area and improve information, advice, and guidance for learners and employers alike.

Table 1, attached, details management information from the Student Loans Company (SLC) on the average value of loans taken out by 18 to 24-year-old students (as of 1 September in the relevant year) studying for a Higher National Certificate (HNC) or Higher National Diploma (HND). It covers the academic years 2017/18, 2018/19, and 2019/20 for English-domiciled students studying in the UK and EU-domiciled students studying in England.

Students are around four months into the 2020/21 academic year; as such, the number of students and average loan amounts are subject to change. Comparable figures for 2020/21 will be available after the end of the academic year.

The figures in Table 1 have been rounded to the nearest pound.

Table 2, attached, details SLC management information on the number of 18 to 24-year-old students in receipt of a loan (broken down by tuition fee loan and maintenance loan) and studying for a HNC or HND. It covers the academic years 2017/18, 2018/19, and 2019/20 for English-domiciled students studying in the UK and EU-domiciled students studying in England.

Students may take out a maintenance loan, a tuition fee loan, or both. Therefore, the average overall loan per academic year for HNCs or HNDs will not be the sum of the average loan for each product. Similarly, the total number of students taking out loans for HNCs or HNDs is not equal to the number in receipt of each loan product.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many 18 to 24 year olds started a course at (1) Level 4 and (2) Level 5, qualification level in each year from 2010 until 2019.

Research published by both the department and Gatsby Foundation provides a full mapping of level 4 and 5 technical education. This research is available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/913988/L4-5_market_study.pdf and http://www.gatsby.org.uk/uploads/education/reports/pdf/mapping-the-higher-technical-landscape-final-version.pdf respectively.

The latter showed that in the 2015/16 academic year, approximately 87,000 learners aged 24 or under were studying at level 4 or 5 in England.

The department collects and publishes data separately on regulated further and higher education, which includes learning at level 4 and 5. The department is investigating whether these data collections could be combined to produce a more comprehensive data series for learners starting level 4 and 5 qualifications.

Further education and apprenticeships data are published by the department, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/further-education-and-skills-statistical-first-release-sfr.

Statistics on students at higher education providers by specific qualification aim are published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). Latest figures refer to the 2014/15 to 2018/19 academic years and are available here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/news/16-01-2020/sb255-higher-education-student-statistics.

Statistics for earlier years are available here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/statistical-first-releases?date_filter%5Bvalue%5D%5Byear%5D=&topic%5B%5D=4.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many secondary schools which were judged by Ofsted as "Requires Improvement" have been closed by (1) a local authority, or (2) a multi-academy trust, in each of the last ten years.

The information requested is not currently available.

The data published by Ofsted shows the number of schools rated as Outstanding, Good, Requires Improvement, and Inadequate, which can be easily extracted from the published data.

The proportion of secondary schools rated as Requires Improvement was 32% in August 2010, and this has changed to 16% in August 2020.

The proportion of all schools rated as Requires Improvement was 30% in August 2010, and this has changed to 10% in August 2020.

11th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many secondary schools in England teach (1) virtual reality, (2) cyber security, and (3) artificial intelligence, at Key Stage 3.

The computing curriculum, introduced in 2014, aims to ensure that all pupils understand the fundamental principles of computer science, information technology and digital literacy.

All local authority-maintained state schools are required to teach the computing curriculum from Key Stages one to four. Other schools, such as academies and free schools, have the freedom to design their own curriculum but are required to offer a broad and balanced curriculum, with many using the computing curriculum as an exemplar. There are a number of schools, including University Technical Colleges, that have specialisms in computing subjects.

The broad set of principles underpinning the curriculum are outlined in the computing programme of study. Relevant information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-computing-programmes-of-study. The curriculum was deliberately designed to avoid over-prescription, and reduce the risk of the content becoming outdated, given the speed of development of digital skills and technological advance.

Programming, algorithms and the use of information technology are taught to pupils in Key Stage three, which provides the foundation for pupils to acquire further knowledge about virtual reality, cyber security and artificial intelligence. The computing curriculum also covers the principles of e-safety from Key Stages one to four, with progression in content to reflect the different and escalating risks that pupils face. This knowledge is fundamental for teaching pupils about cyber security.

The National Centre for Computing Education, formed in 2019 and backed by £84 million of government funding, has created a ‘Teach Computing’ curriculum which comprises key resources on cyber security for teachers of Key Stage three pupils. Cyber security also forms part of the Key Stage four curriculum and the computer science GCSE.

The computer science GCSE was sat by over 77,000 pupils in 2019. Additionally, over 48,000 pupils took a level 2 ICT Technical Award in 2019, which is a high quality equivalent to the computer science GCSE and included in school performance tables.

Outside of school, there are extracurricular opportunities for pupils aged 11 and above, such as CyberFirst, which enrich the teaching of cyber security in the curriculum. CyberFirst is the Government’s cyber security skills youth programme and a vital part of the National Cyber Security Programme, helping to develop the next generation of cyber security professionals. It is led by the National Cyber Security Centre and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

Over the last four years, CyberFirst has supported and helped to improve the teaching and take-up of computing and cybersecurity in the curriculum. It has been achieved through an online platform, Cyber Discovery, short course, the girls’ competition, and discovery days for schools which have engaged over 80,000 pupils in cyber security and careers.

20th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many students at (1) secondary schools, (2) sixth forms, and (3) University Technical Colleges, did not attend in the week ending 16 October because they were isolating or quarantined; and how many of those students had access to a computer and an internet connection to facilitate remote learning.

I refer the noble Lord to the answer I gave to question HL9006, available here: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2020-10-12/hl9006.

Keeping close track of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases in schools is a priority for the Government. Public Health England (PHE) leads in holding data on infection, incidence and COVID-19 cases overall. PHE have published data on COVID-19 incidents by institution, including educational settings. This data is updated weekly and the most recent data can be found online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-covid-19-surveillance-reports.

The Department collects data on the number of schools that have indicated that they have sent children home due to COVID-19 containment measures. We are currently looking at the quality of that data with a view to publishing it as part of the official statistics series. The series includes published data on school openings and attendance, which shows that at a national level approximately 99.7% of state funded schools were open as of 15 October. Of the small proportion (0.3%) of schools that were closed on 15 October, almost all were due to COVID-19 related reasons. Approximately 89% of all children on roll in all state funded schools were in attendance on 15 October. This data is updated weekly and can be found at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

The Department does not hold data on the number of students self-isolating who do not have access to a computer and an internet connection.

20th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many loans were made to students who were studying for (1) Higher National Certificate, and (2) Higher National Diploma, qualifications in (1) 2017, (2) 2018, and (3) 2019.

The attached tables show management information from the Student Loans Company on the number of students in receipt of a loan (broken down by tuition fee loan and maintenance loan) and studying for a Higher National Certificate or Higher National Diploma.

These figures cover students who received funding as English-domiciled students studying in the UK and EU-domiciled students studying in England.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many students at (1) secondary schools, (2) sixth forms, and (3) University Technical Colleges, did not attend in the week ending 9 October because they were isolating or quarantined; and how many of those students had access to a computer and an internet connection to facilitate remote learning.

Keeping close track of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases in schools is a priority for the government. Public Health England (PHE) leads in holding data on infection, incidence and COVID-19 cases overall. PHE have published data on COVID-19 incidents by institution, including educational settings. This data is updated weekly and the most recent data can be found online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-covid-19-surveillance-reports.

The department is currently collecting data from schools on a daily basis, as well as gathering information from local areas and following up with individual settings to confirm that procedures for requiring pupils to isolate are well understood and that necessary decisions are made on the basis of public health advice.

The department collects data on the number of schools that have indicated that they have sent children home due to COVID-19 containment measures. We are currently looking at the quality of that data with a view to publishing it as part of the official statistics series. The series includes published data on school openings and attendance, which shows that at a national level approximately 99.3% of state-funded schools were fully open on 22 October (excluding schools on half term or inset days). Of the small proportion (0.7%) of schools that were closed, almost all were due to COVID-19 related reasons. Approximately 86% of all children on roll in all state-funded schools not on half term or inset days were in attendance on 22 October. This data is updated weekly and the most recent data can be found online at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

During the summer term, the department provided over 220,000 laptops and tablets and over 50,000 4G wireless routers for disadvantaged pupils in year 10, children with a social worker and care leavers. The department has spent over £195 million on support for disadvantaged children and young people to access remote education through laptops and tablets, internet connectivity support, and access to online education platforms. We have delivered over 100,000 laptops and tablets to disadvantaged children during the autumn term. This is in addition to the over 220,000 delivered earlier this year.

We are also working with the major telecommunications companies to improve internet connectivity for disadvantaged and vulnerable families who rely on a mobile internet connection.

Young people aged 16 to 19 without suitable laptops and tablets for education may be eligible for support through the 16 to 19 Bursary Fund. Providers make decisions as to who receives a bursary, based on their own criteria.

The department does not hold data on the number of students self-isolating who do not have access to a computer and internet connection.

5th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many students at (1) secondary schools, (2) sixth forms, and (3) University Technical Colleges, did not attend in the week ending 2 October because they were isolating or quarantined; and how many of those students had access to a computer and an internet connection to facilitate remote learning.

Keeping close track of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases in schools is a priority for the government. Public Health England (PHE) leads in holding data on infection, incidence and COVID-19 cases overall. PHE have published data on COVID-19 incidents by institution, including educational settings. This data can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-covid-19-surveillance-reports.

The department is currently collecting data from schools on a daily basis, as well as gathering information from local areas and following up with individual settings to confirm that procedures requiring pupils to isolate are well understood and that necessary decisions are made on the basis of public health advice.

The department collects data on the number of schools that have indicated that they have either sent children home due to COVID-19 containment measures or have staff shortages due to COVID-19 related absences, and have attendance data for schools that have done so. We are currently looking at the quality of that data with a view to publishing it as part of the official statistics series. The series includes published data on school openings and attendance, which shows that at a national level approximately 93% of state-funded schools were fully open on 1 October. Of all schools that responded to the survey, 7% said they were not fully open due to suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19 on 1 October. Equivalent estimates have not been made at phase level. Approximately 90% of all children on roll in all state-funded schools were in attendance on 1 October. More information is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

During the summer term, the department delivered over 220,000 laptops and tablets, and over 50,000 4G wireless routers, for disadvantaged children in year 10, as well as children with a social worker and care leavers who would not otherwise have had online access, as part of over £160 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care.

The department is now supplementing this support by making 250,000 additional laptops and tablets available in the event that face-to-face schooling is disrupted as a result of local COVID-19 restrictions and children become reliant on remote education. This scheme is intended to enable schools to support disadvantaged children in years 3 to 11 who cannot afford their own laptops and tablets. Schools will also be able to order laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children across all year groups who are shielding as a result of official or medical advice, all year groups who attend hospital schools and those completing their key stage 4 at a further education college.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many primary schools taught computer coding in the current academic year.

The computing curriculum in England was introduced in 2014 across key stages 1 to 4 to ensure it better reflects employers’ needs and the increasing demand for digital skills. There are over 10,000 state-funded primary schools in the academic year 2019/20 which are all required to teach the computing curriculum from key stage 1, with England being one of the first G20 countries to introduce teaching of coding in primary schools. Other schools, such as academies and free schools, have freedom to design their own school curriculum, but are required to offer a broad and balanced curriculum to their pupils, with many using the computing curriculum as an exemplar.

To strengthen the teaching of the computing curriculum and GCSE/A Level computer science, and to improve take up of computing qualifications, we are investing over £80 million in the National Centre for Computing Education (NCCE). The NCCE is providing free high quality continuing professional development (CPD) and teaching resources for both primary and secondary teachers, as well as overseeing a network of 34 computing hubs to support schools across the country. Support from the NCCE includes resources specifically mapped against the whole primary and secondary computing curriculum up to and including key stage 4, a Computer Science Accelerator Programme for GCSE teachers that includes programming-specific CPD elements, and the Isaac Computer Science A level online platform which provides resources for teachers and student workshops.

Computing science is one of the fastest growing subjects at GCSE with over 77,000 pupils sitting the exam in 2019.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) primary, and (2) secondary, schools have installed a 3D printer.

The information requested is not held centrally by the Department.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many GCSE entrants there were in (1) art, (2) music, (3) dance, and (4) drama, in (a) the 2010, and (b) the 2020, academic years.

This information is not yet available for 2019/20. It will become available once we release our provisional publication between December and January 2021 at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/entries-for-gcse-november-2020-exam-series.

The number of pupils in all schools in England at the end of key stage 4 who entered music, art, drama or dance at GCSE level (including equivalents) is published each year (including 2010 onwards) in the ‘subject time series data’ table at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/key-stage-4-performance-2019-revised.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) laptops, and (2) other computers, have been distributed to disadvantaged students under their digital devices and internet access scheme.

The department is providing laptops and tablets to vulnerable and disadvantaged children who would otherwise not have access and are preparing for examination in Year 10, receiving support from a social worker, including pre-school children, or are a care leaver. Where care leavers, children with a social worker at secondary school and children in Year 10 do not have internet connections, we are providing 4G wireless routers.

The department has also partnered with BT to give 10,000 young people free access to BT Wi-Fi hotspots, who do not have access to good internet by other means.

Local authorities and academy trusts are best placed to identify and distribute the laptops, tablets and 4G wireless routers to children and young people who need devices. The department invited local authorities to order devices for the most vulnerable children first - children with a social worker and care leavers.

Devices are being delivered to local authorities daily and will continue to be distributed throughout June.

9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many 19-year-olds were registered as unemployed in the months of (1) June, (2) July, and (3) August.

The Office for National Statistics classify people as unemployed if, in response to the Labour Force Survey / Annual Population Survey, a person states that they are without a job; have been actively seeking work within the last four weeks and are available to start work within the next two weeks. This is not directly related to being in receipt of unemployment-related benefit.

The ONS do not publish data on the number of 19 year olds whom are unemployed

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) 16, (2) 17, (3) 18, and (4) 19, year-olds registered for unemployment-related benefits in the months of (a) September, and (b) October.

Numbers of people claiming unemployment-related benefits by single year age band are publicly available through the department’s Stat Xplore website.

The table below shows the number of people nationally aged 16, 17, 18 and 19 years old in the Universal Credit (UC) searching for work conditionality group – for people claiming UC whom are closest to the labour market - in September and October 2020.

Age

September 2020

October 2020

16

861

940

17

4630

4563

18

49828

51602

19

70483

71766

Total

125795

128878

The number of people nationally aged 16, 17, 18 and 19 years old and are claiming Jobseekers’ Allowance – a legacy unemployment-related benefit - are published quarterly by DWP on Stat Xplore. However, the latest data available is May 2020.

Age

May 2020

16

Negligible or nil number of claimants

17

25

18

452

19

972

Total

1450

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) 16 year olds, (2) 17 year olds, and (3) 18 year olds, have registered as unemployed in the last three months.

The number of people who registered for unemployment related benefits are published as part of the Alternative Claimant Count and are available by age.

Alternative Claimant Count – Monthly On Flows, June to August 2020, UK

Age

June

July

August

16

567

457

198

17

2,026

1,699

604

18

11,962

11,066

8,082

Source: Alternative Claimant Count - On Flows

Notes:

  1. Statistical disclosure control has been applied to this table to avoid the release of confidential data.
  2. On-flows are defined as the number of people claiming unemployment related benefits in month t, who were not claiming in the previous month (t-1).
  3. Figures are standardised to control for 4 and 5 week counting periods.

This data is published and available at: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)