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Written Question
Schools: Mental Health Services
20 May 2021

Questioner: Baroness Tyler of Enfield (LDEM - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Department for Education press release 'Schools and colleges to benefit from boost in expert mental health support', published on 10 May, what is the percentage of schools that will benefit, by the end of the 2021-22 academic year, from (1) the accelerated roll-out of Mental Health Support Teams, (2) the new training for senior mental health leads, and (3) both of these initiatives.

Answered by Baroness Berridge

The government estimates that around 400 Mental Health Support Teams (MHSTs), covering an estimated 3 million children and young people (around 35% of pupils and students in England), will be in place in schools and colleges by 2023. Over 180 MHSTs have already been established across the country covering approximately 15% of the pupil and student population in England, and we expect teams to reach 20-25% coverage by the end of financial year 2021/22 – a year earlier than originally planned.

A grant for senior mental health lead training will become available at the start of the new academic year 2021/22, enabling up to 7800 schools and colleges (approximately a third of all schools and colleges) to access training to help them implement a whole school or college approach to mental health and wellbeing before 31 March 2022. Further information can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/promoting-children-and-young-peoples-emotional-health-and-wellbeing. Funding beyond 1 April 2022 is subject to future government spending decisions and as schools and colleges are yet to apply for a senior mental health lead training grants, no data is available on the percentage of schools and colleges receiving both MHST support, and senior mental health lead training.


Written Question
Mental Patients: Death
16 Feb 2017

Questioner: Baroness Tyler of Enfield (LDEM - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the increase in unexpected patient deaths reported by England’s mental health trusts; and what steps they are taking to reduce the number of such deaths.

Answered by Lord O'Shaughnessy

The Government wants to make the National Health Service the safest, most transparent healthcare system in the world - the first step towards this ambition is to collect safety data more reliably. The level of reported harm has increased as a result of our very deliberate improvements in the way such events are recorded and investigated.

The Government has introduced requirements for the reliable reporting of any safety incidents, all of which should be investigated fully at a local level then reported to NHS England.

From April 2017, all NHS trusts and foundation trusts will be required to publish numbers of avoidable deaths and how they are improving care.


Written Question
Mental Health Services: Children in Care
27 Jul 2015

Questioner: Baroness Tyler of Enfield (LDEM - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of the additional £1.25 billion in funding for mental health services announced in the last Parliament will be spent on specialist services for children in care and young people who have been in local authority care.

Answered by Lord Prior of Brampton

No recent assessments have been made of the mental health outcomes amongst care leavers, or of their access to services. However, one of the themes of Future in mind, published in March 2015 was care for the most vulnerable, including looked after children and care leavers. Although care leavers may be adults, the report addressed the needs of those in transition to adult services and looked at how services could be improved for those with mental health conditions reaching the age of 18 when they generally transfer to adult services.

The Government is currently considering how best to take forward proposals in Future in mind to deliver system-wide, sustainable transformation as well as the way in which the additional £1.25 billion made available in the 2015 Spring budget for children’s mental health over the course of the current Parliament will be used. However, decisions on how to allocate funding to best meet the needs of individual groups of children and young people will be made locally and reflected in local transformation plans.

A copy of Future in mind is attached.


Written Question
Mental Health Services: Care Leavers
27 Jul 2015

Questioner: Baroness Tyler of Enfield (LDEM - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what recent assessment they have made of access to specialist mental health services for young people who have been in local authority care.

Answered by Lord Prior of Brampton

No recent assessments have been made of the mental health outcomes amongst care leavers, or of their access to services. However, one of the themes of Future in mind, published in March 2015 was care for the most vulnerable, including looked after children and care leavers. Although care leavers may be adults, the report addressed the needs of those in transition to adult services and looked at how services could be improved for those with mental health conditions reaching the age of 18 when they generally transfer to adult services.

The Government is currently considering how best to take forward proposals in Future in mind to deliver system-wide, sustainable transformation as well as the way in which the additional £1.25 billion made available in the 2015 Spring budget for children’s mental health over the course of the current Parliament will be used. However, decisions on how to allocate funding to best meet the needs of individual groups of children and young people will be made locally and reflected in local transformation plans.

A copy of Future in mind is attached.


Written Question
Mental Health: Care Leavers
27 Jul 2015

Questioner: Baroness Tyler of Enfield (LDEM - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what recent assessment they have made of mental health outcomes for young people who have been in local authority care.

Answered by Lord Prior of Brampton

No recent assessments have been made of the mental health outcomes amongst care leavers, or of their access to services. However, one of the themes of Future in mind, published in March 2015 was care for the most vulnerable, including looked after children and care leavers. Although care leavers may be adults, the report addressed the needs of those in transition to adult services and looked at how services could be improved for those with mental health conditions reaching the age of 18 when they generally transfer to adult services.

The Government is currently considering how best to take forward proposals in Future in mind to deliver system-wide, sustainable transformation as well as the way in which the additional £1.25 billion made available in the 2015 Spring budget for children’s mental health over the course of the current Parliament will be used. However, decisions on how to allocate funding to best meet the needs of individual groups of children and young people will be made locally and reflected in local transformation plans.

A copy of Future in mind is attached.


Written Question
Mental Health Services: Children in Care
27 Jul 2015

Questioner: Baroness Tyler of Enfield (LDEM - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what recent assessment they have made of access to mental health professionals with a specialism in attachment disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder for young people over 18 years old who have been in local authority care.

Answered by Lord Prior of Brampton

No assessment has been made of access to mental health professionals with a specialism in attachment disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or autism spectrum disorder for young people over 18 years old who have been in local authority care.


Written Question
Mental Health Services
25 Jun 2015

Questioner: Baroness Tyler of Enfield (LDEM - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of the Care Quality Commission's report <i>Right here, right now</i>, what steps they are taking to ensure that local Mental Health Crisis Care Concordat plans are properly funded and implemented in all areas.

Answered by Lord Prior of Brampton

The Government’s Mandate to NHS England sets out clearly that “we expect NHS England to make rapid progress, working with CCGs and other commissioners, to help deliver on our shared goal to have crisis services that, for an individual, are at all times as accessible, responsive and high quality as other health emergency services.” The Mandate also states that the Government expects “every community to have plans to ensure no one in crisis will be turned away” based on the principles set out in the Crisis Care Concordat. The current NHS England planning guidance for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) makes specific reference to the Concordat, as well as asking CCGs to increase their mental health spend this year.

As part of their commitment to the Concordat, we asked the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to undertake a review of the experiences of people receiving crisis care. The report, Right Here, Right Now: Mental health crisis care review, has been placed in the Library and is available at:

http://www.cqc.org.uk/content/right-here-right-now-mental-health-crisis-care-review

The report will inform future inspections as part of the CQC’s new inspection regime. As part of the review, the CQC carried out 15 local area inspections of services that respond to people experiencing a mental health crisis during winter 2014-15. The CQC has now provided feedback to those localities. This feedback and the wider report will enable local partners in these areas, as well as others across the country, to identify areas for improvement which can in turn be addressed through continuously improving Concordat action plans.

The Department, NHS England and Mind are supporting all areas to develop and improve their plans, which were in place throughout England by spring 2015, on an ongoing basis, including in light of the CQC’s review.

The Government has put mental health at the centre of its programme of health reform.

We have increased investment in mental health. Spending on mental health was estimated to increase by £302 million in 2014-15, with total mental health spending rising from £11.362 billion in 2013-14 to £11.664 billion planned in 2014-15, an increase of 0.6% in real terms. We have legislated to put mental health on a par with physical health, and close the health gap between people with mental health problems and the population as a whole.


Written Question
Families
18 Mar 2015

Questioner: Baroness Tyler of Enfield (LDEM - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to deliver the outcomes of the Family Stability Review including doubling the funding for relationship counselling in 2015–16, as announced by the Prime Minister in his speech to the Relationships Alliance on 18 August 2014.

Answered by Lord Freud

The Prime Minister announced increased support for families and guaranteed that spend for relationship support would be at least £7.5m for 2015/16 and I can confirm this will be the case.

We are in the process of finalising the details of contracting for relationship support services for 2015/16. As well as the continuation of a wide range of existing support services, we will include new provision for providing training and guidance for Health Visitors to recognise and respond to the signs of relationship distress, and the launching of a new pilot to test the inclusion of relationship education in peri-natal classes in 8 areas of the country.

In conjunction we will also be offering a 6 month extension to all of the 16 Help and Support for Separated Families Innovation Fund pilots, which focus on helping parents going through separation to resolve conflict and work together in the interests of their children.

This support comes alongside the government’s wider commitment to families through the introduction of the Family Test and the Troubled Families programme which aims to turn around the lives of 120,000 of the most troubled families in England by the end of this Parliament.