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Information since 17 Jan 2022, 8:10 a.m.


Parliamentary Debates
Midwives in the NHS
21 speeches (4,667 words)
Monday 17th January - Commons Chamber
Department of Health and Social Care
Eating Disorders
20 speeches (1,683 words)
Monday 17th January - Lords Chamber
Department of Health and Social Care
Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (Self-Isolation) (England) (Amendment) (No. 5) Regulations 2021 Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (Entry to Venues and Events) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2021
10 speeches (2,496 words)
Monday 17th January - General Committees
Department of Health and Social Care
Covid-19: Vaccinations for School Pupils
20 speeches (1,719 words)
Monday 17th January - Lords Chamber
Department of Health and Social Care


Written Answers
Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Daisy Cooper (Liberal Democrat - St Albans)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will introduce a mechanism for GPs to update the NIMS database where (a) patient vaccine records have been missed or (b) they have been vaccinated overseas.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Public Health: Finance
Asked by: Andrew Gwynne (Labour - Denton and Reddish)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the definition of real terms protection is in regards to local authority public health funding for 2022-23.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

General Practitioners: Liverpool City Region
Asked by: Dan Carden (Labour - Liverpool, Walton)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential effect of pressures resulting from the covid-19 outbreak on GP staff retention in (a) Liverpool, Walton constituency and (b) the Liverpool City Region.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

We have no plans to make a specific assessment. However, we have established a £250 million Winter Access Fund to support general practitioner practices and increase capacity. We are working with NHS England and NHS Improvement and the profession to understand how we can improve staff retention and the working environment due to the impact of the pandemic.

Surgery
Asked by: Daniel Kawczynski (Conservative - Shrewsbury and Atcham)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to avoid the cancellation of planned surgery.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

In light of the spread of the Omicron variant, we are prioritising vaccinations and urgent appointments. Any decisions to temporarily pause elective activity will be taken to prevent the spread of the virus and to protect the National Health Service. The NHS will maintain services wherever possible, particularly for urgent and cancer care. We have provided £2 billion in 2021/22 and a further £8 billion in the next three years to increase activity and tackle backlogs in elective care services.

Long Covid: Research
Asked by: Barry Sheerman (Labour (Co-op) - Huddersfield)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that the UK is participating in research into long covid and possible treatments.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Government has invested £50 million in a research programme to address the long term physical and mental health effects of COVID-19. These studies will use the available evidence to identify the causes and the best treatments to help those affected to recover. We will continue to take into account the full range of research being undertaken internationally.

NHS Trusts: Health Services
Asked by: Barry Sheerman (Labour (Co-op) - Huddersfield)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS Trusts have not restarted elective services since March 2020.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

All National Health Service trusts have restarted elective services. The NHS aims to maintain levels of care through the separation of elective and non-elective capacity to maximise elective activity, while managing pressures in urgent and emergency care.

Long Covid: Health Services
Asked by: Rachael Maskell (Labour (Co-op) - York Central)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the average cost to the NHS of treating a person suffering from long covid.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The information is not available in the format requested, as symptoms can vary in range, duration or severity and individuals may require different levels of support.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Mike Amesbury (Labour - Weaver Vale)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking in Weaver Vale constituency to meet the Government's target of offering all adults over the age of 18 a covid-19 booster vaccination by the end of January 2022.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Cheshire and Merseyside Health and Care Partnership’s vaccination programme has delivered more than 4.3 million doses to date. The programme is currently ensuring there are sufficient appointments to offer all adults over 18 years old a booster dose by the end of January 2022.

General practitioners (GPs) in Weaver Vale are visiting care homes to ensure that care home residents and staff who are eligible have been offered a booster vaccine, with follow up appointments for residents who become eligible in the future. GP partners in Weaver Vale are reviewing ways to increase capacity to focus on vaccinating the most vulnerable. Several pharmacy sites are increasing their capacity to offer vaccinations over the Christmas and New Year period. Cheshire system partners are operating a roving vaccination model to meet the needs of those most at risk, underserved and vaccine hesitant citizens, offering a walk-in service. Plans to increase capacity are being finalised and will be aligned to national operational guidance.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Rachael Maskell (Labour (Co-op) - York Central)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what advice he has received from Government health advisers on an individual's likelihood to transmit the Omnicron covid-19 variant up to 10 weeks after they have been vaccinated.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Alzheimer's Disease
Asked by: Stuart Anderson (Conservative - Wolverhampton South West)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to support people and families affected by Alzheimer's disease.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

Following diagnosis, those with dementia should receive information on local services and access to relevant advice and support. Carers should be made aware of and offered the opportunity for respite and supported with their caring responsibilities. The Department’s guidance ‘After diagnosis of dementia: what to expect from health and care services’ is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/after-a-diagnosis-of-dementia-what-to-expect-from-health-and-care-services/after-diagnosis-of-dementia-what-to-expect-from-health-and-care-services

We are working with stakeholders and the health and care system to identify and implement actions to support people with dementia and their carers. We will be setting out our plans on dementia for England for future years in 2022. This new dementia strategy will include a focus on improving the experience of being diagnosed and living with dementia.

Hospitals: Discharges
Asked by: Barry Sheerman (Labour (Co-op) - Huddersfield)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact that current delays to hospital discharge are having on waiting times for NHS services.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

No formal assessment has been made. Guidance on hospital discharge was issued in November 2021 and details of additional measures to reduce the number of people delayed from leaving acute hospitals has been communicated to National Health Service organisations and local authorities. Since March 2020, we established a national discharge taskforce and allocated £3.3 billion available to support safe and timely hospital discharge.

Health: Females
Asked by: Navendu Mishra (Labour - Stockport)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to publish its response to the Women’s Health Strategy consultation, which closed on 13 June 2021.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

On 23 December 2021, we published ‘Our Vision for the Women’s Health Strategy for England’ and the results of the call for evidence survey. We will publish the analysis of written submissions in due course and the Women’s Health Strategy in the spring.

Vaccination
Asked by: Matthew Offord (Conservative - Hendon)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the Government plans to publish its vaccine strategy.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

England’s vaccine strategy has been delayed due to the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The strategy is kept under review as our understanding of COVID-19, its vaccines, vaccination programmes and its impacts develop.

Social Services: Conditions of Employment and Pay
Asked by: Barry Sheerman (Labour (Co-op) - Huddersfield)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact of the current rate of pay and working conditions on the number of vacancies in the social care sector.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

No formal assessment has been made.

Dentistry: Qualifications
Asked by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to amend the five-year time limit in the General Dental Council’s Overseas Registration Exam to take account of the impact of the covid-19 pandemic and to support candidates who have reached or are approaching that five year limit.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Dentists Act 1984 requires overseas applicants to the General Dental Council’s (GDC) register to undertake its Overseas Registration Exam (ORE) to confirm they have the requisite skills and knowledge to practise dentistry in the United Kingdom.

In April 2020, the GDC suspended Parts 1 and 2 of the ORE due to the restrictions in place to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. On 2 December 2021, the GDC announced a planned sitting of the Part 2 exam in January 2022.

The legislation restricts the GDC from offering Part 2 ORE places to candidates where five or more years have passed since they first attempted Part 1 of the exam. Therefore, the GDC has not been able to offer places on the January 2022 exam sitting to any candidates whose five-year period has expired. Officials have worked with the GDC to develop proposals which will provide these candidates with additional time to take the Part 2 assessment in the future. We plan to consult on this proposed legislative change in early 2022.

Parkinson's Disease: Respite Care
Asked by: Sarah Green (Liberal Democrat - Chesham and Amersham)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking alongside local authorities to ensure that there is adequate funding to provide carers of people with Parkinson's-related dementia with respite and breaks.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

Local authorities are required to undertake an assessment of any carer who requires support. This assessment records the impact on the carer and review their needs, including whether they are willing or able to continue caring.

The ‘People at the Heart of Care’ white paper states that we will invest up to £25 million to work with the sector to improve the services provided to support unpaid carers. This will identify and test a range of new and existing interventions to support unpaid carers, including respite care and breaks. Additionally, as part of the provisional Local Government Finance Settlement, local authorities will have access to over £1 billion for social care in 2022/23.

Novavax: Licensing
Asked by: Martyn Day (Scottish National Party - Linlithgow and East Falkirk)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress is being made on the approval of Novavax for use in the UK; and if he will make a statement.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is unable to comment on products not approved for use in the United Kingdom due to commercial and market sensitivities. We are therefore unable to provide a timetable for the approval of the Novavax vaccine. Any route to approval of new vaccine treatments will be subject to the developer seeking regulatory approval from the MHRA. As with all other COVID-19 vaccines, the MHRA will ensure a thorough and expedited assessment of its safety and efficacy before any authorisation.

Dental Services and Pharmacy: Isle of Wight
Asked by: Bob Seely (Conservative - Isle of Wight)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will take steps to increase support for the provision of independent pharmacies and dentists on the Isle of Wight.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The need for pharmaceutical services is assessed on a three-yearly basis by local authority Health and Wellbeing Boards. The current assessment for the Isle of Wight concluded that the number and distribution of services is adequate to provide pharmaceutical services to the population. NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with Portsmouth Clinical Commissioning Group and the local authority to consider how the provision of dentistry in the Isle of Wight can be supported.

Care Workers and Health Services: Coronavirus
Asked by: Rachael Maskell (Labour (Co-op) - York Central)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate he has made of the number of people who stop working in (a) the NHS and (b) social care following the implementation of mandatory covid-19 vaccinations for those staff.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department’s impact assessment estimated the number of workers who may remain unvaccinated against COVID-19 at the end of the 12-week grace period and are not medically exempt. For National Health Service staff, this is estimated to be 4.9% or 73,000 and 7.6% or 38,000 for social care staff. We continue to encourage unvaccinated staff to make the positive choice to be vaccinated.

The latest data as of 13 January 2022 shows that since the Government’s consultation on the policy in September 2021, there has been a net increase of NHS trust healthcare workers vaccinated with a first dose of over 81,000. For social care, the data shows there has been a net increase of over 20,000 social care workers vaccinated with a first dose.

Care Workers and Health Services: Coronavirus
Asked by: Rachael Maskell (Labour (Co-op) - York Central)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will review the Government's plan for mandatory vaccinations of NHS and care staff in light of evidence that transmission of covid-19 can still occur 10 weeks post-vaccination.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

We continue to consider the latest evidence and clinical advice to inform policy. We remain committed to the vaccination requirements coming into force on 1 April 2022.

Mental Health Services: Waiting Lists
Asked by: Rosena Allin-Khan (Labour - Tooting)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress he has made on the implementation of NHS England’s proposed new waiting time standards for mental health care, first published on and opened for public consultation on 22 July 2021; and what additional resources his Department is planning to provide to help support the NHS to achieve those standards.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

NHS England and NHS Improvement will publish the response to the consultation on the proposals for new waiting time standards in due course. The Department will work with NHS England and NHS Improvement on an implementation plan to consider the operational and financial implications of delivering the standards.

General Practitioners
Asked by: Daniel Kawczynski (Conservative - Shrewsbury and Atcham)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has plans to bring forward legislative proposals to give a legal right to patients to request a face-to-face appointment with their GP.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

We have no current plans to do so. NHS England and NHS Improvement’s guidance states that patients’ input into choices on appointment mode should be sought. Practices should respect preferences for face-to-face care unless there are good clinical reasons to the contrary.

Eyesight: Health Services
Asked by: Matthew Offord (Conservative - Hendon)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will introduce a national eye care strategy.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

There are currently no plans to introduce a national eye health strategy. However, NHS England and NHS Improvement are recruiting a National Clinical Director for Eye Care to lead improvements in eye care services.

General Practitioners: Liverpool West Derby
Asked by: Ian Byrne (Labour - Liverpool, West Derby)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to increase the availability of (a) GP appointments and (b) face to face GP appointments in Liverpool, West Derby constituency.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

General practitioners (GPs) have been asked to prioritise vaccinations and emergency care for the duration of the COVID-19 booster campaign. While some non-urgent appointments may need to be postponed, general practice, NHS 111 and community pharmacy teams are available for everyone with concerns about their health.

Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group has advised that commissioners are strongly encouraged to make local arrangements for extended access provision, where agreed with Primary Care Networks (PCNs). Central Liverpool PCN is currently operating a pilot scheme for enhanced access. All PCNs in Liverpool will be providing enhanced access for patients in their area by October 2022, taking into account any findings from the pilot.

Social Services
Asked by: Lord Hunt of Kings Heath (Labour - Life peer)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the survey by the Association of Directors in Adult Social Services, published on 29 November, and (2) in particular, the findings that (a) almost 400,000 people are now waiting for an assessment of their needs, and (b) more than 1.5 million hours of commissioned home care could not be provided between August and September because of a lack of staff.

Answered by Lord Kamall - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

We have noted the results of this survey, which improves the evidence base for the demand for social care and current issues of concern to local authority leaders in the sector. Local authorities are responsible for assessing an individual’s eligibility for care and support and for meeting care needs in their local area. On 10 December 2021 we announced £300 million to support local authorities and care providers to recruit and retain staff through winter. This is in addition to the existing £162.5 million Workforce Recruitment and Retention Fund. We have also launched a new phase of our national recruitment campaign which will run until March 2022.

Abortion
Asked by: Carla Lockhart (Democratic Unionist Party - Upper Bann)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Answer of 27 April 2021 to Question 179697, on Abortion, whether his Department has plans to investigate illegal abortions occurring over the ten week limit for medical abortion at home.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department continues to work with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to monitor the temporary approval of home use of both early medical abortion pills up to 10 weeks gestation. This includes sharing information between the CQC and Department where serious incidents related to the temporary approval take place. Concerns relating to a potential breach of abortion legislation should be reported to the police. Decisions to bring a prosecution in relation to the law on abortion are for the police and the Crown Prosecution Service.

Abortion
Asked by: Carla Lockhart (Democratic Unionist Party - Upper Bann)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what measures are in place to ensure that home abortions taking place after the legal limit of ten weeks are reported to the police; and which health bodies are responsible for ensuring that that reporting is undertaken.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department continues to work with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to monitor the temporary approval of home use of both early medical abortion pills up to 10 weeks gestation. This includes sharing information between the CQC and Department where serious incidents related to the temporary approval take place. Concerns relating to a potential breach of abortion legislation should be reported to the police. Decisions to bring a prosecution in relation to the law on abortion are for the police and the Crown Prosecution Service.

Magnetic Resonance Imagers
Asked by: Lord Mendelsohn (Labour - Life peer)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask Her Majesty's Government how much the NHS has invested in multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging scanners in the last three years.

Answered by Lord Kamall - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The information requested on the number of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) capable scanners and the investment in such scanners in the last three years is not held centrally.

However, NHS England and NHS Improvement’s national magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) specification includes the capability to perform mpMRI for prostate cancer. A total of 97 MRI machines were purchased through the £200 million equipment replacement programme to this specification from October 2019 to March 2021. NHS trusts are encouraged to adopt the national specification as a minimum requirement when purchasing new MRI equipment.

Coronavirus: Screening
Asked by: Anna McMorrin (Labour - Cardiff North)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will take steps to refund people who have paid for PCR tests but who have not received results from (a) Test n Go and (b) 1010 Labs; and if he will take steps to remove those companies from the Government's recommendations on GOV.UK.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Fleur Anderson (Labour - Putney)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of people with severe allergies who are eligible for a covid-19 vaccine exemption pass.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Rachael Maskell (Labour (Co-op) - York Central)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with Government health advisers on the need for a second covid-19 booster jab.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Daisy Cooper (Liberal Democrat - St Albans)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 22 November 2021 to Question 76833 on Coronavirus: Vaccination, what progress has been made on the expansion of the service that allows individuals who have received a vaccination overseas to access a Covid Pass.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Telemedicine
Asked by: Daniel Kawczynski (Conservative - Shrewsbury and Atcham)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) clinical effect and (b) safety of the increased use of telephone consultations in primary care.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

No specific assessment has yet been made. The Department is working with NHS England and NHS Improvement and NHSX and local commissioners to monitor and assess the extent to which general practice teams have the equipment and skills to provide remote consultations.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Wes Streeting (Labour - Ilford North)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many vaccine doses in England were disposed of in each of the last six months due to passing their expiry date.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Telemedicine
Asked by: Daniel Kawczynski (Conservative - Shrewsbury and Atcham)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential link between the increased use of telephone consultations in primary care and attendances at A&E.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

No specific assessment has been made.

Eating Disorders: Mental Health Services
Asked by: Rosena Allin-Khan (Labour - Tooting)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the NHS’s ability to effectively offer care to children with an eating disorder in the context of increases in the number of hospital admissions for eating disorders.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

While data has shown a significant increase in demand for the treatment of eating disorders, the number of children and young people beginning treatment has also increased.

We are investing an additional £79 million in 2021/22 to expand children’s mental health services, enabling 2,000 more children and young people to access eating disorder services. NHS England and NHS Improvement have announced a further £40 million in 2021/22 to address the impact of the pandemic on children and young people’s mental health, including for eating disorders. NHS England and NHS Improvement continue to work with system leaders and regions and ask that areas prioritise service delivery and investment to meet the needs of vulnerable young people.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Daisy Cooper (Liberal Democrat - St Albans)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2022 to Question 93068 on Coronavirus: Vaccination, if he will (a) urgently publish guidance and (b) introduce retraining for 119 call handlers to enable them to effectively refer patients who have received a covid-19 vaccination overseas to update their NIMS record.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

All 119 call handlers have received substantive and thorough training to effectively guide individuals who have been vaccinated abroad to an appropriate resolution. Call handlers are now able to make referrals to the national booking service.

Department of Health and Social Care: Disclosure of Information
Asked by: Emily Thornberry (Labour - Islington South and Finsbury)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many non-disclosure agreements his Department has signed with (a) companies and (b) trade associations from the 1 January 2021 to the 31 December 2021, inclusive.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

NHS: Negligence
Asked by: Preet Kaur Gill (Labour (Co-op) - Birmingham, Edgbaston)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications of the judgment in Evie Toombes v Dr Philip Mitchell [2021] EWHC 3234 (QB) for the medical profession and the NHS.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

NHS Resolution advise that there are no wider implications for the National Health Service other than the need for good records management by general practitioners (GPs) and other healthcare professionals.

NHS-commissioned general practices are required to keep adequate records of attendance and treatment of patients. The ‘Records Management Code of Practice 2021’, published by NHSX, provides a legal framework for consistent and effective records management based on established standards. The General Medical Council and the British Medical Association also provide guidance on good practice in relation to record keeping by clinicians.

Hospitals: Shropshire
Asked by: Daniel Kawczynski (Conservative - Shrewsbury and Atcham)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when a decision will be made on the submitted business case for the Shropshire hospitals transformation programme.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

As of 11 January 2022, the Department had not received the strategic outline business case (SOC), as it did not pass NHS England and NHS Improvement’s fundamental criteria review. On 28 October 2021, NHS England and NHS Improvement received the SOC from the Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust and determined that it required further work and provide an option compliant with the £312 million allocation. Written feedback on the SOC was issued to the Trust on 17 November 2021. The SOC is currently being amended by the Trust and NHS England and NHS Improvement are expecting it to be resubmitted in the first quarter of 2022.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Exercise
Asked by: Jim Shannon (Democratic Unionist Party - Strangford)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to NICE's updated guidance on exercise for sufferers of ME, whether his Department has plans to promote that information to health and social care staff.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence is working with the National Health Service to support the implementation of its guidance. While the guidance describes best practice and should be taken into account in the treatment of patients, it is not mandatory and does not override a medical practitioner’s clinical judgement.

Members: Correspondence
Asked by: John Penrose (Conservative - Weston-super-Mare)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters dated 1 October and 9 November 2021 from the hon. Member for Weston-super- Mare, regarding a constituent.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

We replied to the hon. Member on 14 January 2022.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Rachael Maskell (Labour (Co-op) - York Central)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, in the context of potential depletion in covid-19 vaccine efficacy, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure ongoing protections against covid-19.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Coronavirus: Drugs
Asked by: Vicky Foxcroft (Labour - Lewisham, Deptford)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance has been published for clinicians regarding covid-19 anti-viral treatment for clinically extremely vulnerable people.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Care Workers: Coronavirus
Asked by: Hilary Benn (Labour - Leeds Central)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether social care staff providing support to individuals in their own homes are required to be vaccinated against covid-19.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

Regulations to extend vaccination as a condition of deployment beyond residential care settings to any other Care Quality Commission (CQC) regulated activity in health and social care, subject to certain exemptions and conditions will come into force on 1 April 2022. The regulations require CQC-registered providers to ensure that anyone they deploy in the provision of this activity, who will have face to face contact with service users, has provided evidence of vaccination or exemption. This applies to home or domiciliary care services, supported living and extra care housing as well as other regulated activities. It does not apply where care is provided under a Shared Lives agreement. Activities which are not CQC-regulated, such as care provided by personal assistants, are not within the scope of the regulations.

Social Services: Conditions of Employment and Pay
Asked by: Barry Sheerman (Labour (Co-op) - Huddersfield)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve pay and conditions in the social care sector.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

The vast majority of care workers are employed by private sector providers who set their pay and conditions, independent of central Government. Local authorities work with care providers to determine a fair rate of pay based on local market conditions.

We have announced over £460 million in Workforce Recruitment and Retention Funds. Round two of the Fund can be used to enable local authorities and providers to bring forward planned rises in pay for the adult social care workforce in advance of the new financial year.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Fleur Anderson (Labour - Putney)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to provide a way of displaying covid-19 vaccination status for people without smartphones.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Coronavirus: East Yorkshire
Asked by: Greg Knight (Conservative - East Yorkshire)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to increase the availability of lateral flow tests in East Yorkshire constituency.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Ruth Jones (Labour - Newport West)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to improve covid-19 vaccine uptake among at-risk groups of people.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The COVID-19 vaccination programme has prioritised patients based on increased age and clinical risk factors such as underlying health conditions and pregnancy. To increase uptake among pregnant women, on 16 December 2021 the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advised that pregnant women of any age should be prioritised for vaccination and included in priority group six. We have provided vaccine toolkits to address concerns on pregnancy, breastfeeding and fertility and increased awareness through sharing stories of women of childbearing age who have already received the COVID-19 vaccine. NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with regional teams and providers to ensure that advice on vaccination in pregnancy, including the risks and benefits to pregnant women, is offered in antenatal services and primary care settings. A new campaign was launched on 10 January 2022 urging pregnant women who have not yet had their first, second, third or booster dose to receive their vaccination as soon as possible.

For those with underlying health conditions, resources are being provided to charities and patient organisations representing those living with clinical risk factors. NHS England and NHS Improvement are developing tailored communications for specialists caring for each group of eligible patients within the immunosuppressed cohort. This includes template referral letters for clinicians to signpost patients for vaccination. Patients with a weakened immune system can receive a third dose from a walk-in site if they have received a referral letter from their general practitioner or hospital doctor, they are aged 12 years old or over and eight weeks has elapsed since their second dose.

We are also ensuring that people with learning disabilities and autism have reasonable adjustments made within the vaccination programme. This includes training resources for vaccination teams, accessible information such as an easy read vaccination invitation letter and consent form and a film on the COVID-19 vaccine.

Coronavirus: Screening
Asked by: Vicky Foxcroft (Labour - Lewisham, Deptford)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Government's commitment to expedite access to antiviral treatment for people at high risk from covid-19, what estimate he has made of the number of PCR tests sent to people in that category.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

In England, approximately 1.3 million individuals have been pre-identified as potentially eligible under the clinical access policy for new treatments to reduce the risk of deterioration or hospitalisation from COVID-19 infection.  These patients have been notified by email or by letter, depending on the patient's contact preferences. Newly eligible patients can be referred by their general practitioner, NHS 111 or their hospital doctor, should they test positive for COVID-19. As of 7 January 2022, an estimated 1.26 million priority polymerase chain reaction test kits had been sent to patients in England who are in the highest risk group.

Coronavirus: Drugs
Asked by: Vicky Foxcroft (Labour - Lewisham, Deptford)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of letters sent by NHS England to people at high risk from covid-19 to inform them of the process for receiving antiviral treatment following a positive PCR test result.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

In England, approximately 1.3 million individuals have been pre-identified as potentially eligible under the clinical access policy for new treatments to reduce the risk of deterioration or hospitalisation from COVID-19 infection.  These patients have been notified by email or by letter, depending on the patient's contact preferences. Newly eligible patients can be referred by their general practitioner, NHS 111 or their hospital doctor, should they test positive for COVID-19. As of 7 January 2022, an estimated 1.26 million priority polymerase chain reaction test kits had been sent to patients in England who are in the highest risk group.

Eating Disorders: Mental Health Services
Asked by: Jim Shannon (Democratic Unionist Party - Strangford)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing dedicated facilities to treat children and young people with eating disorders at specialised hubs placed throughout the UK.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

We have made no such assessment. We have provided additional funding for children and young people's community eating disorder services, with £53 million per year from 2021/22.

This will enhance the capacity of the 70 new or improved community eating disorder teams in England.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have also announced a further £40 million in 2021/22 to address the impact of the pandemic on children and young people’s mental health, including eating disorders. Of this, £10 million of capital funding is providing additional beds at units for young people with the most complex needs, including eating disorders, £1.5 million to ensure there are additional facilities for children under 13 years old.

Mental Health Services
Asked by: Rosena Allin-Khan (Labour - Tooting)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the NHS is on track to reach the target of 1.9 million adults accessing IAPT treatment each year by 2023-24 as set out in the NHS Mental Health Implementation Plan 2019-20 to 2023-24; and what steps his Department is taking to support the NHS in reaching that target.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

The latest data for September 2021 shows that 102,252 referrals accessed Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. This is an increase from 95,793 referrals in August 2021. We are allocating an additional £500 million in 2021/22 to address waiting times for mental health services, provide greater access to mental health support and invest in the National Health Service workforce. Of this funding, £38 million will be used to increase capacity in IAPT services to improve access and maintain waiting times and recovery rates, through measures such as training and development of the workforce.

Eating Disorders: Mental Health Services
Asked by: Navendu Mishra (Labour - Stockport)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to make additional funding available for the treatment of eating disorders in young people in response to the data published by NHS Digital, Hospital admissions with a primary or secondary diagnosis of eating disorders, published on 4 January 2022.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

We have no such plans at present. However, we are investing an additional £79 million in 2021/22 to expand children’s mental health services to allow 2,000 more children and young people to access eating disorder services. NHS England and NHS Improvement have also announced a further £40 million in 2021/22 to address the impact of the pandemic on children and young people’s mental health, including eating disorders. This is in addition to at least £53 million a year being invested in children and young people's community eating disorder services to 2023/24 under the NHS Long Term Plan.

Mental Health Services: Coronavirus
Asked by: Rosena Allin-Khan (Labour - Tooting)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of mental health services to function effectively in the context of the additional pressure on health services as a result of high levels of covid-19 cases.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

Mental health services have remained open throughout the pandemic. Local health systems are asked to ensure that access to community-based mental health services is retained to ensure that those at risk and are most vulnerable can access treatment and care, with face-to-face care provided as far as possible.

On 24 December, NHS England and NHS Improvement published ‘2022-23 priorities and operational planning guidance’, setting out the services that systems have been asked to deliver during the current high levels of COVID-19 cases.

Cystic Fibrosis: Health Services
Asked by: Helen Hayes (Labour - Dulwich and West Norwood)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on specialist cystic fibrosis services of the rollout of Statutory Integrated Care Systems.

Answered by Gillian Keegan - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Long Covid: Health Services
Asked by: Barry Sheerman (Labour (Co-op) - Huddersfield)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what types of support are being provided to people with long covid; and what assessment he has made of the impact of that support on recipients.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

COVID-19 is a new disease and it is not yet clear what the physical, psychological and rehabilitation needs will be for those experiencing long-term effects. As our understanding develops, we will ensure the correct support is in place.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have established specialist services in England to assess adults, children and young people experiencing long-term effects of COVID-19 infection and direct them to appropriate care pathways. The ‘Your COVID Recovery’ online service also provides an interactive and personalised recovery programme.

Bowel Cancer: Screening
Asked by: Tracey Crouch (Conservative - Chatham and Aylesford)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending the bowel screening faecal immunochemical test (FIT) to people (a) over the age of 50 and (b) over the age of 45.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

In 2018, Ministers accepted the UK National Screening Committee’s recommendation to offer bowel screening from the age of 50 to 74 years old using the faecal immunochemical home test kit. This is gradually being implemented by the National Health Service with invitations now issued to those aged 56 years old and over. Any proposal to offer bowel screening below the recommended age of 50 years old would require a submission to the UK National Screening Committee via its major modification process for consideration.

Long Covid
Asked by: Rachael Maskell (Labour (Co-op) - York Central)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason he is not requiring the clinical coding of long covid.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

NHS Digital has established clinical codes for post-COVID-19 syndrome. Codes have been incorporated into primary care electronic record systems since January 2021. NHS England and NHS Improvement continue to promote and facilitate the uptake of appropriate clinical coding for care in primary care and post-COVID assessment services. The diagnostic coding is aligned to the clinical case definition published by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. The SNOMED-CT codes are as follows:

- Acute COVID-19 infection 1325171000000109;

- Ongoing symptomatic COVID-19 1325181000000106; and

- Post-COVID-19 syndrome 1325161000000102.

Long Covid: Young People
Asked by: Desmond Swayne (Conservative - New Forest West)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will take steps to ensure the availability of multi-disciplinary medical treatment for 16 and 17 year old patients with long covid who cannot access paediatric services and have been refused access to long covid clinics.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

National commissioning guidance published by NHS England and NHS Improvement details services which should be available to support people of all ages with a likely diagnosis of post-COVID syndrome. This is regardless of whether they received a positive COVID-19 test or were managed in hospital or the community. The guidance is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/publication/national-guidance-for-post-covid-syndrome-assessment-clinics/

In general, young people aged 16 and 17 years old should access adult post-COVID specialist services. There are a small number of localities where access for this group is through the specialist paediatric hubs, which will accept direct referrals.

Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust: Surgery
Asked by: Barry Sheerman (Labour (Co-op) - Huddersfield)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to reduce waiting times for surgery in the Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust has reopened elective services and is working towards safely reducing their waiting lists. The Trust has an elective recovery programme in place, supported by the local clinical commissioning groups. This includes the use of independent sector to treat patients in community settings and use theatres and outpatient facilities at the weekend. The Trust has also optimised its use of technology, to deliver timely and convenient care for patients and health inequalities data is complementing its clinical prioritisation to minimise the risk of treatment delays.

We have made £2 billion available in 2021/22 and a further £8 billion in the next three years to increase activity and tackle backlogs in elective care in England.

NHS: Vacancies
Asked by: Barry Sheerman (Labour (Co-op) - Huddersfield)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of staff vacancies in the NHS on patient mortality rates.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

We have not made a formal assessment. Safe staffing levels remain the responsibility of local clinical and other leaders, supported by national guidance and regulated by the Care Quality Commission.

Monthly workforce statistics for October 2021 show over 1.2 million full time equivalent staff. Since October 2020, there are 4,800 more doctors, over 10,900 more nurses and over 44,700 more National Health Service Health and Community Hospital Services staff in total. We are on schedule to deliver 50,000 more nurses by the end of this Parliament and we have also funded an additional 1,500 undergraduate medical school places each year for domestic students in England.

Long Covid
Asked by: Rachael Maskell (Labour (Co-op) - York Central)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how long, on average, someone has symptoms of long covid.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The information is not available in the format requested. The majority of people who experience on-going symptoms following COVID-19 infection will recover in time, although the duration of symptoms will vary from person to person.

Coronavirus: Drugs
Asked by: Vicky Foxcroft (Labour - Lewisham, Deptford)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of people at high risk from covid-19 who are eligible to receive antiviral treatment following a positive PCR test result.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

Since December 2021, National Health Service patients can access new COVID-19 therapies, including antivirals and monoclonal antibodies which can reduce the risk of becoming hospitalised. 1.3 million of the highest risk patients in the United Kingdom are eligible for antivirals directly. This cohort include patients at highest risk of hospitalisation and deterioration following a COVID-19 infection. Should they receive a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, they will be assessed by clinicians and offered antiviral or antibody treatments from a COVID Medicines Delivery Unit, if eligible.

Over 20 million people are eligible for antivirals through the new PANORAMIC national study run by the University of Oxford. The study is open to individuals living anywhere in the UK who received a positive PCR test, are aged 50 years old and over or are aged 18 to 49 years old with an underlying medical condition that can increase the risk of developing severe COVID-19.

Physiotherapy: Waiting Lists
Asked by: Catherine West (Labour - Hornsey and Wood Green)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he taking to improve waiting times for patient access to NHS physiotherapy.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

NHS England and NHS Improvement’s Best Musculoskeletal Health national improvement programme is working with community services to address any unwanted variations in waiting times for National Health Service physiotherapy.

Pregnancy: Ethnic Groups
Asked by: Navendu Mishra (Labour - Stockport)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the forthcoming Women’s Health Strategy will tackle health inequalities, including in maternal health for Black, Asian and ethnic minority women.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

Work is ongoing to develop the Women’s Health Strategy, which will tackle health inequalities and address improving outcomes for mothers and babies, including a focus on reducing maternal and neonatal disparities. The Women’s Health Strategy will be published in spring 2022.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Daisy Cooper (Liberal Democrat - St Albans)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) people have successfully added overseas vaccinations to their NIMS record at a regional vaccination centre to access a Covid Pass and (b) appointments had been made available for this purpose by 11 January 2021.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Public Health: Finance
Asked by: Andrew Gwynne (Labour - Denton and Reddish)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential impact on local authorities of the delay in notifying those bodies of their public health grant allocations for 2022-23.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Health Services: Coronavirus
Asked by: Stella Creasy (Labour (Co-op) - Walthamstow)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the details of the ministerial direction he has issued regarding the New Covid Surge Deal With the Independent Health Sector including providing (a) the costs of arrangements including how much the NHS will pay per patient, (b) what budget the money will come from and whether Trust budgets or NHSE and (c) whether the deal specifies if the private sector will be required to prioritise NHS patients over private patients.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Coronavirus: County Durham
Asked by: Kevan Jones (Labour - North Durham)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the availability of lateral flow covid-19 tests in County Durham.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Public Health: Finance
Asked by: Andrew Gwynne (Labour - Denton and Reddish)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, on what date the local authority public health grant allocations for 2022-23 will be publicly released.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Coronavirus: Drugs
Asked by: Vicky Foxcroft (Labour - Lewisham, Deptford)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the success rate of people at high risk from covid-19 being able to access antiviral treatment within five days of a positive PCR test result.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

Sufficient data is not yet available on the average treatment time from the point of a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. However, the United Kingdom-wide clinical access policy for monoclonal antibody and antiviral treatments for patients at highest risk confirms that treatment should be provided within five days of a positive PCR test and within five days of symptom onset. This is in line with the medicines’ market authorisations. The PANORAMIC national study protocol also specifies that antivirals must be administered within five days of a positive PCR result for patients randomised for treatment within the study.

Coronavirus: Drugs
Asked by: Vicky Foxcroft (Labour - Lewisham, Deptford)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate he has made of the average time taken for people at high risk from covid-19 to receive antiviral treatment following a positive PCR test result.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

Sufficient data is not yet available on the average treatment time from the point of a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. However, the United Kingdom-wide clinical access policy for monoclonal antibody and antiviral treatments for patients at highest risk confirms that treatment should be provided within five days of a positive PCR test and within five days of symptom onset. This is in line with the medicines’ market authorisations. The PANORAMIC national study protocol also specifies that antivirals must be administered within five days of a positive PCR result for patients randomised for treatment within the study.

Coronavirus: Screening
Asked by: Baroness McIntosh of Pickering (Conservative - Life peer)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask Her Majesty's Government why they stopped funding workplace testing for COVID-19; and whether that decision will be kept under review.

Answered by Lord Kamall - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

Workplace testing ended in England at the end of July and employers were encouraged to direct their employees to order home tests from GOV.UK, collect from local pharmacies or order via the 119 service. The introduction of these citizen-direct testing channels meant that workplace testing was no longer required. Workplace testing will continue in some sectors where there is a particular need and the Department will continue to monitor any issues in other sectors. We have also announced that we will deliver tests to workplaces to allow 100,000 workers in priority, critical roles to test daily for the next five weeks. Roll out started from Monday 10th January. Tests will be separate from public sectors who already have a testing allocation with UK Health Security Agency, such as adult social care or education, and separate to those delivered to pharmacies and homes, so those channels will not be impacted by the new scheme.

Cancer: Magnetic Resonance Imagers
Asked by: Lord Mendelsohn (Labour - Life peer)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging scans are in use in each Cancer Alliance.

Answered by Lord Kamall - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The information requested on the number of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) capable scanners and the investment in such scanners in the last three years is not held centrally.

However, NHS England and NHS Improvement’s national magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) specification includes the capability to perform mpMRI for prostate cancer. A total of 97 MRI machines were purchased through the £200 million equipment replacement programme to this specification from October 2019 to March 2021. NHS trusts are encouraged to adopt the national specification as a minimum requirement when purchasing new MRI equipment.

Care Homes: Coronavirus
Asked by: Matt Western (Labour - Warwick and Leamington)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of care homes were yet to be visited to deliver booster doses of covid-19 vaccinations as of (a) 25 December 2021 and (b) 7 January 2022.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

As of 30 December 2021, 5,893 or 39% of care homes, including both older adult and non-older adult care homes, had been visited on more than one occasion. As of 25 December 2021, 25 care homes or 0.16% care homes were yet to be visited. As of 7 January 2022, seven or 0.05% of care homes were yet to be visited. Delays in visiting the remaining care homes were due to outbreaks, therefore visits could not take place until the 28-day isolation period was over.

Care Homes: Coronavirus
Asked by: Matt Western (Labour - Warwick and Leamington)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of care homes have been visited to deliver booster doses of covid-19 vaccinations on more than one occasion.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

As of 30 December 2021, 5,893 or 39% of care homes, including both older adult and non-older adult care homes, had been visited on more than one occasion. As of 25 December 2021, 25 care homes or 0.16% care homes were yet to be visited. As of 7 January 2022, seven or 0.05% of care homes were yet to be visited. Delays in visiting the remaining care homes were due to outbreaks, therefore visits could not take place until the 28-day isolation period was over.

Coronavirus: Vaccination
Asked by: Rachael Maskell (Labour (Co-op) - York Central)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his latest assessment of the (a) durability and (b) average duration of the booster covid-19 vaccine in holding immunity is.

Answered by Maggie Throup - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

Recent data on the Omicron variant shows that two to four weeks after a booster dose, vaccine effectiveness against symptomatic infection ranged from approximately 65 to 75%, reducing to 55 to 70% at five to nine weeks and 40 to 50% from 10 or more weeks. Vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation is higher at approximately 95% at two to nine weeks and remaining at 90% at 10 weeks and over in those aged 65 years old and over who have received a booster dose.



Petitions

Don't require or advise asymptomatic people to take covid-19 tests

Petition Open - 14 Signatures

Sign this petition 17 Jul 2022
closes in 5 months, 4 weeks

The Government should remove all testing requirements and guidance for people who do not display Covid-19 symptoms. Asymptomatic people should not be prevented or discouraged from going to work or school, or attending events by any requirement or recommendation that they take a covid-19 test.



Bill Documents
Jan. 17 2022
HL Bill 71-III(a) Amendments for Committee (Supplementary to the Third Marshalled List)
Health and Care Bill 2021-22 - Government Bill
Amendment Paper
Jan. 12 2022
16th Report of the Delegated Powers and Regulatory Reform Committee
Health and Care Bill 2021-22 - Government Bill
Select Committee report


Tweets
Department of Health and Social Care
17 Jan 2022, 11:10 a.m.

Almost one million #COVID19 jabs have been given in Manchester and anyone who's not yet been vaccinated can still come forward 🐝 We met @ManCityCouncil director of public health David Regan & GP @doctormkumar to find out more 👇 Watch our full video: https://t.co/PEXiPSPAgv https://t.co/EbuA5AZmzU

Tweet Link
Department of Health and Social Care
17 Jan 2022, 8 a.m.

Self-isolation guidance for people who test positive for COVID-19 in England has changed. From today, people can leave self-isolation after five full days if they test negative on days 5 and 6. Swipe for details 👇

Tweet Link
Department of Health and Social Care
17 Jan 2022, 11:45 a.m.

Feelings of anxiety and depression can affect anyone. If you need support with your mental health, the NHS is here to help you. Speak to your GP, or refer yourself online at https://t.co/QRHbNXvFQs. @NHSEngland | #BlueMonday | #HelpUsHelpYou. https://t.co/4HI18be7WG

Tweet Link
Department of Health and Social Care
17 Jan 2022, 4:04 p.m.

#COVID19 VACCINE UPDATE: Daily figures on the total number of COVID-19 booster & third doses that have been given in the UK. As of 17 January, 36,473,316 booster & third vaccine doses have been given in the UK. Visit the @UKHSA dashboard for details: https://t.co/cQkuLQglz1 https://t.co/nbUqZsj0qN

Tweet Link
Department of Health and Social Care
17 Jan 2022, 5:17 p.m.

Vaccines Minister @Maggie_Erewash visited the #COVID19 vaccination centre at the Etihad Campus in Manchester today. Walk-in sites are available across Greater Manchester for anyone who is yet to have their first, second or booster jabs. @NCAlliance_NHS @GM_HSC https://t.co/rsydrhAmPR

Tweet Link
Department of Health and Social Care
17 Jan 2022, 8 p.m.

There are ways to reach out for support and stay mentally well this winter. 🧠 Check out Every Mind Matters and activities in your local area 👩‍ Speak to your GP if you are struggling 📞 Contact Samaritans if you or someone you know is in crisis Find out more 👇 #BlueMonday

Tweet Link
Department of Health and Social Care
17 Jan 2022, 12:30 p.m.

Over time, two doses of the #COVID19 vaccine do not give enough protection against the virus. #GetBoostedNow and get protected. ▶️ https://t.co/V59aHTDibv https://t.co/4F9VRGALwS

Tweet Link
Department of Health and Social Care
17 Jan 2022, 9:30 p.m.

It's never too late to come forward for the #COVID19 vaccination. You can still book an appointment or go to a walk-in centre for your first or second dose. More info ➡️ https://t.co/PKVgX1hLvB https://t.co/SqxK6xI53P

Tweet Link



Department of Health and Social Care mentioned

Written Answers
Children: Social Services
Asked by: Sarah Green (Liberal Democrat - Chesham and Amersham)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department for Education:

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to support early intervention services in children's social care.

Answered by Will Quince - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)

In the autumn budget a combined Department for Education, Department of Health and Social Care, and Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities package of £500 million for Early Help was announced. This includes a £300 million package to transform ‘Start for Life’ services and create a network of family hubs in half of council areas in England and a £200 million uplift to the Supporting Families programme.

The additional funding for Supporting Families takes the total investment to £695 million over the next 3 years, around a 40% real-terms uplift in funding for the programme by 2024-25.

Kickstart Scheme: Social Services
Asked by: Jonathan Ashworth (Labour (Co-op) - Leicester South)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department for Work and Pensions:

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the potential for the Government's Kickstart scheme to fill vacancies in the social care sector.

Answered by Mims Davies - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)

I refer the Honourable Member to the answer given for PQ 87676 for a recent breakdown of Kickstart jobs made available and started by sector. This shows that as of 5th December 2021, 4,740 Kickstart jobs within the social care sector were made available for young people to apply to and that 1,840 Kickstart jobs had been started by young people.

Kickstart jobs are categorised by the nature of the role rather than the sector of the employer. This means for example, that an administrative job within the social care sector would be categorised as ‘administrative’, rather than ‘social care’. Therefore, it’s likely that there are a number of other jobs with social care providers that have been categorised within other sectors.

We do not centrally collate information regarding jobs filled or advertised in the social care sector. To gather this would require each Kickstart application to be reviewed to ascertain the principle activities of each employer, which would incur disproportionate costs.

Kickstart jobs are additional and must not displace existing opportunities within the wider labour market. We continue to support employers to fill available jobs including those within the care sector for the remainder of the Kickstart Scheme.

More widely, DWP are working with the social care industry, and the Department of Health and Social Care, to provide our Work Coaches with the knowledge they need to identify suitable candidates and to develop relationships with social care employers in their local areas. As a result, local jobcentres are now directly connecting with employers in their area, to discuss their recruitment needs.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system which has been developed quickly. The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics, but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.

Kickstart Scheme: Social Services
Asked by: Jonathan Ashworth (Labour (Co-op) - Leicester South)
Monday 17th January 2022

Question to the Department for Work and Pensions:

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many social care providers have signed up to provide placements as part of the kickstart scheme.

Answered by Mims Davies - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)

I refer the Honourable Member to the answer given for PQ 87676 for a recent breakdown of Kickstart jobs made available and started by sector. This shows that as of 5th December 2021, 4,740 Kickstart jobs within the social care sector were made available for young people to apply to and that 1,840 Kickstart jobs had been started by young people.

Kickstart jobs are categorised by the nature of the role rather than the sector of the employer. This means for example, that an administrative job within the social care sector would be categorised as ‘administrative’, rather than ‘social care’. Therefore, it’s likely that there are a number of other jobs with social care providers that have been categorised within other sectors.

We do not centrally collate information regarding jobs filled or advertised in the social care sector. To gather this would require each Kickstart application to be reviewed to ascertain the principle activities of each employer, which would incur disproportionate costs.

Kickstart jobs are additional and must not displace existing opportunities within the wider labour market. We continue to support employers to fill available jobs including those within the care sector for the remainder of the Kickstart Scheme.

More widely, DWP are working with the social care industry, and the Department of Health and Social Care, to provide our Work Coaches with the knowledge they need to identify suitable candidates and to develop relationships with social care employers in their local areas. As a result, local jobcentres are now directly connecting with employers in their area, to discuss their recruitment needs.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system which has been developed quickly. The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics, but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.



Department Publications - Policy paper
Monday 17th January 2022
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Source Page: UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2022
Document: UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2022 (PDF)

Found: The Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) is working with its arms™ length bodies and other

Monday 17th January 2022
Ministry of Justice
Source Page: A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation
Document: Welsh version: A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation (PDF)

Found: Lleoliadau penodol, gyda MoJ/HMPPS a phartneria id allweddol yr Adran Iechyd a Gofal Cymdeithasol (DHSC

Monday 17th January 2022
Ministry of Justice
Source Page: A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation
Document: A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation (PDF)

Found: Target Date The Ministry of Justice should work with the Department of Health and Social Care and Welsh

Monday 17th January 2022
Ministry of Justice
Source Page: A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation
Document: inspection report for A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation (PDF)

Found: of Health and Social Care .



Non-Departmental Publications - Policy paper
Jan. 17 2022
Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service
Source Page: A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation
Document: inspection report for A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation (PDF)
Policy paper

Found: of Health and Social Care .

Jan. 17 2022
Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service
Source Page: A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation
Document: Welsh version: A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation (PDF)
Policy paper

Found: Lleoliadau penodol, gyda MoJ/HMPPS a phartneria id allweddol yr Adran Iechyd a Gofal Cymdeithasol (DHSC

Jan. 17 2022
Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service
Source Page: A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation
Document: A joint thematic inspection of community-based drug treatment and recovery work with people on probation (PDF)
Policy paper

Found: Target Date The Ministry of Justice should work with the Department of Health and Social Care and Welsh