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Written Question
Police: Uber
29 Sep 2020

Questioner: David Davis (CON - Haltemprice and Howden)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with police forces on information and intelligence obtained from Uber.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.


Written Question
Police: Uber
29 Sep 2020

Questioner: David Davis (CON - Haltemprice and Howden)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions Uber has provided information to police forces in (a) 2016, (b) 2017, (c) 2018, (d) 2019 and (e) 2020.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.


Written Question
Police: Uber
29 Sep 2020

Questioner: David Davis (CON - Haltemprice and Howden)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the necessary warrants have been in place for the sharing of information between Uber and police forces in (a) 2016, (b) 2017, (c) 2018, (d) 2019 and (e) 2020.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.


Written Question
Police: Uber
29 Sep 2020

Questioner: David Davis (CON - Haltemprice and Howden)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what role her Department has played in any data sharing agreements made between police forces and Uber.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.


Written Question
Police: Uber
29 Sep 2020

Questioner: David Davis (CON - Haltemprice and Howden)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the legal basis is for the sharing of intelligence from Uber to police forces without the prior granting of a warrant.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

Home Office officials work with law enforcement regularly to consider what data is operationally valuable to them and how they may lawfully access it. It is vital that police forces have the information they need to detect and prevent crime and keep the public safe.The legal routes available to police forces will depend on the specific circumstances and the types of data sought.

Under Common Law, the police have the power to obtain and store information for policing purposes for the prevention and detection of crime. Schedule 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) allows police to access data held in confidence by a third party, provided the data is relevant evidence of an indictable offence and it is authorised by a circuit Judge.

The Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) sets out the circumstances in which Public Authorities can acquire certain types of data and the safeguards that apply. The IPA is overseen by the independent Investigatory Powers Commissioner.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office collects a wide range of statistics on the use of investigatory powers. Section 234 of the IPA requires the publication of key statistics, including the number of warrants and authorisations issued, given, considered and approved during the year.

The Home Office do not keep information on the number of requests made to individual companies or data sharing agreements. The Police forces themselves, who are operationally independent, would hold this data.


Written Question
Drugs: Organised Crime
8 Feb 2019

Questioner: Joan Ryan

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent meetings his Department has had with representatives of (a) Addison Lee, (b) BlaBlaCar, (c) Gett, (d) HOPP (Taxify), (e) Kabee, (f) mytaxi and (g) other taxi, minicab and private hire vehicle companies on the county lines drug trade.

Answered by Victoria Atkins

Tackling county lines is a priority for this Government and to date we have rolled out a comprehensive package of communications and awareness raising activity with a range of key sectors, including transport partners.

However, specific engagement regarding county lines has taken place with the Licensed Private Hire Car Association, Uber, the National Institute of Licensing and National Association of Licensing Enforcement Officers.

In additional, materials have been shared with police forces and local authorities to disseminate to taxi companies as part of their engagement work on county lines activity.

To date there has been no engagement with Addison Lee, BlaBlaCar, Gett, HOPP (Taxify), Kabee or mytaxi.


Written Question
Crimes of Violence
12 Dec 2017

Questioner: Lord Ouseley

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, following recent moped-related snatch crimes and acid attacks, they intend to introduce special measures to tackle those crimes.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

In July 2017, the Home Secretary announced an action plan to tackle the use of acid and other corrosives substances in violent attacks. The action plan is based on four key strands: ensuring effective support for victims and survivors; effective policing; ensuring that relevant legislation is understood and consistently applied; and working with retailers to restrict access to acids and other harmful corrosive substances.

We are also consulting on new legislative proposals on new offences in respect of selling the most harmful corrosive substances to under 18s and possession of a corrosive substance in a public place.

On moped related crime, the Government is working with motorcycle and insurance industry leaders, the police, the Local Government Association, charities and representatives from the motorcycle riding community to identify a set of actions so that more can be done to prevent these crimes. This work sits alongside the review we have announced into the law, guidance and practice in relation to police pursuits and response driving.

Officials have met representatives from Uber and UberEats to discuss this issue. We have ensured they are in contact with the Metropolitan Police Service so that they are aware of these concerns and to discuss what practical advice can be provided to their couriers and drivers.


Written Question
Motorcycles: Crime
11 Dec 2017

Questioner: Stephen Timms (LAB - East Ham)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has had discussions with representatives of delivery firms whose drivers use mopeds on the risk of assault to their drivers; and if she will make a statement.

Answered by Victoria Atkins

In July 2017, the Home Secretary announced an action plan to tackle the use of acid and other corrosives substances in violent attacks. The action plan is based on four key strands: ensuring effective support for victims and survivors; effective policing; ensuring that relevant legislation is understood and consistently applied; and working with retailers to restrict access to acids and other harmful corrosive substances.

We are also consulting on new legislative proposals on new offences in respect of selling the most harmful corrosive substances to under 18s and possession of a corrosive substance in a public place.

On moped related crime, the Government is working with motorcycle and insurance industry leaders, the police, the Local Government Association, charities and representatives from the motorcycle riding community to identify a set of actions so that more can be done to prevent these crimes. This work sits alongside the review we have announced into the law, guidance and practice in relation to police pursuits and response driving.

Officials have had discussions with Uber and UberEats about their concerns about assaults being committed against their drivers and couriers. This in particular, covered the work underway to prevent attacks with acids and other corrosive substances and the work to tackle moped enabled crime.


Written Question
Motorcycles: Crime
11 Dec 2017

Questioner: Stephen Timms (LAB - East Ham)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what representations she has received about city neighbourhoods where moped delivery drivers are unwilling to make deliveries because of the danger of becoming a victim of crime; and if she will make a statement.

Answered by Victoria Atkins

In July 2017, the Home Secretary announced an action plan to tackle the use of acid and other corrosives substances in violent attacks. The action plan is based on four key strands: ensuring effective support for victims and survivors; effective policing; ensuring that relevant legislation is understood and consistently applied; and working with retailers to restrict access to acids and other harmful corrosive substances.

We are also consulting on new legislative proposals on new offences in respect of selling the most harmful corrosive substances to under 18s and possession of a corrosive substance in a public place.

On moped related crime, the Government is working with motorcycle and insurance industry leaders, the police, the Local Government Association, charities and representatives from the motorcycle riding community to identify a set of actions so that more can be done to prevent these crimes. This work sits alongside the review we have announced into the law, guidance and practice in relation to police pursuits and response driving.

Officials have met representatives from Uber and UberEats to discuss this issue. We have ensured they are in contact with the Metropolitan Police Service so that they are aware of these concerns and to discuss what practical advice can be provided to their couriers and drivers.


Written Question
Uber
28 Nov 2017

Questioner: Wes Streeting (LAB - Ilford North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what representations he has received from police forces relating to Uber.

Answered by John Hayes

The Department has received numerous representations regarding Uber from individuals, trade bodies, driver representation organisations and regulatory bodies. However, since the Department does not hold information categorised as requested, this information could only therefore be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Details of Ministerial meetings with external organisations are published on a quarterly basis and are available via the gov.uk website.

Officials at the Department are not required to keep record of meetings attended; it is not therefore possible to provide a comprehensive list of meetings with any party, including Uber. However, a search of diaries by officials most likely to meet with Uber and that are still at the Department indicates that there was one meeting in 2015, six in 2016 and three in 2017 (as of 24 November).


Written Question
Burma: Rohingya
3 Jun 2016

Questioner: Lord Hunt of Chesterton

Question

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what action they are taking to ensure that Uber drivers in London and other cities hold genuine driving licences and valid insurance; what penalties are applied by the police and others to Uber drivers who fail to meet those requirements; and what measures are being taken to ensure that owners of Uber vehicles pay the same level of taxes as owners of black cabs and minicabs.

Answered by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon

The licensing of private hire vehicles, operators and drivers is the responsibility of local licensing authorities, including Transport for London. The Department for Transport issues Best Practice Guidance to assist with this but it remains a licensing authority’s responsibility to enforce its licensing conditions. Driving without a valid driving licence or valid insurance are both offences, for which penalties, including fines and points on a licence, are ultimately a matter for the courts. Uber drivers have the same tax liability as any other self-employed person.