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Written Question
Nationality and Borders Bill
14 Jan 2022

Questioner: Stuart C McDonald (SNP - Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 4 November 2021 to Question 67180 and the oral contribution from the Minister for Justice and Tackling Illegal Migration to the Home Affairs Committee on 17 November 2021, when she will publish the economic impact assessment for the Nationality and Borders Bill.

Answered by Tom Pursglove

The Nationality and Borders Bill is part of our New Plan for Immigration, delivering the most comprehensive reform of the asylum system in decades.

As previously stated, an economic impact assessment of the Nationality and Borders Bill will be published in due course, to complement the Equality Impact Assessment, which was published on 16 September.

The Equality Impact Assessment can be found on the GOV.UK website; https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-nationality-and-borders-bill-equality-impact-assessment.


Written Question
British Nationality
14 Jan 2022

Questioner: Chi Onwurah (LAB - Newcastle upon Tyne Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the provisions of the Nationality and Borders Bill in respect of powers to remove British citizenship from people that the Government believes are eligible for foreign citizenship will apply to British citizens who are eligible for Israeli citizenship under Israel's law of return.

Answered by Tom Pursglove

Clause 9 of the Nationality and Borders Bill relates solely to how a person is notified of a decision to deprive them of their British citizenship. There is no change to the reasons for which a person could be deprived of their British citizenship or to their right of appeal.


Written Question
Nationality and Borders Bill
6 Jan 2022

Questioner: Alan Brown (SNP - Kilmarnock and Loudoun)

Question

To ask the Attorney General, what recent discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on the compatibility of the Nationality and Borders Bill with international law.

Answered by Suella Braverman

Any request for my advice is subject to the Law Officers’ Convention and this includes discussions with Cabinet colleagues on the compatibility of proposed legislation with international law.

The UK prides itself on its leadership within the international system, and that it discharges its international obligations in good faith.

Either the Solicitor General or I attend the Parliamentary Business and Legislation Committee, which scrutinises all of the government’s legislation before it reaches Parliament.


Written Question
British Nationality
20 Dec 2021

Questioner: Ruth Jones (LAB - Newport West)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether British citizens must be formally notified of any proposals to revoke their citizenship by the Government.

Answered by Kevin Foster

Section 40(5) of the British Nationality Act 1981 (BNA) requires the Secretary of State to give a person notice of a decision to deprive them of their citizenship before making the deprivation order.

The Nationality and Borders Bill allows for someone to be deprived of their citizenship without prior notice but only in exceptional circumstances. Those circumstances are where we do not know the person’s whereabouts, where it would not be reasonably practicable to give notice or where notice cannot be given for reasons of national security, in the interests of the relationship between the UK and another country or otherwise in the public interest.


Written Question
Refugees: International Assistance
20 Dec 2021

Questioner: Lyn Brown (LAB - West Ham)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the UNHCR Pledging Conference 2021: UK statement, published on 7 December 2021, what recent assessment she has made of the impact of the provisions in the Nationality and Borders Bill on the credibility of UK representatives.

Answered by James Cleverly

The Nationality and Borders Bill and the New Plan for Immigration, which Home Office are leading, will deliver the most comprehensive reform of the asylum system in decades. The UK has a proud history of supporting refugees, and this will continue. We will also continue to work closely with our international partners on what are shared global challenges. Ensuring refugees can access protection will remain central to our partnership with the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), other humanitarian agencies and Non-Governmental Organisations.


Written Question
Nationality and Borders Bill
13 Dec 2021

Questioner: Lord Hylton (CB - Excepted Hereditary)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to have discussions with (1) the Jesuit Refugee Service, (2) the Helen Bamber Foundation, (3) Refugee Action, (4) Care4Calais, and (5) other NGOs, before proceeding further with the Nationality and Borders Bill.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

The Nationality and Borders Bill is part of the Government’s New Plan for Immigration, which will deliver the most comprehensive reform of the asylum system in decades.

A public consultation on the Plan was held earlier this year. The Government published its response to the consultation in July, and this can be found on the GOV.UK website: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/new-plan-for-immigration.

The Government regularly engages with a number of NGOs as we develop and implement policies. We will continue to engage with individuals and groups as we take forward the Bill and deliver the New Plan for Immigration.


Written Question
Undocumented Migrants: Falkland Islands
10 Dec 2021

Questioner: Andrew Rosindell (CON - Romford)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential effect of sending illegal migrants from the UK to the Falkland Islands on the local population of that island.

Answered by Tom Pursglove

We have been clear we are committed to working closely with international partners as we work to fix our broken asylum system. The Government will not give a running commentary on the progress of talks or who we are in talks with.

Changes in the Nationality and Borders Bill support our future intention to process asylum claims overseas. This, alongside the suite of measures within the Bill, seeks to disincentivise people from making dangerous journeys across Europe to the UK and encourage people to claim asylum in the first safe country they reach. That is the fastest route to safety.

We will, of course, ensure that all removals are compliant with our international obligations. Every single person who is eligible for removal under this policy will be able to make representations where they are concerned the country in question would not be safe for them.


Written Question
Undocumented Migrants: Falkland Islands
10 Dec 2021

Questioner: Andrew Rosindell (CON - Romford)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of sending migrants that have entered the UK illegally to the Falklands for processing of their asylum claims.

Answered by Tom Pursglove

We have been clear we are committed to working closely with international partners as we work to fix our broken asylum system. The Government will not give a running commentary on the progress of talks or who we are in talks with.

Changes in the Nationality and Borders Bill support our future intention to process asylum claims overseas. This, alongside the suite of measures within the Bill, seeks to disincentivise people from making dangerous journeys across Europe to the UK and encourage people to claim asylum in the first safe country they reach. That is the fastest route to safety.

We will, of course, ensure that all removals are compliant with our international obligations. Every single person who is eligible for removal under this policy will be able to make representations where they are concerned the country in question would not be safe for them.


Written Question
Asylum: Embassies
8 Dec 2021

Questioner: Ruth Jones (LAB - Newport West)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of giving asylum seekers the ability to claim asylum at British embassies across the globe.

Answered by Kevin Foster

The UK has a proud record of providing protection for people who need it, in accordance with our obligations under the Refugee Convention and the European Convention on Human Rights.

However, there is no provision within our Immigration Rules for someone to be allowed to travel to the UK to seek asylum or temporary refuge. Whilst we sympathise with people in many difficult situations around the world, we are not bound to consider asylum claims in British Embassies or High Commissions from the very large numbers of people overseas who might like to come here. Opening an opportunity to claim asylum would also make the operation of these locations impractical if large numbers sought to do so.

Those who need international protection should claim asylum in the first safe country they reach – that is the fastest route to safety.

We already welcome vulnerable people in need of protection to the UK through our resettlement schemes. These schemes have provided safe and legal routes for tens of thousands of people to start new lives in the UK. Through these routes we have resettled more refugees than any EU country since 2015. They include the UK Resettlement Scheme, the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy, the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme, and the Nationality and Borders Bill will establish in law safe and legal routes.


Written Question
Asylum: Mental Health
8 Dec 2021

Questioner: Barry Sheerman (LAB - Huddersfield)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has made an assessment of the potential effect of offshore asylum processing on the mental health of people claiming asylum.

Answered by Kevin Foster

The Nationality and Borders Bill, which is part of our New Plan for Immigration, seeks to build a fair, but firm asylum and illegal migration system.

On 16 September, we published an Equality Impact Assessment for the policies being taken forward through the Bill, which includes assessment of those who may have mental health needs. This can be found here: The Nationality and Borders Bill: equality impact assessment (accessible version) - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

The Home Office will continue to ensure the welfare and dignity of all claimants forms a central platform of our decision-making processes.

Any vulnerabilities will be taken into consideration and every single person who is eligible for removal under this policy will be able to make representations where they are concerned the country in question would not be safe for them.


Written Question
Asylum: Children
8 Dec 2021

Questioner: Lord Bishop of Durham (Bishops - Bishops)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether issuing priority removal notices and evidence notices to those under the age of 18 at the time of their arrival in the UK is compliant with (1) the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child, (2) the Children Act 1989, and (3) the Children Act 2004.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

As part of our obligations under the public sector equality duty, an equality impact assessment has been completed in respect of the measures in the Nationality and Borders Bill concerning priority removal notices and evidence notices, this includes a consideration of possible impacts on children.


Written Question
Immigration
8 Dec 2021

Questioner: Lord Roberts of Llandudno (LDEM - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultations, if any, they are having with religious groups about potential legislation on immigration.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

The Government’s New Plan for Immigration is delivering the most comprehensive reform of the asylum system in decades. An essential element of the Plan is the Nationality and Borders Bill.

A public consultation on the Plan was held earlier this year, with a wide variety of stakeholders from different sections of our society taking part. The Government published its response to the consultation in July, and this can be found on the GOV.UK website: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/new-plan-for-immigration.

The Government regularly engages with individuals and groups with an interest in migration, including religious groups, as we take forward the Bill and deliver the New Plan for Immigration.


Written Question
British Nationality: British Indian Ocean Territory
8 Dec 2021

Questioner: Baroness Lister of Burtersett (LAB - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to allow descendants of the natives of the Chagos Archipelago to have the right to register as full British citizens.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

The Nationality and Borders Bill will introduce measures which will allow children of British Overseas Territories Citizen (BOTC) mothers, who were born before 1983; and the children of BOTC unmarried fathers who were born before 2006, to register as BOTCs.

Children of Chagossian mothers who left the Chagos Islands before 1969 would also be able to benefit from this change.

These changes to British nationality law will also allow these groups to acquire British citizenship more easily.


Written Question
Nationality and Borders Bill
7 Dec 2021

Questioner: Neil Coyle (LAB - Bermondsey and Old Southwark)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the financial impact on the RNLI of proposed Government amendments to the Nationality and Borders Bill.

Answered by Tom Pursglove

We do not anticipate that the amendment laid by the Government to the Nationality and Borders Bill in respect of assisting unlawful immigration or an asylum seeker (clause 40) will have any financial impact on the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI). Government Amendment 63 has been made to allow RNLI to continue as now and it doesn’t require any changes of practice from them.

Home Office officials have discussed clause 40, Government Amendment 63 and the duty to rescue persons in distress at sea with the RNLI.


Written Question
Nationality and Borders Bill
7 Dec 2021

Questioner: Neil Coyle (LAB - Bermondsey and Old Southwark)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has consulted the RNLI on (a) Clause 40 of the Nationality and Borders Bill and (b) Government amendment 63 regarding exemption from potential prosecutions.

Answered by Tom Pursglove

We do not anticipate that the amendment laid by the Government to the Nationality and Borders Bill in respect of assisting unlawful immigration or an asylum seeker (clause 40) will have any financial impact on the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI). Government Amendment 63 has been made to allow RNLI to continue as now and it doesn’t require any changes of practice from them.

Home Office officials have discussed clause 40, Government Amendment 63 and the duty to rescue persons in distress at sea with the RNLI.