Tip: To match a phrase, use quotation marks around the search term. eg. "Parliamentary Estate"


View sample alert
Written Question
Dublin Regulations
25 Nov 2021

Questioner: Hilary Benn (LAB - Leeds Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she is holding discussions with the EU Commission on a replacement agreement for the Dublin Regulation.

Answered by Tom Pursglove

The UK is in discussions regarding the returns of asylum seekers to European Member States; it would not be appropriate to provide a running commentary on these negotiations.

We can confirm that work is underway to secure appropriate return agreements with safe countries. Returns may also be agreed with partner countries on a case-by-case basis without formal agreements. This happened historically, outside of the former Dublin arrangements, and will continue to be part of the approach we apply.

Our inadmissibility provisions in the Immigration Rules give us the legal basis to declare an asylum claim as inadmissible where a person has a connection to or has passed through a safe country. The first returns on inadmissible grounds have been successfully carried out.


Written Question
Asylum
8 Mar 2021

Questioner: Helen Hayes (LAB - Dulwich and West Norwood)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average duration of the Dublin III regulation procedure is, from the moment another Member State accepts responsibility until the effective transfer from the UK.

Answered by Chris Philp

The Home Office did not centrally record the duration of the various processes whilst bound by the Dublin regulations and this information could now only be provided at disproportionate cost.


Written Question
Asylum
8 Mar 2021

Questioner: Helen Hayes (LAB - Dulwich and West Norwood)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average duration of the Dublin III regulation procedure is, from the moment an outgoing request is issued to the UK until the effective transfer to the Member State responsible.

Answered by Chris Philp

The Home Office did not centrally record the duration of the various processes whilst bound by the Dublin regulations and this information could now only be provided at disproportionate cost.


Written Question
Asylum: Greek Islands
1 Mar 2021

Questioner: Rupa Huq (LAB - Ealing Central and Acton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department will take to relocate more asylum seekers and refugees from the Aegean Islands to the UK.

Answered by Chris Philp

The responsibility for asylum seekers and refugees in EU Member States lies with the authorities of the safe EU country in which they are present in accordance with their international obligations. We regularly engage with Greek ministers and senior officials on the challenges presented by the migration situation in Greece.

The UK has a proud history of providing protection to those who need it. In 2019 the UK received more asylum claims from unaccompanied children than any country in the EU and accounted for approximately 20% of all claims from unaccompanied children made in the EU and UK.

Our existing Immigration Rules enable those with close family members in the UK to apply to join eligible sponsors such as those with refugee or humanitarian protection leave, or with British or settled status. Under the Immigration, Nationality and Asylum (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 we have committed to processing Dublin family reunion request made before the end of the Transition Period at 11pm on 31 December. Some of these requests have been received from Greece.


Written Question
Asylum: EU Countries
8 Feb 2021

Questioner: Fleur Anderson (LAB - Putney)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps have been taken to ensure the smooth transfer of accepted Dublin III family reunion cases to the UK in addition to the guidance issued now that the Dublin Regulation will no longer govern the way in which transfers happen between sending states and the UK.

Answered by Chris Philp

The ’savings’ provisions, as set out in Schedule 2, Part 3 of the Immigration, Nationality and Asylum (EU Exit) Regulations 2019, allow a Dublin Regulation family reunion request made before the end of the Transition Period at 11pm 31 December 2020 to continue to be processed after that time.

We continue to cooperate collaboratively with sending States for the transfer of individuals under the Dublin Regulation we accepted under these provisions.


Written Question
Undocumented Migrants: English Channel
4 Nov 2020

Questioner: Stuart C McDonald (SNP - Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)

Question

To ask the Prime Minister, whether (a) he, (b) officials in his office and (c) political advisors in his office have briefed members of the press with the name of the (i) law firm and (ii) lawyer that represents individuals the Home Office is attempting to remove under the Dublin III regulations in the last six months.

Answered by Boris Johnson

I refer the Hon Member to the answer my Hon Friend the Minister for Immigration Compliance and the Courts gave him on the 29 October 2020, UIN 102849.


Written Question
Undocumented Migrants: English Channel
29 Oct 2020

Questioner: Stuart C McDonald (SNP - Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether (a) she, (b) officials in her Department and (c) political advisors in her Department have briefed members of the press with the name of the (i) law firm and (ii) lawyer that represents individuals the Home Office is attempting to remove under the Dublin III regulations in the last six months.

Answered by Chris Philp

The Home Secretary, Home Office officials and political advisors have not briefed members of the press with either the name of the law firm or lawyer that represent individuals the Home Office is attempting to remove under the Dublin III regulations in the last six months.

The names of law firms and lawyers involved in legal cases are publicly available.


Written Question
UK Internal Trade: Northern Ireland
20 Oct 2020

Questioner: Stephen Farry (Alliance - North Down)

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to enable the Trader Support Service to support businesses moving goods from Great Britain to Northern Ireland via the Holyhead to Dublin route.

Answered by Penny Mordaunt

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.


Written Question
Members: Correspondence
5 Oct 2020

Questioner: Alison Thewliss (SNP - Glasgow Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans provide a substantive response to the correspondence of hon. Member for Glasgow Central of 15 July 2020 regarding constituent Mr Azizi.

Answered by Chris Philp

I apologise for the delay in responding to the hon. Member’s correspondence. A reply was sent on 1 October 2020.

The hon. Member for Glasgow Central wrote on 15 July 2020 on behalf of her constituent, Mr Nihaz Azizi (known to UKVI as Mr Nihat Azizi), who claimed asylum in the UK on 3 April 2019. The hon. Member requested a progress update on the asylum claim.

Routine fingerprint checks indicated that Mr Azizi had previously claimed asylum in Germany in January 2016, and consideration was therefore given to returning him to Germany in accordance with the Dublin Regulations. However, it was subsequently decided to process his asylum claim in the UK.

UKVI cannot give an indication as to when Mr Azizi’s asylum claim is likely to be concluded as this will depend on the nature and extent of any enquiries that may need to be carried out before it can make a decision.

UKVI will contact Mr Azizi in writing via his legal representatives, Latta & Co Solicitors, once a decision is made on his asylum claim or if any further information or evidence is required.


Written Question
Immigration: Enforcement
29 Sep 2020

Questioner: Lord Hylton (CB - Excepted Hereditary)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to review (1) their policy towards, (2) the operation of, and (3) the methods used to assess the performance of, immigration enforcement; and what steps they are taking to ensure that such enforcement (a) delivers value for money, and (b) is effective.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

Enforcing the UK’s immigration laws is critical to a functioning immigration system and effectively implementing the Government’s policies.

As the public would expect, we continually review all of the different methods we use to prevent illegal migration, ensure compliance with the Government’s policies and enforce the UK’s immigration laws, to ensure that they are effective and deliver value for money.

Many of the challenges we currently face in seeking to delivering an effective and efficient enforcement capability, in addition to logistical constraints relating to COVID 19, are due to the rigid nature of the Dublin Regulations and last-minute litigation challenges and will be addressed by the Government’s plans to deliver reform to the entire system within the Sovereign Borders Bill.


Written Question
Refugees: Children
28 Sep 2020

Questioner: Catherine West (LAB - Hornsey and Wood Green)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps have been taken to ensure that safe and legal pathways remain open from 2021 for unaccompanied children within Europe (a) with and (b) without families in the UK.

Answered by Chris Philp

The Government remains fully committed to ensuring eligible individuals seeking asylum in Europe, including unaccompanied children, who have family members in the UK can continue to be transferred under the Dublin III Regulation throughout the transition period. Furthermore, the Immigration, Nationality and Asylum (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 include ‘saving’ provisions under which transfer requests under the Dublin family reunion provisions which entered the system before the end of the transition period will continue to be processed after that date.

The UK has presented a genuine and sincere offer to the EU on a future reciprocal arrangement for the family reunion of unaccompanied children seeking asylum in either the EU or the UK, with specified family members in the UK or the EU, where it is in the child’s best interests. On 19 May we published draft legal text as a constructive contribution to negotiations.

Furthermore, we continue to provide safe and legal routes to bring families together through our refugee family reunion Rules, and Part 8 and Appendix FM of the Immigration Rules. These routes have not been affected by the UK’s exit from the EU.


Written Question
Undocumented Migrants: English Channel
10 Sep 2020

Questioner: Christian Wakeford (CON - Bury South)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many immigrants who crossed the English Channel illegally have been returned to their home countries since 1 January 2018.

Answered by Chris Philp

We remain committed to removing those with no right to be in the UK, and who do not comply with our immigration laws.

The Home Office continues to work closely with EU Member State partners to enact transfers as soon as possible and ahead of the six-month timeframe for a return.

There are a number of factors that have affected returns, including the inflexibility of Dublin Regulations and last-minute legal challenges from activist lawyers, alongside practical and logistical difficulties as a result of the pandemic. We are working at pace to reduce the number of older cases in the system and increase the number of removals - and we are in active discussions with countries to make that happen.

The Home Office publishes data on the number of asylum seekers transferred under the Dublin regulation in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of asylum seekers transferred out of the UK under the Dublin Regulation, broken down by the EU member state they have been transferred to are published in tables Dub_D01 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending December 2019.

Please note, that we do not publish the breakdowns of the nationality of those being transferred under the Dublin Regulation

Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the ‘summary tables’. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on asylum and resettlement.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fassets.publishing.service.gov.uk%2Fgovernment%2Fuploads%2Fsystem%2Fuploads%2Fattachment_data%2Ffile%2F885622%2Fdublin-regulation-datasets-mar-2020.xlsx&data=02%7C01%7C%7C45a74cb48ae24878e4a308d806ee2df2%7Cf24d93ecb2914192a08af182245945c2%7C0%7C0%7C637266967355702880&sdata=vaSspWJbkCtn8xcTawc2wFnj9D1kOXdQfFYbX8AD1F0%3D&reserved=0

https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.gov.uk%2Fgovernment%2Fstatistical-data-sets%2Fasylum-and-resettlement-datasets&data=02%7C01%7C%7C45a74cb48ae24878e4a308d806ee2df2%7Cf24d93ecb2914192a08af182245945c2%7C0%7C0%7C637266967355702880&sdata=lQm%2B%2Faz5MK1EfybmyRPb8JjSvt5VbRTt2bXNvIj3oD8%3D&reserved=0

https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.gov.uk%2Fgovernment%2Fuploads%2Fsystem%2Fuploads%2Fattachment_data%2Ffile%2F849497%2Fasylum-summary-sep-2019-tables.xlsx&data=02%7C01%7C%7C45a74cb48ae24878e4a308d806ee2df2%7Cf24d93ecb2914192a08af182245945c2%7C0%7C0%7C637266967355712874&sdata=6AWUyArHORIe%2Ftd4Hz5zEMMZlR2ne5Dlfm8ww4EFar0%3D&reserved=0


Written Question
Undocumented Migrants: English Channel
10 Sep 2020

Questioner: Christian Wakeford (CON - Bury South)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that immigrants who cross the English Channel illegally return safely to their home countries.

Answered by Chris Philp

We remain committed to removing those with no right to be in the UK, and who do not comply with our immigration laws.

The Home Office continues to work closely with EU Member State partners to enact transfers as soon as possible and ahead of the six-month timeframe for a return.

There are a number of factors that have affected returns, including the inflexibility of Dublin Regulations and last-minute legal challenges from activist lawyers, alongside practical and logistical difficulties as a result of the pandemic. We are working at pace to reduce the number of older cases in the system and increase the number of removals - and we are in active discussions with countries to make that happen.

The Home Office publishes data on the number of asylum seekers transferred under the Dublin regulation in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of asylum seekers transferred out of the UK under the Dublin Regulation, broken down by the EU member state they have been transferred to are published in tables Dub_D01 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending December 2019.

Please note, that we do not publish the breakdowns of the nationality of those being transferred under the Dublin Regulation

Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the ‘summary tables’. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on asylum and resettlement.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fassets.publishing.service.gov.uk%2Fgovernment%2Fuploads%2Fsystem%2Fuploads%2Fattachment_data%2Ffile%2F885622%2Fdublin-regulation-datasets-mar-2020.xlsx&data=02%7C01%7C%7C45a74cb48ae24878e4a308d806ee2df2%7Cf24d93ecb2914192a08af182245945c2%7C0%7C0%7C637266967355702880&sdata=vaSspWJbkCtn8xcTawc2wFnj9D1kOXdQfFYbX8AD1F0%3D&reserved=0

https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.gov.uk%2Fgovernment%2Fstatistical-data-sets%2Fasylum-and-resettlement-datasets&data=02%7C01%7C%7C45a74cb48ae24878e4a308d806ee2df2%7Cf24d93ecb2914192a08af182245945c2%7C0%7C0%7C637266967355702880&sdata=lQm%2B%2Faz5MK1EfybmyRPb8JjSvt5VbRTt2bXNvIj3oD8%3D&reserved=0

https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.gov.uk%2Fgovernment%2Fuploads%2Fsystem%2Fuploads%2Fattachment_data%2Ffile%2F849497%2Fasylum-summary-sep-2019-tables.xlsx&data=02%7C01%7C%7C45a74cb48ae24878e4a308d806ee2df2%7Cf24d93ecb2914192a08af182245945c2%7C0%7C0%7C637266967355712874&sdata=6AWUyArHORIe%2Ftd4Hz5zEMMZlR2ne5Dlfm8ww4EFar0%3D&reserved=0


Written Question
Asylum: Families
1 Sep 2020

Questioner: Bell Ribeiro-Addy (LAB - Streatham)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of additional Dublin Regulation requests that will be decided in the UK after the end of the transition period.

Answered by Chris Philp

The UK will cease to participate in the Dublin Regulation at the end of the transition period. However, the Immigration, Nationality and Asylum (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 contain a “savings provision” to enable a Dublin family reunion request, made before 1 January 2021, to continue to be processed after that date.


Written Question
Deportation: Undocumented Migrants
10 Jul 2020

Questioner: John Hayes (CON - South Holland and The Deepings)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with which countries the UK has deportation agreements for the return of nationals found illegally in the UK.

Answered by Chris Philp

To support the facilitation of removing those individuals with no right to remain in the UK, the UK has formal returns or readmission agreements with the following countries:

Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Bosnia & Herzegovina, China, Georgia, Hong Kong, Iraq, Macau, Macedonia, Malaysia, Moldova, Montenegro, Nigeria, Pakistan, Rwanda, Serbia, Sri Lanka, Somalia, South Korea, South Sudan, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine and Vietnam.

There are also formal returns arrangements for third-country nationals to other European countries through the Dublin Regulations.

To all other countries to which returns are enforced, the Home Office utilises informal bilateral processes.