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Written Question
Regional Planning and Development: Tees Valley
9 Mar 2021

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

What assessment he has made of his Department's progress in levelling up the economy of the Tees Valley.

Answered by Kemi Badenoch

The Government remains committed to levelling up opportunity across the UK, including in the Tees Valley.

At the Budget I confirmed a series of measures to level up Tees Valley’s economy:

  • New investment in offshore wind ports infrastructure;
  • the Teesside Freeport, which I visited with the Prime Minster on Thursday;
  • and the new Treasury economic campus in Darlington.

The Tees Valley will also benefit from two new Towns Fund Deals, in Middlesbrough and Thornaby.


Written Question
Offenders: Deportation
22 Feb 2021

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with regard to the Answer of 9 February to Question 149327, why the information requested is only be available at disproportionate cost when it has previously been supplied for the period up to March 2019 in response to Freedom of Information request reference 54393 dated 29 July 2019.

Answered by Chris Philp

The information requested is not available from published statistics.

I note the Honourable Member references previous questions, but they are not identical. As such the information requested is not available in a reportable format and would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Any foreign national who is convicted of a crime and given a prison sentence is considered for deportation at the earliest opportunity.

Section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 provides a statutory duty to deport a foreign national if they have been convicted of an offence in the UK and sentenced to a period of imprisonment of at least 12 months. This is subject to several exceptions, including where to do so would be a breach of a person’s ECHR rights or the UK’s obligations under the Refugee Convention.

Where a decision is made to deport, and representations are raised against that decision, an FNO is likely to be granted a right of appeal. This may be exercised in or out of country depending on the circumstances of the case.

The Home Office publishes data on Returns in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release(opens in a new tab)’. Data on the number of Returns from the UK by return type (including enforced returns) are published in table Ret_01 of the Returns ‘summary tables(opens in a new tab)’.

The term 'deportations' refers to a legally-defined subset of returns which are enforced either following a criminal conviction or when it is judged that a person’s removal from the UK is conducive to the public good. Information on those deported is not separately available and therefore the published statistics refer to all enforced returns.

The MoJ publishes data on Appeals in the following statistical quarterly release, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/tribunal-statistics-quarterly-july-to-september-2020(opens in a new tab).

This Government’s priority is keeping the people of this country safe and we are clear that foreign criminals should be deported from the UK wherever it is legal and practical to do so.


Written Question
Offenders: Deportation
9 Feb 2021

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many successful appeals against deportation by foreign national offenders on human rights grounds were allowed on the basis of (a) Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights and (b) Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights in each year since 2010.

Answered by Chris Philp

The information requested above is not available in a reportable format and would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Any foreign national who is convicted of a crime and given a prison sentence is considered for deportation at the earliest opportunity.

Section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 provides a statutory duty to deport a foreign national if they have been convicted of an offence in the UK and sentenced to a period of imprisonment of at least 12 months. This is subject to several exceptions, including where to do so would be a breach of a person’s ECHR rights or the UK’s obligations under the Refugee Convention.

Where a decision is made to deport, and representations are raised against that decision, an FNO is likely to be granted a right of appeal. This may be exercised in or out of country depending on the circumstances of the case.

The Home Office publishes data on Returns in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of Returns from the UK by return type (including enforced returns) are published in table Ret_01 of the Returns ‘summary tables’.

The term 'deportations' refers to a legally-defined subset of returns which are enforced either following a criminal conviction or when it is judged that a person’s removal from the UK is conducive to the public good. Information on those deported is not separately available and therefore the published statistics refer to all enforced returns.

The MoJ publishes data on Appeals in the following statistical quarterly release, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/tribunal-statistics-quarterly-july-to-september-2020.


Written Question
Deportation: Appeals
9 Feb 2021

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Home Office, how many appeals against deportation by foreign national offenders were allowed in each calendar year since 2010; and how many of those appeals were allowed on human rights grounds.

Answered by Chris Philp

The information requested above is not available in a reportable format and would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Any foreign national who is convicted of a crime and given a prison sentence is considered for deportation at the earliest opportunity.

Section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 provides a statutory duty to deport a foreign national if they have been convicted of an offence in the UK and sentenced to a period of imprisonment of at least 12 months. This is subject to several exceptions, including where to do so would be a breach of a person’s ECHR rights or the UK’s obligations under the Refugee Convention.

Where a decision is made to deport, and representations are raised against that decision, an FNO is likely to be granted a right of appeal. This may be exercised in or out of country depending on the circumstances of the case.

The Home Office publishes data on Returns in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of Returns from the UK by return type (including enforced returns) are published in table Ret_01 of the Returns ‘summary tables’.

The term 'deportations' refers to a legally-defined subset of returns which are enforced either following a criminal conviction or when it is judged that a person’s removal from the UK is conducive to the public good. Information on those deported is not separately available and therefore the published statistics refer to all enforced returns.

The MoJ publishes data on Appeals in the following statistical quarterly release, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/tribunal-statistics-quarterly-july-to-september-2020.


Written Question
Offenders: Deportation
9 Feb 2021

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many foreign national offenders lodged an appeal against a Deportation Order in each year since 2010.

Answered by Chris Philp

The information requested above is not available in a reportable format and would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Any foreign national who is convicted of a crime and given a prison sentence is considered for deportation at the earliest opportunity.

Section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 provides a statutory duty to deport a foreign national if they have been convicted of an offence in the UK and sentenced to a period of imprisonment of at least 12 months. This is subject to several exceptions, including where to do so would be a breach of a person’s ECHR rights or the UK’s obligations under the Refugee Convention.

Where a decision is made to deport, and representations are raised against that decision, an FNO is likely to be granted a right of appeal. This may be exercised in or out of country depending on the circumstances of the case.

The Home Office publishes data on Returns in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of Returns from the UK by return type (including enforced returns) are published in table Ret_01 of the Returns ‘summary tables’.

The term 'deportations' refers to a legally-defined subset of returns which are enforced either following a criminal conviction or when it is judged that a person’s removal from the UK is conducive to the public good. Information on those deported is not separately available and therefore the published statistics refer to all enforced returns.

The MoJ publishes data on Appeals in the following statistical quarterly release, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/tribunal-statistics-quarterly-july-to-september-2020.


Written Question
Offenders: Deportation
9 Feb 2021

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many foreign national offenders were served with a Deportation Order in each year since 2010.

Answered by Chris Philp

The information requested above is not available in a reportable format and would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Any foreign national who is convicted of a crime and given a prison sentence is considered for deportation at the earliest opportunity.

Section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 provides a statutory duty to deport a foreign national if they have been convicted of an offence in the UK and sentenced to a period of imprisonment of at least 12 months. This is subject to several exceptions, including where to do so would be a breach of a person’s ECHR rights or the UK’s obligations under the Refugee Convention.

Where a decision is made to deport, and representations are raised against that decision, an FNO is likely to be granted a right of appeal. This may be exercised in or out of country depending on the circumstances of the case.

The Home Office publishes data on Returns in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of Returns from the UK by return type (including enforced returns) are published in table Ret_01 of the Returns ‘summary tables’.

The term 'deportations' refers to a legally-defined subset of returns which are enforced either following a criminal conviction or when it is judged that a person’s removal from the UK is conducive to the public good. Information on those deported is not separately available and therefore the published statistics refer to all enforced returns.

The MoJ publishes data on Appeals in the following statistical quarterly release, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/tribunal-statistics-quarterly-july-to-september-2020.


Written Question
Sentencing: Foreign Nationals
9 Feb 2021

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many foreign national offenders received a prison sentence of 12 months or more in each year since 2010.

Answered by Chris Philp

The information requested above is not available in a reportable format and would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Any foreign national who is convicted of a crime and given a prison sentence is considered for deportation at the earliest opportunity.

Section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 provides a statutory duty to deport a foreign national if they have been convicted of an offence in the UK and sentenced to a period of imprisonment of at least 12 months. This is subject to several exceptions, including where to do so would be a breach of a person’s ECHR rights or the UK’s obligations under the Refugee Convention.

Where a decision is made to deport, and representations are raised against that decision, an FNO is likely to be granted a right of appeal. This may be exercised in or out of country depending on the circumstances of the case.

The Home Office publishes data on Returns in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of Returns from the UK by return type (including enforced returns) are published in table Ret_01 of the Returns ‘summary tables’.

The term 'deportations' refers to a legally-defined subset of returns which are enforced either following a criminal conviction or when it is judged that a person’s removal from the UK is conducive to the public good. Information on those deported is not separately available and therefore the published statistics refer to all enforced returns.

The MoJ publishes data on Appeals in the following statistical quarterly release, https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/tribunal-statistics-quarterly-july-to-september-2020.


Written Question
Shared Ownership: Insulation
20 Jan 2021

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to help people with shared ownership of a property who are unable to dispose of the property as a result of remedial action being needed by the landlord owing to the presence of combustible cladding.

Answered by Christopher Pincher

It is unacceptable for leaseholders, including those in shared ownership, to have to worry about the cost of fixing historic safety defects in their buildings that they did not cause.

Where developers or building owners have been unable or unwilling to pay, we have introduced funding schemes providing £1.6 billion to accelerate the pace of work and meet the costs of remediating the highest risk and most expensive defects – ACM cladding and other unsafe cladding systems like High Pressure Laminates.

The Government is determined to remove barriers to fixing historic defects and identify financing solutions that help to protect leaseholders, including those participating in shared ownership schemes, whilst also helping to protect the taxpayer. The Government has asked Michael Wade to accelerate work on a long-term solution. We will provide an update as soon as we are in a position to do so.


Written Question
Free Zones
8 Oct 2020

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of free ports to support the UK's global trade after the end of the transition period.

Answered by Steve Barclay

The government plans to establish Freeports across the UK. These will be national hubs for trade, innovation and commerce, regenerating communities across the UK. They can attract new businesses, spreading jobs, investment and opportunity to towns and cities up and down the country.

Our Freeports consultation response, published on Wednesday 7 October, sets out in more detail how Freeports will unleash the potential of ports across the country.


Written Question
NHS: Weather
6 Oct 2020

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

What additional support he is providing to the NHS ahead of winter 2020-21.

Answered by Edward Argar

This Government is committed to supporting the National Health Service and wider social care sector this winter, as it has throughout this year. In July, the Government announced £3 billion in additional funding, alongside £450 million for accident and emergency department upgrades and expansions. Similarly, we are supporting adult social care with a further £546 million of infection control funding over this winter. Where health policy is devolved, the devolved nations have benefitted from the appropriate Barnett consequentials.


Written Question
Ports
9 Oct 2018

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the White Paper, The Future Relationship Between the United Kingdom and the European Union, published in July 2018, what assessment he has made of the UK's ability to establish Supercharged Free Ports after the UK leaves the EU.

Answered by Mel Stride

A free port is an area located at a port which is designated as a free zone. Section 100A of the Customs and Excise Management Act 1979 (CEMA) currently provides the legal basis for the designation of free zones by HM Treasury and will continue to do so following UK withdrawal from the EU. Applying for designation as a free zone will be a commercial decision to be taken by private operators.

Schedule 2 Part 2 Paragraph 2 of the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Act 2018 makes provision to enable HMRC to make regulations imposing requirements in respect of goods kept in free zones designated under CEMA 1979.


Written Question
Free Zones
9 Oct 2018

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the White Paper, The Future Relationship Between the United Kingdom and the European Union, published in July 2018, what assessment he has made of the UK's ability to establish Supercharged Free Ports after the UK leaves the EU.

Answered by Mel Stride

A free port is an area located at a port which is designated as a free zone. Section 100A of the Customs and Excise Management Act 1979 (CEMA) currently provides the legal basis for the designation of free zones by HM Treasury and will continue to do so following UK withdrawal from the EU. Applying for designation as a free zone will be a commercial decision to be taken by private operators.

Schedule 2 Part 2 Paragraph 2 of the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Act 2018 makes provision to enable HMRC to make regulations imposing requirements in respect of goods kept in free zones designated under CEMA 1979.


Written Question
Pupils: Per Capita Costs
12 Sep 2018

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what average spending per pupil was in (a) Middlesbrough and (b) Redcar and Cleveland in each year since 2009-10.

Answered by Nick Gibb

School-level figures for spending per pupil by local authority are published annually. The Department publishes information on income and expenditure in schools on the Schools Financial Benchmarking website, available at:

https://schools-financial-benchmarking.service.gov.uk/Help/DataSources.

To download data for all schools click on the Data Sources link and then CFR data (Consistent Financial Reporting, covering local authority maintained schools) and AAR data (Academies Accounts Return, for academy schools).

Average spending per pupil (£’s) – Local Authority Maintained schools

Year (Financial)

(a) Middlesbrough

(b) Redcar and Cleveland

2009-10

*

*

2010-11

£4,656

£4,864

2011-12

£4,945

£4,940

2012-13

£4,916

£4,811

2013-14

£4,767

£4,918

2014-15

£5,125

£5,133

2015-16

£5,211

£5,351

2016-17

£5,050

£5,068

Source: CFR data (Consistent Financial Reporting, covering local authority maintained schools) available at:

https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/download-data?currentstep=datatypes&regiontype=all&la=0&downloadYear=2016-2017&datatypes=spendperpupilfull.

Average spending per pupil (£’s) – Academy schools

Year (Academic)

(a) Middlesbrough

(b) Redcar and Cleveland

2009/10

*

*

2010/11

*

*

2011/12

£7,286

£7,631

2012/13

£7,164

£7,813

2013/14

£7,089

£7,279

2014/15

£6,646

£6,291

2015/16

£6,395

£5,848

2016/17

£5,464

£5,586

* : Data not available

Source: AAR data (Academies Accounts Return, for academy schools) available at:

https://sat1prsfb.blob.core.windows.net/sfb/SFB_Academies_2016-17_download.xlsx.


Written Question
Apprentices: Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland
12 Sep 2018

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many young people in the Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland constituency started an apprenticeship in each year since 2009-10.

Answered by Anne Milton

The attached table shows figures for apprenticeship starts in the Middleborough South and East Cleveland constituency since the 2009/10 academic year, including data for the first three quarters of the 2017/2018 academic year (August 2017 to April 2018) as published in the FE data library: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/fe-data-library.


Written Question
Schools: North Yorkshire
12 Sep 2018

Questioner: Simon Clarke (CON - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of schools in (a) Middlesbrough and (b) Redcar and Cleveland are classified as Good or Outstanding by Ofsted.

Answered by Nick Gibb

As at 31 March 2018, Ofsted inspection data shows the proportion of schools in Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland:

a) There were 84% of schools in Middlesbrough classified as Good or Outstanding, and

b) There were 86% of schools in Redcar and Cleveland classified as Good or Outstanding.