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Written Question
Shipbuilding
20 Sep 2021

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

What assessment he has made of the potential effect of the creation of the National Shipbuilding Office on (a) the number of ships being built in the UK and (b) the amount of (i) British technology, (ii) components and (iii) steel in those ships.

Answered by Ben Wallace

The National Shipbuilding Office will be responsible for driving forward one of the Prime Minister’s key domestic priorities across Government. It will report directly to the Shipbuilding Tsar and will oversee all of the UK Government’s interests in UK shipbuilding.

Our National Shipbuilding Strategy Refresh, which will be published later this year, will set out our approach in more detail.


Written Question
Overseas Trade
15 Jul 2021

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

What assessment she has made of how international trade benefits (a) Kettering constituency, (b) North Northamptonshire and (c) England.

Answered by Graham Stuart

Kettering and the wider East Midlands economy already benefit from the higher productivity and better-quality jobs associated with international trade. Over 680,000 jobs in the region were directly or indirectly linked to exports in 2016, and new Foreign Direct Investment created over 2,149 new jobs in 2020/21. We are confident the new Free Trade Agreements we are striking globally will create even more opportunities for Kettering and Northamptonshire companies.


Written Question
Emergency Services: Crimes of Violence
1 Jul 2021

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

If he will hold discussions with the CPS on improving prosecution rates for assault of emergency workers in (a) Kettering, (b) North Northamptonshire and (c) England.

Answered by Lucy Frazer

I agree that we should do everything we can to protect our emergency workers. I hope that the Honourable Member will be pleased to know that between 2019 and 2020 the numbers of prosecutions for these offences increased by 27.2% in the East Midlands CPS Area and by 25.1% overall across England and Wales.


Written Question
Events Industry: Coronavirus
28 Apr 2021

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether all participants regardless of their covid-19 vaccination status are tested both prior to and after the event they attend in the large events pilots of the Events Research Programme; when and how those results are published; and if he will make a statement.

Answered by Nigel Huddleston

The Events Research Programme Science Board has planned for testing to take place both before and after each of the event pilots to ensure event safety and to gather evidence on the pilots. This will be for all attendees, regardless of COVID vaccination status, and there will be no requirement for participants to show proof of the vaccine.

The Events Research Programme (including DCMS, DHSC and BEIS) will report at the end of May to the Prime Minister, to feed into wider discussions around Step 4 of the roadmap.


Written Question
Events Industry: Coronavirus
28 Apr 2021

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to covid-19 testing at large events pilots taking place as part of the Events Research Programme, whether the test results are planned to be recorded separately for people who have received (a) zero, (b) one and (c) two doses of a covid-19 vaccine.

Answered by Nigel Huddleston

An individual’s vaccination status will be included as a variable when analysing test result data relating to the Events Research Programme (ERP). This will enable analysis of whether vaccinations have impacted on any potential transmission at the events.

The Events Research Programme (including DCMS, DHSC and BEIS) will report at the end of May to the Prime Minister, to feed into wider discussions around Step 4 of the roadmap.


Written Question
UK Internal Trade: Northern Ireland
21 Apr 2021

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

What recent discussions the Government has had with the EU on improving the implementation of the Northern Ireland protocol.

Answered by Robin Walker

The Government has provided a joint work programme to the EU as a first step in working together to resolve the full range of issues that we have identified with the operation of the Protocol.

Our priority now is to move those discussions forward, address concerns, and ensure the Protocol is given effect in the pragmatic and proportionate way intended.


Written Question
Housing: Insulation
25 Feb 2021

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his oral contribution on Building Safety on 10 February 2021, Official report, column 329, whether cladding on residential buildings of less than 11 metres in height by default does not require remedial work; and if he will make a statement.

Answered by Christopher Pincher

Longstanding safety advice from the independent expert advisory panel established by Government following the Grenfell tragedy is that height is a central factor in assessing risk, and it is right we prioritise action on higher rise buildings where risk to multiple households is greater when fire spreads. For lower and medium-rise blocks of flats, the risks are significantly lower and the remediation of cladding is less likely to be needed - in many cases, it will not be needed at all. Government funding does not absolve building owners of their responsibility to ensure their buildings are safe. They should consider all routes to meet costs, protecting leaseholders where they can – for example through warranties and recovering costs from contractors for incorrect or poor work.


Written Question
Kettering Hospital
12 Jan 2021

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

If the Minister of State for Health will meet with (a) representatives of Kettering General Hospital and (b) hon. Members for north Northamptonshire to review redevelopment plans at Kettering General Hospital.

Answered by Edward Argar

I would be delighted to meet with my hon. Friend, hon. Members from North Northamptonshire and his local hospital trust at the earliest possible opportunity.


Written Question
Coronavirus
26 Mar 2020

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many of the (a) first 200, (b) second 200, (c) third 200 and (d) fourth 200 covid-19 cases in the UK by sample-date were (i) under five years, (ii) five -14 years, (iii) 15-29 years, (iv) 30-39 years, (v) 40-49 years, (vi) 50-59 years, (vii) 60-69 years, (viii) 70-79 years, (ix) 80-89 years and (x) 90 years or over.

Answered by Jo Churchill

Data on the COVID-19 cases in the United Kingdom are not available in the format requested.

Public Health England has published a COVID-19 tracking dashboard showing reported cases of coronavirus in the UK, including new cases, cases by upper tier local authority in England.

The dashboard can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-track-coronavirus-cases


Written Question
Health Services and Social Services: Northamptonshire
29 Oct 2019

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

If he will establish an integrated health and social care pilot programme in Northamptonshire.

Answered by Edward Argar

Last week, in a Westminster Hall debate called by my Hon. Friend, I announced the approval of £46 million for the Urgent Care scheme at Kettering General Hospital, to be awarded at the next capital review.

Officials have been supporting Northamptonshire to develop their proposals on health and social care integration. The Secretary of State is looking forward to considering the updated proposals from Northamptonshire in due course.


Written Question
Reoffenders
23 Oct 2019

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of offenders on licence after fixed-term recall (a) re-offended and (b) breached their licence conditions and were recalled for a fixed term again in each of the last five years.

Answered by Lucy Frazer

The only lawful basis for recalling an offender on licence to custody is by way of response to a breach of one or more licence conditions. In some cases, the breach of licence conditions will be associated with some alleged further offending. Whilst information about offenders who receive a further fixed term recall is held, to produce the proportion of those who had received more than one fixed term recall could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Public protection is our priority. Offenders on licence are subject to strict licence conditions and supervision.

Where offenders are eligible for a fixed-term recall, they may be recalled to prison on a standard recall, which is the only type of recall available for those offenders ineligible for a fixed-term recall (such as those on a life licence). Where they receive a standard recall, they are liable to serve the rest of their sentence in prison.

The decision to recall is taken on the professional advice of senior probation staff.

From the data available, I can report that the following number of offenders were recalled multiple times in each year, on a fixed-term recall, on the same sentence. In each decision in every case, the probation officer will have established that the offender was eligible for a fixed-term recall and will have judged, based on the available evidence, that a fixed-term recall was the necessary and proportionate response to the breach of licence condition(s).

Year

Number of offenders

2014

2606

2015

2644

2016

1387

2017

2258

2018

2362

**The figures in this table have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.


Written Question
Reoffenders
23 Oct 2019

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of recalls to prison resulted in (a) fixed-term recall and (b) standard recall in the latest period for which figures are available.

Answered by Lucy Frazer

For the period 1 January 2019 to 31 March 2019 there were 2522 fixed term recalls (41%) and 3646 standard recalls (59%).

Where offenders are eligible for a fixed-term recall, their probation officer may decide that a fixed-term recall is the proportionate and necessary response to a breach of licence conditions. If not, they will be recalled to prison on a standard recall, which is the only type of recall available as a response for offenders ineligible for a fixed-term recall. Where offenders are recalled on a standard recall, they are liable to serve the rest of their sentence in prison.

The decision to recall is taken on the professional advice of senior probation staff.


Written Question
Homicide: Sentencing
22 Oct 2019

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average length of sentence served by people convicted of murder was in each of the last five years.

Answered by Chris Philp

The information you ask for is routinely published and therefore available in the public domain, however, I have provided it below for ease of reference. The table shows the average time served by individuals sentenced to mandatory life, the only sentence available to the Courts for those convicted of murder, who were released from custody in each of the last five years.

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

17

16

16

17

17

As with any large-scale recording system, administrative IT systems are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Public protection is our priority. It is for the independent Parole Board to review the detention of those prisoners serving mandatory life sentences who have completed their tariff period. The Board will direct the release of these prisoners only if it is satisfied that the levels of risk posed to the general public are reduced enough that the National Probation Service and its partner agencies can safely manage them in the community under supervision.


Written Question
Suspended Sentences: Electronic Tagging
21 Oct 2019

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people serving suspended sentences were made subject to an electronic monitoring condition, broken down by offence; and on how many occasions was that condition breached in each of the last five years.

Answered by Chris Philp

Electronic Monitoring (EM), both of curfews and using satellite enabled tags to monitor an individual’s whereabouts, is a vital tool in protecting the public and robustly monitoring offenders in the community. It supports probation staff and the police in managing offenders and defendants safely in the community, delivering the orders of the court and helping to tackle the problems which lead to offending.

The below table shows the number of suspended sentence orders with an EM requirement by offence type. Data is only available from 2016.

Summary motoringÈ

Violence against the personÈNon-compliance of ordersÈFailed Bail condition È

Failed Bail condition È

Suspended sentence orders with an electronic monitoring requirement by offence type(1)

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Criminal damage and arson

241

172

117

Drug offences

1021

906

764

Fraud offences

461

389

284

Miscellaneous crimes against society

1093

952

664

Offence not recorded

83

46

23

Possession of weapons

538

561

656

Public order offences

312

295

259

Robbery

546

579

470

Sexual offences

214

239

183

Summary motoring

1141

1045

761

Theft offences

1093

886

495

Violence against the person

2030

1647

1312

Non-compliance of orders

1064

896

701

Failed Bail condition

140

114

61

Total

9977

8727

6750

The below table shows the number of tagged subjects who failed to comply with their suspended sentence order electronic monitoring requirement at least once. Data on compliance is only available for completed suspended sentence orders.

2016/17(3)

2017/18

2018/19

Total completed suspended sentence orders with an electronic monitoring requirement with equip install(2)(3)

7421

8193

6430

Compliance

2585

3040

2666

Non-compliance

4836

5153

3764

2016/17(3) 2017/18 2018/19

Total completed suspended sentence orders with an electronic monitoring requirement with equip install(2)(3) 7421 8193 6430

Compliance 2585 3040 2666

Non-compliance 4836 5153 3764

(1) Derived from electronic monitoring new starts files

(2) Derived from number of completions of orders with equipment on

(3) Electronic monitoring completions data only available from June 2016 onwards. A person may have more than one completion.

Some orders are for multiple offences, in these cases orders have been assigned to first offence type recorded on the orders.

Note for reference: Failed bail conditions = not surrendering to bail, and non-compliance of orders = BREACH OF ACTION PLAN ORDER, Breach of Criminal Behaviour Order, Breach of Restraining order, Failure to attend supervision appointments, Failure to comply with Notification Requirements, FAILURE TO NOTIFY OF CHANGE OF CIRCUMSTANCES etc.

If a subject on tag does not comply with an Electronic Monitoring condition or requirement, for example by being absent during curfew hours or tampering with a tag, an instantaneous alert is generated that is sent to Electronic Monitoring Services (EMS). The appropriate authorities decide, based on the evidence, whether the non-compliance event constitutes a breach and if so what action should be taken. The nature of breaches vary, and not all non-compliance events are classed as formal breaches requiring further action – for example, if the subject was at hospital or in custody at the time, and therefore unable to return to their curfew location in time for their curfew. While the majority of non-compliance events will generate an alert than can lead to a breach there are a range of other circumstances that can lead to breach action being taken.


Written Question
Offenders: Electronic Tagging
21 Oct 2019

Questioner: Philip Hollobone (CON - Kettering)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Answer of 20 June 2019 to Question 267275 on Offenders: Electronic Tagging, how many events were classed as formal breaches requiring further action.

Answered by Lucy Frazer

Electronic monitoring, both of curfews and using satellite enabled tags to monitor an individual’s whereabouts, is a vital tool in protecting the public and robustly monitoring offenders in the community. It supports probation staff and the police in managing offenders and defendants safely in the community, delivering the orders of the court and helping to tackle the problems which lead to offending. Data that identifies the number of non-compliance events that lead to breach action is not held centrally and could only be identified at a disproportionate cost.