Nick Thomas-Symonds Written Questions

33 Questions to Home Office tabled by Nick Thomas-Symonds


Date Title Questioner
14 Sep 2020, 1:23 p.m. Passengers: Coronavirus Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers in total have arrived in the UK by air from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

Answer (Chris Philp)

The Home Office does not routinely release location specific statistics on the arrival of passengers by specific modes of transport.

However, the Home Office is due to publish additional statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system in the next few weeks.

This statistics will be published on the gov,uk website

10 Sep 2020, 11:19 a.m. Passengers: Coronavirus Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by rail from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

Answer (Chris Philp)

84307 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by sea from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020

84308 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by rail from each country not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84309 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by rail from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84310 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers in total have arrived in the UK by air from each country not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84311 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers in total have arrived in the UK by air from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

10 Sep 2020, 11:19 a.m. Passengers: Coronavirus Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers in total have arrived in the UK by air from each country not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

Answer (Chris Philp)

84307 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by sea from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020

84308 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by rail from each country not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84309 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by rail from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84310 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers in total have arrived in the UK by air from each country not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84311 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers in total have arrived in the UK by air from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

10 Sep 2020, 11:19 a.m. Passengers: Coronavirus Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by sea from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

Answer (Chris Philp)

84307 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by sea from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020

84308 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by rail from each country not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84309 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by rail from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84310 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers in total have arrived in the UK by air from each country not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84311 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers in total have arrived in the UK by air from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

10 Sep 2020, 11:19 a.m. Passengers: Coronavirus Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by rail from each country not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

Answer (Chris Philp)

84307 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by sea from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020

84308 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by rail from each country not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84309 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers have arrived in the UK by rail from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84310 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers in total have arrived in the UK by air from each country not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

84311 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passengers in total have arrived in the UK by air from countries not included on the list of covid-19 travel corridors since 3 July 2020.

7 Sep 2020, 2:45 p.m. Yarl's Wood Immigration Removal Centre Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) men and (b) women are detained in Yarl's Wood Immigration Removal Centre.

Answer (Chris Philp)

The Home Office publishes statistics on people entering detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on people entering detention under immigration powers by place of detention and sex, are published in Table Det_D01and on people in detention at the last day of each quarter in Table Det_D02 of the ‘immigration detention detailed datasets’. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

Figures on people entering detention in Q3 2020 will be published on 26 November 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

The figures published in Det_D01 relate to the first place of detention. If an individual enters immigration detention in another part of the detention estate, or in prison before being moved to Yarl’s Wood, they will be recorded under that centre.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/returns-and-detention-datasets#immigration-detention

https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=release-date-oldest

7 Sep 2020, 2:45 p.m. Yarl's Wood Immigration Removal Centre Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people are detained in Yarl’s Wood Immigration Removal Centre.

Answer (Chris Philp)

The Home Office publishes statistics on people entering detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on people entering detention under immigration powers by place of detention and sex, are published in Table Det_D01and on people in detention at the last day of each quarter in Table Det_D02 of the ‘immigration detention detailed datasets’. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

Figures on people entering detention in Q3 2020 will be published on 26 November 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

The figures published in Det_D01 relate to the first place of detention. If an individual enters immigration detention in another part of the detention estate, or in prison before being moved to Yarl’s Wood, they will be recorded under that centre.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/returns-and-detention-datasets#immigration-detention

https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=release-date-oldest

7 Sep 2020, 2:45 p.m. Yarl's Wood Immigration Removal Centre Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) people, (b) men and (c) women were detained in Yarl’s Wood Immigration Removal Centre in each month from 1 July 2019.

Answer (Chris Philp)

The Home Office publishes statistics on people entering detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on people entering detention under immigration powers by place of detention and sex, are published in Table Det_D01and on people in detention at the last day of each quarter in Table Det_D02 of the ‘immigration detention detailed datasets’. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

Figures on people entering detention in Q3 2020 will be published on 26 November 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

The figures published in Det_D01 relate to the first place of detention. If an individual enters immigration detention in another part of the detention estate, or in prison before being moved to Yarl’s Wood, they will be recorded under that centre.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/returns-and-detention-datasets#immigration-detention

https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=release-date-oldest

14 May 2020, 2:28 p.m. Serious Violence Taskforce Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the serious violence taskforce last met.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

The Serious Violence Taskforce was established in 2018 to oversee the implementation of the Serious Violence Strategy. It last met on 26 June 2019.

The Government remains incredibly grateful for the work of the Taskforce which brought together Ministers, senior leaders and key partners. The Taskforce influenced additional action and investment in this area, for example through the creation of the new £200m Youth Endowment Fund, the consultation on the new duty on agencies to reduce serious violence and the launch of the Independent Review of Drugs Misuse.

The Government’s Manifesto set out an ambitious package of reforms to deliver on the people’s priorities and tackle violent crime and safeguard people’s streets and neighbourhoods. The Prime Minister and Home Secretary are driving this with a new cross-Whitehall Crime and Justice Taskforce to ensure we use every lever at our disposal to fight crime.

We will consider the future role for the Serious Violence Taskforce in delivering these priorities, within this context.

14 May 2020, 2:28 p.m. Serious Violence Taskforce Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the serious violence taskforce next plans to meet.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

The Serious Violence Taskforce was established in 2018 to oversee the implementation of the Serious Violence Strategy. It last met on 26 June 2019.

The Government remains incredibly grateful for the work of the Taskforce which brought together Ministers, senior leaders and key partners. The Taskforce influenced additional action and investment in this area, for example through the creation of the new £200m Youth Endowment Fund, the consultation on the new duty on agencies to reduce serious violence and the launch of the Independent Review of Drugs Misuse.

The Government’s Manifesto set out an ambitious package of reforms to deliver on the people’s priorities and tackle violent crime and safeguard people’s streets and neighbourhoods. The Prime Minister and Home Secretary are driving this with a new cross-Whitehall Crime and Justice Taskforce to ensure we use every lever at our disposal to fight crime.

We will consider the future role for the Serious Violence Taskforce in delivering these priorities, within this context.

8 Jul 2019, 3:16 p.m. Rape: Prosecutions Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of reported rape cases were not passed to the Crown Prosecution Service by the police forces of England and Wales in 2017-18.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Government does not hold data on the total number of reported rape cases which are not passed on to the Crown Prosecution Service by the police.

The Crown Prosecution Service publishes data on the number of pre-charge decisions for rape cases.

The Government expects every report of sexual violence and rape to be treated seriously from the point of disclosure and continues to work with the police to look at ways to improve police investigations. Through the refreshed Violence Against Women and Girls Strategy we have committed to undertake an end-to-end review into the criminal justice response to rape, from the point of police report through to final outcome in court, which will include examining police referrals to the Crown Prosecution Service for a charging decision.

20 Nov 2018, 5:46 p.m. Armed Conflict: British Nationals Abroad Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assistance his Department has (a) requested and (b) received from the European Counter-Terrorism Centre on apprehending foreign fighters.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The Government values the role of Europol in helping law enforcement agencies coordinate investigations into serious and organised cross border crime and terrorism. That includes the European Counter Terrorism Centre (ECTC) which was set up in 2016 as an operations centre and hub of expertise for EU Member States at Europol. Since September 2017 the UK has embedded UK Police Officers within the ECTC and works closely with our European partners through the centre.

Information exchange between UK authorities and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. This includes information sharing to tackle the threat of terrorism and cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border terrorist activity impacting on the UK.

We cannot comment specifically on the assistance that the Department has requested and received from the ECTC as this is operationally sensitive information.

8 Nov 2018, 4:53 p.m. UK Border Force: Finance Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what additional funding has been allocated to the Border Force at UK airports to ensure it is adequately funded after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

BF received £91.7m ring-fenced funds from HM Treasury in 2018-19 to prepare for EU Exit. BF’s 2019-20 allocation for EU Exit is expected to be confirmed by HM Treasury before the start of the 2019-20 financial year.

7 Nov 2018, 3:22 p.m. Crime Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effect of any differences in the definition of serious crime would have on (a) criminal justice and (b) police cooperation between the EU and the UK after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Government has made a strong case for an ambitious and mutually beneficial future partnership with the EU that covers: mechanisms for rapid and secure data exchange, practical measures to support cross-border operational cooperation, and continued UK cooperation with EU law enforcement and criminal justice agencies.

Negotiations on the future relationship between the UK and the EU in the area of criminal justice and law enforcement cooperation is ongoing so we cannot pre-judge the outcome, but at this stage there is no reason to expect that differences in the definition of serious crime will be an issue.

6 Nov 2018, 5:21 p.m. UK Border Force: Finance Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of (a) the adequacy of the resourcing allocated to Border Force and (b) the effect of the UK leaving the EU on that resourcing.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Border Force will always ensure it has the necessary resources to keep the border secure and will respond flexibly to emerging requirements through ongoing assessments of operational needs.

Border Force has recruited a Readiness Task Force to provide operational resilience to the frontline and allow existing staff to undertake EU exit related training. The c.300 multi-disciplinary Border Force officers will be fully deployed by the end of the year.

An additional c.600 Border Force officers are being recruited in 2018/19 to respond to the new requirements it will face as a result of EU Exit and to provide resilience at key locations.

6 Nov 2018, 4:08 p.m. Passports: Biometrics Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on UK citizens using ePassport gates after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

We keep the border and immigration system under regular review however the Government has no plans to change the use of e-passport gates by UK citizens.

29 Oct 2018, 4:49 p.m. Counter-terrorism: Internet Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assistance his Department has (a) requested and (b) received from the European Counter-Terrorism Centre on removing online terrorist propaganda.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The UK continues to lead international efforts to prevent terrorist use of the internet. In the UK, the Metropolitan Police Service’s Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content to online platforms that is assessed to contravene those platforms’ terms and conditions. Following referrals from CTIRU, online platforms have removed over 300,000 pieces of terrorist-related material since its inception in February 2010.


This successful model was replicated within the EU as a response to the international nature of the online threat. The UK was instrumental in the formation of the European Union Internet Referral Unit (EU IRU), which went live in July 2015 following the Charlie Hebdo attacks. The EU IRU is one initiative of the European Counter-Terrorism Centre, part of Europol.


The UK continues to work closely with the EU and other international partners to push industry to take a more proactive approach to detecting and removing terrorist content from their platforms. The UK and the EU IRU share information, evidence and best practice on an ongoing basis to prevent terrorist use of the internet.

29 Oct 2018, 4:34 p.m. Armed Conflict: British Nationals Abroad Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of Directive 2017/541 on apprehending foreign fighters under Article 9 of that Directive.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The UK did not opt in to Directive 2017/541 on combating terrorism. UK effec-tiveness on combating terrorism and countering travelling for the purpose of terrorism, as referred to by Article 9 of Directive 2017/541 is not governed through this EU legislation. The UK already has strong domestic legislation in place and opting in would not have increased further public protection.

22 Oct 2018, 4:14 p.m. Airports: Biometrics Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government plans to support trials of new biometric technologies at UK airports.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Home Office continues to explore a range of digital options to improve the security and efficiency of our visa and border systems. These proposed changes are part of the government’s commitment to ensure the security of the UK border for the safety and benefit of customers and taxpayers.

22 Oct 2018, 4:12 p.m. Immigration Controls: Airports Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effect on reducing immigration queuing times at airports allowing passengers from five eyes partner countries to use ePassport gates would have.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

We keep our border and immigration system under regular review to understand what changes can made to improve the passenger experience without reducing border security.

29 Aug 2018, 3:24 p.m. Cybercrime: Security Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much her Department spent annually on cyber security (a) before and (b) after the publication of the National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence Review 2015.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

Cyber Security policy and funding priorities are set out in the National Cyber Security Strategy 2016. This strategy was accompanied by a commitment to spend £1.9bn over the 5 years 2016-2021 on cyber security; This is in addition to routine spend on cyber capabilities across Government.

11 Jun 2018, 3:01 p.m. Shoplifting: Torfaen Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will make an assessment of the level of shop theft in Torfaen compared with the constituency average in the last year.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Home Office collects recorded crime data for shoplifting from all police forces in England and Wales. These data are published at country, police force area (PFA), and community service partnership (CSP) level.

For the latest year to December 2017, police recorded crime for shoplifting in the most relevant areas were:

Wales: 20,352

Gwent PFA: 3,994

Torfaen CSP: 692

3 May 2018, 4:18 p.m. Counter-terrorism: Finance Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding was allocated to the Prevent strand of the counter-terrorism strategy in 2016-17.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

This Government is committed to the Prevent programme: Prevent's spend was £37.7 million in 2016-17, and is allocated £45.5 million from 2017-18. Prevent is working and is successful. Prevent has made a significant impact in safeguarding people being drawn into terrorism.

3 May 2018, 4:18 p.m. Counter-terrorism: Finance Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding has been allocated to the Prevent strand of the counter-terrorism strategy in 2017-18.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

This Government is committed to the Prevent programme: Prevent's spend was £37.7 million in 2016-17, and is allocated £45.5 million from 2017-18. Prevent is working and is successful. Prevent has made a significant impact in safeguarding people being drawn into terrorism.

2 Mar 2018, 3:02 p.m. Bank Services: Fraud Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he intends to bring forward legislative proposals to reduce the success of telephone banking scams.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The activities underpinning telephone banking scams, such as impersonating a bank, are captured under the Fraud Act 2006. The Joint Fraud Taskforce which brings together Government, banks and law enforcement will continue to develop a collective response to fraud.

27 Feb 2018, 3:56 p.m. Bank Services: Fraud Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to tackle telephone banking fraud.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The Government launched the Joint Fraud Taskforce in 2016 to bring together banks, law enforcement and Government to develop a collective response to fraud against individuals and banks. The Take Five to Stop Fraud campaign was developed jointly by the banking industry, Government experts and the Joint Fraud Taskforce. The campaign is designed to help encourage the public to protect themselves from fraud and scams, providing advice on how to avoid falling victim to fraud, including around telephone banking scams. The current campaign, “My money, my info, I don’t think so” provides advice to help the public develop resilience to requests from fraudsters relating to financial and personal information. This Government is also committed to stopping stolen funds from getting into the hands of criminals, and where possible, enabling stolen money to be returned back to the victims of fraud. A priority area for the Taskforce is to establish a technical solution and regulatory framework that will ensure that more fraud losses can be returned to victims.

27 Feb 2018, 3:56 p.m. Bank Services: Fraud Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to support collaboration between banks and police banking fraud teams on tracing funds obtained through telephone banking fraud.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The Government launched the Joint Fraud Taskforce in 2016 to bring together banks, law enforcement and Government to develop a collective response to fraud against individuals and banks. The Take Five to Stop Fraud campaign was developed jointly by the banking industry, Government experts and the Joint Fraud Taskforce. The campaign is designed to help encourage the public to protect themselves from fraud and scams, providing advice on how to avoid falling victim to fraud, including around telephone banking scams. The current campaign, “My money, my info, I don’t think so” provides advice to help the public develop resilience to requests from fraudsters relating to financial and personal information. This Government is also committed to stopping stolen funds from getting into the hands of criminals, and where possible, enabling stolen money to be returned back to the victims of fraud. A priority area for the Taskforce is to establish a technical solution and regulatory framework that will ensure that more fraud losses can be returned to victims.

11 Dec 2017, 5:05 p.m. Hate Crime: Disability and Homosexuality Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many incidents have been recorded for hate crime against (a) gay and (b) disabled people in each of the last five years for which data is available.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Home Office collects information on the number of hate crimes recorded by the police, by monitored strand - including sexual orientation and disability. The latest statistics are published in the ‘Hate crime, England and Wales, 2016 to 2017’ statistical bulletin, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hate-crime-england-and-wales-2016-to-2017

This Government is committed to tackling hate crime. The UK has a strong legislative framework to tackle hate crime. We are working across Government with police, (including National Community Tensions Team), the Crown Prosecution Service and community partners to send out a clear message that hate crime will not be tolerated and we will vigorously pursue and prosecute those who commit these crimes.

11 Dec 2017, 5:04 p.m. Hate Crime: Disability and Sexuality Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to combat hate crime motivated by a victim’s sexuality or disability.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

This Government abhors all forms of hate crime, including hate crimes motivated by a victim’s actual or perceived sexuality or disability. That is why we are taking a cross-Government approach to tackling the issues through the Hate Crime Action Plan published in July 2016.

The Government will continue to deliver against the commitments under the action plan which includes recently announced funding for seven new community-led projects, three of which focus specifically on tackling disability hate crime and one which focuses specifically on LGBT hate crime. The Home Secretary has also recently announced funding for the creation of a national online hate crime hub, improving the response to all forms of hate crime.

24 Jul 2017, 12:24 p.m. Metropolitan Police: Safer Neighbourhood Teams Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many metropolitan police officers there were serving in Greater London in Safer Neighbourhood Teams in (a) 2011 and (b) 2016.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of officers primarily employed in Neighbourhood Policing/Safer Neighbourhood roles by police force area.

The number of full time equivalent police officers in the Metropolitan Police,

primarily employed in Neighbourhood Policing/Safer Neighbourhood roles, can be found in the data tables published alongside the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletins, which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Data as at 31 March 2016 can be found in Table F4 of the police workforce statistics published in July 2016: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/544954/police-workforce-tabs-jul16.ods

Previous data were collected under a different framework, with different definitions. Therefore, data prior to 31 March 2015 are not directly comparable with later years. Although some functions may appear to be similar between the two, there are often differences in definitions, and so any attempts to compare across the two frameworks should be done with caution. Data under the old framework have been published since 2012, and can be found in the supplementary data tables of the relevant police workforce publications via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Officers with multiple responsibilities or designations are recorded under their primary function. The data do not therefore provide a complete picture of all officers assigned to neighbourhood policing functions. A more reliable measure is the number of officers employed in ‘Local policing’ roles, which includes both neighbourhood and response functions. This measure is available for 2015 and 2016, but not for previous years where a different framework was used.

Any comparisons at force level should be made with care due to collaboration arrangements between forces for particular functions. Additionally, police functions data are often affected by re-structuring within police forces. Therefore comparisons over time for specific functions should be made with care.

24 Jul 2017, 12:23 p.m. Counter-terrorism: Police Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers were assigned to counter-terrorism duties in (a) 2011 and (b) 2016.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Home Office collects and publishes police workforce data annually on the number of officers primarily employed in Counter Terrorism/Special Branch roles as part of the Police workforce, England and Wales statistical bulletin. This can be accessed at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales.

Data as at 31 March 2016 can be found in Table F4 of the police workforce statistics published in July 2016 at https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/544954/police-workforce-tabs-jul16.ods and record that 3,888 officers were designated as primarily involved in counter-terrorism or Special Branch.

This figure does not include all officers supporting counter-terrorism work and excludes many of those posts funded separately by the Counter-Terrorism Policing Grant and those in some national counter-terrorism functions. For reasons of national security, we do not publish the number or location of posts funded by the Counter-Terrorism Policing Grant. The published figures do not, therefore, reflect the total number of officers assigned to counter-terrorism policing.

Previous data were collected under a different framework, with different definitions. Therefore, data prior to 31 March 2015 are not directly comparable with later years. Although some functions may appear to be similar between the two frameworks, there are often differences in definitions, and so any attempts to compare across the two should be done with caution. Data under the old framework have been published since 2012, and can be found in the supplementary data tables of the relevant police workforce publications via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Any comparisons at force level should be made with care due to collaboration arrangements between forces for particular functions. Additionally, police functions data are often affected by re-structuring within police forces. Therefore comparisons over time for specific functions should be made with care.

24 Jul 2017, 12:22 p.m. Metropolitan Police Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to reduce the number of police officers in the Metropolitan Police Force during the course of the current Parliament.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The 2015 Spending Review protected overall police spending in real terms, and the 2017/18 police funding settlement maintained that protection.

It is a local decision for Police and Crime Commissioners, working with Chief Constables, to determine the composition and size of their workforce.

13 Jul 2017, 2:53 p.m. Cybercrime Nick Thomas-Symonds

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to help the public to protect themselves against the threat of cyber-crime.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

Cyber security, including cyber crime, is a top priority threat to national security. This is why the National Cyber Security Strategy 2016-2021 is supported by £1.9billion of transformational investment.

The NCSP funds the Cyber Aware campaign which works with a range of public and private sector partners to encourage the public (and Small and Medium Enterprises) to adopt more secure online behaviour like using a strong separate password for your email account and downloading the latest software updates.

The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) was launched on 1 October 2016. The Centre provides a single, central body for cyber security at a national level. It will help make the UK the safest place to live and do business online and acts as a bridge between industry and government, providing a unified source of advice and support on cyber security, including the management of cyber security incidents.

The NCSC are developing a series of Active Cyber Defence measures, to be implemented by industry, that aim to automatically protect UK internet users from the vast majority of high-volume/ low–sophistication cyber attacks. These measures will block, disrupt and neutralise malicious cyber activity before it reaches users.

The UK Government can’t do this alone. The private sector has a crucial role and a responsibility in countering cyber crime so that the UK is one of the safest places to do business online and in which the public are protected.