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Written Question
Refugees: Afghanistan
15 Dec 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of Afghans who arrived under Operation Pitting have received Indefinite Leave to Remain.

Answered by Kevin Foster

In view of the urgency of the situation the majority of those who entered the UK during the evacuation phase were initially granted limited leave to enter with access to public funds and employment. This status is not a bar to them being permanently housed or to starting their life in the UK, including taking employment.

The Home Office has now started the process to support them in applying for and being granted Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR). Our aim is to conclude this process before individuals’ leave to remain expires. All those evacuated will be provided with ILR.

Communications have been issued advising individuals of next steps to progress permanent residence in the UK. They also provide links to guidance and information on how prospective employers and landlords can contact the Home Office to confirm individuals’ right to take employment and rented accommodation.

More information can be found in the Afghanistan Resettlement and Immigration Policy Statement

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement-accessible-version#afghan-relocations-and-assistance-policy


Written Question
Refugees: Afghanistan
7 Dec 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether Afghans who arrived under Operation Pitting and given six months Leave To Remain will have their status converted to Indefinite Leave to Remain in an appropriate immigration category by the end of their six month period.

Answered by Kevin Foster

Following the policy statement, the Government published on 13 September, we will be working through the cases of those who have recently arrived from Afghanistan and will be processing them in line with the published policy.

The Home Office is contacting those here in the UK under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy and those moving onto the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme, in order to assist them to obtain Indefinite Leave to Remain status.

No one will be required to leave the United Kingdom, or be disadvantaged in any way, while we work through their cases.

More information can be found in the Afghanistan Resettlement and Immigration Policy Statement

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement-accessible-version#afghan-relocations-and-assistance-policy


Written Question
Visas: Fees and Charges
7 Dec 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much revenue her Department received from visa fees in the 12 months to October 2021.

Answered by Kevin Foster

The Home Office records and publishes data on a financial year basis. Please refer to page 161 of the Home Office 2020-21 Annual Report and Accounts, which contains data from April 2020 to and including March 2021, for the most recent disclosure of visa and immigration income.

HO annual report and accounts 2020-21 (publishing.service.gov.uk)

Data relating to the current financial year has yet to be published but will be made available in the 2021-22 Home Office Annual Report and Accounts.


Written Question
Evictions
2 Dec 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of abolishing no fault evictions on frequency of rent increases intended to instigate an eviction.

Answered by Eddie Hughes

The Government is committed to bringing in a Better Deal for Renters to deliver a fairer and more effective rental market that works for both tenants and landlords. This will enhance renters’ security and improve protections for tenants by abolishing so-called “no-fault” evictions through removing Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 and by ensuring the grounds for possession are fit for purpose. This represents a generational change in the law that governs private renting, so landlords will always have to provide a reason for ending a tenancy, such as breach of contract or wanting to move into the property.

This will provide tenants with more stability, protecting them from having to move at short notice, and allow them to put down roots and challenge poor standards where they exist, short notice moves, and plan for the future.

The Government is keen to avoid any unintended negative consequences related with abolishing Section 21. As part of this, we are clear that there should not be any mechanism for landlords to force a tenant to leave the property by including clauses in fixed term tenancy agreements which hike up the rent by excessive or unreasonable amounts just before the agreement is due to expire.


Written Question
Protest: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
24 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that (a) if drones are used by the police to monitor protests that protesters are aware that aerial surveillance will be taking place, and (b) should government agencies wish to use drones for covert surveillance that authorisation will only be given when necessary and proportionate.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

Decisions to use drones and in what circumstances, are operational matters for police forces who, when operating drones, are subject to the requirements of the Air Navigation Order and data protection law, including the need to provide data protection impact assessments.

Covert surveillance activities of public authorities are governed by the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) 2000 and Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Scotland) Act (RIPSA) 2000. Authorisation for using drones for covert surveillance is therefore considered by agencies on a case by case basis, in accordance with the requirements of RIPA.


Written Question
Unmanned Air Vehicles
23 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what (a) financial and (b) other resource support the Government has provided to the drone industry to assist integrating drones operating beyond visual line of sight into UK airspace; and what plans he has for the future of drone use in the UK.

Answered by Robert Courts

Government is working with and supporting industry to develop the drone industry. A key programme is the Future Flight Challenge that is a joint government and industry investment of £300m to develop greener ways to fly, such as all-electric aircraft and deliveries by drone, by advancing electric and autonomous flight technologies.

In addition, government supports specific focused projects such as the £1.2m Drone Pathfinder Catalyst Programme that looks to support integrating drones into UK airspace by bringing together drone providers and end users to demonstrate innovative drone use cases, helping to inform regulatory development; and the Civil Aviation Authority’s Innovation Hub sandbox supports the testing and trialling of innovative unmanned aircraft operations and flights beyond visual line of sight to take place in a safe environment and in collaboration with the regulator.


Written Question
Unmanned Air Vehicles
22 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will take steps to bring forward an independent review on the (a) economic, (b) safety, (c) privacy and (d) environmental impacts of the proposed expansion in domestic drone use for (i) civil, (ii) military, (iii) commercial and (iv) other purposes.

Answered by Robert Courts

The Department is currently considering recommendations from two separate independent reports from the Regulatory Horizons Council (RHC) in November 2021 and the Taskforce on Innovation Growth and Regulatory Reform (TIGRR) in May 2021. These independent reports reviewed domestic drone use.

In addition, the Department is currently consulting on the future of flight that includes domestic drone use. This builds on the Air Traffic Management and Unmanned Aircraft Act 2021 that included provisions to ensure safe drone use. The future of flight consultation will close on 22 November 2021 and will give consideration of the responses, alongside the recommendations of the reports, to develop a legislative and regulatory framework to allow for wider market and public use of new aviation technology (including drones) in a safe, secure and sustainable way.


Written Question
Special Educational Needs: Admissions
22 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment his Department has made of the impact of waiting times for places in SEN schools on families.

Answered by Will Quince

The department does not collect information on waiting times for places in special schools.

Where a local authority identifies that a pupil requires a special school place (through the statutory education, health and care assessment process), they are statutorily required to secure the placement under the Children and Families Act 2014. Local authorities have a duty to arrange suitable education for any pupil of compulsory school age who, because of illness, permanent exclusion or other reasons, would not get a suitable education without such provision. Local authorities are required to keep the sufficiency of special educational provision in their area under review.

On 27 October 2021, my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced that an additional £2.6 billion has been made available over the next three years to deliver new places and improve existing provision for pupils with special educational needs and disabilities or who require alternative provision. The government continues to invest in the Free Schools programme, through which 74 special and 50 alternative provision free schools have opened across the country since 2010, with 70 similar projects in the pipeline.


Written Question
Special Educational Needs: Admissions
22 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if his Department will publish the average wait times for SEN school places as at 17 November 2021.

Answered by Will Quince

The department does not collect information on waiting times for places in special schools.

Where a local authority identifies that a pupil requires a special school place (through the statutory education, health and care assessment process), they are statutorily required to secure the placement under the Children and Families Act 2014. Local authorities have a duty to arrange suitable education for any pupil of compulsory school age who, because of illness, permanent exclusion or other reasons, would not get a suitable education without such provision. Local authorities are required to keep the sufficiency of special educational provision in their area under review.

On 27 October 2021, my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced that an additional £2.6 billion has been made available over the next three years to deliver new places and improve existing provision for pupils with special educational needs and disabilities or who require alternative provision. The government continues to invest in the Free Schools programme, through which 74 special and 50 alternative provision free schools have opened across the country since 2010, with 70 similar projects in the pipeline.


Written Question
HIV Infection: Drugs
22 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of (a) the availability of the HIV prevention drug PrEP, (b) levels of uptake across the UK and (c) equity of access amongst different groups.

Answered by Maggie Throup

The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has not made an assessment on the availability of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Local authorities are responsible for the supply of PrEP through specialist sexual health services in their area.

The UKHSA is analysing data on the uptake of PrEP among different population groups. The GUMCAD STI Surveillance System collects data on PrEP eligibility, offer and use and the number of tablets prescribed. Data on PrEP need and use will be published in routine sexually transmitted infections and human immunodeficiency virus surveillance outputs beginning in 2022.


Written Question
HIV Infection: Disease Control
22 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government’s planned HIV Action Plan will ensure that equitable progress is made in reducing and ending HIV transmissions amongst all population groups and ensure that current health disparities are tackled.

Answered by Maggie Throup

The HIV Action Plan is planned for publication on 1 December 2021. The Government’s policy on issues related to HIV, such as equitable access to testing and treatment and tackling HIV-related stigma and health disparities, will be addressed in the Action Plan.


Written Question
HIV Infection: Health Services
22 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to support those living with HIV who are not engaged in care to access successful HIV treatment.

Answered by Maggie Throup

The HIV Action Plan is planned for publication on 1 December 2021. The Government’s policy on issues related to HIV, such as equitable access to testing and treatment and tackling HIV-related stigma and health disparities, will be addressed in the Action Plan.


Written Question
Biofuels: Electricity Generation
10 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will list each of the countries (a) from which wood pellets burnt in UK power stations are sourced and (b) in which officials in his Department have conducted site visits to affected forests.

Answered by Greg Hands

This data is publicly available from Ofgem’s Renewables Obligation Annual Report 2019-20.


Written Question
Biofuels: Electricity Generation
10 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the volume of wood pellets that will be burnt to produce electricity in each of the next five years.

Answered by Greg Hands

Projections of generation from renewable sources, which includes wood pellets, are available in Annex L of BEIS Energy and Emissions projections at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/updated-energy-and-emissions-projections-2019


Written Question
Iraq and Syria: Military Intervention
28 Oct 2021

Questioner: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (LAB - Brighton, Kemptown)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the difference between the mechanisms the US use and the mechanisms his Department uses, to monitor and investigate instances of possible civilian harm from airstrikes with the US-led Coalition in Iraq and Syria.

Answered by James Heappey

The UK follows robust procedures and uses all available evidence when conducting battle damage assessments. Parliament will always be informed of any instance where we assess a UK airstrike is responsible for a civilian casualty incident, whether incurred during a new strike, or as a result of re-examining historic strikes using new information. Specifically under Operation SHADER, the UK's contribution to the US-led Coalition, Operation INHERENT RESOLVE, the UK has conducted airstrikes against Daesh in Iraq and Syria. The UK has accepted responsibility for one civilian casualty that occurred during an airstrike on Daesh fighters in eastern Syria on 26 March 2018. This incident was subject to a Written Ministerial Statement on 2 May 2018. However, we accept the possibility that there could be other instances of civilian casualties about which we are unaware, despite our best efforts to assess battle damage. For that reason, in 2016, the then Defence Secretary committed that MOD officials would work with civil society organisations on this issue. As a result, we always re-examine any new information relating to a potential incident submitted to us by such organisations, where it is possible that UK forces may have been involved.